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Keyword: cancerresearch

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  • An omega-3 that's poison for tumors

    06/12/2021 1:36:35 PM PDT · by ConservativeMind · 23 replies
    Science Daily / Université catholique de Louvain / Cell Metabolism ^ | June 11, 2021 | Emeline Dierge, Elena Debock, Céline Guilbaud, Cyril Corbet, Eric Mignolet, Louise Mignard, et al.
    3D tumors that disintegrate within a few days thanks to the action of a well-known omega-3 (DHA, found mainly in fish) -- this is a promising discovery. Hungry for fatty acids, tumor cells in acidosis gorge themselves on DHA but are unable to store it correctly and literally poison themselves. The result? They die. …the team quickly identified that these acidotic tumour cells responded in diametrically opposite ways depending on the fatty acid they were absorbing. Within a few weeks, the results were both impressive and surprising. "We soon found that certain fatty acids stimulated the tumour cells while others...
  • Modified RNA has a direct effect on DNA

    02/17/2021 1:02:43 PM PST · by RomanSoldier19 · 100 replies
    phys.org ^ | JANUARY 29, 2020 | by Eyrun Thune, University of Oslo
    An article titled "m6A RNA modification as a new player in R-loop regulation," by the Dynamic Gene Regulation research group led by Arne Klungland at IMB, was published in the January edition of Nature Genetics. Following a new collaboration between UiO and research groups in Nottingham and Oxford, it has now been revealed that RNA has a direct effect on DNA stability, according to Professor Klungland's research. He believes the discovery will provide the health service with an important tool, since many studies have shown that the regulation of modifications to RNA is important for the development of cancer. If...
  • California Turns Off a Lot More Than Just the Lights with Forced Blackouts

    10/14/2019 12:27:59 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 23 replies
    PJ Media ^ | October 14, 2019 | Stephen Green (Vodkapundit)
    Going solar isn’t necessarily any protection from California’s new “planned” power outages, and local residents and businesses are enduring a lot more than just a few inconveniences. Bloomberg’s Chris Martin has a story on California’s troubles with one of my favorite headlines ever: “Californians Learning That Solar Panels Don't Work in Blackouts.” Apparently, many of California’s would-be Earth-savers had no idea that just putting solar panels on their roofs doesn’t mean they’ll have power when PG&E switches it off. As Martin explains:
  • Cancer 'vaccine' eliminates tumors in mice

    02/05/2018 7:13:59 AM PST · by mac_truck · 75 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 1/31/18 | Stanford University Medical Center
    Injecting minute amounts of two immune-stimulating agents directly into solid tumors in mice can eliminate all traces of cancer in the animals, including distant, untreated metastases, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. The approach works for many different types of cancers, including those that arise spontaneously, the study found. The researchers believe the local application of very small amounts of the agents could serve as a rapid and relatively inexpensive cancer therapy that is unlikely to cause the adverse side effects often seen with bodywide immune stimulation. "When we use these two agents...
  • Biologists' new peptide could fight many cancers

    01/16/2018 2:30:48 PM PST · by Red Badger · 8 replies
    phys.org ^ | January 16, 2018 | by Anne Trafton, & Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    MIT biologists have designed a new peptide that can disrupt a key protein that many types of cancers, including some forms of lymphoma, leukemia, and breast cancer, need to survive. The new peptide targets a protein called Mcl-1, which helps cancer cells avoid the cellular suicide that is usually induced by DNA damage. By blocking Mcl-1, the peptide can force cancer cells to undergo programmed cell death. "Some cancer cells are very dependent on Mcl-1, which is the last line of defense keeping the cell from dying. It's a very attractive target," says Amy Keating, an MIT professor of biology...
  • Single-Payer a Danger for Cancer Patients

    01/10/2018 7:31:09 AM PST · by Kaslin · 26 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | January 10, 2018 | Betsy McCaughey
    Today, breast cancer kills 39 percent fewer women than 25 years ago. Prostate cancer kills 52 percent fewer men, the American Cancer Society announced last week. You can thank new technologies that detect cancer early and defeat it for many of the lives saved. Americans diagnosed with most types of cancer have better odds of surviving it in the U.S. than anywhere else on the planet. But watch out. These staggering achievements are at risk. A chorus of Democratic politicians is kicking off 2018 with renewed calls for universal, government-run health care. Leading the pack for single-payer are presidential contenders...
  • Cancer targeted with reusable 'stinging nettle' treatment

