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Keyword: antikytheramechanism

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  • THIS MECHANICAL LEGO SOLAR SYSTEM ACTUALLY TRACKS PLANETARY ORBITS WITH 99.8% ACCURACY

    08/02/2022 8:11:07 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    yankodesign.com ^ | 08/01/2022 | SARANG SHETH
    Standing at an impressive 20.5 inches tall and 30 inches wide, this LEGO Ideas entry doesn’t just demonstrate the solar system’s movement, but it does so while staying true to each planet’s orbit time. The Clockwork Solar System from LEGO builders Chris Orchard and Brent Waller is a nearly 3000-brick marvel that replicates our solar system’s celestial dance with 99.8% accuracy while a set of clocks at the bottom even count down the year while the planets rotate around the sun. Orchard and Waller are both self-professed LEGO nerds, while Waller even mentions he’s been associated with the LEGO Ideas...
  • Massive marble head found at Antikythera Shipwreck

    06/21/2022 9:28:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | June 18th to 20th, 2022 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have announced the discovery of a massive marble head at the Antikythera Shipwreck in Greece, the site where the Antikythera mechanism was previously discovered in 1901. The Antikythera wreck is a Roman-era shipwreck dating from the 1st century BC. The site was discovered by sponge divers near the Greek island of Antikythera in 1900.Some scholars speculated that the ship was carrying part of the loot of the Roman General Sulla from Athens in 86 BC. A reference by the Greek writer, Lucian, to one of Sulla’s ships sinking in the Antikythera region gave which rise to this theory.Previous excavations...
  • Researchers propose a 'day zero' for the oldest computer ever discovered

    04/15/2022 1:47:35 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 42 replies
    PC Gamer ^ | By Katie Wickens
    Built some time between 200 BC and 60 BC, the Antikythera mechanism is the oldest known computer mechanism in existence. This ancient, geared device for tracking the heavens is in pretty bad shape after all that time. But, despite the rust, researchers may have finally revealed a possible date it was first set ticking—also known as "Day Zero." For a clock like this the calibrations would require a start date to ensure the device’s accuracy. Recent advancements have pointed to the calibration date having been around the time the moon was in its apogee position, its furthest position in orbit...
  • Bronze Arm Found in Famous Shipwreck Points to More Treasure Below

    10/06/2017 7:05:39 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    NYT ^ | OCT. 5, 2017 | NICHOLAS ST. FLEUR
    A bronze statue’s orphaned arm. A corroded disc adorned with a bull. Preserved wooden planks. These are among the latest treasures that date back to the dawn of the Roman Empire, discovered amid the ruins of the Antikythera shipwreck, a sunken bounty off the coast of a tiny island in Greece. Marine archaeologists working on a project called Return to Antikythera announced these findings on Wednesday from their most recent excavation of the roughly 2,000-year-old wreck, which was first discovered 115 years ago. They said the haul hints at the existence of at least seven more bronze sculptures still buried...
  • "Art thou not Sebastian whom I before commanded to be slain with arrows?" ~ A few interesting points about Saint Sebastian's ancient Passio.

    01/21/2022 7:34:58 AM PST · by Antoninus · 36 replies
    Gloria Romanorum ^ | January 20, 2022 | Florentius
    Saint Sebastian is one of the great ancient martyrs of the Roman Catholic Church as well as one of the saints most frequently depicted in artwork down through the centuries. The image of Sebastian tied to a stake, his body riddled with arrows, is one of the most immediately recognizable and jarring images of the ancient martyrs. As with many of the martyrs from the days prior to Constantine, his story has become somewhat muddled. He is mentioned in a homily of Saint Ambrose (On Psalm 118) as having come from Milan. Most of the rest of his biography comes...
  • Scientists Have Unlocked the Secrets of the Ancient 'Antikythera Mechanism'

    03/14/2021 11:25:42 AM PDT · by tbw2 · 74 replies
    Vice.com ^ | 3/12/2021 | Becky Ferreira
    A digital model has revealed a complex planetarium on the ancient device's face. “Unless it's from outer space, we have to find a way in which the Greeks could have made it,” researchers say.
  • Antikythera Mechanism shows evidence of lunar calendar

    12/18/2020 10:36:13 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    SocArXiv ^ | June 2020 | C.Budiselic1, A.T. Thoeni2*, M. Dubno3, A. T. Ramsey4
    New finding from Antikythera MechanismBased onstatistical analysis of micro CT imaging of the more than 2,000-year-old Antikythera Mechanism, we show unexpected evidence establishing a lunar calendar with Egyptian civil-calendar month-names circa 100 B.C. This finding displaces a century-long presumption of a 365-day solar calendar on the Antikythera Mechanism with a 354-day lunar calendar and may inform a fundamental question of the number and type of calendars used in Ancient Egypt.
  • The Antikythera mechanism is a 2,000-year-old computer

