Keyword: anabaptists

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  • Vanity: CHAZ is not the first attempt at a Utopian City: Munster 1634: Dan Carlin Hardcore History

    06/13/2020 5:01:38 AM PDT · by C19fan · 14 replies
    Dan Carlin Hardcore History ^ | June 13, 2020 | Me
    Murderous millennial preachers and prophets take over the German city of Munster after Martin Luther unleashes a Pandora’s Box of religious anarchy with the Protestant Reformation.
  • Messianic Communism in the Protestant Reformation

    02/26/2010 8:11:15 AM PST · by Rodebrecht · 4 replies · 193+ views
    Mises Daily ^ | 12-02-2009 | Murray N. Rothbard
    [This article is excerpted from An Austrian Perspective on the History of Economic Thought, vol. 1, Economic Thought Before Adam Smith.] Communist Zealots: the Anabaptists Sometimes Martin Luther must have felt that he had loosed the whirlwind, even opened the gates of Hell. Shortly after Luther launched the Reformation, various Anabaptist sects appeared and spread throughout Germany. The Anabaptists believed in predestination of the elect, but they also believed, in contrast to Luther, that they knew infallibly who the elect were: i.e., themselves. The sign of that election was in an emotional, mystical conversion process, that of being "born again,"...
  • Messianic Communism in the Protestant Reformation (Communist Zealots: the Anabaptists)

    12/03/2009 5:40:10 AM PST · by markomalley · 11 replies · 547+ views
    Ludwig von Mises Institute ^ | 12/2/2009 | Murray N. Rothbard
    Communist Zealots: the Anabaptists Sometimes Martin Luther must have felt that he had loosed the whirlwind, even opened the gates of Hell. Shortly after Luther launched the Reformation, various Anabaptist sects appeared and spread throughout Germany. The Anabaptists believed in predestination of the elect, but they also believed, in contrast to Luther, that they knew infallibly who the elect were: i.e., themselves. The sign of that election was in an emotional, mystical conversion process, that of being "born again," baptized in the Holy Spirit. Such baptism must be adult and not among infants; more to the point, it meant that...
  • Historic Anabaptist writings to be available online

    11/26/2008 7:56:18 AM PST · by Alex Murphy · 7 replies · 559+ views
    Associated Baptist Press ^ | 25 November 2008 | Bob Allen
    PRAGUE, Czech Republic (ABP) -- Writings of Balthasar Hubmaier, one of the most well known and respected Anabaptist theologians of the Reformation, will soon be available for online research, thanks to a project of European Baptist scholars. The Institute of Baptist and Anabaptist Studies at International Baptist Theological Seminary in Prague, Czech Republic, and the German Baptist Seminary in Berlin recently announced that photographic reproductions of all of Hubmaier's surviving works would be scanned into digital images and made available on the Internet. IBTS Rector Keith Jones called it a long-term project likely to take six months to a year...
  • Erasmus

    04/05/2003 3:18:00 PM PST · by Commander8 · 15 replies · 419+ views
    QUESTION: Wasn't Erasmus, whose work led to the Textus Receptus and ultimately the King James Bible, really a Roman Catholic? Doesn't this mean that the King James Bible is just another Roman Catholic Bible? ANSWER: Erasmus was raised a Catholic and did not openly "leave" the Roman Catholic Religion, but he did not believe in Roman Catholic doctrine either. In fact, his best friends and defenders were the Christians, like the Anabaptists and Martin Luther. Here is proof from researcher Gail Riplinger.
  • QUESTION #57

    02/18/2003 5:35:49 PM PST · by Commander8 · 192+ views
    The Answer Book ^ | 1989 | Dr. Samuel C Gipp
    QUESTION: Was Erasmus, the editor of the Textus Receptus, a "good" Roman Catholic? ANSWER: Erasmus, who edited the Greek text which was later to be known as the Textus Receptus, was an embarassment to the pope and a poor example of a "good" Roman Catholic.