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Keyword: rna

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  • New discovery shows human cells can write RNA sequences into DNA

    06/19/2021 7:19:48 PM PDT · by delta7 · 38 replies
    Thomas Jefferson University ^ | June 11 2021 | Thomas Jefferson University
    Cells contain machinery that duplicates DNA into a new set that goes into a newly formed cell. That same class of machines, called polymerases, also build RNA messages, which are like notes copied from the central DNA repository of recipes, so they can be read more efficiently into proteins. But polymerases were thought to only work in one direction DNA into DNA or RNA. This prevents RNA messages from being rewritten back into the master recipe book of genomic DNA. Now, Thomas Jefferson University researchers provide the first evidence that RNA segments can be written back into DNA, which potentially...
  • New Discovery Shows Human Cells Can Write RNA Sequences Into DNA – Challenges Central Principle in Biology

    06/14/2021 9:14:14 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 61 replies
    https://scitechdaily.com/ ^ | By THOMAS JEFFERSON UNIVERSITY | JUNE 12, 2021
    In a discovery that challenges long-held dogma in biology, researchers show that mammalian cells can convert RNA sequences back into DNA, a feat more common in viruses than eukaryotic cells. Cells contain machinery that duplicates DNA into a new set that goes into a newly formed cell. That same class of machines, called polymerases, also build RNA messages, which are like notes copied from the central DNA repository of recipes, so they can be read more efficiently into proteins. But polymerases were thought to only work in one direction DNA into DNA or RNA. This prevents RNA messages from being...
  • New discovery shows human cells can write RNA sequences into DNA

    06/11/2021 6:36:31 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 56 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Thomas Jefferson University
    Cells contain machinery that duplicates DNA into a new set that goes into a newly formed cell. That same class of machines, called polymerases, also build RNA messages, which are like notes copied from the central DNA repository of recipes, so they can be read more efficiently into proteins. But polymerases were thought to only work in one direction DNA into DNA or RNA. This prevents RNA messages from being rewritten back into the master recipe book of genomic DNA. Pomerantz's team started by investigating one very unusual polymerase, called polymerase theta. Of the 14 DNA polymerases in mammalian cells,...
  • COVID-19 RNA Based Vaccines and the Risk of Prion Disease

    05/16/2021 12:19:45 PM PDT · by Triple · 66 replies
    Microbiology & Infectious Diseases ^ | January 2021 | J B Classen
    Introduction Vaccines have been found to cause a host of chronic, late developing adverse events. Some adverse events like type 1 diabetes may not occur until 3-4 years after a vaccine is administered [1]. In the example of type 1 diabetes the frequency of cases of adverse events may surpass the frequency of cases of severe infectious disease the vaccine was designed to prevent. Given that type 1 diabetes is only one of many immune mediated diseases potentially caused by vaccines, chronic late occurring adverse events are a serious public health issue. The advent of new vaccine technology creates new...
  • Pfizer scientist says mRNA technology used for Covid vaccines could create 'more potent' seasonal flu shots

    05/11/2021 2:51:43 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 37 replies
    CNBC ^ | May 2021 | Berkeley Lovelace Jr.
    The mRNA technology used to develop the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine could also help create "more potent" seasonal flu shots, Kathrin Jansen, head of Pfizer's vaccine research and development, told CNBC.
  • Is it time for the US to delay second Covid-19 shots?

    04/14/2021 4:16:59 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 21 replies
    Advisory Board ^ | Apr 14, 2021 | Daily Briefing
    Current practice in the United States is to administer two doses of Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines three to four weeks—which is the interval the drugmakers used in their clinical trials...drugmakers chose this interval "to rapidly prove efficacy in clinical trials," not because they were trying to assess "the optimal way of using the vaccines to quell a pandemic." And while this "three- or four-week follow-up is safe and effective, there is no evidence it optimizes either individual benefit or population protection..." "A single dose of an mRNA vaccine is 80% effective and durable for 12 weeks," whereas the full two-dose...
  • If you are not planning on getting mrna shots, remember this as well

    04/05/2021 8:02:27 PM PDT · by Secret Agent Man · 126 replies
    Everyone undecided, or not taking this vaccine, remember this: If you are having future scheduled medical procedures done, bank some of your blood ahead of time. These mrna snippets get inside cells, that includes blood cells. Don’t forget this is another vector where you could wind up with mrna vaccine in you even though you avoided the shot, or haven't decided if you want it or not.
  • 11 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT MRNA VACCINES FOR COVID-19

