Keyword: nagpra

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  • Bottom Line: Trump Did What McCain Could Not

    08/28/2018 7:12:41 AM PDT · by Abakumov · 87 replies
    Eagle Action Report ^ | 8/27/2018 | Felicia Tweedy
    It wasn't until recent years that I found myself in opposition to John McCain. The once "maverick" and "hawk" was anything but. He became a bought and paid for politician that had many in his own Party, turning on him. If it wasn't enough to learn about the numerous donations from George Soros linked businesses to his campaigns, with the rise of Donald Trump, we saw a very bitter and embattled man, who lashed out in policy decisions from what appeared to be his own personal issues. Trump did what McCain could not. Trump went on the attack - even...
  • John McCain in New Book: I’m (Going to Die,) Freer Now to Speak My Mind

    04/30/2018 12:12:00 PM PDT · by conservative98 · 95 replies
    DB ^ | 04.30.18 | GIDEON RESNICK
    In a new book, Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) writes that his battle with brain cancer has given him a sense of liberation to vote and speak his mind. “This is my last term,” McCain writes in his upcoming book The Restless Wave, which he co-authored with former adviser Mark Salter. An excerpt of the book was posted Monday on Apple News. “If I hadn’t admitted that to myself before this summer, a stage 4 cancer diagnosis acts as ungentle persuasion,” McCain continues. “I’m freer than colleagues who will face the voters again. I can speak my mind without fearing the...
  • Kenosha Dig Points to Europe as Origin of First Americans

    03/04/2002 12:05:29 PM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 92 replies · 5,281+ views
    Milwaukee Journal Sentinel ^ | 3-4-02 | John Fauber
    A contentious theory that the first Americans came here from Europe - not Asia - is challenging a century-old consensus among archaeologists, and a dig in Kenosha County is part of the evidence. The two leading proponents of the Europe theory admit that many scientists reject their contention, instead holding fast to the long-established belief that the first Americans arrived from Siberia via a now-submerged land bridge across the Bering Sea to Alaska. The first of the Europe-to-North America treks probably took place at the height of the last Ice Age more than 18,000 years ago, said Dennis Stanford, ...
  • D.N.A. Backs Lore on Pre-Columbian Dogs

    07/15/2013 8:45:18 PM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 10 replies
    New York Times ^ | July 15, 2013 | By Jack Hitt
    BISHOPVILLE, S.C. — Inside a fenced acre on the swampy Lynches River flood plain in central South Carolina, seven of Don Anderson’s primitive dogs spring into high alert at approaching strangers. Medium-sized, they fan out amid his junkyard of improvised habitat: a few large barrels to dig under, an abandoned camper shell from a pickup, segments of black plastic water pipe and backhoed dirt mounds overgrown with waist-high ragweed. These are Carolina dogs, and though they are friendly, one can instantly sense they are different from other dogs. Several rush to the gate, their whole bodies wagging eagerly. Others sprint...
  • Native Native American dogs

    07/11/2013 8:26:22 PM PDT · by Theoria · 16 replies
    Dienekes Anthropology Blog ^ | 11 July 2013 | Dienekes Anthropology Blog
    Pre-Columbian origins of Native American dog breeds, with only limited replacement by European dogs, confirmed by mtDNA analysis Barbara van Asch et al. Dogs were present in pre-Columbian America, presumably brought by early human migrants from Asia. Studies of free-ranging village/street dogs have indicated almost total replacement of these original dogs by European dogs, but the extent to which Arctic, North and South American breeds are descendants of the original population remains to be assessed. Using a comprehensive phylogeographic analysis, we traced the origin of the mitochondrial DNA lineages for Inuit, Eskimo and Greenland dogs, Alaskan Malamute, Chihuahua, xoloitzcuintli and...
  • Old dog, new tricks: Study IDs 9,400-year-old mutt

    01/19/2011 5:59:52 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 58 replies
    palmbeachpost ^ | Jan. 19, 2011 | CLARKE CANFIELD
    PORTLAND, Maine — Nearly 10,000 years ago, man's best friend provided protection and companionship — and an occasional meal. That's what researchers are saying after finding a bone fragment from what they are calling the earliest confirmed domesticated dog in the Americas. University of Maine graduate student Samuel Belknap III came across the fragment while analyzing a dried-out sample of human waste unearthed in southwest Texas in the 1970s. A carbon-dating test put the age of the bone at 9,400 years, and a DNA analysis confirmed it came from a dog — not a wolf, coyote or fox, Belknap said....
  • Did Carolina Dogs Arrive With Ancient Americans?