    01/09/2018 12:14:48 PM PST · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    phys.org ^ | January 9, 2018 | University of Warwick
    Representation of the organic-osmium compound, which is triggered using a non-toxic dose of sodium formate, a natural product found in many organisms, including nettles and ants. Credit: Dr James Coverdale/University of Warwick ================================================================================================================== Cancer cells can be destroyed more effectively and selectively with a unique new reusable treatment, activated with a substance found in stinging nettles and ants—thanks to new research by the University of Warwick. Led by Professor Peter J. Sadler from Warwick's Department of Chemistry, researchers have developed a new line of attack against cancer: an organic-osmium compound, which is triggered using a non-toxic dose of sodium formate,...
  • Cancer Doctor Found Dead Following ‘Breakthrough’ Discovery

    11/29/2017 8:36:33 AM PST · by Main Street · 99 replies
    usatoday24x7 ^ | November 28, 2017 | Sean Adl-Tabatabai
    A New York Doctor was found murdered shortly after reporting a “breakthrough” discovery in the cure for cancer. Dr. Miguel Crespo’s body was found in the bathroom of the Weill Cornell Medical Center on the Upper East Side where he worked, after having gone missing for several hours. Police initially thought that Dr. Crespo had committed suicide by drug overdose after they found vomit next to his body and “foaming at his mouth.” However, close friends and family say his death is suspicious, noting that Dr. Crespo had just made an exciting discovery in the field of cancer research and...
  • Cancer resources

    05/06/2017 11:29:57 AM PDT · by Dacula · 117 replies
    Self
    My wife has stage 4 metastatic cancer. She has battled this before and survived twice. This time the cancer has reached her brain and the doctors are a bit more apprehensive than before. Does anyone know about grants? All of her doctors are telling us to apply for grants to pay for her medicine. Any advice would be appreciated. I may not be able to respond right away, but I will do my best. Lots of planning and preparation on my part.
  • Jihad in America: Al-Timimi Verdict a Turning Point in Legal War on Terror

    05/03/2005 12:42:00 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 15 replies · 705+ views
    Pittsburgh Tribune-Review ^ | Sunday, May 1, 2005 | Debra Erdley
    The conviction last week of Ali al-Timimi, an American-born Islamic scholar, on terrorism charges thrust the so-called "Virginia Paintball Jihad" case to the forefront as the federal government's greatest court victory against terrorism. All told, federal prosecutors counted 10 convictions in the case. Al-Timimi's conviction marked the first post-Sept. 11 case in which the government won a terrorism conviction for actions tied to philosophy and words designed to help the enemy, rather than deeds, such as providing money, equipment or actual combat help to that enemy. "Until now these people have escaped. It is a very powerful position to be...
  • Mother fights brain cancer with electric fields (Video)

    06/03/2015 6:04:10 PM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 13 replies
    Reuters ^ | 6-2-2015
    Transcript: Against all odds, Elizabeth Marek is alive, she has a device that attacks brain cancer cells with electric fields to thank. Elizabeth has glioblastoma, a deadly and aggressive form of brain cancer with no cure and a life expectancy of just over two years. 26 weeks pregnant with her second child, 3 years after a small tumor was found in her brain, Elizabeth began suffering from extreme headaches. She thought it was migraines, but it wasn't. SOUNDBITE (English) ELIZABETH MAREK, BRAIN CANCER PATIENT, SAYING: "It ended up being a tumor that was the size of my fist on the...
  • Israeli team finds two proteins that can suppress cancer

    04/14/2015 4:50:09 AM PDT · by SJackson · 15 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | April 13, 2015
    In breakthrough, researchers in Technion lab of Nobel laureate Aaron Ciechanover discover proteins that affect cancerous cells’ growth and development team of Israeli researchers at the Technion has discovered two proteins that can suppress cancer and control the cells’ growth and development. The study was conducted in the laboratory of Prof. Aaron Ciechanover, an Israeli Nobel-prize winner in chemistry, and led by Dr. Yelena Kravtsova-Ivantsiv. The team included research students and physicians from the Rambam, Carmel and Hadassah Medical Centers. In a paper published in the journal Cell last week, the researchers showed how the proteins could repress cancerous tissues...
  • Antibiotics that target mitochondria effectively eradicate cancer stem cells...

