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Keyword: carthage

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  • Roman history in Spain: The search for Hannibal's elephants on the Tagus River

    04/30/2020 6:30:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    El Pais in English ^ | April 20, 2020 | Vicente G. Olaya, tr by Heather Galloway
    The year was 220 B.C. and the young Carthaginian general Hannibal Barca had to return to his winter quarters in Qart Hadasht - now Cartagena in southeast Spain - after taking Helmatica - now Salamanca in the northwest of the country - from the Vettones tribe. It was spring or summer, and the 27-year-old and his troops had to overcome two obstacles to get to their destination: firstly, the wide rivers and high mountains that were difficult for their 40 elephants to cross; the secondly, the hostile local Carpetani, Vettone and Olcade tribes, who sought revenge for the destruction of...
  • You can stop coronavirus

    04/17/2020 11:38:43 AM PDT · by eastexsteve · 32 replies
    Panola Watchman ^ | 04/16/2020 | Staff
    Briarcliff Skilled Nursing has updated its COVID-19 numbers. They are now up to 12 residents and eight staff who have tested positive for the virus.
  • Phoenician ship completes Atlantic voyage [crew is pretty old now]

    02/08/2020 10:08:12 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 72 replies
    Lyme Regis ^ | February 7th, 2020 | Francesca Evans
    The replica of a wooden Phoenician ship, which visited Lyme Regis last year, has completed its 6,000 mile voyage across the Atlantic. The Phoenicia visited Lyme Regis last July before setting out on its voyage from the old port of Carthage, Tunisia, in September. It called in at Cadiz (Spain), Essaouira (Morocco), Tenerife (Canary Islands) and Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic) before arriving in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, at the Coral Ridge Yacht Club on Thursday, February 4... The ship's trans-Atlantic voyage was part of the Phoenicians Before Columbus Expedition, designed, with the help of the US-based Phoenician International Research Center, to...
  • Statue of ancient god of child sacrifice put on display in Rome

    11/11/2019 6:16:08 PM PST · by Norski · 20 replies
    LifeSiteNews ^ | Nov 6, 2019 | LifeSiteNews staff
    "ROME, November 6, 2019 (LifeSiteNews) – A reconstruction of a pagan idol who demanded child sacrifice was stationed at the entrance of Rome’s Colosseum as part of a secular historical exhibition. The statue of Moloch, worshipped by both the Canaanites and the Phoenicians, is part of an exhibit dedicated to Ancient Rome’s once-great rival, the city of Carthage. The large-scale exhibition, titled Carthago: The immortal myth, runs until March 29, 2020. . .Three ancient Greek historians all attest that it was customary in Carthage to burn children alive as offerings to the deity, whom they called Baal and Cronus or...
  • Spectacular collision of suns will create new star in night sky in 2022

    01/06/2017 10:13:34 AM PST · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 6 January 2017 • 4:15pm | Sarah Knapton, Science Editor
    At the beginning of the 3rd century civil war raged in Britain as the Roman emperor Septimius Severus sought to quell unrest in the north. But unknown to the fighting cohorts and Caledonian tribes, high above their heads two stars were coming together in a huge cataclysmic explosion. Now 1800 years later the light from that collision will finally arrive on Earth creating a new star in the night sky - dubbed the ‘Boom Star - in an incredibly rare event which is usually only spotted through telescopes. Before their meeting the two stars were too dim to be seen...
  • Archaeologists to embark on quest for 2,500-year-old lost Greek theatre

    11/29/2010 7:55:28 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | Monday, November 29, 2010 | Nick Squires
    Alexander Hardcastle spent a decade searching for the fabled theatre, which is said to be buried beneath the remains of Akragas, a city established by Greek colonists six centuries before Christ on the southern coast of Sicily... Hardcastle, a former soldier who had served with the Royal Engineers in the Boer War, believed that remains of the stone-built theatre had survived, despite Akragas being shaken by earthquakes, sacked by the Carthaginians and plundered for its stone. The Harrow-educated gentleman scholar, who was born in Belgravia, spent a fortune on the quest between 1920 and 1930, but lost all his money...
  • New discovery in Valley of Temples

    01/17/2006 11:16:21 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies · 191+ views
    Gruppo Ansa ^ | Jan 17 2006
    Archaeologists working in Sicily's Valley of the Temples have found traces of a settlement thought to pre-date the famous Greek temples built there in around 600 BC... The discovery of a structure possibly built before the Greeks arrived came during preparatory work ahead of a project to shore up the ground near the Temple of Hera. Archaeologists uncovered a mysterious walled structure on top of which ancient Greeks had apparently built a shrine and a burial ground. Until now it has been thought that Agrigento was settled by the Greeks soon after they began starting colonies in much of the...
  • Sicily The Wonder of the Mediterranean 1