    03/28/2006 11:00:20 AM PST · by RegulatorCountry · 48 replies · 793+ views
    National Geographic ^ | March 11, 2003 | Brian Handwerk
    Humans and dogs enjoy a prehistoric relationship, a longstanding bond with its origins in a time when dogs as we know them evolved from wild animals into our domesticated companions. Now, a canine living in a manner similar to that of dogs from those ancient days may have been discovered in isolated stretches of longleaf pines and cypress swamps in the American Southeast. The Carolina Dog, a familiar-looking animal long known in the rural South as the "yaller dog," may be more than the common mutt that immediately meets the eye. I. Lehr Brisbin, Jr., Senior Ecologist at the University...
  • CANINE EVOLUTION: A Shaggy Dog History

    11/21/2002 6:36:35 PM PST · by Lessismore · 4 replies · 1,013+ views
    Science Magazine | 2002-11-21 | Elizabeth Pennisi
    Biologists chase down pooches' genetic and social past A Shaggy Dog History Two-kilogram teacup poodles; 90-kg mastiffs; slender greyhounds; squat English bulldogs: For a single species, canines come in a vast array of shapes and sizes. Even more remarkably, they all come from the same stock. Many millennia ago, humans took in a few primitive wolves and made them man's best friend. Or so the story goes. For centuries, researchers have doggedly pursued the evolutionary and social history of canines, with mixed success. Only subtle differences distinguish dogs from coyotes, jackals, and other canids, making family trees difficult to construct...
  • The Dixie Dingo

    11/30/2001 1:40:40 PM PST · by blam · 125 replies · 15,672+ views
    Carolinadog.org ^ | U of Carolina
    "The Dixie Dingo" "The Native American Dog" "The American Dingo" " Southern Aboriginal Dog" "The Indian's Dog" Still living Wild in the bottom land swamps and forests of the Southeastern United States. Genetic (mitochondrial DNA) testing being performed at the University of South Carolina, College of Science and Mathematics, indicates that these dogs, related to the earliest domesticated dogs, are the remnant descendants of the feral pariah canids who came across the Bering land mass 8,000 to 11,000 years ago as hunting companions to the ancestors of the Native Americans. However, their future in the wild looks bleak. Loss ...
  • Oldest DNA ever found sheds light on humans' global trek

    10/22/2014 2:15:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 52 replies
    www.centnews.com ^ | 2014-10-22 18:00:08 | Richard INGHAM
    France - Scientists said Wednesday they had unravelled the oldest DNA ever retrieved from a Homo sapiens bone, a feat that sheds light on modern humans' colonisation of the planet. A femur found by chance on the banks of a west Siberian river in 2008 is that of a man who died around 45,000 years ago, they said. Teased out of collagen in the ancient bone, the genome contains traces from Neanderthals -- a cousin species who lived in Eurasia alongside H. sapiens before mysteriously disappearing. Previous research has found that Neanderthals and H. sapiens interbred, leaving a tiny Neanderthal...
  • 24,000-Year-Old Body Is Kin to Both Europeans and American Indians

    11/20/2013 2:33:43 PM PST · by mandaladon · 51 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 20 Nov 2013 | NICHOLAS WADE
    The genome of a young boy buried at Mal’ta near Lake Baikal in eastern Siberia some 24,000 years ago has turned out to hold two surprises for anthropologists. The first is that the boy’s DNA matches that of Western Europeans, showing that during the last Ice Age people from Europe had reached farther east across Eurasia than previously supposed. Though none of the Mal’ta boy’s skin or hair survive, his genes suggest he would have had brown hair, brown eyes and freckled skin. The second surprise is that his DNA also matches a large proportion — some 25 percent —...
  • Native Americans and Northern Europeans Paleolithic Cousins

    12/17/2012 3:35:35 AM PST · by Renfield · 15 replies
    Frontiers of Anthropology ^ | 12-16-2012 | Dale Drinnon
    The strong linkage between these populations has always been empirically apparent. This finally settles what has been obvious and clearly establishes the time line. Thus later incursions merely topped up an already European palette. What has been more troubling has been the avoidance of this topic from the academics. Now DNA research is systematically reducing sophism for what it truly is. Ignoring and even denying obvious evidence should be made into a capital crime in academe. It all starts with denigrating the technical abilities of our ancients by denying them the natural wits we are all born with. We...
  • Affinities Of The Paleoindians

    06/13/2006 2:20:25 PM PDT · by blam · 9 replies · 599+ views
    Antiquity Of Man ^ | Mikey Brass
    Affinities of the Paleoindians by Mikey Brass I would like to make it clear from the start that my knowledge of the early occupation of the Americas is very limited. It is a peripheral interest of mine. I don't feel competent enough to make many pronouncements on the late Pleistocene timing of the migration(s) from north-east Asia into the Americas. Instead I focus primarily here on showing, contrary to reports eminating from both pseudoscientific and unfortunately some portions of mainstream archaeology, that the origins of the Paleoindians lay in mainland Asia. Christy Turner has identified what he terms the "Mongoloid...
  • First Americans

