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Keyword: milk

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  • "Cheese", the bactterial weapon of the ages.

    10/21/2002 5:05:58 PM PDT · by scouse · 23 replies · 377+ views
    Guardian (UK) ^ | 10.21.02 | unknown
    Oct. 18 — Bacteria found in a 2,000-year-old piece of cheese could be the final evidence that this food was a continuous source of infectious disease in the ancient Roman world. According to a study published in a recent issue of the Journal of Infection, a tiny piece of cheese containing disease bacteria was carbonized in the volcanic eruption that one night in late August, 79 A.D. covered Pompeii and the nearby towns of Herculaneum and Stabiae with nine to 20 feet of hot ash and pumice. About 250 people fled to the beach, trying in vain to escape the...
  • Clues to Roman Illnesses in 2,000-Year-Old Cheese

    10/10/2002 11:02:29 AM PDT · by chance33_98 · 49 replies · 681+ views
    Clues to Roman Illnesses in 2,000-Year-Old Cheese Oct. 9 — By E. J. Mundell NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A tiny piece of cheese, carbonized in the volcanic eruption that killed the citizens of Pompeii, is yielding up secrets as to how ancient Romans ate, lived and died. Using an electron microscope, anthropological researcher Dr. Luigi Capasso of the State University G. d'Annunzio in Chieti, Italy, has been able to pinpoint goats' milk cheese as a prime source of brucellosis--a debilitating joint disease that ravaged the ancient world. "Roman cheese was an important and continuous source of possible infectious...
  • Art of cheese-making is 7,500 years old

    12/13/2012 11:49:12 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Nature ^ | 12-12-2012 | Nidhi Subbaraman
    Traces of dairy fat in ancient ceramic fragments suggest that people have been making cheese in Europe for up to 7,500 years. In the tough days before refrigerators, early dairy farmers probably devised cheese-making as a way to preserve, and get the best use out of, milk from the cattle that they had begun to herd. Peter Bogucki, an archaeologist at Princeton University in New Jersey, was in the 1980s among the first to suspect that cheese-making might have been afoot in Europe as early as 5,500 bc. He noticed that archaeologists working at ancient cattle-rearing sites in what is...
  • Clay pot fragments reveal early start to cheese-making, a marker for civilization

    01/12/2013 5:52:13 AM PST · by Renfield · 21 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 1-10-2013 | John Sullivan
    (Phys.org)—As a young archaeologist, Peter Bogucki based his groundbreaking theory on the development of Western civilization on the most ancient of human technology, pottery. But it took some of the most modern developments in biochemistry—and 30 years —finally to confirm he was right. While working as director of studies at one of Princeton University's residential colleges in the 1980s, Bogucki theorized that the development of cheese-making in Europe—a critical indicator of an agricultural revolution—occurred thousands of years earlier than scientists generally believed. His insight, based on a study of perforated potsherds that Bogucki helped recover from dig sites in Poland,...
  • 7,200-Year-Old Traces of Cheese Have Been Discovered in Cute Animal Pots

    09/06/2018 3:14:45 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    science alert ^ | 6 SEP 2018 | MIKE MCRAE
    Residue on 7,200 year old pottery found in Croatia has pushed back the dawn of cheese making in the Mediterranean. The find resets the timeline of agriculture in the region, with fermented dairy products being made a mere five centuries after milk was first stored. But its innovation was more than just a culinary milestone for dairy connoisseurs – it could have been a life saver. … Archaeological data shows people have been growing crops and raising livestock in the region for roughly 8,000 years. Impressed Ware, named for the simple shell-like impressions used to decorate the clay. They form...
  • World’s Oldest Solid Cheese Found in 3,200-Year-Old Jar in Egypt

    08/19/2018 3:48:36 PM PDT · by ETL · 38 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Aug 16, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    Ptahmes was Mayor of Memphis and high-ranking official under the Pharaohs Sethi I and Ramses II (1290-1213 BC) of the XIX dynasty. His tomb is located in the south of the Causeway of the Pharaoh Unas which yields a number of tombs dated to the New Kingdom. It was rediscovered in 2010 after a part of it was revealed in 1885 and lost under the sands at the end of the 19th century. During the 2013/2014 excavation season, Cairo University archeologists found broken jars at the site. One jar contained a solidified whitish mass, as well as canvas fabric that...
  • Oldest Cheese Ever Found in Egyptian Tomb

