Free Republic 3rd Qtr 2020 Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $4,406
5%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 5% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: godsgravesglyphs

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Dawn of the chicken revealed in Southeast Asia

    07/02/2020 9:57:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 58 replies
    Science: Vol. 368, Issue 6498, pp. 1411 ^ | June 26, 2020 | Andrew Lawler
    [Summary] Chickens outnumber all other species of birds by an order of magnitude and they are humanity's single largest source of animal protein. Yet for 2 centuries, biologists have struggled to explain how the chicken became the chicken. Now, the first extensive study of the bird's full genome concludes that people in northern Southeast Asia or southern China domesticated a colorful pheasant sometime after about 7500 B.C.E. People then carried the bird across Asia and on to every continent except Antarctica. The research team also found that the modern chicken's chief ancestor is a subspecies of red jungle fowl named...
  • Testing the DNA of cave art

    07/02/2020 10:40:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Bradshaw Foundation ^ | Friday, June 19, 2020 | Bridgette Watson (CBC News)
    The University of Victoria paleoanthropologist Genevieve von Petzinger explains that a DNA test, which would reveal genetic mutations due to evolution, could help pinpoint the time period a painting was made and may help determine if the art was actually the handiwork of humans or Neanderthals — who lived about 130,000 to 40,000 years ago. "It would just be so fascinating to see the identity. The million dollar question is, did Neanderthals paint?" There is already some indication, according to von Petzinger, that this extinct species was, in fact, artistic. Von Petzinger said that a few years ago, some of...
  • Biology in art: Genetic detectives ID microbes suspected of slowly ruining humanity's treasures

    07/02/2020 9:57:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | June 18, 2020 | editors
    A new study of the microbial settlers on old paintings, sculptures, and other forms of art charts a potential path for preserving, restoring, and confirming the geographic origin of some of humanity's greatest treasures. Genetics scientists with the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI), collaborating with the Leonardo da Vinci DNA Project and supported by the Richard Lounsbery Foundation, say identifying and managing communities of microbes on art may offer museums and collectors a new way to stem the deterioration of priceless possessions, and to unmask counterfeits in the $60 billion a year art market... The genetic detectives caution that additional...
  • Schoolboy Cathal gets a hands-on history lesson with 4,000-year-old boat

    07/02/2020 9:22:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Irish Central ^ | June 9, 2020 | Shane O'Brien
    The lake is home to at least one crannóg -- an artificial island used as dwellings and defense mechanisms in prehistoric Ireland. Crannóg's are the oldest dwellings in prehistoric Ireland. There are additionally at least seven ringforts surrounding the town of Lisacul. Eileen McDonagh, Cathal's mother, told the Irish Independent that he was supposed to be doing his homework when he made the discovery. She said that her son became bored with his schoolwork and went for a walk down to the lake, where he paddled up to his ankles in a pair of wellington boots. It was there that...
  • Ancient Maya reservoirs contained toxic pollution

    07/01/2020 11:13:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | June 26, 2020 | University of Cincinnati
    Reservoirs in the heart of an ancient Maya city were so polluted with mercury and algae that the water likely was undrinkable. Researchers from the University of Cincinnati found toxic levels of pollution in two central reservoirs in Tikal, an ancient Maya city that dates back to the third century B.C. in what is now northern Guatemala. UC's findings suggest droughts in the ninth century likely contributed to the depopulation and eventual abandonment of the city. "The conversion of Tikal's central reservoirs from life-sustaining to sickness-inducing places would have both practically and symbolically helped to bring about the abandonment of...
  • Olives First Domesticated 7,000 Years Ago in Israel, Study Says

    07/01/2020 10:23:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Haaretz ^ | March 11, 2020 | Ariel David
    Villagers in what is today Israel were the first to cultivate olive trees, an international study that pooled data from countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea has concluded. This start of olive domestication apparently began in the Galilee around 7,000 to 6,500 years ago, the team estimates. Olives and especially olive oil were staples of ancient economies around the Mediterranean Basin: The oil was used for cooking, lighting as well as medicinal and ritual purposes. But so far there has been little agreement among researchers as to where and when people first domesticated the plant. Dating estimates have ranged from more...
  • Some Chimpanzees Have a Bone in Their Heart—and Some Humans Might, Too

    07/01/2020 7:36:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | June 20, 2020 | George Dvorsky
    Scientists in the United Kingdom have discovered a rare bone, called the os cordis, in chimpanzees with a common heart condition. The implications of this finding could extend to humans, who share a close genetic relationship to chimps. Cattle, buffalo, and sheep have it. So do otters, camels, and dogs. Primates, not so much—at least that’s what scientists thought. The os cordis, a small bone found in the hearts of certain animals, is also present in some chimpanzees, according to research published today in Scientific Reports. It’s the first time os cordis has been detected in a great ape species....
  • Global warming killed off the Mayans by locking leaders in violent power struggle

