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Keyword: herodotus

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  • An Analysis of Herodotus in "The Persian Wars": 8. The Battle of Plataia

    06/08/2021 6:17:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    The Circle of Ancient Iranian Studies ^ | 1960 | Professor Livio Catullo Stecchini
    Mardonios had urged the King not to abandon the enterprise even after the debacle at Salamis. According to Mardonios there was a way to invade the Peloponnese even without a ferry and he argued with the King that he could proceed to that invasion the following year if he had 300,000 men, that is, half of the army that had come to Greece in 380 B.C.Mardonios marched with the King's army up to Thessaly and there he went into winter quarters. The following spring he was joined by 40,000 men under Artabazos who had followed the King in his withdrawal...
  • An Analysis of Herodotus in "The Persian Wars": 4. The Battle of Marathon

    06/01/2021 9:44:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    The Circle of Ancient Iranian Studies ^ | 1960 | Professor Livio Catullo Stecchini
    The Persian plans were intelligently and carefully conceived, as they usually were, but they were foiled by the genius of Miltiades who followed the military maxim pour les vaincre il faut de l'audace, encore de l'audace, toujours de l'audace. The Persians knew that after the withdrawal of the cavalry they were exposed to an Athenian attack, but they must have calculated that if this attack was launched they could embark their infantry and sail off before the Athenians reached the shore. At a normal pace it would take about 15 or 20 minutes for the Athenian hoplite formation to advance...
  • Discovery of the ruined temple in the ancient sunken city of Heracleion, Egypt

    12/14/2020 8:21:19 AM PST · by PAUL09 · 14 replies
    ANCIENT ARCHEOLOGY ^ | 14-12-2020 | PAUL
    Archaeologists researching on an underwater diving project, stumbled over an ancient underwater temple claimed as Heracleion’s ‘Egyptian Atlantis’ and probably have found a destroyed ancient Greek temple and treasure-laden vessels which might have sunken into the sea due to floods and tsunami 1,200 years back.
  • 10 Mysterious Underwater Cities You Haven't Heard Of

    12/14/2014 3:38:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Listverse ^ | August 5, 2013 | Andrew Handley
  • New astonishing finds in Aboukir!

    01/30/2004 6:53:55 AM PST · by vannrox · 3 replies · 697+ views
    Hilti Foundation ^ | Mission Report 2003 (FR post 24 JAN 04) | Editorial Staff - Franck Goddio
    Alexandria, January 2004. The 2003 joint Aboukir Bay research mission of the Department of Underwater Archaeology of the Supreme Council of Antiquities and the European Institute for Underwater Archaeology (IEASM) led by Franck Goddio has brought to light scientific results of great historic interest. On the site of the sunken city of Heracleion, discovered in May 2001, archaeological excavations performed around the temple of Heracles have enabled to define the topography of the surroundings of the sanctuary. In this monument a cult to the supreme pharaohnic deity Amon and to his son Konshu (respectively Zeus and Heracles for the Greeks)...
  • The Oldest Circumcision in the World {2400 BC, Egypt}

    09/24/2020 9:08:51 AM PDT · by Cronos · 52 replies
    JTA.org ^ | 2016 | Zachary Solomon
    In Saqqara, in Ankhmahon’s tomb, Visir of the Pharaoh Teti Dynasty (c. 2345 BCE) there is a bas-relief with a representation of circumcision. Below is a papyrus illustrating the operation in vivid color. Have you ever wondered what the oldest illustration of a circumcision looked like? Of course you haven’t, but we’ll tell you anyway. A bas-relief—a type of sculptural technique in which the sculpted elements remain attached to their background—dating back to 2,400 BCE and depicting two men being circumcised was found in an Egyptian tomb built for Ankhmahor, a high-ranking official during the sixth dynasty of Egypt. The...
  • The Garamantes

    07/17/2020 1:05:10 AM PDT · by texas booster · 19 replies
    The Ancient Blogger ^ | 8 May 2020 | Ancient Blogger
    The Fezzan is an area of approximately 212,000 square miles of unforgiving desert and valleys. Situated in the south west of modern day Libya it’s not an area you’d easily traverse, let alone live in. Yet in the 1st millennium BCE a people did exactly that. They created art, irrigated the baked earth and sustained a culture. One of the earliest surviving references to the Garamantes is found in Herodotus’ Histories, written in the 5th century BCE[1]. Herodotus’ description was contradictory, they had no weapons, but they hunted a cave dwelling tribe nearby using chariots. He also went on to...
  • Egypt breakthrough: How 2,000-year-old mystery was solved after 'lost labyrinth' discovery