    08/16/2018 10:09:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | August 16, 2018 | Katherine J. Wu
    Last month, archaeologists cracked open a tomb excavated in Alexandria, Egypt, revealing three skeletons bathing in an crimson pool of sludgy sewage. In response, tens of thousands around the world immediately petitioned for the right to sip from the freshly uncorked casket of amontillado. (Spoiler: It hasn't worked out.) But fear not, coffin connoisseurs: There's a new artisanal artifact in town -- the world's oldest solid cheese, over 3,000 years in the making. The tomb of Ptahmes, mayor of Memphis, the ancient capital of Egypt during the 13th century BC, contains quite the trove of treasures. First uncovered in 1885,...
  • Entomologist Confirms First Saharan Farming 10,000 Years Ago

    03/22/2018 4:05:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | St Patrick's Day, Saturday, March 17, 2018 | editors
    The team has been investigating findings from an ancient rock shelter at a site named Takarkori in south-western Libya. It is desert now, but earlier in the Holocene age [our present age], some 10,000 years ago, it was part of the "green Sahara" and wild cereals grew there. More than 200,000 seeds - in small circular concentrations - were discovered at Takarkori, which showed that hunter-gatherers developed an early form of agriculture by harvesting and storing crops. But an alternative possibility was that ants, which are capable of moving seeds, had been responsible for the concentrations...The site has yielded other...
  • Where to Find the Oldest Cheese in North America

    09/04/2017 9:12:18 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 27 replies
    Food & Wine ^ | August 15, 2017 | Naomi Tomky
    The buttery cheese, named after the word “doormat” for a very specific reason, dates to the 17th century. Naomi Tomky August 15, 2017 When my Quebec City tour guide mentions that the island we’re heading to has the oldest cheese in North America, I’m briefly concerned. A grotesque vision of a 150-year-old pickle my friend Harriet once told me about flashes before my eyes. But, what I learn upon arriving at the Île d'Orléans, 15 minutes from the capital, is that Paillasson is simply the oldest style of cheese in North America—it’s made fresh on the island, tastes extremely good...
  • High Alpine Dairying May Have Begun Over 3000 Years Ago

    04/26/2016 11:30:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | April 22, 2016 | Beth Jones, PLOS.org
    Dairy fats on Iron Age pottery sherds, evidence of pre-historic origin for dairying. The discovery of dairy fats on ancient pottery may indicate dairying high in the Alps occurred as early as the Iron Age over 3000 years ago, according to a study published April 21, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Francesco Carrer from the University of York, UK, and colleagues. Dairy farming has long been an important economic and cultural tradition in the European high Alps, but little is known about when and how the practice originated. Using organic residue analysis, the authors of the present...
  • Coolest Archaeological Discoveries of 2014 [CHEESE!]

    12/30/2014 1:54:56 PM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | December 25, 2014 06:10am ET | by Megan Gannon, News Editor
    Thanks to the careful work of archaeologists, we learned more in the past year about Stonehenge's hidden monuments, Richard III's gruesome death and King Tut's mummified erection. From the discovery of an ancient tomb in Greece to the first evidence of Neanderthal art, here are 10 of Live Science's favorite archaeology stories of 2014. 1. An Alexander the Great-era tomb at Amphipolis [snip] 2. Stonehenge's secret monuments [snip] 3. A shipwreck under the World Trade Center [snip] 4. Richard III's twisted spine, kingly diet and family tree [snip] 5. A teenager in a "black hole" [snip] 6. Syria by satellite...
  • Ancient mummies found buried with world's oldest cheese

    03/01/2014 3:15:21 AM PST · by Renfield · 30 replies
    L. A. Times ^ | 2-28-2014 | Jean Harris
    For some cheese lovers, the older and stinkier the cheese, the better. Well, what about a cheese that's been aging for 3,600 years? Yellow lumps, believed to be the world's oldest cheese, were found on mummies buried in the Taklamakan Desert in northwestern China. The cheese, which was found during archaeological excavations that took place between 2002 and 2004, dates to as early as 1615 BC. The cheese was found on the necks and chests of the mummies. The multiple layers of cowhide the mummies were buried in, and the dry, salty desert helped preserve the cheese....
  • How 17th Century Fraud Gave Rise To Bright Orange Cheese

    11/09/2013 4:31:29 AM PST · by NYer · 54 replies
    npr ^ | November 7, 2012 | Allison Aubrey
    Shelburne Farms' clothbound cheddar has a bright yellow color because it's made from the milk of cows that graze on grasses high in beta-carotene. The news from Kraft last week that the company is ditching two artificial dyes in some versions of its macaroni and cheese products left me with a question.Why did we start coloring cheeses orange to begin with? Turns out there's a curious history here.In theory, cheese should be whitish — similar to the color of milk, right?Well, not really. Centuries ago in England, lots of cheeses had a natural yellowish-orange pigment. The cheese came from the...
  • New study finds milk drinkers may have a healthy weight advantage