    05/24/2020 6:22:58 PM PDT · by bitt · 69 replies
    vox.com ^ | 5/17/2017 | brian resnick
    115 years ago, divers found a hunk of bronze off a Greek island. It changed our understanding of human history. One hundred fifteen years ago, an archeologist was sifting through objects found in the wreck of a 2,000-year-old vessel off the Greek island Antikythera. Among the wreck’s treasures — beautiful vases and pots, jewelry, a bronze statue of an ancient philosopher — was the most peculiar thing: a series of brass gears and dials mounted in a case the size of a mantel clock. Archeologists dubbed the instrument the Antikythera mechanism. The genius — and mystery — of this piece...
  • No, Archaeologists Probably Did Not Find a New Piece of the Antikythera Mechanism

    11/23/2018 3:21:10 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | November 15, 2018 | Jason Daley
    This week, word began to spread around some corners of the web that a new piece of the legendary ancient Greek computer known as the Antikythera Mechanism may have been found. But the claims, which surfaced following a Haaretz feature on the ongoing archaeological work in the area where the device was first uncovered, are misleading at best... ...in 2017... marine archaeologists from the Greek Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities and Lund University in Sweden uncovered more treasures including pieces of a bronze statue and an encrusted bronze disk with four tabs on it that appeared almost like a cog wheel....
  • Human skeleton discovered at Antikythera shipwreck after more than 2,000

    09/20/2016 3:08:48 AM PDT · by Islander7 · 21 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Sept 19, 2016 | By Associated Press and Cheyenne Macdonald
    Full title: Human skeleton discovered at Antikythera shipwreck after more than 2,000 years at the bottom of the sea Buried beneath sand and the fragments of ancient pottery, researchers have discovered the 2,000-year-old remains of a sailor who died upon the ill-fated 'Antikythera ship.' Archaeologists have investigated the famous shipwreck off a tiny Greek island for which it's named for over a century, revealing a trove of remarkable artefacts – including the mysterious 'Antikythera Mechanism,' thought to be a 'guide to the galaxy.'
  • New discovery hints at still further treasures hidden at famous shipwreck

    10/21/2017 9:07:22 AM PDT · by bitt · 10 replies
    fox news ^ | Oct 5, 2017 | Michael Harthorne
    The ship bound for Rome sunk in 1BC and was first discovered off the coast of Greece in 1900. And yet the Antikythera shipwreck is still providing new discoveries. The Guardian reports an expedition to the site last month turned up a silver tankard, a human bone, and much more. Perhaps most exciting: the arm of a bronze statue and evidence that the remains of at least seven bronze statues are still buried there.
  • Human skeleton found on famed Antikythera shipwreck

    09/19/2016 5:44:00 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 33 replies
    nature ^ | 19 September 2016 | Jo Marchant
    Foley and the archaeologists, meanwhile, are elated by the chance to learn more about the people on board the first-century bc ship, which carried luxury items from the eastern Mediterranean, probably intended for wealthy buyers in Rome. The skeleton discovery is a rare find, agrees Mark Dunkley, an underwater archaeologist from the London-based heritage organization Historic England. Unless covered by sediment or otherwise protected, the bodies of shipwreck victims are usually swept away and decay, or are eaten by fish. Complete skeletons have been recovered from younger ships, such as the sixteenth-century English warship the Mary Rose and the seventeenth-century...
  • Ancient Greek 'computer' came with a user guide

    07/02/2016 1:00:20 AM PDT · by blueplum · 63 replies
    Fox News ^ | 28 June 2016 | Megan Gannon
    ....With the turn of a hand crank, the ancient Greeks could track the positions of the sun and the moon, the lunar phases, and even cycles of Greek athletic competitions. The 82 corroded metal fragments of the Antikythera mechanism contain ancient Greek text, much of which is unreadable to the naked eye. But over the past 10 years, new imaging techniques, such as 3D X-ray scanning, have revealed hidden letters and words in the text...
  • The World's First Computer May Have Been Used To Tell Fortunes [Engraved text translation]

