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Keyword: iliad

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  • Archaeologists Excavate Lower City of Mycenae

    06/06/2014 5:53:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 2, 2014 | unattributed
    Mycenae -- the ancient city of the legendary King Agamemnon, best known from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and its iconic Lion Gate and cyclopean defensive walls, has long fascinated scholars and site visitors alike with the epic proportions of its imposing citadel remains... But there is another Mycenae -- one known for centuries from ancient historical documents -- which has nevertheless eluded the eyes of archaeologists, historians, and tourists. One might call it "Greater Mycenae", the Lower Town. It is invisible because most of it still lies undetected, unexcavated, below the surface. In its heyday it was a second millenium...
  • Why Should Christians Read the Pagan Classics? Reason 9: THE HUMAN CONDITION

    05/20/2020 2:45:45 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 5 replies
    Memoria Press ^ | Summer 2014 | Cheryl Lowe
    Reason #9: HUMAN CONDITION When it comes to the human condition, we may think that Scripture is all we need. After all, Scripture does show us our true human condition in a way that the Greeks did not and could not: our relationship to God, that we are sinners, that we are a fallen race in need of redemption, that sin separates us from God, that God loves us and offers us grace and salvation. This is the good news that has been revealed by God in Scripture and in the person of Jesus Christ and nowhere else. Indeed, the...
  • Ancient coffin with scenes from Homer's poems unearthed in Cyprus

    03/20/2006 10:31:31 AM PST · by Daralundy · 31 replies · 1,277+ views
    NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) - A 2,500-year-old stone coffin with well-preserved colour illustrations from Homer's epics has been discovered in western Cyprus, archeologists said Monday. "It is a very important find," said Pavlos Flourentzos, director of the island's antiquities department. "The style of the decoration is unique, not so much from an artistic point of view, but for the subject and the colours used." Only two other similar sarcophagi have ever been discovered in Cyprus. Both are housed in New York's Metropolitan Museum, but their colour decoration is more faded. The limestone sarcophagus was accidentally found by construction workers last week...
  • Homer Odyssey: Oldest extract discovered on clay tablet

    07/11/2018 3:09:09 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    BBC ^ | July 10, 2018 | unattributed
    Found near the ruined Temple of Zeus in the ancient city of Olympia, the tablet has been dated to Roman times. It is engraved with 13 verses from the poem recounting the adventures of the hero Odysseus after the fall of Troy. The tale was probably composed by Homer in the late 8th Century BC. It would have been handed down in an oral tradition for hundreds of years before the tablet was inscribed. The exact date of the tablet still needed to be confirmed, but its discovery was "a great archaeological, epigraphic, literary and historical exhibit", the Greek culture...
  • 'Homer can help you': War veterans use ancient epics to cope

    03/14/2018 7:26:17 AM PDT · by thecodont · 13 replies
    Associated Press via Stars and Stripes ^ | Published: March 14, 2018 | By WILSON RING
    BURLINGTON, Vt. — The trials of Odysseus are really not that different from the struggles of those learning to readjust after wars of today, modern veterans are finding. A small group of military veterans has been meeting weekly in a classroom at the University of Vermont to discuss "The Iliad" and "The Odyssey" for college credit — and to give meaning to their own experiences, equating the close-order discipline of men who fought with spears, swords and shields to that of men and women who do battle these days with laser-guided munitions. Homer isn't just for student veterans. Discussion groups...
  • The First English Translation of ‘The Odyssey’ by a Woman Was Worth the Wait

    11/17/2017 7:49:01 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 36 replies
    Washington Post ^ | November 16 | Madeline Miller
    Attempting a new translation of “The Odyssey” is like directing “Hamlet.” Much of your audience knows the work well, and they take their seats with entrenched expectations and the intonations of favorite performances reverberating in their heads. At the same time, though, you will have audience members who have never seen the play, for whom you provide the introduction to a giant of Western literature. And let us not forget those who are there under duress, dreading the upcoming hours of boredom. You must find a way to speak to all these disparate groups, sneaking past the defenses of the...
  • Palace Of Homer's Hero Rises Out Of Myths

    03/28/2006 10:59:23 AM PST · by blam · 44 replies · 1,291+ views
    The Times (UK) ^ | 3-28-2006 | John Carr
    Palace of Homer's hero rises out of the myths From John Carr in Athens ARCHAEOLOGISTS claim to have unearthed the remains of the 3,500-year-old palace of Ajax, the warrior-king who according to Homer’s Iliad was one of the most revered fighters in the Trojan War. Classicists hailed the discovery, made on a small Greek island, as evidence that the myths recounted by Homer in his epic poem were based on historical fact. The ruins include a large palace, measuring about 750sq m (8,000sq ft), and believed to have been at least four storeys high with more than thirty rooms. Yannos...
  • Splendid Strength (Review: The Iliad, Translated by Peter Green)

    06/07/2015 5:40:28 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 39 replies
    The Washingon Free Beacon ^ | June 7, 2015 | Kate Harvard
    When it comes to picking a translation of the Iliad or the Odyssey, readers of Homer sometimes feel as if they are being forced to choose between the beautiful and the good. The most popular translations of Homer are either praised for their poetry or for their accuracy, but not for both. Robert Fitzgerald and Robert Fagles’ translations are known for their lovely verses, but also for taking liberties with the text. Meanwhile, Richard Lattimore’s translation is known for being line-by-line accurate to the Greek, but also for being convoluted and difficult to read. However, his fidelity to the text...
  • Philistines at the Gate