    03/01/2021 11:41:13 AM PST · by entropy12 · 141 replies
    Benaroya Research Institute ^ | February 4, 2021 | Benaroya Research Institute
    In the race for a COVID-19 vaccine, messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines finished first. This includes those made by Pfizer and Moderna. These vaccines use a new approach to fight off pathogens (germs like viruses and bacteria). We recently talked to BRI’s Adam Lacy-Hulbert, PhD — who has long studied viruses and ways to combat them — to learn more about this new vaccination approach. He shared 11 key things to know about mRNA vaccines.
  • Could you make a genetically targeted weapon

    02/23/2021 9:39:19 AM PST · by delta7 · 64 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 28 oct 2004 | David adam
    Rather than specifically triggering the toxic effects of organisms such as anthrax, the Sunshine project warned that weapons based on a new medical technique called RNA interference could shut down vital genes. If the sequence of the target gene varies between two different populations the technique could be used to interrupt key body functions in one population and not the other. "If as little as 10% or 20% of a target population would be affected, this would wreak havoc among enemy soldiers on a battlefield or in an enemy society as a whole," the group said. Others say the concerns...
  • Modified RNA has a direct effect on DNA

    02/17/2021 1:02:43 PM PST · by RomanSoldier19 · 100 replies
    phys.org ^ | JANUARY 29, 2020 | by Eyrun Thune, University of Oslo
    An article titled "m6A RNA modification as a new player in R-loop regulation," by the Dynamic Gene Regulation research group led by Arne Klungland at IMB, was published in the January edition of Nature Genetics. Following a new collaboration between UiO and research groups in Nottingham and Oxford, it has now been revealed that RNA has a direct effect on DNA stability, according to Professor Klungland's research. He believes the discovery will provide the health service with an important tool, since many studies have shown that the regulation of modifications to RNA is important for the development of cancer. If...
  • Moderna's RNA COVID-19 Vaccine Ready for Phase II as Vaccine Development Picks up Pace

    05/11/2020 9:10:52 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 2 replies
    MD India ^ | 05/11/2020
    Following the news that Moderna’s mRNA COVID-19 vaccine candidate received FDA approval to start Phase II clinical studies; Philipp Rosenbaum, PhD, Infectious Diseases Analyst at GlobalData, a leading data and analytics company, offers his view: “With plans to start Phase III trials in early summer, Moderna’s ambitious timeline leaves some skepticism, as no data has been published to date. mRNA-based vaccines have yet to be proven to work in humans, and the history of vaccine development shows that setbacks and roadblocks are almost certain. “Companies that have begun clinical trials of their COVID-19 vaccine candidates include BioNTech, which partnered up...
  • Memories Can Be Injected and Survive Amputation and Metamorphosis [in insects]

    12/20/2019 7:14:54 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    Nautilus ^ | 12/13/2019 | Marco Altamirano
    Glanzman’s unpopular hypothesis was that they might reside in the nucleus of the neuron cell, where DNA and RNA sequences compose instructions for life processes. Glanzman’s team found that the RNA from trained donors induced learning, while the RNA from untrained donors had no effect. They had transferred a memory, vaguely but surely, from one animal to another, and they had strong evidence that RNA was the memory-transferring agent. The work of Douglas Blackiston, an Allen Discovery Center scientist at Tufts University... wanted to know if a butterfly could remember something about its life as a caterpillar, so he exposed...
  • Gene transcripts from ancient wolf analyzed after 14,000 years in permafrost

    08/03/2019 10:48:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | July 30, 2019 | PLOS
    RNA -- the short-lived transcripts of genes -- from the "Tumat puppy", a wolf of the Pleistocene era has been isolated, and its sequence analyzed in a new study by Oliver Smith of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues publishing on July 30 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology. The results establish the possibility of examining a range of RNA transcripts from ancient organisms, a possibility previously thought to be extremely unlikely because of the short lifespan of RNA. DNA, which encodes the "hard copy" of genes, is known to survive for thousands of years under favourable conditions. But RNA...
  • Engineers create an inhalable form of messenger RNA

