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  • Ancient Greek Corinthian Helmet Found in Southwest Russia

    02/25/2022 6:01:13 AM PST · by Phoenix8 · 30 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | 09/21/2021 | Chrysopoulos
    An ancient Greek Corinthian helmet was found in a fifth century BC grave in the Taman Peninsula, southwest Russia. Made of bronze, ancient Greek Corinthian helmets covered the entire head and neck, with slits for the eyes and mouth, protruding cheek covers (paragnathides) and a curved protrusion in the back to protect the nape of the neck. The helmet has a padded interior made of fabric or leather to protect the warrior’s skull. These helmets were essential for the Greek hoplites, the famous foot soldiers of the phalanxes.
  • Etruscan settlement found in Sardinia for first time [tr]

    01/21/2018 2:55:01 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    ANSAmed ^ | January 8, 2018 | unattributed
    An Etruscan settlement that dates back to the 9th century BC has been found on the Sardinian coasts near Olbia. The presence emerged during a review of the findings of recent years by the archaeological superintendency for the Sassari and Nuoro provinces. The area of the settlement - according to a statement issued by the superintendency - is on the Tavolara isle, a position that enabled a certain degree of caution in contact with coastal inhabitants and those further inland. Archaeologists note that other settlements might be found in the Gallura area, on the opposite shore from Etruria. Etruria's cities...
  • Turkey: How the 3,000-year Greek Presence on the Aegean Shore Came to an End

    03/17/2017 5:45:15 PM PDT · by Texas Fossil · 49 replies
    Philos Project ^ | March 16, 2017 | Uzay Bulut
    Tension is running high between Greece and Turkey. The cause? Turkish Chief of the General Staff Gen. Hulusi Akar paid a visit to Imia, a pair of two small, uninhabited Greek islets in the Aegean Sea, on January 29. He was accompanied by the commanders of the Turkish land, naval and air forces.Imia – which Turkey calls “Kardak” – was a subject of yet another crisis in 1996 that brought Greece and Turkey to the brink of war. Although armed conflict was ultimately averted, Turkey still claims that the islands are Turkish, even though the islands in the Aegean are...
  • Discoveries of Polish archaeologists in Armenia [Urartu]

    12/09/2014 5:13:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | December 8, 2014 | PAP - Science and Scholarship in Poland
    Archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw discovered evidence of destruction and capture of the ancient city of Metsamor, one of the most famous archaeological sites in the vicinity of Yerevan. "In the entire area of research we found layers of burning and ash. The city was probably captured by the army of Argishti I, the ruler of Urartu," told PAP Krzysztof Jakubiak, head of the project. Argishti I was the king of Urartu, the biblical Kingdom of Ararat in the Armenian Highlands. During his reign, the boundaries of the state expanded to the Caucasus, the area of...
  • Archaeology bombshell: Discovery of 145 human remains that 'solves biggest Bible mystery'

    07/31/2020 3:16:14 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 109 replies
    The Express, UK ^ | July 29, 2020 | CHARLIE BRADLEY
    The researchers found a Philistine cemetery in Israel – home to 145 human remains dating back to between the 11th and the 8th centuries BC. The discovery, made in 2013 and finally revealed in 2016, may yield answers to an enduring mystery surrounding the origins of the Philistines. It came at the end of a 30-year excavation by the Leon Levy Expedition. The Philistines were an ancient people who lived from the 12th century BC until 604 BC. They are known for their biblical conflict with the Israelites.
  • Archaeology, genetics confirm Bible story of Philistines' origins

    08/05/2019 9:16:02 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 38 replies
    Christian Post ^ | 08/05/2019 | By John Stonestreet and Roberto Rivera
    Between 1997 and 2016, researchers at an excavation near Ashkelon in Israel examined the remains of more than one hundred humans, remains that dated from the 12th to 6th centuries before Christ. The researchers hoped to find human DNA in order to answer an old question: Who were the Philistines? Where did they come from? As it turns out, the Philistines were exactly who the Bible says they were, and they came from where the Bible says they did. Amos 9 speaks of God bringing up the Philistines from Caphtor, just as he brought Israel out of Egypt. Deuteronomy 2...
  • Unique Flagstones Of Rabat Tepe Raise Questions

    10/20/2005 4:53:40 PM PDT · by blam · 6 replies · 511+ views
    CHN ^ | 10-20-2005
    Unique flagstones of Rabat Tepe Raise QuestionsThe discovery of 3000-year-old flagstones in Rabat Tepe has surprised archaeologists. Tehran, 20 October 2005 (CHN) -- The first season of archaeological excavations in Rabat Tepe led to the discovery of 3000-year-old 180x180 cm flagstone, which have never been seen before in any Urartu historical sites. Similar flagstones have been found in Ancient Rome and Ancient Iran historical sites. Rabat Tepe is located near the town of Sardasht in West Azarbaijan province of Iran. It is believed that hill used to be the capital of Musasir government about 3000 years ago. Before setting on...
  • Cave Paintings of the Altamira Cave and Lascaux Cave, to Hurrian Hymns

