Free Republic 2nd Qtr 2024 Fundraising Target: $81,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $32,825
40%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 40%!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: chinacoal

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • New England's last coal plants set to shutter, ushering in era of green energy.

    04/06/2024 5:11:56 AM PDT · by Carriage Hill · 130 replies
    Fox News ^ | 4.06.2024 | Thomas Catenacci
    The final coal-fired power plants in New England are slated to shutter in the coming years, making it the second region to phase out the energy source that powered the U.S. economy for decades.
  • China’s Coal Production Hit a New Record High in 2023

    01/18/2024 10:10:23 AM PST · by george76 · 11 replies
    Oil price ^ | Jan 17, 2024 | Tsvetana Paraskova -
    Higher power demand and efforts to boost energy security pushed China’s coal production to a record-high level in 2023, ... Chinese coal output rose by 2.9% year-over-year to 4.66 billion metric tons in 2023 ... Coal imports also rose last year, as some domestic mining operations were suspended for some time in 2023 ... Higher demand after the COVID restrictions were lifted and higher domestic coal prices led to record-high coal imports into China, which soared by 61.8% year-on-year to 474.42 million metric tons in 2023, ... In the latter part of 2023, China ramped up coal and natural gas...
  • China’s reliance on Middle East oil, gas to rise sharply ---- As China embarks on a long transition to renewables, Middle East’s strategic significance for Beijing will only grow

    12/30/2021 2:08:25 PM PST · by elpadre · 12 replies
    asiatimes.com ^ | December 30, 2021 | Dale Aluf
    China has long relied on the Middle East to secure much of the oil needed to fuel its rapid economic development. Now Chinese President Xi Jinping wishes to create an “ecological civilization” that relies less on fossil fuels and more on renewable energy. As the world’s largest oil importer seeks to become greener and more self-reliant, one might expect a shift in its attention and capital. The reality, however, Since China became a net importer of oil in 1993, the Middle East has emerged as an increasingly important source of this critical commodity. By the time China surpassed the US...
  • China's 2020 coal output rises to highest since 2015, undermining climate pledges

    01/20/2021 11:04:59 AM PST · by RightGeek · 17 replies
    Reuters via Nasdaq ^ | 1/17/2021 | Muyu Xu, Shivani Singh
    BEIJING, Jan 18 (Reuters) - China's coal output rose last year to its highest since 2015, despite Beijing's climate change pledge to reduce consumption of the dirty fossil fuel and months of disruption at major coal mining hubs. The world's biggest coal miner and consumer produced 3.84 billion tonnes of coal in 2020, data from the National Bureau of Statistics showed on Monday. China's coal output dropped after reaching a peak of 3.97 billion tonnes in 2013, as Beijing axed excessive mining capacity and promoted clean energy consumption. But production is rising amid surging industrial demand and an unofficial restriction...
  • Coal powers China: While the West wages war on coal, hydro-carbons power China’s industrial and military might

    01/18/2021 6:51:59 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 15 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 01/18/2021 | Viv Forbes
    While the West wages war on coal, hydro-carbons power China’s industrial and military might. China uses massive amounts of coal to generate electricity, smelt metals, and manufacture cement -- they generate almost twice as much electricity as the USA, and two thirds of that is coal-powered. In China, wind power is a token 5% (probably earning carbon offsets from western shysters). But the stop-start power from wind/solar is not allowed to interrupt reliable base-load generators like coal. In Australia, wind and solar are promoted, protected and subsidized. Their variable output requires quick-start electricity from gas, hydro or batteries to maintain...
  • Here is what's holding back China's plans for world domination

    01/04/2018 7:19:04 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 16 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 01/04/2018 | David Archibald
    There is no doubt that China wants to subjugate Asia, echoing Japan's role during World War II.  For those who think China's economy might overtake the United States economy, and thus make China a more formidable adversary, this article aims to provide detail on China's main constraint in that ambition: that its domestic coal production is near its peak and will then go into long-term decline. Even if China can keep its energy supply constant with an accelerated expansion of its nuclear power sector, the cost of producing coal from deeper mines will mean that the costs of industrial...
  • China Burns Much More Coal Than Reported

    11/04/2015 5:58:09 PM PST · by Lorianne · 22 replies
    New York Times - CNBC ^ | 03 November 2015 | Chris Buckley
    China, the world's leading emitter of greenhouse gases from coal, is burning far more annually than previously thought, according to new government data. The finding could vastly complicate the already difficult efforts to limit global warming. Even for a country of China's size and opacity, the scale of the correction is immense. China has been consuming as much as 17 percent more coal each year than reported, according to the new government figures. By some initial estimates, that could translate to almost a billion more tons of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere annually in recent years, more than all...
  • China coal use continues to fall precipitously in 2015

    05/22/2015 5:26:33 AM PDT · by thackney · 14 replies
    Renew Economy ^ | 18 May 2015 | Joshua Hill
    New figures show that China’s use of coal has continued to fall dramatically over the first four months of 2015, according to Greenpeace Energydesk. In fact, following news in October of 2014 that showed coal use had fallen for the first time this century, these most recent figures suggest that the decline in China’s coal use is actually accelerating. According to Energydesk, coal consumption in China fell by almost 8%, and CO2 emissions dropped by approximately 5% over the first four months of 2015, when compared to the first four months of 2014. Impressively, for China, their figures are roughly...
  • China now burning as much coal as the rest of the world combined

    02/02/2013 12:05:17 PM PST · by redreno · 14 replies
    Washington Post ^ | January 29, 2013 | Brad Plumer
    Want a better sense for why climate change is such a daunting problem? Check out this striking new chart from the U.S. Energy Information Administration: China’s coal use grew 9 percent in 2011, rising to 3.8 billion tons. At this point, the country is burning nearly as much coal as the rest of the world combined. Coal, of course, is the world’s premier fossil fuel, a low-cost source of electricity that kicks a lot of carbon-dioxide up into the atmosphere. And China’s growing appetite is a big reason why global greenhouse-gas emissions have soared in recent years, even as the...
  • China consumes nearly as much coal as the rest of the world combined

    01/31/2013 7:01:50 AM PST · by thackney · 9 replies
    Energy Information Administration ^ | JANUARY 29, 2013 | Energy Information Administration
    Coal consumption in China grew more than 9% in 2011, continuing its upward trend for the 12th consecutive year, according to newly released international data. China's coal use grew by 325 million tons in 2011, accounting for 87% of the 374 million ton global increase in coal use. Of the 2.9 billion tons of global coal demand growth since 2000, China accounted for 2.3 billion tons (82%). China now accounts for 47% of global coal consumption—almost as much as the entire rest of the world combined. Robust coal demand growth in China is the result of a more than 200%...
  • Sunken Fires Menace Land and Climate

    04/03/2005 6:55:52 PM PDT · by Coleus · 34 replies · 2,070+ views
    NY Times via the national academies ^ | 01.15.02 | Andrew C. Revkin
    Sunken Fires Menace Land and Climate January 15, 2002 Fires are burning in thousands of underground coal seams from Pennsylvania to Mongolia, releasing toxic gases, adding millions of tons of heat-trapping carbon dioxide to the atmosphere and baking the earth until vegetation shrivels and the land sinks. Scientists and government agencies are starting to use heat-sensing satellites to map the fires and try new ways to extinguish them. But in many instances -- particularly in Asia -- they are so widespread and stubborn that miners simply work around the flames. There is geological evidence that grassland and forest fires, lightning...