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Keyword: deusexmachina

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  • What If Earth got Kicked Out of the Solar System? Rogue Earth (9:45)

    02/11/2021 10:17:08 AM PST · by SmokingJoe · 54 replies
    Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell YouTube ^ | December 1 2020 | Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell
    What could happen to the earth in the distant future if we don't have the sun to keep us warm anymore or allow plants to grow. 9 minutes 45 seconds long.
  • Science Says: A big space crash likely made Uranus lopsided

    12/21/2018 10:37:36 AM PST · by Red Badger · 42 replies
    AP ^ | 12/21/2018 | By SETH BORENSTEIN
    <p>WASHINGTON (AP) — Uranus is a lopsided oddity, the only planet to spin on its side. Scientists now think they know how it got that way: It was pushed over by a rock at least twice as big as Earth.</p>
  • A big space crash likely made Uranus lopsided

    12/21/2018 10:37:30 AM PST · by ETL · 23 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Dec 21, 2018 | Seth Borenstein
    <p>Uranus is a lopsided oddity, the only planet to spin on its side. Scientists now think they know how it got that way: It was pushed over by a rock at least twice as big as Earth.</p> <p>Detailed computer simulations show that an enormous rock crashed into the seventh planet from the sun, said Durham University astronomy researcher Jacob Kegerreis, who presented his analysis at a large earth and space science conference this month.</p>
  • Study of Uranus Suggests Some of its Moons are on a Collision Course

    07/04/2018 12:21:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    Phys.org ^ | September 6, 2017 | Bob Yirka
    The researchers report that they were studying the planet's rings, which are collectively called Eta, and discovered that they had an oddly shaped orbit -- not round or even circular. Instead, they describe it as sort of triangular. More study showed that the odd orbit of the rings was due to gravitational pull from Cressida -- one of the planet's moons. The gravitational impact is exaggerated, they note, due to the moon keeping pace with the orbit of the planet. The particles in the ring, on the other hand, move faster than the moon. This results in the moon tugging...
  • How Did Uranus Form?

    03/09/2018 9:43:05 AM PST · by Simon Green · 83 replies
    Space.com ^ | 03/08/18 | Nola Taylor Redd,
    Although planets surround stars in the galaxy, how they form remains a subject of debate. Despite the wealth of worlds in our own solar system, scientists still aren't certain how planets are built. Currently, two theories are duking it out for the role of champion. The first and most widely accepted, core accretion, works well with the formation of the terrestrial planets but has problems with giant planets such as Uranus. The second, the disk instability method, may account for the creation of giant planets. "What separates the ice giants from the gas giants is their formation history: during...
  • HUBBLE JUST SPOTTED SOMETHING MASSIVE COMING OUT OF URANUS

    10/14/2017 4:17:21 PM PDT · by Lazamataz · 94 replies
    Bursts of solar winds caused a huge sparkling region on Uranus, scientists observed this by using Hubble space telescope. Electrons that come from various origins such as solar winds, the planetary ionosphere and moon volcanism, when charged in the form of streams caused this, researchers from the Paris Observatory used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to observe this on Uranus. They were able to catch it in powerful magnetic fields and, controlled it into the upper atmosphere, where set off spectacular bursts of light when made interactions with gas particles, such as oxygen or nitrogen.
  • Why is Uranus on its Side?

    08/06/2016 8:37:29 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 60 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | 5 Aug , 2016 | Faser Cain
    It’s impossible to do an article about Uranus without opening up the back door to a spit storm of potty humour.... Anyway, perhaps one of the strangest aspects of Uranus is its tilt.... The Earth is tilted 23.5 degrees away from the Sun’s equator. Mars is 25 degrees, and even Mercury is 2.1 degrees tilted.... Uranus is 97.8 degrees... ...[A]stronomers define the angle as greater than 90 degrees when you take its direction of rotation into account. When you describe it as turning in the same direction as the rest of the planets in the Solar System, then you have...
  • Who Needs a Moon?