    01/28/2019 4:51:50 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    BBC via YouTube ^ | 2017 | Michael Scott
    [snip] I'm in Syracuse on Sicily's east coast, founded by the Greeks 27 centuries ago. In the city's ancient heart is the Duomo, the Cathedral of Syracuse. Today, this is a Christian church, but to walk through its doors is to take a trip back in time to 500 years before Christ was even born. The Duomo began life in 480 BC as the building project of a Greek tyrant, who having beaten the Carthaginians in battle, used the loot to build this. And these are the columns from that temple, soaring up into the sky. It was topped by...
  • The Martyrdom of Saints Perpetua and Felicitas

    01/28/2018 2:42:59 PM PST · by GoldenState_Rose · 2 replies
    We arrived at the forum, and straight away the story went about the neighbourhood near the forum and a huge crowd gathered. We walked up to the prisoner's dock. All the others when questioned admitted their guilt. Then, when it came my turn, my father appeared with my son, dragged me from the step, and said: Perform the sacrifice--have pity on your baby!' Hilarianus the governor, who had received his judicial powers as the successor of the late proconsul Minucius Timinianus, said to me: 'Have pity on your father's grey head; have pity on your infant son. Offer the sacrifice...
  • Carthage Archaeologists Dig Up Smart Cooling System For Chariot Racers

    07/09/2016 8:36:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 30, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    On the north coast of Africa lie the ruins of a city that came within a hairbreadth of defeating the might of Rome. Now archaeologists digging at the famous Circus of Carthage have revealed a startlingly advanced system to cool down horses and chariots during races... Key to the discovery of the clever cooling system at the Circus of Carthage, the biggest sporting arena outside Rome, was the detection of water resistant mortar... The discovery was made at the spina, the median strip of the circus, around the ends of which the charioteers would turn during races. The spina would...
  • DNA Captured From 2,500-Year-Old Phoenician

    05/28/2016 10:34:05 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 40 replies
    This is the first ancient DNA to be obtained from Phoenician remains. Known as “Ariche,” the young man came from Byrsa, a walled citadel above the harbor of ancient Carthage. Byrsa was attacked by the Roman general Scipio Aemilianus “Africanus” in the Third Punic War. It was destroyed by Rome in 146 B.C. Analysis of the skeleton revealed the man died between the age of 19 and 24, had a rather robust physique and was 1.7 meters (5’6″) tall. He may have belonged to the Carthaginian elite, as he was buried with gems, scarabs, amulets and other artifacts. Now genetic...
  • Seattle's Vanishing Black Community

    05/27/2016 9:17:44 PM PDT · by steve86 · 65 replies
    Pacific Northwest Magazine / Seattle Times ^ | May 26, 2016 | Tyrone Beason
    PASTOR PATRINELL WRIGHT was just a 20-year-old country girl from Carthage, Texas, who didn’t know what she was getting into when she migrated to Seattle in 1964. She grew up one of seven children in the Walnut Grove community, to be exact, a nearby farming enclave designated for blacks. That’s how it was in Southern towns back then. If you were black, you knew where you belonged, and it sure wasn’t around white people, unless you happened to be working for them. Seattle had its own form of segregation, with blacks clustered mainly in the city’s Central District because of...
  • ‘You can’t find this in any other country’

    03/24/2009 5:48:59 PM PDT · by forkinsocket · 4 replies · 422+ views
    The National ^ | March 25. 2009 | John Thorne
    ERRIADH, TUNISIA // In 586BC the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar laid waste to Jerusalem, inadvertently sowing seeds for a Jewish haven across the sea that has outlived his realm by 25 centuries and counting. Legend tells that refugees fled to the Tunisian island of Djerba, carrying a block from the ruined Temple of Solomon. Today it lies beneath the El Ghriba synagogue, the cornerstone of a thriving Jewish community. And after decades of Jewish exodus from Arab countries, that community is growing. For western holidaymakers, Djerba is a strip of lavish resorts along a sandy Mediterranean coast. For Tunisians, it also...
  • The Ancient Battle Generals Still Love To Copy (Cannae)

    02/28/2016 5:31:58 AM PST · by C19fan · 60 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | January 27, 2016 | Robert Bateman
    I went to the most famous battlefield in Western History, and had a surprise. Not a good one. It is a stomp, well off the path, to get to Cannae. The main train lines in Italy run up and down the coasts. Going inland, particularly in southeast Italy, is somewhat more episodic. My train had two cars. At the fourth stop, “Battle”, I got off.
  • Research On Ancient Writing Linked With Modern Mideast Conflict

