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Keyword: anthropology

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  • Neanderthals dived for shells to make tools, research suggests

    01/16/2020 4:47:28 PM PST · by blueplum · 35 replies
    The Guardian UK ^ | 15 Jan 2020 | Nicola Davis
    Neanderthals went diving for shells to turn into tools, according to new research, suggesting our big-browed cousins made more use of the sea than previously thought. The study focuses on 171 shell tools that were found in a now inaccessible coastal cave in central Italy, known as the Grotta dei Moscerini, which was excavated in 1949. Dating of animal teeth found within layers alongside the shell tools suggest they are from about 90,000 to 100,000 years ago – a time when only Neanderthals are thought to have been present in western Europe....(snip) ...The team reported another surprise: the discovery of...
  • Ancient 'chewing gum' yields insights into people and bacteria of the past [Denmark]

    12/18/2019 4:54:33 AM PST · by zeestephen · 13 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 17 December 2019
    It is the first time that an entire ancient human genome has been extracted from anything other than human bones..."What is more, we also retrieved DNA from oral microbes and several important human pathogens, which makes this a very valuable source of ancient DNA, especially for time periods where we have no human remains...Syltholm, Denmark, is completely unique. Almost everything is sealed in mud, which means that the preservation of organic remains is absolutely phenomenal..."
  • Scientist challenges interpretation of new find, the oldest primate fossil ever discovered

    01/04/2004 9:13:08 AM PST · by AdmSmith · 40 replies · 1,195+ views
    Nature Jan. 1, 2004, Nature ^ | 31 dec 2003 | Greg Borzo
    Find opens debate about whether man's earliest ancestors came from Asia and were diurnal or nocturnal CHICAGO--A skull and jawbones recently found in China is the oldest well-preserved primate fossil ever discovered ? as well as the best evidence of the presence of early primates in Asia. But the fossil raises the tantalizing possibility that remote human ancestors may have originated in Asia and stirs up debate about the nature of early primates. In the words of Robert D. Martin, Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs at Chicago's Field Museum, "It was once thought that primates originated in North...
  • Ancient Anthropoid Origins Discovered In Africa

    10/14/2005 3:27:55 AM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 127 replies · 2,184+ views
    Duke University ^ | 13 October 2005 | News office staff
    New species firmly establish African roots for anthropoid line.The fossil teeth and jawbones of two new species of tiny monkey-like creatures that lived 37 million years ago have been sifted from ancient sediments in the Egyptian desert, researchers have reported. Related They said their findings firmly establish that the common ancestor of living anthropoids -- including monkeys, apes and humans -- arose in Africa and that the group had already begun branching into many species by that time. Also, they said, one of the creatures appears to have been nocturnal, the first example of a nocturnal early anthropoid. The researchers...
  • Gigantic Apes Coexisted With Early Humans, Study Finds

    11/09/2005 1:28:12 PM PST · by mlc9852 · 28 replies · 1,325+ views
    foxnews.com ^ | November 9, 2005 | Bjorn Carey
    A gigantic ape standing 10 feet tall and weighing up to 1,200 pounds lived alongside humans for over a million years, according to a new study. Fortunately for the early humans, the huge primate's diet consisted mainly of bamboo. Scientists have known about Gigantopithecus blackii since the accidental discovery of some of its teeth on sale in a Hong Kong pharmacy about 80 years ago. While the idea of a giant ape piqued the interest of scientists — and bigfoot hunters — around the world, it was unclear how long ago this beast went extinct. Precise dating Now Jack Rink,...
  • Oldest Hominid Skull In Australia Found Near Bega (7 Million Years Old)

    01/13/2006 4:46:20 PM PST · by blam · 75 replies · 1,286+ views
    Oldest hominid skull in Australia found near Bega Friday, 13 January 2006 THE endocast of a primitive hominid-like skull was recovered from among the rubble of a volcanic plug in the Bega district in May 2005 The find could suggest that a race of ancestral hominids had evolved in Australia from tree-dwelling primate ancestors by seven million years ago. This is well before our primate ancestors supposedly left the trees for a terrestrial existence in Africa around six million years ago! The fossil was discovered by noted prehistory researcher Rex Gilroy of Katoomba NSW, where he operates the 'Australian-Pacific Archaeological...
  • Human Ancestors Went Out Of Africa And Then Came Back... [1998]

    12/17/2007 5:37:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies · 570+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Friday, August 7, 1998 | adapted from New York University materials
    SUNY-Albany biologist Caro-Beth Stewart and NYU anthropologist Todd R. Disotell have proposed... that the ancestor of humans and the living African apes evolved in Eurasia, not Africa. This controversial new model for the evolution of humans and apes is the cover story of the July 30th issue of Current Biology. Stewart and Disotell describe their theory in an article entitled "Primate evolution -- in and out of Africa." ...The fossil record indicates that apes were present in Europe and Western Asia during the Miocene Era, from about 8 to 17 million years ago. Ancestors of these ape species must have...
  • Oldest hominid discovered is 7 million years old: study

