Free Republic 2nd Qtr 2021 Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $43,431
49%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 49%!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: genetics

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Biggest genetic study of supercentenarians reveals clues to healthy aging

    05/05/2021 12:45:58 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 19 replies
    https://newatlas.com ^ | May 04, 2021 | By Rich Haridy
    A whole genome study discovered a number of genetic characteristics unique to those who live well past 100ljsphotography/Depositphotos VIEW 1 IMAGES In the most detailed genomic study ever conducted of individuals over the age of 100 years, researchers have homed in on several particular genetic characteristics that seem to confer protection from age-related diseases. Gene variants improving DNA repair processes were particularly prominent in this cohort of supercentenarians. If you eat well, exercise frequently and avoid those detrimental vices, you can reasonably hope to live a long and healthy life. Of course, many age-related diseases seem almost inevitable, whether they...
  • The New York Times Can Tell The Difference Between Men And Women With Vaccines But Not Pronouns

    04/13/2021 6:35:32 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 10 replies
    The Federalist ^ | April 13, 2021 | Kylee Zemple
    The same science that explains why men and women respond differently to COVID vaccines also explains why eschewing sex in pursuit of gender fluidity is an exercise in futility.At any given time on The New York Times’ website, a quick search for “gender” will yield an array of articles on the ins and outs of sex personified and the endless ways biology teams up with political adversaries to oppress queer people.One recent so-called gender headline offered “A Guide To Neopronouns,” those nonsensical sounds like “ze” and “zir” that break from the sex binary and thus from reality. “Are you a...
  • Could you make a genetically targeted weapon

    02/23/2021 9:39:19 AM PST · by delta7 · 64 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 28 oct 2004 | David adam
    Rather than specifically triggering the toxic effects of organisms such as anthrax, the Sunshine project warned that weapons based on a new medical technique called RNA interference could shut down vital genes. If the sequence of the target gene varies between two different populations the technique could be used to interrupt key body functions in one population and not the other. "If as little as 10% or 20% of a target population would be affected, this would wreak havoc among enemy soldiers on a battlefield or in an enemy society as a whole," the group said. Others say the concerns...
  • Modified RNA has a direct effect on DNA

    02/17/2021 1:02:43 PM PST · by RomanSoldier19 · 100 replies
    phys.org ^ | JANUARY 29, 2020 | by Eyrun Thune, University of Oslo
    An article titled "m6A RNA modification as a new player in R-loop regulation," by the Dynamic Gene Regulation research group led by Arne Klungland at IMB, was published in the January edition of Nature Genetics. Following a new collaboration between UiO and research groups in Nottingham and Oxford, it has now been revealed that RNA has a direct effect on DNA stability, according to Professor Klungland's research. He believes the discovery will provide the health service with an important tool, since many studies have shown that the regulation of modifications to RNA is important for the development of cancer. If...
  • The U.S. Government Shouldn’t Send Communist China Americans’ DNA And Health Info

    01/25/2021 9:31:05 AM PST · by Kaslin · 6 replies
    The Federalist.com ^ | January 25, 2021 | Ben Weingarten
    The Biden administration must take serious steps to ensure China ceases its exploitation of the COVID-19 crisis in ways that threaten our national security.Some two decades ahead of schedule, on Jan. 12, the Trump administration declassified its Indo-Pacific Strategic Framework, a document outlining its national security strategy regarding Asia. The document is critical, and the timing of its declassification was telling.As National Security Advisor Robert C. O’Brien noted in a statement announcing its release, the framework “has provided overarching strategic guidance for implementing the 2017 National Security Strategy within the world’s most populous and economically dynamic region.”By making the document...
  • Biden pick to head DOJ Civil Rights Division wrote Blacks had 'superior physical and mental abilities'

    01/12/2021 6:35:57 AM PST · by Altura Ct. · 46 replies
    Fox ^ | 1/12/21
    EXCLUSIVE – Joe Biden's pick to run the Justice Department's enormously powerful Civil Rights Division is a woman called Kristen Clarke. Clarke says her job is simple: End hate. But like so many in her world, Clarke is actually an enthusiastic purveyor of what she claims to fight. A new investigation by "Tucker Carlson Tonight" has uncovered shocking statements that Clarke made while attending Harvard as an undergraduate. In 1994, Clarke wrote a letter to The Harvard Crimson in her capacity as the president of the Black Students Association to explain her views on race science. "Please use the following...
  • Breakthrough study might explain why people develop severe COVID-19