    04/05/2017 7:06:52 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 72 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | April 5, 2017 | By PHOEBE WESTON
    The reason for the collapse of Mayan civilisation has been hotly debated, but now scientists claim they have an answer - climate change. Researchers believe that hot weather made the Mayans more aggressive and therefore likely to fight one another. As crops failed due to the rising temperatures leaders waged war for power which lit the fuse of their eventual demise around 900 AD, the study says. With crops levels low Mayan leaders could no longer rely on brash festivals or building projects to keep their sujects happy. So they resorted to power struggles and war instead which finished the...
  • Molly Pitcher-A woman of Courage and Faith.

    06/30/2020 7:41:50 AM PDT · by Manly Warrior · 11 replies
    Molly Pitcher-A woman of Courage and Faith. In the Revolutionary War, there arises a story of a woman they called Molly Pitcher. She followed her artilleryman husband William Hayes into the battle of Monmouth. Men were dying of dehydration, so she got pitchers of water from a nearby spring to give to the men and to cool the guns. She walked thru gunfire, because her husband needed her. She kept this guiding force in her will: “March on, my soul be strong!” (Judges 5:21). When her husband was wounded she went to him, tenderly laid him down and cared for...
  • Luxembourg's PM tears into Boris Johnson over the 'nightmare of Brexit' as he stands next...

    09/16/2019 10:11:05 AM PDT · by RummyChick · 44 replies
    DM ^ | 9/16/2019 | JAMES TAPSFIELD, POLITICAL EDITOR FOR MAILONLINE
    Boris Johnson dramatically pulled out of a press conference in Luxembourg today after protests and an extraordinary spat with counterpart Xavier Bettel. Protesters carrying messages including 'Bog Off Boris' first jeered the PM after showdown talks with EU commission president Jean-Claude Juncker over lunch at a restaurant. And Mr Johnson then faced cat-calls from a crowd including British ex-pats as he arrived for a meeting with Luxembourg counterpart Xavier Bettel. The stormy atmosphere led to Mr Johnson requesting the press call be held outside following their private discussions. It was originally planned to be held just yards from the demonstrations....
  • Detectorist finds Roman lead pig ingot in Wales

    06/28/2020 3:51:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com ^ | June 23, 2020 | Dominic Robertson | Source: Shropshire Star
    The object found was a large lead ingot or 'pig' (about half a metre long, weighing 63 kilograms). The 'writing' reported by Mr Jones was a cast Latin inscription confirming that it was Roman and about 2,000 years old... The exploitation of Britain's natural resources was one of the reasons cited by Roman authors for the invasion of Britain by the Emperor Claudius in AD 43... Lead ore or galena contains silver as well as lead, and both were valuable commodities for the Romans. Less than a hundred lead ingots of this type are known from the mines of Roman...
  • New Evidence Supports Modern Greeks Having DNA of Ancient Mycenaeans

    06/28/2020 3:18:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    GreekReporter.com ^ | June 22, 2020 | Stavros Anastasiou
    New emerging DNA evidence suggests that living Greeks are indeed descendants of the ancient Mycenaeans, who ruled mainland Greece and the Aegean Sea from 1,600 BC to 1,200 BC. The proof comes from a study in which scientists analyzed the genes from the teeth of 19 people across various archaeological sites within mainland Greece and Mycenae. A total of 1.2 million letters of genetic code were compared to those of 334 people across the world. Genetic information was also compiled from a group of thirty modern Greek individuals in order to compare it to the ancient genomes. This allowed researchers...
  • Archaeologists have found astonishingly well-preserved gear from a fisherman who lived 5,000 years ago

    06/28/2020 1:12:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    ScienceNorway ^ | June 26, 2020 | Ingrid Spilde
    The whole story starts with a farmer. Specifically, the farmer at Jortveit farm in southern Norway. Around the beginning of the 1930s he decided to drain a wetland near the farm so he could cultivate new land. But while he was working on the deep drainage trenches, strange things started to crop up. Bones from a bluefin tuna and a killer whale. And huge fish hooks and harpoons made of bones. In the middle of the wetland! The tools eventually ended up in the University Museum of Antiquities in Oslo, where they were studied by archaeologists. The bones, on the...
  • Former Dornoch man discovers 5500-year-old cup in loch