    05/23/2006 4:30:48 PM PDT · by blam · 35 replies · 1,057+ views
    Abotech ^ | 4-26-1999 | Sharon Begley - Andrew Murr
    The First Americans By Sharon Begley and Andrew Murr Newsweek, April 26, 1999 New digs and old bones reveal an ancient land that was a mosaic of peoples—including Asians and Europeans. Now a debate rages: who got here first? 'Skull wars:' Facial reconstruction of the 'Spirit Cave Man,' based on bones found in Spirit Cave, Churchill County, Nevada (David Barry--Courtesy Nevada State Museum; facial reconstruction by Sharon Long) As he sat down to his last meal amid the cattails and sedges on the shore of the ancient lake, the frail man grimaced in agony. A fracture at his left temple...
  • Alleged 40,000-Year-Old Human Footprints In Mexico Much, Much Older Than Thought

    11/30/2005 11:24:19 AM PST · by blam · 79 replies · 3,674+ views
    Eureka Alert/UC-Berkeley ^ | 11-30-2005 | Robert Sanders
    Contact: Robert Sanders rsanders@berkeley.edu 510-643-6998 University of California - Berkeley Alleged 40,000-year-old human footprints in Mexico much, much older than thought Berkeley -- Alleged footprints of early Americans found in volcanic rock in Mexico are either extremely old - more than 1 million years older than other evidence of human presence in the Western Hemisphere - or not footprints at all, according to a new analysis published this week in Nature. The study was conducted by geologists at the Berkeley Geochronology Center and the University of California, Berkeley, as part of an investigative team of geologists and anthropologists from the...
  • 40,000-year-old footprint of first Americans

    07/05/2005 3:38:09 AM PDT · by Renfield · 41 replies · 1,512+ views
    The Telegraph (U.K.) ^ | 5-07-2005 | Roger Highfield
    A plastic replica of a 40,000-year-old, size eight foot has shattered previous theories of the identity of the first humans to walk in the Americas. Scientists made the foot from tracks left on the shore of an ancient volcanic lake in central Mexico. The traditional view is that the first settlers walked across the Bering Strait, from Russia to Alaska, at the end of the last ice age around 11,500 to 11,000 years ago. But the discovery of footprints in the Valsequillo Basin by a British-led team provides new evidence that humans settled in the Americas as early as 40,000...
  • Footsteps in time that add 30,000 years to history of America

    07/04/2005 9:59:36 PM PDT · by freedom44 · 58 replies · 1,589+ views
    Times Online UK ^ | 7/4/05 | Lewis Smith
    THE discovery of human footprints, preserved by volcanic ash, have put back the likely date that the American continent was colonised by Man by almost 30,000 years, British scientists say. The prints, found by the scientists at the edge of a lake in Mexico, are thought to be about 40,000 years old. Their discovery upsets the widely accepted theory that Man first reached America across a land bridge, now covered by the Bering Sea, 11,500 years ago. Casts of the footprints reveal that a community of Homo sapiens lived in the Valsequillo Basin, near Puebla in central Mexico. Their feet...
  • JOURNEY OF MANKIND (The Peopling Of The World)

    04/25/2005 5:11:40 PM PDT · by blam · 41 replies · 1,838+ views
    The Bradshaw Foundation ^ | Unknown | Stephen Oppenheimer
    This is the result of a DNA study done by Professor Stephen Oppenheimer and funded by The Bradshaw Foundation. As you go on the journey, here are some things I would like you to make note of and I would appreciate your comments:1. 135-115,000 years ago, notice that the first human excursion out of Africa failed/Died out.2. 74,000 years ago Toba exploded and reduced the worldwide human population to 2-10,000. Note the (about) 10,000 year absence of humans in India, Pakistan and parts of SE Asia. Also, there are two populations of 'out of Africa' humans that are seperated from...
  • (South Carolina) Fire Pit Dated To Over 50,000 Years Old (More)

    11/19/2004 8:07:26 AM PST · by blam · 63 replies · 3,788+ views
    AP ^ | 11-18-2004 | Amy Geier Edgar
    Fire Pit Dated to Be Over 50,000 Years Old Thu Nov 18,10:10 AM ET Top Stories - AP By AMY GEIER EDGAR, Associated Press Writer COLUMBIA, S.C. - In the growing debate about when people first appeared on this continent, a leading archaeologist said Wednesday he has discovered what could be sooty evidence of human occupation in North America tens of thousands of years earlier than is commonly believed.University of South Carolina archaeologist Al Goodyear said he has uncovered a layer of charcoal from a possible hearth or fire pit at a site near the Savannah River. Samples from the...
  • Archeologist finds evidence of humans in North America 50,000 years ago

    11/17/2004 10:04:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies · 3,117+ views
    Canoe (Canada) ^ | November 17, 2004 | AP
    University of South Carolina archeologist Al Goodyear said he has uncovered a layer of charcoal from a possible hearth or fire pit at a site near the Savannah River. Samples from the layer have been laboratory-dated to more than 50,000 years old. Yet Goodyear stopped short of declaring it proof of the continent's earliest human occupation. "It does look like a hearth," he said, "and the material that was dated has been burned." ...Goodyear, who has worked the Topper site since 1981, discovered the charcoal layer in May.