    12/13/2020 6:37:52 PM PST · by blueplum · 33 replies
    BGR via MSN ^ | 13 Dec 2020 | Chris Smith
    ....Researchers from the GenOMICC consortium compared the 2,700 ICU patients’ genetic information with samples from healthy volunteers from other studies. They discovered key differences in these five genes: IFNAR2, TYK2, OAS1, DPP9, and CCR. They “partially explain why some people become severely sick with Covid-19, while others are not affected.” “Our findings reveal that critical illness in Covid-19 is related to at least two biological mechanisms: innate antiviral defenses, which are known to be important early in disease (IFNAR2 and OAS genes), and host-driven inflammatory lung injury, which is a key mechanism of late, life-threatening COVID-19 (DPP9, TYK2, and CCR2),”...
  • To fix Africa's hunger problem, bring on genetically modified crops

    10/27/2020 6:29:44 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 30 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 10/27/2020 | Vijay Jayaraj
    The economic situation in Africa has improved a lot since the 1990s.  Yet rampant poverty and food insecurity still impact millions of lives there. Currently, there is a huge demand-supply gap in the agricultural sector.  At least three hundred million are malnourished. The United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization defines food security as "a situation that exists when all people, at all times, have physical, social and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life." Africa's agricultural sector needs to be strengthened to meet the demand for quality food.  In...
  • Escaped cloned female mutant crayfish take over Belgian cemetery

    10/26/2020 6:59:12 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 31 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | 10/23/2020
    Escaped self-cloning mutant crayfish created in experimental breeding programmes have invaded a Belgian cemetery. Hundreds of the duplicating crustaceans, which can dig down to up to a metre and are always female, pose a deadly threat to local biodiversity after colonising a historic Antwerp graveyard. "It's impossible to round up all of them. It's like trying to empty the ocean with a thimble," said Kevin Scheers, of the Flemish Institute for Nature and Woodland Research. Marbled crayfish, which travel across land and water at night and eat whatever they can, do not occur in nature and are banned by the...
  • Escaped cloned female mutant crayfish take over Belgian cemetery

    10/25/2020 3:36:06 AM PDT · by sevinufnine · 57 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 10/23/2020 | James Crisp
    Escaped self-cloning mutant crayfish created in experimental breeding programs have invaded a Belgian cemetery. Hundreds of the duplicating crustaceans, which can dig down to up to a meter and are always female, pose a deadly threat to local biodiversity after colonizing a historic Antwerp graveyard. “It’s impossible to round up all of them. It’s like trying to empty the ocean with a thimble,” said Kevin Scheers of the Flemish Institute for Nature and Woodland Research. Marbled crayfish, which travel across land and water at night and eat whatever they can, do not occur in nature and are banned by the...
  • DNA from Denisovans can be found in humans today: DNA from an unknown ancient ancestor of humans that once bred with Denisovans still exists among people today, study reveals

    08/07/2020 11:24:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    Daily Mail Online ^ | 06 Aug 2020 | Ian Randall
    [Ghost] DNA from an unknown ancient ancestor of humans that once bred with Denisovans still exists among the genomes of people today, a study has revealed. The different branches of the human family tree have interbred and swapped genes -- a processes known as 'introgression' -- on numerous occasions... Experts from the US found that some three per cent of the Neanderthal genome came from interbreeding with another ancient human group 300,000 years ago... The researchers used the algorithm to look at genomes from two Neanderthals, a Denisovan and two African humans. Alongside finding that a small proportion of the...
  • Archaeology bombshell: Discovery of 145 human remains that 'solves biggest Bible mystery'

    07/31/2020 3:16:14 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 109 replies
    The Express, UK ^ | July 29, 2020 | CHARLIE BRADLEY
    The researchers found a Philistine cemetery in Israel – home to 145 human remains dating back to between the 11th and the 8th centuries BC. The discovery, made in 2013 and finally revealed in 2016, may yield answers to an enduring mystery surrounding the origins of the Philistines. It came at the end of a 30-year excavation by the Leon Levy Expedition. The Philistines were an ancient people who lived from the 12th century BC until 604 BC. They are known for their biblical conflict with the Israelites.
  • Women with Neandertal gene give birth to more children

    06/08/2020 9:46:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | May 27, 2020 | Karolinska Institutet
    One in three women in Europe inherited the receptor for progesterone from Neandertals -- a gene variant associated with increased fertility, fewer bleedings during early pregnancy and fewer miscarriages. This is according to a study published in Molecular Biology and Evolution by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden... Progesterone is a hormone that plays an important role in the menstrual cycle and in pregnancy. Analyses of biobank data from more than 450,000 participants -- among them 244,000 women -- show that almost one in three women in Europe have inherited...
  • British man struck down by coronavirus describes horror symptoms of deadly disease [Photo]