    11/14/2005 1:25:30 PM PST · by blam · 31 replies · 1,424+ views
    The State ^ | 11-14-2005 | Ron Grossman
    Posted on Sun, Nov. 13, 2005 Research on ancient writing linked with modern Mideast conflict BY RON GROSSMAN CHICAGO - Professorial colleagues think Ron Tappy has made a landmark breakthrough in our understanding of the world of the Bible. He himself is waiting for the other shoe to drop. This week, Tappy will formally unveil his discovery at the meetings of the American Schools of Oriental Research. Normally a presentation titled "The 2005 Excavation Season at Tel Zayit, with Special Attention to the Tenth Century BCE" would hardly be noticed beyond the scholars who will gather at the Hyatt Penn's...
  • In Lebanon, DNA may yet heal rifts

    09/09/2007 8:12:40 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 13 replies · 960+ views
    Reuters via Yahoo ^ | 9-9-07 | Anon
    Lebanese geneticist Pierre Zalloua takes a saliva sample form a Lebanese man to test his DNA in a university laboratory near Byblos ancient city in north Lebanon, in this August 17, 2007 file photo. Zalloua following the genetic footprint of the ancient Phoenicians says he has traced their modern-day descendants, but stumbled into an old controversy about identity in his country. (Jamal Saidi/Files/Reuters) A Lebanese scientist following the genetic footprint of the ancient Phoenicians says he has traced their modern-day descendants, but stumbled into an old controversy about identity in his country. Geneticist Pierre Zalloua has charted the spread...
  • Lebanese are Phoenicians After All; And so Are Many of the Rest of US

    12/27/2008 6:02:57 AM PST · by decimon · 21 replies · 705+ views
    Informed Comment ^ | Dec. 23, 2008 | Juan Cole
    A team of biologists at Lebanese American University estimates that 1 in 17 persons around the Mediterranean carries genetic markers distinctive to the ancient Phoenician people who resided in what is now Lebanon. The Phoenicians spread out in a trade diaspora two millennia ago, establishing colonies from Spain to Cyprus. The team also found that one third of Lebanese have the markers for Phoenician descent, and that these are spread evenly through the population, among both Christians and Muslims. In fact, all Lebanese have broadly similar sets of genetic markers. The lead researcher commented, "Whether you take a Christian village...
  • Phoenician Artifacts Recovered Off Coast of Malta

    08/28/2014 4:25:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology mag ^ | Monday, August 25, 2014 | unattributed
    Scientists from the French National Research Agency and Texas A&M University are part of a team that has recovered 20 Phoenician grinding stones and 50 amphorae about one mile off the coast of Malta’s Gozo Island. Timothy Gambin of the University of Malta told the Associated Press that the ship was probably traveling between Sicily and Malta when it sank ca. 700 B.C. The team will continue to look for other artifacts and parts of the vessel, which sits at a depth of almost 400 feet and is one of the oldest shipwrecks to be discovered in the central Mediterranean....
  • In the Wake of the Phoenicians: DNA study reveals a Phoenician-Maltese link

    08/21/2005 1:38:08 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 35 replies · 1,729+ views
    The National Geographic ^ | October 2004 | Cassandra Franklin-Barbajosa
    In the Wake of the Phoenicians: DNA study reveals a Phoenician-Maltese link The idea is fascinating. Who among us hasn't considered our heritage and wondered if we might be descended from ancient royalty or some prominent historical figure? Led by a long-standing interest in the impact of ancient empires on the modern gene pool, geneticist and National Geographic emerging explorer Spencer Wells, with colleague Pierre Zalloua of the American University of Beirut, expanded on that question two years ago as they embarked on a genetic study of the Phoenicians, a first millennium B.C. sea empire that—over several hundred years—spread across...
  • So How Far Did The Phoenicians Really Go In The Region?

    02/23/2004 8:55:51 AM PST · by blam · 109 replies · 1,380+ views
    Daily Star ^ | 2-23-2004 | Peter Speetjens
    So how far did the Phoenicians really go in the region?In one of the early adventures of Asterix and Obelix, a Phoenician trade ship takes the world’s funniest Celtic warriors from the Gaul’s last village free from Roman rule to Queen Cleopatra in the land of the Nile. Now, of course this is but an image in a comic book, but still, is it possible that the Phoenicians, generally known as the greatest seafarers of antiquity, actually reached Brittany, or even further? There’s no doubt that Phoenicians were well established all over the Mediterranean. Archeological remains prove they lived in...