    04/11/2020 4:33:07 PM PDT · by mairdie · 26 replies
    YouTube ^ | April 11, 2020 | MVD
    Cave paintings of the Spanish Altamira Cave and the French Lascaux Cave, to the Hurrian Hymns from "Music of the Ancient Sumerians, Egyptians, and Greeks." They're around 17,000 years old.
  • Freedom Speaks Hurrian: A Cuneiform Song of Liberation

    08/11/2019 2:05:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | August 05, 2019 | Marek Dospel
    The tablets containing the Song of Liberation were excavated in 1983 under a Byzantine period church in the Hittite capital city of Hattusha. Writing for the July–October 2019 issue of Biblical Archaeology Review, Eva von Dassow of the University of Minnesota reports on an intriguing, fictitious account of subjugation and liberation from Late Bronze Age Levant. The epic poem was originally composed in the Hurrian language, around 1600 B.C.E., but the surviving text comes from a Hurrian-Hittite bilingual edition from around 1400 B.C.E. It is recorded in cuneiform writing on a series of clay tablets, which came to light only...
  • Scholars say Philistine genes help solve biblical mystery

    07/03/2019 1:16:54 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 109 replies
    www.wpri.com ^ | Posted: Jul 3, 2019 / 02:13 PM EDT / Updated: Jul 3, 2019 / 02:21 PM EDT | by: ILAN BEN ZION
    JERUSALEM — Goliath the Greek? Human remains from an ancient cemetery in southern Israel have yielded precious bits of DNA that a new study says help prove the European origin of the Philistines — the enigmatic nemeses of the biblical Israelites. The Philistines mostly resided in five cities along the southern coast of what is today Israel and the Gaza Strip during the early Iron Age, around 3,000 years ago. In the Bible, David fought the Philistine giant Goliath in a duel, and Samson slew a thousand of their warriors with the jawbone of an ass. Many archaeologists have proposed...
  • The Price of Plunder [Hasanlu Tepe gold cup]

    03/30/2019 12:04:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Archaeology ^ | January/February 2015 | Jason Urbanus
    Hasanlu developed into a significant commercial and production center during the early Iron Age (1400-800 B.C.), owing to its location on important trade and communication routes between Mesopotamia and Anatolia. The citadel at the center of the settlement contained an array of monumental buildings, including palaces, temples, and large multi-columned halls. The evidence Danti is studying confirms that the citadel met with a violent end. Many buildings were ransacked and burned, which caused them to collapse. In addition, the remains of more than 250 people were uncovered, some with signs of systematic execution. "The horrific level of violence evident in...
  • Special Report: Ekron Identity Confirmed [ from 1998 ]

    11/20/2006 9:03:51 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 364+ views
    Archaeology ^ | January/February 1998 | Seymour Gitin, Trude Dothan, and Joseph Naveh
    An inscription carved into a limestone slab found at Tel Miqne, 23 miles southwest of Jerusalem, confirms the identification of the site as Ekron, one of the five Philistine capital cities mentioned in the Bible. The inscription is unique because it contains the name of a biblical city and five of its rulers, two of whom are mentioned as kings in texts other than the Bible. The only such inscription found in situ in a securely defined, datable archaeological context, it has far-reaching implications for our understanding of the history of Ekron and Philistia... The inscription was found in the...
  • Listen To The World's Oldest-Known Melody (1400 BC)

    09/27/2016 10:12:31 AM PDT · by blam · 64 replies
    Fox News Science - Newser ^ | 9-27-2016 | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore
    Elizabeth Armstrong Moore September 27, 2016 In 1950, a collection of 29 tablets was discovered in the ruins of Ugarit, an ancient city in the northern region of present-day Syria, but only one had survived the intervening centuries well enough to be deciphered. Known as H6, the 3,500-year-old clay tablet revealed a simple hymn specifying the use of nine lyre strings and the intervals between them, much like an "ancient guitar tab," reports ClassicFM, which has recently picked up the story. The resulting melody, it says, isn't just the oldest discovered in the world, but "utterly enchanting." Musician and composer...
  • Intact tomb of Bronze Age Minoan man discovered in Ierapetra, Crete