    05/28/2011 4:43:54 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 33 replies
    Science ^ | 27 May 2011 | Govert Schilling
    BOSTON—The number of Earth-like extrasolar planets suitable for harboring advanced life could be 10 times higher than has been assumed until now, according to a new modeling study. The finding contradicts the prevailing notion that a terrestrial planet needs a large moon to stabilize the orientation of its axis and, hence, its climate. In 1993, French mathematicians Jacques Laskar and Philippe Robutel showed that Earth’s large moon has a stabilizing effect on our planet’s climate. Without the moon, gravitational perturbations from other planets, notably nearby Venus and massive Jupiter, would greatly disturb Earth’s axial tilt, with vast consequences for the...
  • The sun follows the rhythm of the planets

    06/05/2019 4:54:27 PM PDT · by grey_whiskers · 95 replies
    SpaceDaily.com ^ | May 30, 2019 | "Staff writers"
    One of the big questions in solar physics is why the Sun's activity follows a regular cycle of 11 years. Researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), an independent German research institute, now present new findings, indicating that the tidal forces of Venus, Earth and Jupiter influence the solar magnetic field, thus governing the solar cycle.
  • Earth Must Have Another Moon, Say Astronomers

    12/22/2011 7:05:56 AM PST · by Lonesome in Massachussets · 44 replies
    Back in 2006, the Catalina Sky Survey in Arizona noticed that a mysterious body had begun orbiting the Earth. This object had a spectrum that was remarkably similar to the titanium white paint used on Saturn V rocket stages and, indeed, a number of rocket stages are known to orbit the Sun close to Earth. But this was not an object of ours. Instead, 2006 RH120, as it became known, turned out to be a tiny asteroid just a few metres across--a natural satellite like the Moon. It was captured by Earth's gravity in September 2006 and orbited us...
  • Venus' Tail of the Unexpected

    02/23/2008 5:04:59 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 22 replies · 382+ views
    Thunderbolts.info ^ | 02/20/2008 | by Rens Van der Sluijs
    The ion tail of Venus. Credit: Jeff Hecht, New Scientist Magazine May 31, 1997.   Feb 20, 2008Venus' Tail of the UnexpectedAncient peoples report that the planet Venus once had visible "ropes" stretching out to the Earth. Could a plasma glow discharge have been the cause?The "induced magnetotail" that points away from Venus in the direction of the earth is a teardrop-shaped plasma structure filled with “a lot of little stringy things” that was first detected by NASA’s Pioneer Venus Orbiter in the late 1970s. In 1997, Europe’s Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) Satellite showed that the tail stretched some...
  • Moons that escape their planets are now called ‘ploonets’

    07/13/2019 2:40:31 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 67 replies
    BGR ^ | 07/11/2109 | Miek Wehner
    The researchers suggest that this type of world may a result of large “hot Jupiter” exoplanets migrating toward their host star. Exoplanet surveys have detected several such planets, and it’s believed that they likely formed at a greater distance from their respective stars and then slowly crept inward. When that happens, it’s possible that the change in gravitational forces would prompt large moons to break free from their existing orbits and become standalone worlds of their own. Computer simulations showed that this could indeed happen, and in those cases, the researchers believe we should call them ploonets. Remarkably, our own...
  • Jupiter Used to Be Four Times Farther from the Sun, Study Claims

    03/26/2019 9:33:56 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 49 replies
    Populat Mechanics ^ | Mar 25, 2019 | By Avery Thompson
    …[S]ientists have discovered enough planets around other stars to offer a clearer picture of the average solar system, and to reveal the ways in which our own solar system is really weird. For instance, most systems have gas giant planets, but those "hot Jupiters" tend to orbit very close to their host stars. That makes our solar system an outlier. All our system’s gas giants orbit in the outer solar system, while the inner region is reserved for rocky planets like our own. But according to a new simulation, our home system is even weirder than we thought. One of...
  • A Diamond the Size of Earth - is this Jupiter's core?