    06/10/2016 6:55:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    A ten-year project to decipher inscriptions on the ancient Greek “Antikythera mechanism” has revealed new functions, including the first hint that the device was used to make astrological predictions. The writings also lend support to the idea that the gadget, often called the world's first computer because of its ability to model complex astronomical cycles, originated from the island of Rhodes. Until now, scholars have focused on decoding the sophisticated array of gearwheels inside the 2000-year-old artifact. The new publication tackles instead the lettering squeezed onto every available surface. “It’s like discovering a whole new manuscript,” says Mike Edmunds, emeritus...
  • Is This Ancient Greek 'Laptop' Proof That Time Travel Is Real? [in short, no]

    02/06/2016 2:35:49 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 105 replies
    Yahoo -- ABC News Network ^ | February 5, 2016 | some wackadoodle
    A statue showing a young girl holding up what appears to be a laptop -- complete with USB ports -- has sparked a frenzy among conspiracy theorists. The statue, 'Grave Naiskos of an Enthroned Woman with an Attendant' is in The J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, California. 'I am not saying that this is depicting an ancient laptop computer,' said YouTuber StillSpeakingOut. 'But when I look at the sculpture I can't help but think about the Oracle of Delphi, which was supposed to allow the priests to connect with the gods to retrieve advanced information and various aspects.' In...
  • Marine Archaeologists Excavate Greek Antikythera Shipwreck

    09/26/2015 2:47:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | September 25, 2015
    The shipwreck dates to circa 65 B.C., and was discovered by Greek sponge fishermen in 1900 off the southwestern Aegean island of Antikythera. They salvaged 36 marble statues of mythological heroes and gods; a life-sized bronze statue of an athlete; pieces of several more bronze sculptures; scores of luxury items; and skeletal remains of crew and passengers. The wreck also relinquished fragments of the world’s first computer: the Antikythera Mechanism, a geared mechanical device that encoded the movements of the planets and stars and predicted eclipses... The project is the first-ever systematic excavation of this shipwreck, relying on the precise...
  • 'Exosuit' Mission to 2,000-Year-Old Shipwreck Begins

    09/17/2014 8:59:08 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    livescience.com ^ | September 16, 2014 11:47am | Megan Gannon,
    Sponge divers first discovered the 2,000-year-old shipwreck off the Greek island Antikythera in 1900. They recovered fragments of bronze statues, corroded marble sculptures, gold jewelry and, most famously, the Antikythera mechanism, a clocklike astronomical calculator sometimes called the world's oldest computer. Teams led by Jacques Cousteau pulled up more artifacts and even found human remains when they visited the wreck in the 1950s and 1970s. But none of those previous expeditions had access to the Exosuit, a one-of-a-kind diving outfit that weighs 530 lbs. (240 kilograms), and can plunge to the extraordinary depths of 1,000 feet (305 meters) and stay...
  • Scientist tackles mystery of ancient astronomical device

    01/11/2015 1:41:07 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 63 replies
    Phys.org, Science X network ^ | January 6, 2015 | Sandi Doughton, The Seattle Times
    "The amazing thing is the mechanical engineering aspect," says James Evans, a physicist and science historian at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Wash. He is part of an international group working to crack the puzzle of the device's origins and purpose. Evans recently added a new twist with an analysis that suggests it dates to 205 B.C. -- as much as a century earlier than previously believed. If he's right, it is more likely that the Antikythera Mechanism was inspired by the work of the legendary Greek mathematician Archimedes. It would also mean the device was built at...
  • Stunning finds from ancient Greek shipwreck [Antikythera]

    10/10/2014 12:12:50 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 10/09/2014 | Provided by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    A Greek and international team of divers and archaeologists has retrieved stunning new finds from an ancient Greek ship that sank more than 2,000 years ago off the remote island of Antikythera. The rescued antiquities include tableware, ship components, and a giant bronze spear that would have belonged to a life-sized warrior statue. The Antikythera wreck was first discovered in 1900 by sponge divers who were blown off course by a storm. They subsequently recovered a spectacular haul of ancient treasure including bronze and marble statues, jewellery, furniture, luxury glassware, and the surprisingly complex Antikythera Mechanism. But they were forced...
  • Wearable submarine to hunt for 2000-year-old computer

    06/06/2014 10:06:22 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    newscientist.com ^ | 04 June 2014 by | Mark Harris
    Like an underwater Iron Man, a diver will fly around the wreck of an ancient Greek ship later this year, looking to shed light on the Antikythera mechanism THE world's most advanced robotic diving suit is getting ready to help search for one of the world's oldest computers. Called Exosuit, the suit has a rigid metal humanoid form with Iron Man-like thrusters that enable divers to operate safely down to depths of 300 metres (see photo). Though designed for diving in the bowels of New York City's water treatment plants, earlier this month it underwent its first trials in seawater...