    08/25/2018 8:33:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 76 replies
    TornosNews.gr ^ | Wednesday, August 22, 2018 | unattributed, Daily Mail
    An initial inspection of the ceramics found in the tomb allowed it to be dated to the late Minoan period, or 1400 to 1200 BC Archaeologists in Crete have discovered an intact Minoan-era tomb containing a well-preserved adult skeleton along with funerary vessels. An initial inspection of the ceramics found in the tomb allowed it to be dated to the late Minoan period, or 1400 to 1200 BC, a statement from the Ministry of Culture noted. The tomb was discovered during an emergency excavation in an olive grove outside the village of Kentri, in the eastern prefecture of Ierapetra, the...
  • First ancient Corinthian Helmet discovered in Southwest Russia

    06/02/2018 11:07:32 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 73 replies
    TornosNews ^ | May 27, 2018 | etavenir.fr
    A Corinthian helmet was discovered in a 5th century BC grave in the Taman Peninsula, southwest Russia, according to RIA Novosti news agency. Made of bronze, Corinthian helmets covered the entire head and neck, with slits for the eyes and mouth, protruding cheek covers (paragnathides in Greek) as well as a curved protrusion in the back to protect the nape of the neck. The helmet has a padded interior made of fabric or leather to protect the warrior's skull. These helmets were indispensable for the Greek hoplites, the famous foot soldiers of the phalanxes, as they were highly protective because...
  • Urartian king's burial chamber opened for first time [ Argishti ]

    01/08/2011 7:43:24 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Today's Zaman ^ | Monday, January 3, 2011 | Anatolia News Agency
    Burial chambers of Urartian King Argishti and his family in the western wing of the ancient castle in the eastern province of Van was opened for the first time. The Anatolia news agency took photographs and video of the burial chambers which were closed to visitors. Centered around the Lake Van in the eastern Turkey, the Urartian Kingdom ruled from the mid 9th century BC till its defeat by Media in the early 6th century BC. The most splendid monuments of the Urartian Kingdom take place in Van since the city was the capital of the kingdom. Built on a...
  • Mystery 3,000-year-old castle spotted underwater

    11/22/2017 4:28:41 PM PST · by vannrox · 44 replies
    Daily star ^ | 22NOV17 | Christine Younan
    BOFFINS have discovered the ruins of a 3,000-year old castle underwater – and believe they have finally found what they’ve been looking for. Archaeologists who have been searching Lake Van – the second largest lake in Turkey – for decades have discovered what they believe is a lost city. The castle is thought to be an Iron Age relic of the Urartu civilisation – also called the Kingdom of Van – which lived in the area from the 6th to the 9th century BC. The remarkable discovery was made by archaeologists from the Van Yüzüncü Yıl University and a team...
  • A Mysterious 3,000-Year-Old Castle Has Been Found Under a Lake in Turkey

    11/22/2017 7:55:32 AM PST · by Red Badger · 56 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 21 NOV 2017 | MICHELLE STARR
    Sometimes legends are true. Sunken cities are typically the stuff of legend, but now archaeologists have found the real thing hiding deep within Lake Van in Turkey. After a decade of searching the Middle East's second largest lake, the home of a lost kingdom has been found hundreds of metres beneath the surface. Archaeologists from the Van Yüzüncü Yıl University announced the incredible discovery - a vast 3,000-year-old castle preserved deep within the lake in amazing condition. The researchers worked closely with an independent team of divers to find their prize. Lost underwater cities and castles are a popular motif...
  • Ancient Greek Port Revealed Near Corinth, Peloponnese

    11/06/2014 7:39:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | October 31, 2014 | Daphne Tsagari
    An ancient Greek port was revealed and recorded at the location of the Ancient Lechaion harbor, in the area of the modern Corinth Gulf, in the Peloponnese. The submerged ancient port covered a total area of 2,750 square meters. It ran 911 meters along the modern Corinth Gulf coastline and the entrance channel to the port lay on the harbor’s eastern part. The channel is 8.9 meters wide while a western and a middle mole were also found west of it. The port played a pivotal role in Corinthian history, as it was located about 3 km west of Ancient...
  • Secrets of the Roman Empire's ancient and 'luxurious' harbour of Corinth

    12/15/2017 7:55:41 AM PST · by mairdie · 14 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 15 December 2017 | Harry Pettit
    The secrets of the Roman Empire's ancient and 'luxurious' harbour of Corinth have been revealed in a series of new underwater excavations. Archaeologists have uncovered evidence of 'large-scale engineering' at the port of Lechaion, which was mostly destroyed in the 6th or early 7th century AD by a massive earthquake. Wooden foundations preserved so well they look new have been found at the site, as well as a host of Roman artefacts including fishing lines and hooks, wooden pulleys and ceramics imported from Tunisia and Turkey. These discoveries are helping researchers understand the infrastructure and layout of an ancient port...