    06/28/2020 12:43:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Northern Times ^ | June 23, 2020 | Mike Merritt
    A former Royal Navy diver and Dornoch native has discovered an almost completely intact 5500-year-old cup, hidden in the mud of a loch in the Outer Hebrides... on the Isle of Lewis on Friday... The location has been kept secret at this stage, but Mr Murray described it as "a beautiful example" of the Neolithic age and was the first person to drink from it in thousands of years. Mr Murray has also previously discovered similar bowls around mysterious man-made islands in the Outer Hebrides which have led to a "startling" re-writing of history. The structures - known as crannogs...
  • Non-tobacco plant identified in ancient pipe for first time

    06/28/2020 12:34:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Mirage News [Australia] ^ | June 26, 2020 | Public Release
    People in what is now Washington State were smoking Rhus glabra, a plant commonly known as smooth sumac, more than 1,400 years ago. The discovery, made by a team of Washington State University researchers, marks the first-time scientists have identified residue from a non-tobacco plant in an archeological pipe. Unearthed in central Washington, the Native American pipe also contained residue from N. quadrivalvis, a species of tobacco not currently grown in the region but that is thought to have been widely cultivated in the past. Until now, the use of specific smoking plant mixtures by ancient people in the American...
  • First evidence that ancient humans ate snakes and lizards is unearthed in Israel

    06/28/2020 12:17:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Live Science ^ | June 25, 2020 | Mindy Weisberger
    Human communities in the Levant at this time were known as Natufian. They were primarily hunters and foragers and are considered the first non-nomadic society; the semi-sedentary habits of Natufian culture were likely a precursor to humans settling down and becoming farmers. At the el-Wad Terrace settlement, the site was densely layered with animal remains, of which "a high percentage" belonged to lizards and snakes, the researchers reported in a new study, published online June 10 in the journal Scientific Reports. The quantity of squamate bones at the site was astonishing; that alone hinted at human consumption as a possible...
  • Sledge dogs are closely related to 9,500-year-old 'ancient dog'

    06/28/2020 7:27:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | June 25, 2020 | University Of Copenhagen the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    'We have extracted DNA from a 9,500-year-old dog from the Siberian island of Zhokhov, which the dog is named after. Based on that DNA we have sequenced the oldest complete dog genome to date, and the results show an extremely early diversification of dogs into types of sledge dogs', says one of the two first authors of the study, PhD student Mikkel Sinding, the Globe Institute. Until now, it has been the common belief that the 9,500-year-old Siberian dog, Zhokhov, was a kind of ancient dog - one of the earliest domesticated dogs and a version of the common origin...
  • Darwin's Dilemma Of 1859 Gets A Solution, Say Paleobiologists [Science]

    01/11/2009 6:46:55 PM PST · by Coyoteman · 26 replies · 4,873+ views
    Scientific Blogging ^ | January 10, 2009 | News Staff
    A solution to the puzzle which came to be known as ‘Darwin’s Dilemma’ has been uncovered by scientists at the University of Oxford in a paper published in the Journal of the Geological Society. ‘To the question of why we do not find rich fossiliferous deposits belonging to these…periods prior to the Cambrian system, I can give no satisfactory answer’, Charles Darwin wrote in On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or The Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life in 1859, summarizing what came to be known as ‘Darwin’s Dilemma’ – the lack of...
  • Some Scientists Think SARS May Have Come from Outer Space

    05/22/2003 5:47:54 PM PDT · by TaxRelief · 207 replies · 880+ views
    LONDON (Reuters) ^ | May 22, 2003 | Patricia Reaney
    LONDON (Reuters) - Could SARS have come from outer space? Some scientists think so. Instead of jumping from an unknown animal host in southern China, a few researchers in Britain believe the virus that has baffled medical experts descended from the stratosphere. "I think it is a possibility that SARS came from space. It is a very strong possibility," Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe told Reuters. The director of the Cardiff Center for Astrobiology in Wales and a proponent of the theory that life on Earth originated from space, admits the theory defies conventional wisdom. But in a letter published in The...
  • 'Wonderchicken' fossil from the age of dinosaurs reveals origin of modern birds

    03/18/2020 11:20:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | March 18, 2020 | by University of Cambridge
    Artist's reconstruction of the world's oldest modern bird, Asteriornis maastrichtensis, in its original environment. 66.7 million years ago parts of Belgium were covered by a shallow sea, and conditions were similar to modern tropical beaches like The Bahamas. Asteriornis lived at the end of the Age of Dinosaurs, a time when mosasaurs (giant marine reptiles) swam in the oceans, and Tyrannosaurus rex lived on land. Asteriornis had fairly long legs and may have prowled the tropical shoreline. Credit: Phillip Krzeminski ==================================================================== The oldest fossil of a modern bird yet found, dating from the age of dinosaurs, has been identified by...