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Keyword: babylonian

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  • First Reading of Tenebrae from Last Night....

    04/09/2020 7:51:51 AM PDT · by MurphsLaw · 7 replies
    Ann Barnhardt Blog | Circa 587 B.C. | Jewish
    If THIS doesn’t get one’s attention, absolutely nothing will… (The Book of Lamentations is a collection of five poems that serve as an anguished response to the destruction of Jerusalem in 587 B.C., after a long siege by the invading Babylonian army) Are we there yet ?
  • The Sound of Akkadian -- Listen to Ancient Babylonian online

    10/01/2010 7:06:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Heritage Key ^ | Thursday, September 30, 2010 | Ann Wuyts
    Almost 2,000 years after its last native speakers disappeared... [t]he recordings include excerpts from some of the earliest known works of world literature, dating back to the first years of the second millennium BC... readings of Babylonian poems, myths and other texts in the original tongue... -- available online for free at www.speechisfire.com -- are given by Dr. Worthington's fellow Assyriologists. Babylonian is one of two variants (or dialects) of Akkadian, the other being Assyrian. Akkadian became the 'lingua franca' of the Near East around, until its use began to decline around the 8th century BC. The last Akkadian cuneiform...
  • Trilingual Inscription Surfaces Near Darius the Great’s Tomb

    03/02/2019 2:22:28 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | 02/26/2019 | Megan Sauter
    An ancient trilingual inscription has surfaced on a hillside near the tomb of Persian king Darius the Great (Darius I) in Naqsh-e Rustam, the necropolis (“city of the dead”) 4 miles northwest of Persepolis, Iran. Written in Old Persian, Elamite, and Babylonian, the inscription records the title of an official who was close to the royal court. Unfortunately, his name has not been preserved. Not only does this inscription shed light on the elite families who associated with the Persian kings, some of them even serving as advisors, but it also adds a new verb to all three languages—the act...
  • Mathematical mystery of ancient Babylonian clay tablet solved

    08/25/2017 9:41:11 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 83 replies
    phys.org ^ | 08-24-2017 | Provided by: University of New South Wales
    The 3,700-year-old Babylonian tablet Plimpton 322 at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Columbia University in New York. Credit: UNSW/Andrew Kelly ================================================================================ UNSW Sydney scientists have discovered the purpose of a famous 3700-year old Babylonian clay tablet, revealing it is the world's oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, possibly used by ancient mathematical scribes to calculate how to construct palaces and temples and build canals. The new research shows the Babylonians beat the Greeks to the invention of trigonometry - the study of triangles - by more than 1000 years, and reveals an ancient mathematical sophistication that had been...
  • 3,700-year-old Babylonian tablet rewrites the history of maths - and shows the Greeks [tr]

    08/25/2017 3:41:48 AM PDT · by C19fan · 51 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | August 24, 2017 | Sarah Knapton
    A 3,700-year-old clay tablet has proven that the Babylonians developed trigonometry 1,500 years before the Greeks and were using a sophisticated method of mathematics which could change how we calculate today. The tablet, known as Plimpton 332, was discovered in the early 1900s in Southern Iraq by the American archaeologist and diplomat Edgar Banks, who was the inspiration for Indiana Jones.
  • 3,700-year-old Babylonian tablet rewrites the history of maths - and shows the Greeks did not...

    08/24/2017 7:42:25 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 77 replies
    The tablet, known as Plimpton 332, was discovered in the early 1900s... Babylonian mathematics used a base 60, or sexagesimal system, rather than the 10 which is used today. Because 60 is far easier to divide by three, experts studying the tablet, found that the calculations are far more accurate. ... Hipparchus, who lived around 120BC, has long been regarded as the father of trigonometry, with his ‘table of chords’ on a circle considered the oldest trigonometric table. A trigonometric table allows a user to determine two unknown ratios of a right-angled triangle using just one known ratio. But the...
  • By the Waters of Babylon

    01/10/2016 1:38:28 AM PST · by CharlesOConnell · 3 replies
    American Pie ^ | March 14, 1971 | Phillip Hayes
    By the Waters of Babylon (Round) Based on a canon by Philip Hayes, arranged by Don McLean (American Pie), and Lee Hays (The Weavers), Psalm 137 (539 BC)youtube.com/watch?v=uTnspbSjKVc By the Waters of Babylon We Lay Down and Wept, and Wept, for Thee Zion We Remember Thee, Remember Thee, Remember Thee Zion
  • Who Really Discovered America?