    02/08/2015 4:37:54 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    Impact Journals ^ | January 22, 2015 | Various
    Abstract Here, we propose a new strategy for the treatment of early cancerous lesions and advanced metastatic disease, via the selective targeting of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a.k.a., tumor-initiating cells (TICs). We searched for a global phenotypic characteristic that was highly conserved among cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types, to provide a mutation-independent approach to cancer therapy. This would allow us to target cancer stem cells, effectively treating cancer as a single disease of “stemness”, independently of the tumor tissue type. Using this approach, we identified a conserved phenotypic weak point – a strict dependence on mitochondrial biogenesis for...
  • Tomorrow's Cancer-Blasting Wonder Drug Could Come From a Tobacco Plant

    04/06/2014 4:48:21 AM PDT · by navysealdad · 10 replies
    Australian researchers published findings this week on a newly-discovered plant compound that destroys cancer cells, but leaves healthy cells unharmed. They found it in possibly the last place you'd look for a cancer cure: the family of plants that brings us cancer's number-one culprit, tobacco.
  • Teen Googles his way to new cancer testing method

    08/25/2012 6:17:52 PM PDT · by JerseyanExile · 21 replies
    CBC News ^ | August 24, 2012 | Lauren O'Neil
    Fifteen-year-old Jack Andraka took home top science fair honours this year for the development of a cancer-testing method found to be 168 times faster, 26,000 times cheaper and 400 times more sensitive than the current gold-medal standard. His work was impressive enough to earn the Maryland high school student a total of $100,500 in grants and prizes at the 2012 Intel Science Fair. Even more impressive is the source he credits for much of his success: Google. "I definitely could not have done this research and project without the use of the internet", Andraka told BBC News in an interview...
  • In cancer science, many 'discoveries' don't hold up

    04/01/2012 11:11:56 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 31 replies
    Reuters ^ | Wed, Mar 28, 2012 2:09pm EDT | Sharon Begley
    A former researcher at Amgen Inc has found that many basic studies on cancer—a high proportion of them from university labs—are unreliable, with grim consequences for producing new medicines in the future. During a decade as head of global cancer research at Amgen, C. Glenn Begley identified 53 "landmark" publications—papers in top journals, from reputable labs—for his team to reproduce. Begley sought to double-check the findings before trying to build on them for drug development. Result: 47 of the 53 could not be replicated. He described his findings in a commentary piece published on Wednesday in the journal Nature. "It...
  • New leukemia treament exceeds 'wildest expectations'

    08/10/2011 1:39:34 PM PDT · by Nachum · 68 replies
    NBC News ^ | 8/10/11 | Robert Bazell
    Doctors have treated only three leukemia patients, but the sensational results from a single shot could be one of the most significant advances in cancer research in decades. And it almost never happened. In the research published Wednesday, doctors at the University of Pennsylvania say the treatment made the most common type of leukemia completely disappear in two of the patients and reduced it by 70 percent in the third. In each of the patients as much as five pounds of cancerous tissue completely melted away in a few weeks, and a year later it is still gone
  • Drug 'attacks cancer stem cells' (... targets ...cells which help breast cancers grow and spread )

    08/14/2009 9:43:41 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 8 replies · 514+ views
    BBC ^ | Friday, 14 August 2009 12:23 UK 11:23 GMT, | BBC Staff
    A compound that appears to target the master cells which help breast cancers grow and spread has been discovered by US scientists.Some 16,000 chemicals were tested by researchers In tests in mice, salinomycin killed breast cancer stem cells far more effectively than some existing drugs, and slowed tumour growth. The drug, a farm antibiotic, has yet to be tested in humans, the journal Cell reports. But UK experts warned a human version could be some years away. This is one of the biggest advances we have seen this year in this area of research Dr John Stingl Cancer Research UK...
  • Cancer protection secret revealed ( how cells switch a gene called p53,)

    01/31/2009 8:05:05 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 20 replies · 966+ views
    BBC ^ | 00:01 GMT, Sunday, 1 February 2009 | BBC Staff
    Scientists say they have discovered a missing link in the way cells protect themselves against cancer.Zebrafish share the p53 gene with humans They have uncovered how cells switch a gene called p53, which can block the development of tumours, on and off. The researchers say the finding has important implications for cancer treatment and diagnosis. The study, published in Genes And Development, was carried out by teams of scientists in Singapore and the University of Dundee. Discovering how it is regulated will have incredibly important implications in the development of better drugs and ways to diagnose cancer Lesley WalkerCancer Research...
  • Celebs Help Cancer Research at Angel Ball (DFU's adventure with Denise Rich)

    10/31/2007 9:32:50 PM PDT · by doug from upland · 1 replies · 92+ views
    NOTE: it can now be revealed. My trip to the Northeast, in which we screened HILLARY! UNCENSORED, began as a trip to attend the Denise Rich Angel Ball. It is a long story, but I'll have to give the short version. A friend invited me to join her party at the Ball. She had arranged a major donation of artwork for the charity auction and was supposed to have a table for 10. Unfortunately, it didn't quite work out that way, and they only allowed two to attend the Ball. The rest of us were allowed to go to the...