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Keyword: tarshish

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  • Groundbreaking study: Ancient tin ingots found in Israel were mined in England

    09/23/2019 7:55:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | 16 September 2019 | Amanda Borschel-Dan
    When the Bronze Age hit ancient Israel, the copper-rich region was able to quickly source seven of the eight ingredients needed to produce the alloy at Timna and other mines. But where tin -- another one-eighth of the metal's recipe -- came from has been a lingering mystery for scholars. A new paper from an international team of researchers proposes a surprisingly faraway source -- Cornwall. In a paper published in June on the open-access, peer-reviewed scientific journal PLOS One, the authors analyze 27 tin ingots, or blocks, from five sites bordering the eastern Mediterranean Sea. For decades, researchers have...
  • Ancient Tablets May Reveal What Destroyed Minoan Civilization

    09/16/2019 4:21:23 PM PDT · by Openurmind · 54 replies
    Haaretz ^ | Sep 10, 2019 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The Minoans and their capital Knossos weren’t incinerated by volcanic blast from Thera or flattened by quake as thought, but tellingly: their writing system changed. The mystery of what happened to the Minoan civilization has tormented archaeologists for over a century, and the tale has now taken a new twist. Nothing happened to them, say archaeologists who have been excavating the island of Crete for over thirty years. This extraordinary people, who produced palatial architecture unparalleled in the Aegean region at the time, were not immolated by the volcanic eruption of Thera as once thought, crushed by earthquake, or squashed...
  • Intact tomb of Bronze Age Minoan man discovered in Ierapetra, Crete

    08/25/2018 8:33:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 73 replies
    TornosNews.gr ^ | Wednesday, August 22, 2018 | unattributed, Daily Mail
    An initial inspection of the ceramics found in the tomb allowed it to be dated to the late Minoan period, or 1400 to 1200 BC Archaeologists in Crete have discovered an intact Minoan-era tomb containing a well-preserved adult skeleton along with funerary vessels. An initial inspection of the ceramics found in the tomb allowed it to be dated to the late Minoan period, or 1400 to 1200 BC, a statement from the Ministry of Culture noted. The tomb was discovered during an emergency excavation in an olive grove outside the village of Kentri, in the eastern prefecture of Ierapetra, the...
  • Greek Farmer Accidentally Discovers 3,400-Year-Old Minoan Tomb Hidden Under Olive Grove

    08/10/2019 10:06:50 AM PDT · by Anoop · 55 replies
    archaeology-world ^ | AUGUST 7, 2019 | ARCHAEOLOGY WORLD TEAM
    Sometime between 1400 and 1200 B.C., two Minoan men were laid to rest in an underground enclosure carved out of the soft limestone native to southeast Crete. Both were entombed within larnakes—intricately embossed clay coffins popular in Bronze Age Minoan society—and surrounded by colorful funerary vases that hinted at their owners’ high status. Eventually, the burial site was sealed with stone masonry and forgotten, leaving the deceased undisturbed for roughly 3,400 years.
  • Tartessian, Europe's newest and oldest Celtic language

    06/24/2019 3:21:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    History Ireland ^ | Mar/Apr 2009 | (it appears to be) John T. Koch
    One of the enduring consequences of the era of Phoenician influence -- which had by around 800 BC progressed from trading outposts to full-blown colonies in southern Spain -- was the adoption of alphabetic writing by the native population, first in the south-west. The number of known Tartessian inscriptions on stone is now about 90 and steadily rising with new discoveries. Concentrated densely in southern Portugal (the Algarve and Lower Alentejo), there is a wider scatter of fifteen over south-west Spain. The best exhibition of the inscriptions is on view in the new and innovative Museu da Escrita do Sudoeste,...
  • Listen To The World's Oldest-Known Melody (1400 BC)

    09/27/2016 10:12:31 AM PDT · by blam · 64 replies
    Fox News Science - Newser ^ | 9-27-2016 | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore
    Elizabeth Armstrong Moore September 27, 2016 In 1950, a collection of 29 tablets was discovered in the ruins of Ugarit, an ancient city in the northern region of present-day Syria, but only one had survived the intervening centuries well enough to be deciphered. Known as H6, the 3,500-year-old clay tablet revealed a simple hymn specifying the use of nine lyre strings and the intervals between them, much like an "ancient guitar tab," reports ClassicFM, which has recently picked up the story. The resulting melody, it says, isn't just the oldest discovered in the world, but "utterly enchanting." Musician and composer...
  • 'Titanic' filmmaker: Atlantis found – and linked to Jewish Temple