    01/04/2019 5:30:38 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    MIT News ^ | Anne Trafton
    Messenger RNA, which can induce cells to produce therapeutic proteins, holds great promise for treating a variety of diseases. The biggest obstacle to this approach so far has been finding safe and efficient ways to deliver mRNA molecules to the target cells. In an advance that could lead to new treatments for lung disease, MIT researchers have now designed an inhalable form of mRNA. This aerosol could be administered directly to the lungs to help treat diseases such as cystic fibrosis, the researchers say. “We think the ability to deliver mRNA via inhalation could allow us to treat a range...
  • Epstein-Barr virus <i>(mononucleosis)</i> linked to seven serious diseases

    04/17/2018 5:09:38 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 14 replies
    medicalexpress.com ^ | 4/16/18 | Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
    A far-reaching study conducted by scientists at Cincinnati Children's reports that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)—best known for causing mononucleosis—also increases the risks for some people of developing seven other major diseases. Those diseases are: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), celiac disease, and type 1 diabetes. Combined, these seven diseases affect nearly 8 million people in the U.S. Overall, the study sheds new light on how environmental factors, such as viral or bacterial infections, poor diet, pollution or other hazardous exposures, can interact with the human genetic blueprint...
  • Substantial Lack Of Phosphorus In The Universe Makes Finding Alien Life Unlikely

    04/05/2018 11:49:13 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 57 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 4/5/18 | Allan Adamson
    Amid efforts to find alien life, scientists have not yet confirmed the existence of an extraterrestrial civilization. Findings of a new study suggest this has something do with the element phosphorus lacking in the cosmos. Life-Giving PhosphorusPhosphorus is the 11th most common element on Earth, and it is fundamental to all living things. Phosphorus is one of only six chemical elements on our planet that organisms depend on. "[Phosphorus] helps form the backbone of the long chains of nucleotides that create RNA and DNA; it is part of the phospholipids in cell membranes; and is a building block of the...
  • The Alien Observatory --"We May Soon Discover Worlds That Host Lifeforms with Strange...

    04/02/2018 6:23:28 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies
    In 2016, NASA sequenced DNA in space for the first time, but alien life, we may soon discover, may be vastly different on other planets and moons, particularly as we expand our efforts to explore ocean worlds with our solar system and beyond. “Most strategies for life detection rely upon finding features known to be associated with Earth's life, such as particular classes of molecules,” the researchers wrote. DNA and RNA are the building blocks of life on Earth, but the molecules of life might differ substantially on another planet. A new paper by scientists at Georgetown University, published online...
  • Science Fact Swallows Science Fiction

    01/26/2017 9:48:32 AM PST · by Sean_Anthony · 8 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 01/26/17 | Dr. Robert Owens
    I began working in what I call Writing Mode which is where I go when consumed with the writing of a new book Not too long ago, I began a science fiction novel, which has always been a dream of mine, and since I finally broke through the fiction wall last year with my book, America’s Trojan War, I thought it was time. I even had a plot that had been rattling around in my mind for years. I began working in what I call Writing Mode, which is where I go when consumed with the writing of a new...
  • Researchers May Have Solved 'Missing Link' Mystery in Origin of Life

    06/09/2015 8:54:48 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 96 replies
    NBC News ^ | 06/09/2015 | by JESSE EMSPAK, LIVE SCIENCE CONTRIBUTOR
    How did life on Earth begin? It's been one of modern biology's greatest mysteries: How did the chemical soup that existed on the early Earth lead to the complex molecules needed to create living, breathing organisms? Now, researchers say they've found the missing link. Between 4.6 billion and 4.0 billion years ago, there was probably no life on Earth. The planet's surface was at first molten and even as it cooled, it was getting pulverized by asteroids and comets. All that existed were simple chemicals. But about 3.8 billion years ago, the bombardment stopped, and life arose. Most scientists think...
  • Telomere extension turns back aging clock in cultured human cells, study finds

    01/23/2015 2:28:53 PM PST · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | Provided by Stanford University Medical Center
    A new procedure can quickly and efficiently increase the length of human telomeres, the protective caps on the ends of chromosomes that are linked to aging and disease, according to scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Treated cells behave as if they are much younger than untreated cells, multiplying with abandon in the laboratory dish rather than stagnating or dying. The procedure, which involves the use of a modified type of RNA, will improve the ability of researchers to generate large numbers of cells for study or drug development, the scientists say. Skin cells with telomeres lengthened by...