    09/15/2010 1:37:56 PM PDT · by decimon · 42 replies
    Weber Shandwick Worldwide ^ | September 15, 2010 | Unknown
    Research suggests boosting key milk nutrients calcium and vitamin D could aid weight lossNow there's a new reason to grab a glass of milk when you're on diet, suggests a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. In a 2-year weight loss study, milk drinkers had an advantage over those who skipped the milk. Israeli researchers found that adults who drank the most milk (nearly 2 glasses per day) and had the highest vitamin D levels at 6 months, lost more weight after 2 years than those who had little or no milk or milk products --...
  • Ancient Europeans remained intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture

    11/02/2014 8:20:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    University College Dublin ^ | 22 October 2014 | UCD University Relations
    By analysing DNA extracted from the petrous bones of skulls of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified that these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices and 4,000 years after the onset of cheese-making among Central European Neolithic farmers. The findings published in the scientific journal Nature Communications (21 Oct) also suggest that major technological transitions in Central Europe between the Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age were also associated with major changes in the genetics of these populations. For the study, the international team of scientists examined...
  • Lactose tolerance spread throughout Europe in only a few thousand years

    09/16/2020 10:11:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | September 3, 2020 | Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz
    The human ability to digest the milk sugar lactose after infancy spread throughout Central Europe in only a few thousand years. This is the conclusion reached by an international research team led by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). The researchers analyzed genetic material from the bones of individuals who had fallen in a conflict around 1200 B.C. on the banks of the Tollense, a river in the present-day German state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania... found that only around one in eight of the assumed warriors had a gene variant that enabled them to break down the lactose in milk. "Of the...
  • WATCH: Dutch Farmers Become Ungovernable After 'Climate Change' Agreement

    07/03/2022 1:17:21 PM PDT · by ShadowAce · 91 replies
    Redstate ^ | 3 July 2022 | Bonchie
    You won’t see it on any of the alphabet networks, but a protest movement is exploding in the Netherlands after the government moved to shut down farms in order to “fight” climate change. The contentious move, pushed by the World Economic Forum, was enacted as part of an EU agreement that seeks to limit the release of nitrogen. This is what becoming ungovernable looks like.🚨🚨⚠️⚠️The Dutch protesters are pouring manure on government offices, flooding streets, and becoming all together ungovernable. This uprising is in response to the WEF controlled government shutting down farms to "save the planet." You have to...
  • New study associates intake of dairy milk with greater risk of prostate cancer

    06/22/2022 7:37:13 PM PDT · by ConservativeMind · 35 replies
    Men with higher intakes of dairy foods, especially milk, face a significantly higher risk of prostate cancer compared to men with lower intakes, according to a new study. The study found no such associations between increased prostate cancer risk and intake of non-dairy calcium, suggesting substances other than calcium play a role in the risk dairy foods poses for prostate cancer. The study's results reveal that men who consumed about 430 grams of dairy per day (1 ¾ cups of milk) faced a 25% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to men who consumed only 20.2 grams of dairy per...
  • Alaska kids served sealant instead of milk at school program

    06/15/2022 11:14:44 PM PDT · by jimtorr · 34 replies
    AP via The Hill ^ | 15 June 2022 | MARK THIESSEN
    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A dozen children and two adults were served floor sealant instead of milk at a day care summer program at an Alaska elementary school after containers were apparently mixed up, the school district superintendent said Wednesday. Several students complained of burning sensations in their mouth and throats, and at least one child was treated at a hospital after the Tuesday morning incident in Juneau, Superintendent Bridget Weiss said.
  • Eating fish twice a week makes you more likely to get melanoma - while drinking too much cow's milk raises risk of prostate cancer, research says

    06/08/2022 6:22:01 PM PDT · by fruser1 · 50 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 6/8/2022 | Emily Craig
    Scientists analysed melanoma diagnosis rates among adults who ate the equivalent of 300g of any type of fish each week, including battered cod. They were compared against participants who consumed much less. Some even ate none. Results showed people who adhered official advice, which states a healthy diet includes at least two portions of fish a week, were up to a fifth more likely to get the cancer. Meanwhile, a separate US study found men consuming more than 430g of dairy per day — the equivalent of two cups of milk — are 25 per cent more likely to suffer...