    02/06/2020 6:31:43 AM PST · by familyop · 57 replies
    Daily Mirror (London) ^ | February 6, 2020 | Jonathan Coles
    A British man once struck down by coronavirus has described how the horror symptoms of the deadly disease almost killed him. Simon Parker, 47, thought he was suffering from a common cold when he fell ill on Boxing Day in 2016. But he became severely ill over the next few days and by New Year's Eve couldn't even breathe - forcing him to desperately call 999. He was taken from his home in Kingswear, Devon, to a hospital where he was put into an induced coma.
  • 'Game-Changer' Warrant Let Detective Search Genetic Database

    11/07/2019 3:19:24 AM PST · by C19fan · 16 replies
    NY Times ^ | November 6, 2019 | Kashmir Hill and Heather Murphy
    or police officers around the country, the genetic profiles that 20 million people have uploaded to consumer DNA sites represent a tantalizing resource that could be used to solve cases both new and cold. But for years, the vast majority of the data have been off-limits to investigators. The two largest sites, Ancestry.com and 23andMe, have long pledged to keep their users’ genetic information private, and a smaller one, GEDmatch, severely restricted police access to its records this year. Last week, however, a Florida detective announced at a police convention that he had obtained a warrant to penetrate GEDmatch and...
  • How U.S. Commandos IDed a ‘Mutilated’ Baghdadi So Quickly

    10/29/2019 9:04:40 AM PDT · by shove_it · 35 replies
    The Daily Beast ^ | Updated 10.28.19 3:46AM ET | David Axe
    New technology includes a smaller and much faster DNA-reader that troops can haul into combat aboard their helicopters and use while the smoke from combat is still clearing... ... Baghdadi’s head reportedly remained intact following the blast. Using a biometric facial-recognition scanner, the Americans “immediately identified” Baghdadi, Fox News correspondent Jennifer Griffin reported...
  • DNA Spit Kit Genealogy Databases: Boy, Will You Regret This!

    10/16/2019 7:09:14 AM PDT · by ding_dong_daddy_from_dumas · 119 replies
    Youtube ^ | 10/15/2019 | Lionel Nation
    They might find a particular marker or something that indicates you may have a predisposition or high likelihood of breast cancer or Alzheimer's.... What could go wrong?
  • Team discovers surprise contributor to multiple sclerosis

    10/08/2019 8:18:25 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | October 7, 2019 | University of Virginia
    Cells that scientists have largely ignored when studying multiple sclerosis are actually key contributors to MS development, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows. The discovery suggests new avenues for devising treatments and is a vital step toward finding a cure. Cells that scientists have largely ignored when studying multiple sclerosis are actually key contributors to MS development, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows. The discovery suggests new avenues for devising treatments and is a vital step toward finding a cure. In MS, the body's immune system begins to attack the...
  • Genetic Modification of Crops Is 'Rape,' Botanist Says

    09/20/2019 6:16:25 AM PDT · by C19fan · 35 replies
    PJ Media ^ | September 20, 2019 | Tyler O'Neil
    Last week, a Native American botanist argued that the genetic modification of crops is a form of rape. Perhaps the next step in the #MeToo movement involves returning to the low crop yields before the Green Revolution, which saved billions of lives by making food more available through genetic modification, among other things. Robin Wall Kimmerer, a botanist, member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, and director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment at SUNY-Syracuse, called corn "one of our deepest and oldest relatives." In an interview with Wisconsin Public Radio, she humanized corn as the "Corn Mother,"...
  • See the face of your 100,000-year-old ancestor

    09/19/2019 10:42:50 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 95 replies
    The Jerusalem Post ^ | By Maayan Jaffe-Hoffman September 19, 2019 20:32
    Israeli team used DNA to design first Denosivan replica Portrait of a female Denisovan teen. (photo credit: MAAYAN HAREL) ================================================================ Meet “Denise,” the first reconstructed anatomical profile of what, until now, were considered the mysterious Denisovans, a group of archaic humans. She was revealed on Thursday by researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The team who managed to recreate her profile say that long-term, their research shows possible strategies that could be taken for forensic applications. Denisovans lived in Siberia and Eastern Asia before going extinct approximately 50,000 years ago, said Hebrew University researcher Prof. Liran Carmel, who led...