    07/14/2002 2:08:47 PM PDT · by blam · 182 replies · 18,652+ views
    Who Really Discovered America? Did ancient Hebrews reach the shores of the North and South American continents thousands of years before Christopher Columbus? What evidence is there for Hebrew and Israelite occupation of the Western Hemisphere even a thousand years before Christ? Was trans-Atlantic commerce and travel fairly routine in the days of king Solomon of Israel? Read here the intriguing, fascinating saga of the TRUE DISCOVERERS OF AMERICA! William F. Dankenbring A stone in a dry creek bed in New Mexico, discovered by early settlers in the region, is one of the most amazing archaeological discoveries in the Western...
  • The story behind the world’s oldest museum, built by a Babylonian princess 2,500 years ago

    In 1925, archaeologist Leonard Woolley discovered a curious collection of artifacts while excavating a Babylonian palace. They were from many different times and places, and yet they were neatly organized and even labeled. Woolley had discovered the world's first museum. It's easy to forget that ancient peoples also studied history - Babylonians who lived 2,500 years ago were able to look back on millennia of previous human experience. That's part of what makes the museum of Princess Ennigaldi so remarkable. Her collection contained wonders and artifacts as ancient to her as the fall of the Roman Empire is to us....
  • New Babylonian Town Found

    03/20/2008 2:48:27 PM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 1,075+ views
    Azzaman.com ^ | 3-19-2008 | Azzaman
    New Babylonian town found Azzaman, March 19, 2008 Iraqi archaeologists have discovered a new Babylonian town 180 kilometers south of Baghdad. The head archaeologist Mohammed Yahya said the town is more than 20,000 square meters in area and includes administrative quarters, temples and other buildings of “magnificent and splendid design” Yahya, who is the head of the provincial Antiquities Department in the Province of Diwaniya, where the new Babylonian town was discovered, said he still lacks evidence on the town’s ancient name. The locals call it Shamiya after a provincial district nearby, he said. “We have dug up a sectional...
  • Hamas’ win: historical revisionism, a dark reality, but a little hope

    01/27/2006 5:22:09 AM PST · by forty_years · 1 replies · 404+ views
    War to Mobilize Democracy, LLC ^ | January 27, 2005 | Andrew Jaffee
    Hamas' victory in Palestinian parliamentary elections is already being sanitized by the politically correct, despite the terrorist group's bloody track record and its fallacious and dubious historical claims to the land of Israel. Thankfully, some Western leaders are condemning the selection of murderers by Palestinians for their government. At the top of a BBC article yesterday regarding the Hamas terrorist group winning Palestinian elections: The win poses problems for efforts to restart peace talks with Israel, say analysts. Israel insists it will not deal with an authority including Hamas. So this is all just Israel's problem/fault because the majority of...
  • Archaeoligists: Iraqi Dam Threatens City

    02/05/2003 6:34:50 AM PST · by vannrox · 8 replies · 593+ views
    ABC News via AP ^ | Feb. 3 2003 | AP Editorial Staff
    Feb. 3 — An Iraqi dam under construction on the Tigris River threatens to submerge the remains of the spiritual capital of the ancient Assyrian empire in an act archaeologists liken to flooding the Vatican.Much of the city of Ashur, which thrived for more than 1,000 years until the Babylonians razed it in 614 B.C., could vanish under a lake to be created by the Makhoul dam, U.S. and European archaeologists said.More than 60 outlying historical sites are also threatened.Ashur, or Assur, was of such importance that it lent its name to the Assyrian civilization itself."Losing it would be...
  • The Babylonian Gap Revisited

    04/28/2002 8:31:45 AM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 898+ views
    The Babylonian Gap Revisited Perhaps the greatest disaster to befall ancient Israel was the conquest, at the end of the sixth century B.C.E. and start of the fifth, by the Babylonian empire. The fall of Judah to this new regional superpower occurred in two stages: Major strongholds like the Philistine cities of Ashkelon and Ekron fell to the armies of Nebuchadrezzar (Biblical Nebuchadnezzar) in 604 B.C.E. Jerusalem was besieged in 597 B.C.E. and capitulated to the Babylonians. Under the leadership of the puppet king Zedekiah, the Judahite capital survived another decade. But when Nebuchadrezzar learned that Zedekiah had conspired with...