    12/28/2018 10:47:49 AM PST · by Red Badger · 57 replies
    www.guide-to-the-universe.com ^ | 12/28/2018 - Undated | Staff
    In his book "2061 - Odyssey Three" (the third of his Space Odyssey series), Arthur C. Clarke put forward the intriguing proposal that the core of the planet Jupiter was, in fact, a diamond the size of Earth. Now Clarke, even though a science fiction author of some repute, had a science background and always tried to bring rigorous scientific accuracy to his stories. So, could his proposition be possible? The somewhat predictable answer is - we don't know. But we can analyse the possibility within known scientific parametres, to see if it is, at least, possible. For diamond to...
  • Jupiter and Venus Change Earth’s Orbit Every 405,000 Years

    05/10/2018 7:28:52 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 65 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | 05/10/2018 | Matt Williams
    Over the course of the past 200 million years, our planet has experienced four major geological periods (the Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous and Cenozoic) and one major ice age (the Pliocene-Quaternary glaciation), all of which had a drastic impact on plant and animal life, as well as effecting the course of species evolution. For decades, geologists have also understood that these changes are due in part to gradual shifts in the Earth’s orbit, which are caused by Venus and Jupiter, and repeat regularly every 405,000 years. But it was not until recently that a team of geologists and Earth scientists...
  • Does Jupiter Have a Solid Core?

    05/09/2017 7:39:24 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | 05/07/2017 | Matt William
    Our current theories regarding the formation of the Solar System claim that the planets formed about 4.5 billion years ago from a Solar Nebula (i.e. Nebular Hypothesis). Consistent with this theory, Jupiter is believed to have formed as a result of gravity pulling swirling clouds of gas and dust together. Jupiter acquired most of its mass from material left over from the formation of the Sun, and ended up with more than twice the combined mass of the other planets. In fact, it has been conjectured that it Jupiter had accumulated more mass, it would have become a second star....
  • Stony meteorites reveal the timing of Jupiter’s migration

    12/14/2016 7:57:55 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 16 replies
    Astronomy Magazine ^ | 13 Dec, 2016 | K.N. Smith
    Home/News/Stony meteorites reveal the timing of Jupiter’s migration 941 Stony meteorites reveal the timing of Jupiter’s migration The gas giant caused iron-vaporizing collisions in the asteroid belt 5 million years ago. By K.N. Smith | Published: Tuesday, December 13, 2016 JUPITER_proccessed_image An artist's rendering of Jupiter WikiMedia Commons/ Ukstillalive The youngest stony meteorites in the solar system may reveal when Jupiter migrated through the asteroid belt. These meteors contain grains of metal that can only be the remnant of high-velocity collisions driven by Jupiter’s gravitational influence. New evidence comes from a rare group of meteorites called CB chondrites. Formed around...
  • Baby Jupiter was likely slammed by planet 4.5 billion years ago

    08/15/2019 11:34:57 AM PDT · by rdl6989 · 19 replies
    New York Post ^ | August 15, 2019 | Mike Wehner
    Scans from NASA’s Juno spacecraft have hinted that Jupiter’s core isn’t exactly what scientists once thought it was. The core isn’t as dense as researchers suspected, but determining why that is has proven to be a challenge. “This is puzzling,” Andrea Isella, co-author of a new study published in Nature, said in a statement. “It suggests that something happened that stirred up the core and that’s where the giant impact comes into play.”
  • Moving the Orbits of Planets

    02/02/2006 9:44:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies · 737+ views
    David Jewitt ^ | Last updated Sep 2004 | David Jewitt
    Meanwhile, the Doppler discovery of extrasolar planets orbiting very close to their parent stars has raised a different problem. Many of the planets are so close to their stars (<0.1 AU), and so hot, that they cannot be supposed to have formed where we now observe them. By inference, they could have formed at larger distances (several AU) and then migrated inwards. What would cause this inward migration? As with the solar system case, the root cause may be an exchange of angular momentum with material surrounding the planets at their formation. In particular, if the extrasolar planets formed in...
  • Solving Solar System Quandaries Is Simple: Just Flip-flop The Position Of Uranus And Neptune

    12/30/2007 5:44:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 96+ views
    Science Daily ^ | Thursday, December 13, 2007 | adapted from Arizona State University materials
    ...the planets weren't always in the order they are today. Four billion years ago, early in the solar system's evolution, Uranus and Neptune switched places. This is the result of recent work by Steve Desch, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University. The work appears in this week's Astrophysical Journal. Desch based his conclusion on his calculations of the surface density of the solar nebula. The solar nebula is the disk of gas and dust out of which all of the planets formed. The surface density -- or mass per area -- of...