    07/15/2020 3:01:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Express.co.uk ^ | Wednesday, June 24, 2020 | Callum Hoare
    The discovery was made in Dashur, an archaeological site 90km south of Cairo, where the tattered remains of Pharaoh Amenemhat III's Black Pyramid can be seen today. The huge mortuary temple that originally stood adjacent to this pyramid is believed to have formed the basis of the complex of buildings with galleries and courtyards called a "labyrinth" by famed ancient Greek historian Herodotus. With no visible remains, the story was thought to simply be a legend passed down by generations until Egyptologist Flinders Petrie uncovered its "foundations" in the 1800s, leading experts to theories the labyrinth was demolished under the...
  • On The Origin Of The Etruscan Civilisation

    02/14/2007 8:39:18 AM PST · by blam · 22 replies · 1,054+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 2-14-2007 | Michael Day
    On the origin of the Etruscan civilisation 00:01 14 February 2007 NewScientist.com news service Michael Day Etruscan cippus (grave marker) in the shape of a warrior head. Found in Orvieto, Italy One of anthropology's most enduring mysteries - the origins of the ancient Etruscan civilisation - may finally have been solved, with a study of cattle. This culturally distinct and technologically advanced civilisation inhabited central Italy from about the 8th century BC, until it was assimilated into Roman culture around the end of the 4th century BC. The origins of the Etruscans, with their own non-Indo-European language, have been debated...
  • Tuscany's Etruscan Claim Knocked

    05/16/2006 11:30:01 AM PDT · by blam · 19 replies · 618+ views
    ANSA ^ | 5-16-2006
    Tuscany's Etruscan claim knockedModern Tuscans not descendants of ancient people, DNA says (ANSA) - Rome, May 16 - The Tuscans' proud claim to be the descendants of the ancient Etruscans has taken a knock . A DNA comparison of Etruscan skeletons and a sample of living Tuscans has thrown up only "tenuous genetic similarities", said lead researcher Guido Barbujani of Ferrara University . "If the Tuscans were the direct descendants of the Etruscans the DNA should be the same," said Barbujani, a genetecist who coordinated the study with Stanford University in the United States . The study, which appears in...
  • 'Round A Table of Wines and Wars: Agricultural Practices of the Etruscans

    04/17/2019 11:17:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    CBTNews Features ^ | 2006 | CropBiotech Net
    The Italian peninsula seems to shimmer and shine with history and art, from graceful, full bodied nymphs set against make-believe cypresses and oaks, to crumbling mounds of marble on which lie the almost breathable, almost visible words of lives, songs, and politics past. But before all the art, before the reawakening, before the soldiers cloaked in scarlet and gold, and the senators in their Senate hall...before the reign of emperors and tyrants was a race of peoples whose culture lived on in the greatest empire the world has ever known. They were the Etruscans, a mysterious tribe that scattered throughout...
  • Nile Shipwreck Discovery Proves Herodotus Right

    03/23/2019 3:53:54 PM PDT · by wildbill · 36 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 2/23/1918 | Staff
    In the fifth century BC, the Greek historian Herodotus visited Egypt and wrote of unusual river boats on the Nile. Twenty-three lines of his Historia, the ancient world’s first great narrative history, are devoted to the intricate description of the construction of a “baris”. For centuries, scholars have argued over his account because there was no archaeological evidence that such ships ever existed. Now there is. A “fabulously preserved” wreck in the waters around the sunken port city of Thonis-Heracleion has revealed just how accurate the historian was.
  • Found: A Ship Once Described By Herodotus

    03/23/2019 5:34:39 AM PDT · by vannrox · 35 replies
    Atas Obscura ^ | 19mar19 | by Jonathan Carey
    A wreck discovered in the Nile suggests the ancient Greek historian’s description was spot on. by Jonathan CareyMarch 19, 2019 Found: A Ship Once Described By Herodotus The wooden hull of ship 17. Christoph Gerigk@Franck Goddio/Hilti Foundation Herodotus is known as the father of history, but some of his writings have created more questions than answers. In his account of a fifth-century B.C. trip to Egypt, included in his most important work The Histories, the ancient Greek historian describes seeing unusual boats called baris sailing down the Nile. However, no physical evidence was discovered of the ships until now.A team...
  • Human Remains In Ancient Jar A Mystery