    02/02/2017 2:35:09 PM PST · by amorphous · 38 replies
    Worldnet Daily ^ | 2 Feb 2017 | Bob Unruh
    Atlantis Rising,” a new documentary by “Titanic” director James Cameron, argues the “mythical” city is the biblical Tarshish. Breaking News Israel reports the “lost city of Atlantis has been found, and it’s straight out of the Bible – at least according to a stunning new National Geographic documentary.” Emmy-winning journalist Simcha Jacobivici worked with Cameron on the newly released film. BIN reported the two followed “ancient clues through Greece, the Mediterranean, and the Atlantic on a search for Atlantis.” “Along the way, they discover mind-blowing biblical connections to Atlantis, including a 3,000 year old carving that ties the mythical city...
  • Archaeological discovery yields surprising revelations about Europe's oldest city

    01/08/2016 2:21:28 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | January 6, 2016 | heritagedaily
    The discovery suggests that not only did this spectacular site in the Greek Bronze Age (between 3500 and 1100 BC) recover from the collapse of the socio-political system around 1200 BC, but also rapidly grew and thrived as a cosmopolitan hub of the Aegean and Mediterranean regions. Antonis Kotsonas, a University of Cincinnati assistant professor of classics, will highlight his field research with the Knossos Urban Landscape Project at the 117th annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America and Society for Classical Studies. The meeting takes place Jan. 7-10, 2016 in San Francisco. Kotsonas explains that Knossos, "renowned as...
  • If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts...Meditation on-Jonah.

    01/26/2015 7:24:23 AM PST · by Salvation · 7 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 01-2515 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    If I take the wings of the morning, and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, Even there shall thy hand lead me. A Meditation on the Story of Jonah. By: Msgr. Charles PopeAs a followup to yesterday’s (Sunday 3rd Week) reference to Jonah the Prophet, I would like to sketch a fuller portrait of his life. Yesterday’s reading dropped us into the middle of the story. Let’s look at the backstory and see how the Lord does not give up on Jonah, nor on the people whom He has sent Jonah to deliver. God keeps calling until we are ready, until our last...
  • Sacred Precincts: A Tartessian Sanctuary in Ancient Spain

    12/11/2004 9:20:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 906+ views
    Archaeology Odyssey (via Web Archive) ^ | December 2003 | by Sebastián Celestino and Carolina López-Ruiz
    When the Phoenicians arrived on the Iberian peninsula, probably at the end of the ninth century B.C., they came into contact with an indigenous people called the Tartessians... The structure at Cancho Roano... was not a palace at all; it was simply a Tartessian sanctuary, which over time became influenced by Phoenician culture. Scholars have only recently begun to separate Tartessian history from myth. When the Greeks reached the Iberian peninsula a few centuries after the Phoenicians, they called the land Tartessos... According to the fifth-century B.C. historian Herodotus, Tartessian civilization was discovered accidentally by a Greek named Kolaios, who...
  • Satellite Images 'Show Atlantis'

    06/06/2004 10:00:25 AM PDT · by blam · 107 replies · 3,463+ views
    BBC ^ | 6-6-2004 | Paul Rincon
    Satellite images 'show Atlantis' By Paul Rincon BBC News Online science staff The imagery may show the former locations of major buildings and rings A scientist says he may have found remains of the lost city of Atlantis. Satellite photos of southern Spain reveal features on the ground appearing to match descriptions made by Greek scholar Plato of the fabled utopia. Dr Rainer Kuehne thinks the "island" of Atlantis simply referred to a region of the southern Spanish coast destroyed by a flood between 800 BC and 500 BC. The research has been reported as an ongoing project in the...
  • Who Were the Hurrians?

    06/25/2008 6:23:45 PM PDT · by blam · 31 replies · 595+ views
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | July/August 2008 | Andrew Lawler
    Who Were the Hurrians? Volume 61 Number 4, July/August 2008 New discoveries in Syria suggest a little-known people fueled the rise of civilization Excavations at the 3rd millennium city of Urkesh in Syria are revealing new information about the mysterious people who lived there, known as the Hurrians. This view of the city's royal palace shows the service area (left) and living quarters (right). (Ken Garrett) With its vast plaza and impressive stone stairway leading up to a temple complex, Urkesh was designed to last. And for well over a millennium, this city on the dusty plains of what is...
  • Unearthed Hittite artifacts in Istanbul break new ground [sic, Hurrians]

    11/03/2013 9:48:46 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | Thursday, October 31, 2013 | Omer Erbil
    Traces of the Hurrian civilization discovered in excavations in the ancient city of Bathonea in Istanbul's Küçükçekmece river basin are being hailed as the year's most important discovery as they provide the first ever proof that the Hittites came to Europe and civilisations' long history... The traces from the Hurrian civilization -- the early Hittite era -- were found in the Küçükçekmece river basin in the western parts of the city. The discoveries -- iron god and goddess statues that were found in two different places -- have created great excitement among researchers... Two Hurrian statues, bitumen, tin and...
  • Genetic study proves Israel's wild boars originated in Europe