    02/28/2008 4:21:27 AM PST · by Renfield · 33 replies · 737+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | 2-27-08
    CHICAGO (AFP) - French fossil hunters have pinned down the age of Toumai, which they contend is the remains of the earliest human ever found, at between 6.8 and 7.2 million years old. The fossil was discovered in the Chadian desert in 2001 and an intense debate ensued over whether the nearly complete cranium, pieces of jawbone and teeth belonged to one of our earliest ancestors. Critics said that Toumai's cranium was too squashed to be that of a hominid -- it did not have the brain capacity that gives humans primacy -- and its small size indicated a creature...
  • Oldest hominid discovered is 7 million years old: study

    02/28/2008 7:02:18 AM PST · by Red Badger · 29 replies · 216+ views
    www.physorg.com ^ | 02/28/2008 | Staff
    Undated handout photo shows the skull of Toumaï, a seven-million-year-old fossil believed to be the remains of the earliest human ever found, found in 2001. New fossil remains as well as the 3D reconstruction of the skull confirm that the creature is the oldest species of the human branch, a common ancester of the chimpanzee and of homo sapiens French fossil hunters have pinned down the age of Toumai, which they contend is the remains of the earliest human ever found, at between 6.8 and 7.2 million years old. The fossil was discovered in the Chadian desert in 2001...
  • Little teeth suggest big jump in primate timeline

    08/07/2008 10:27:32 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 168+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | Monday, August 4, 2008 | Duke University
    Just 9-thousandths of a square inch in size, the teeth are about 54.5 million years old and suggest these early primates were no larger than modern dwarf lemurs weighing about 2 to 3 ounces... Previous fossil evidence shows primates were living in North America, Europe and Asia at least 55 million years ago. But, until now, the fossil record of anthropoid primates has extended back only 45 million years... In addition to stretching the primate timeline, the specimens represent a new genus as well as a new species of anthropoid, which the researchers have named Anthrasimias gujaratensis by drawing from...
  • New fossil reveals primates lingered in Texas

    11/06/2008 4:10:01 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 756+ views
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 13, 2008 | Chris Kirk, University of Texas at Austin
    More than 40 million years ago, primates preferred Texas to northern climates that were significantly cooling, according to new fossil evidence discovered by Chris Kirk, physical anthropologist at The University of Texas at Austin. Kirk and Blythe Williams from Duke University have discovered Diablomomys dalquesti, a new genus and species of primate that dates to 44-43 million years ago when tropical forests and active volcanoes covered west Texas. The researchers have published their discovery in the Journal of Human Evolution article, "New Uintan Primates from Texas and their Implications for North American Patterns of Species Richness during the Eocene." During...
  • Fossil Discovery: More Evidence for Asia, Not Africa, as the Source of Earliest Anthropoid Primates

    06/07/2012 2:49:58 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 28 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 06/07/2012
    An international team of researchers has announced the discovery of Afrasia djijidae, a new fossil primate from Myanmar that illuminates a critical step in the evolution of early anthropoids -- the group that includes humans, apes, and monkeys. The 37-million-year-old Afrasia closely resembles another early anthropoid, Afrotarsius libycus, recently discovered at a site of similar age in the Sahara Desert of Libya. The close similarity between Afrasia and Afrotarsius indicates that early anthropoids colonized Africa only shortly before the time when these animals lived. The colonization of Africa by early anthropoids was a pivotal step in primate and human evolution,...
  • Site in Germany yields human presence over 1 million years ago

    03/25/2016 5:53:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Spring 2016 Issue | Journal of Human Evolution
    The late Early Pleistocene site near Untermassfeld, in Germany, is now well known for a rich array of fauna dating back to about 1.07 million years ago, including simple 'Mode 1' (or Oldowan-type) stone tools evidencing early human occupation. Now researchers Günter Landeck and Joan Garcia Garriga report, for the first time, evidence of early human butchery in the form of cut marks on animal bones and intentional hammerstone-related bone breakage. These human-modified bones were recovered in a small faunal subsample excavated from levels with simple 'Mode 1' stone tools. The butchered assemblage was found during fieldwork and surveying of...
  • Fossils Suggest Tree-Dwelling Apes Walked Upright Long Before Hominids Did (Germany, 11M YA)