    01/26/2007 2:38:22 PM PST · by blam · 38 replies · 1,040+ views
    Discovery.com ^ | 1-26-2007 | Jennifer Viegas
    Human Remains in Ancient Jar a Mystery Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Jan. 23, 2007 — For over 100 years, four blue-glazed jars bearing the nametag of Rameses II (1302-1213 B.C.) were believed to contain the Egyptian pharaoh's bodily organs. But analysis of organic residues scraped from the jars has determined one actually contained an aromatic salve, while a second jar held the organs of an entirely different person who lived around 760 years later. Now the question is, who was this individual? "We do believe that the unknown person was of importance for at least two reasons," said Jacques Connan,...
  • Yurts Through the Ages: From Nomadic Tribes to Modern Glampers

    02/16/2016 11:14:45 AM PST · by ToeCharmer · 9 replies
    One of the most iconic living quarters in the history of mankind, the yurt is most closely associated with the nomadic peoples of central Asia. Herodotus, the father of history himself, was the first to describe yurts in the written word. According to him, yurts were the primary domiciles of the Scythians, who rode horses and lived in a nomadic fashion near the Black Sea from 600BC-300AD. The Ger Nomadic Mongolian families called their homes “gers.” Their dwellings were made up of same-sized orange mesh-like walls that curved around the center of the tent. Each yurt had 3-5 walls and...
  • The Truth Behind '300' [Persian view]

    03/18/2007 9:32:41 AM PDT · by freedom44 · 147 replies · 5,009+ views
    Spenta Productions ^ | 3/18/07 | Cyrus Kar
    The Battle of Thermopylae was of course written by the classical Greek author, Herodotus, who lived in the Persian city of Halicarnassus. His book, 'The Histories' became part of Western folklore only recently. It was not until about 1850 that America embraced Herodotus as the leading authority on Persian history. Before 1850, however, the West had a very favorable impression of the Persian Empire. That's because the West's main source for Persian history was the Bible and the 'Cyropaedia,' written by another Greek author named Xenophon. But the Cyropaedia glorified the monarchy of Cyrus The Great, and in the wake...
  • Analysis: Islam vs. West: An ongoing clash of civilizations

    01/10/2015 6:06:29 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 12 replies
    i24 News, Tel Aviv ^ | January 9, 2015 | by SEVER PLOCKER
    It would be a big mistake to see the terror attack in Paris as an attack on the freedom of the press. Such a statement puts the massacre in the French capital in line with attacks against journalists by members of a Colombian drug cartel or the Chechen mafia. That's not the case. The goal of the attack on the office of satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo was not to frighten newspaper editors so that they would not publish one cartoon or another. The goal was to show and prove who controls the streets and consciousness of the French Republic: The...
  • Sacred Precincts: A Tartessian Sanctuary in Ancient Spain

    12/11/2004 9:20:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 906+ views
    Archaeology Odyssey (via Web Archive) ^ | December 2003 | by Sebastián Celestino and Carolina López-Ruiz
    When the Phoenicians arrived on the Iberian peninsula, probably at the end of the ninth century B.C., they came into contact with an indigenous people called the Tartessians... The structure at Cancho Roano... was not a palace at all; it was simply a Tartessian sanctuary, which over time became influenced by Phoenician culture. Scholars have only recently begun to separate Tartessian history from myth. When the Greeks reached the Iberian peninsula a few centuries after the Phoenicians, they called the land Tartessos... According to the fifth-century B.C. historian Herodotus, Tartessian civilization was discovered accidentally by a Greek named Kolaios, who...
  • Sacred Precincts: A Tartessian Sanctuary In Ancient Spain

    10/22/2003 11:30:20 AM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 1,568+ views
    Archaeological Odyessy ^ | 10-22-2003 | AO
    Sacred Precincts: A Tartessian Sanctuary in Ancient Spain Sebastián Celestino and Carolina López-Ruiz When the Phoenicians arrived on the Iberian peninsula, probably at the end of the ninth century B.C., they came into contact with an indigenous people called the Tartessians. The two cultures soon fused. The hybrid culture produced by this fusion of peoples is evident in a mysterious structure at Cancho Roano, deep in the heart of south-central Spain. The structure at Cancho Roano is sometimes called a “palace-sanctuary” because of its monumentality. But it was not a palace at all; it was simply a Tartessian sanctuary, which...
  • Herodotus -- Historia, "The Histories"

    11/14/2015 9:52:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 71 replies
    The Internet Classics Archive ^ | 5th century BC | Daniel C. Stevenson, Web Atomics
    The Internet Classics Archive | General Help May I reproduce works found on this site?Yes! To the best of our knowledge all works on the site are in the public domain. You are free to reproduce and distribute them at no cost. Why are there more Greek than Latin authors?The first batch of works in the Internet Classics Archive came from the Eric Project at Virginia Tech ( see sources help), and were about evenly mixed between Greek and Latin texts. The second set of works, roughly the same size as the first, came from the Perseus Project, and consisted...