    11/10/2013 7:44:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Nov 04, 2013 | Tel Aviv University
    Wild boars look more or less the same in Israel as they do anywhere else: stalky and hairy with big heads, long snouts, and beady eyes. So scientists had no reason to suspect Israeli wild boars were any different than their brothers and sisters roaming the Middle East, from Egypt to Iran... unlike the Near Eastern wild boars in surrounding countries, Israel's wild boars originated in Europe. After a genetic and archaeological analysis, the researchers suggest the wild boars living in Israel are descendants of domesticated pigs brought to Israel starting almost 3,000 years ago by the Philistines and other...
  • 50 Ancient Tombs Uncovered (1400BC, Crete)

    07/18/2004 1:17:56 PM PDT · by blam · 54 replies · 2,126+ views
    The Australian ^ | 7-18-2004
    50 ancient tombs uncovered From correspondents in Athens July 18, 2004 ARCHEOLOGISTS have discovered 50 tombs dating back to the late Minoan period, around 1400 BC, and containing a number of artifacts on the Greek island of Crete, ANA news agency reported today. The tombs were part of the once powerful ancient city of Kydonia, which was destroyed at the time but later rebuilt. The oldest among them contained bronze weapons, jewellery and vases and are similar to the tombs of fallen soldiers of the Mycenaean type from mainland Greece, said the head of the excavations, Maria Vlazaki. The more...
  • Inscription in Carian and Greek

    07/17/2004 6:20:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 1,150+ views
    Anistoriton ^ | 27 Dec. 1997 | (editors)
    On 8/9 November 1997 the Swiss newspaper Neue Zurcher Zeitung reported that German and Turks archaeologists, who conducted excavations at the ancient site of Kaunos on Asia Minor coast just across the Greek island of Rhodes, unearthed an inscription in two scripts. The top part is inscribed in the Carian language and the same text is repeated in the lower part in classical Greek. The inscription is a resolution of the city of Kaunos to honor two Athenians, one of whom is Nikokles of Lycekleous a fairly know person and contemporary of Demosthenes. Thus, the stone was safely dated to...
  • In the footsteps of the Bronze Men [ the Carians in Egypt ]

    04/06/2010 6:03:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 317+ views
    Al-Ahram Weekly ^ | Issue No. 992, April 1-7, 2010 | Nevine El-Aref
    When Herodotus toured the known world during the fifth century BC to compile his international history, he did not forget his hometown Caria, now Bodrum in Turkey. Caria (the name means "the steep country") stood in the western part of Anatolia, whose coast, according to the ancient world map, stretched from mid-Ionia to Lycia and east to Phrygia. Mountains and valleys were the main features of the country's scenery, and it was poor in agriculture in comparison with its counterparts at the time: Egypt and Babylonia. Its hilltops were fortified, while villages were scattered in valleys and it was hard...
  • Quarry, Setting and Team Marks: The Carian Connection

    10/08/2004 3:20:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 499+ views
    University of Leiden (Netherlands) ^ | 1998 | (about) Sheldon Lee Gosline
    In this paper, the author proposes some specific attributions for signs deriving from the Carian or another West-Anatolian script found on in situ blocks from standing walls: quarry, block positioning, or team marks. The proposals are based on data from three distant yet related sites where such marks have been preserved, among which the Khnum temple terrace on Elephantine. In time, however, the quarry marks at Elephantine do not correspond with the other two sites. Therefore, the author proposes that the terrace was built several hundred years earlier than the Graeco-Roman Period to which the terrace is usually dated, or...
  • "King's" villas cause outrage [Caria, in modern Turkey]

    05/17/2008 11:11:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 190+ views
    Voices Newspaper ^ | Saturday, May 17, 2008 | editor
  • Illegal excavation reveals an important discovery

    08/10/2010 8:08:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | Sunday, August 8, 2010 | Dogan News Agency
    The Tourism and Culture Ministry started a research investigation into an illegal excavation which took place in the Zeus Karios area in Milas, Bodrum. The illegal excavation revealed the large tomb stone of King Hekataios. The tomb stone was made in 390 B.C. and it is said that the discovery is one of the most important archeological discovery in modern times. Speaking after the research, Undersecretariat of Culture and Tourism Ministry Özgür Özarslan said: "The discovery revealed that the tomb stone belongs to Hekataios's father Mausolos. Mausolos was the satrap of Karia." The tomb stone is thought to have been...