    12/09/2019 10:05:11 AM PST · by blam · 55 replies
    Science News ^ | 12-9-2019 | Bruce Bower
    Tree-dwelling apes in Europe strode upright around 5 million years before members of the human evolutionary family hit the ground walking in Africa. That’s the implication of fossils from a previously unknown ape that lived in what’s now Germany about 11.6 million years ago, say paleontologist Madelaine Böhme of the University of Tübingen in Germany and her colleagues. But the relation, if any, of these finds to the evolution of a two-legged stride in hominids by perhaps 6 million years ago is hazy (SN: 9/11/04). Excavations in a section of a Bavarian clay pit produced 37 fossils from the ancient...
  • Prehistoric Fossil Teeth Spark Heated Debate Over Human Evolution

    11/02/2019 10:13:36 AM PDT · by gnarledmaw · 20 replies
    Seeker ^ | 10/25/2017 | Jen Viegas
    The teeth, found in Germany, provoked one observer to suggest human history may need to be rewritten. Some experts, however, remain very skeptical. In a paper shared at the social networking site ResearchGate, Herbert Lutz and his team say they discovered “a new great ape with startling resemblances to African members of the hominin tribe.” The "plausible age” of the fossils — an upper left canine tooth and an upper right first molar — is 9.7 million years, they say. If confirmed, that would make the teeth around 6 million years older than fossils for the early-human, African ancestor Australopithecus...
  • Archaeology fossil teeth discovery in Germany could re-write human history

    11/02/2019 10:01:04 AM PDT · by gnarledmaw · 50 replies
    Deutsche Welle ^ | 19.10.2017 | Alistair Walsh
    A 9.7-million-year-old discovery has left a team of German scientists scratching their heads. The teeth seem to belong to a species only known to have appeared in Africa several million years later. A team of German archaeologists discovered a puzzling set of teeth in the former riverbed of the Rhine, the Museum of Natural History in Mainz announced on Wednesday. The teeth don't appear to belong to any species discovered in Europe or Asia. They most closely resemble those belonging to the early hominin skeletons of Lucy (Australopithecus afarensis) and Ardi (Ardipithecus ramidus), famously discovered in Ethiopia. But these new...
  • Extremely rare 13 million-year-old primate skull found

    08/09/2017 1:54:20 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 48 replies
    www.cnbc.com ^ | 08-09-2017 | Robert Ferris | @RobertoFerris
    * This may be the most intact primate fossil skull ever discovered. * The fossil comes from a little-known period of primate evolutionary history. Source: Fred Spoor This is Alesi, the skull of the new extinct ape species Nyanzapithecus alesi (KNM-NP 59050). ================================================================================================================================ A group of scientists have found what may be the most intact fossilized primate skull ever discovered, and the find could shed light on the common evolutionary heritage shared by apes and humans. The lemon-sized skull was discovered in Kenya by an international team of researchers, and was dated to the middle of the Miocene era, a...
  • Oldest primate fossil rewrites evolutionary break in human lineage

    06/06/2013 2:14:27 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 60 replies
    ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility) ^ | June 6, 2013 | Kirstin Colvin
    The study of the world’s oldest early primate skeleton has brought light to a pivotal event in primate and human evolution: that of the branch split that led to monkeys, apes and humans (anthropoids) on one side, and living tarsiers on the other. The fossil, that was unearthed from an ancient lake bed in central China’s Hubei Province, represents a previously unknown genus and species named Archicebus Achilles. The results of the research were published on 6 June 2013 in Nature. Oldest primate fossil rewrites evolutionary break in human lineage The fossil, which is 55 million years old and dates...
  • 11.9 Million-Year-Old Fossil of Pierolapithecus Analyzed by Researchers

    05/05/2013 12:53:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Sci-news.com ^ | Friday, May 3, 2013 | Sergio Prostak
    Dr Moya-Sola with colleagues discovered the fossil specimen of Pierolapithecus in Spain in 2002. They estimated that the hominid lived about 11.9 million years ago, arguing that it could be the last common ancestor of modern great apes: chimpanzees, orangutans, bonobos, gorillas and humans... the shape of the specimen’s pelvis indicates that Pierolapithecus lived near the beginning of the great ape evolution, after the lesser apes had started to develop separately but before the great ape species began to diversify... “The ilium – the largest bone in the pelvis – of the Pierolapithecus is wider than that of Proconsul nyanzae,...
  • Ancient Animal Could Be Human-Ape Ancestor

    11/18/2004 3:41:57 PM PST · by Willie Green · 98 replies · 1,866+ views
    The Centre Daily Times ^ | Thu, Nov. 18, 2004 | DIEDTRA HENDERSON -- Associated Press
    For education and discussion only. Not for commercial use. WASHINGTON - A nearly 13 million-year-old ape discovered in Spain is the last probable common ancestor to all living humans and great apes, a research team says in Friday's issue of Science magazine. A husband-and-wife team of fossil sleuths unearthed an animal with a body like an ape, fingers like a chimp and the upright posture of humans. The ancient ape bridges the gap between earlier, primitive animals and later, modern creatures. This newest ape species, Pierolapithecus catalaunicus, is so significant that it adds a new page to ancient human history....