    06/02/2005 8:09:10 AM PDT · by EarthStomper · 33 replies · 736+ views
    TechCentralStation.com ^ | 06-02-05 | Lee Harris
    In a recent meeting of the Board of Education in the city of Artichoke, Alabama, it was decided to ban the reading of Homer's Illiad and Odyssey in the classroom. The grounds given for the exclusion of these towering masterpieces of ancient literature is that reading them in a public school violated the first amendment's guarantee of the separation of church and state. Wallace Nobrainer, the attorney for the Artichoke school system, explained that "the Homeric texts are obviously designed to promote the polytheistic view of the Greeks," and hence they should be looked upon in the same light as...
  • Author Says a Whole Culture -- Not a Single 'Homer' -- Wrote 'Iliad,' 'Odyssey'

    01/05/2015 1:09:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 65 replies
    National Geographic ^ | January 4, 2015 | Simon Worrall
    In Why Homer Matters, historian and award-winning author Adam Nicolson suggests that Homer be thought of not as a person but as a tradition and that the works attributed to him go back a thousand years earlier than generally believed. Speaking from his home in England, Nicolson describes how being caught in a storm at sea inspired his passion for Homer, how the oral bards of the Scottish Hebrides may hold the key to understanding Homer's works, and why smartphones are connecting us to ancient oral traditions in new and surprising ways... About ten years ago, I set off sailing...
  • Helen Of Troy Existed?

    10/18/2005 11:08:43 AM PDT · by blam · 111 replies · 2,602+ views
    The Discovery Channel ^ | 10-18-2005 | Jennifer Viegas
    Helen of Troy Existed? By Jennifer Viegas, Discovery NewsWas a Queen of Sparta Helen of Troy? Oct. 17, 2005— Helen of Troy, described in the epic poem The Iliad, was based on a real woman, according to a new book that weaves history, archaeology and myth to recreate the famous ancient Greek beauty's life. According to the new theory proposed by Bettany Hughes, Helen's mythological character was inspired by a wealthy Bronze Age leader from the southern mainland of Greece. Hughes, a former Oxford University scholar who has conducted research in the Balkans, Greece, and Asia Minor, was unavailable for...
  • Amazon Warrior Women

    08/04/2004 8:51:53 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 5,400+ views
    PBS ^ | Current | PBS
    Amazon Warrior WomenThis painting on a Greek vase depicts an Amazon woman warrior on horseback engaged in battle.Amazons in myth: History's first mention of a race of warrior women comes in Homer's ILIAD, an account of the Trojan War, probably written in the 8th to the 7th century B.C. Homer's Amazons, a race of fierce women who mated with vanquished male foes and kept only the female children they bore, were believed to occupy the area around the Black Sea. Amazon women also crop up in other Greek myths. One of the labors of Hercules, for example, required him to...
  • The War that Killed Achilles by Caroline Alexander [reviews]

    12/23/2010 8:35:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 1+ views
    The Guardian, New York Times ^ | October 13, 2009 -- December 18, 2010 | Tom Holland, Vera Rule, Steve Coates, Dwight Garner
    ...In the earliest days of their history, so the Greeks recorded, a city in Asia by the name of Troy had been besieged by their ancestors for 10 long years, captured, and burnt to the ground. Why? Responsibility for the conflict was pinned on Paris, a Trojan prince whose abduction of Helen, the fabulously beautiful daughter of the king of the gods, had set in train a truly calamitous sequence of events. Not only Troy had ended up obliterated, but so, too, had the age of heroes. War had consumed the world. No wonder, then, that the Greeks should have...
  • Project Troia -- Bronze Age Troy Just Keeps on Growing

    10/08/2010 6:04:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Heritage Key ^ | Monday, October 4, 2010 | Ann Wuyts
    German archaeologists have made new discoveries at modern day Hisarlik, northwest Turkey -- ancient Troy. The finds further confirm the area occupied during the Bronze Age was not limited to the citadel; Troy VI and VII were much larger than originally thought. The three year research project at Troy -- lead by Prof. Ernst Pernicka, from the University of Tubingen's Institute of Pre- and Early History -- sees scholars focus on the analysis and publication of materials found since the university started excavations at the site in 1988... smaller excavations... in combination with geophysical surveying and the drilling of test...
  • Excavations in Ancient Tegea

    12/04/2009 1:40:02 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 630+ views
    ana-mpa.gr ^ | Friday, December 4, 2009 | unattributed
    The first stage of a five-year (2009-2013) excavation project in Ancient Tegea, near Tripolis, has been completed by an international team of archaeologists led by the Norwegian Institute in Athens in Collaboration with the Greek culture ministry's 38th Ephoria for Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities and 25th Ephoria of Byzantine Antiquities. The area of excavation is a field located to the west of the theatre and the Basilica of Thyrsos, where magnetometer survey 2003-2004 documented the probable location of a major north-south street and a stoa bordering the agora... Tegea was a settlement in ancient Greece, and it is also a...
  • 2,700-Year-Old Fabric Found in Greece

    05/10/2007 10:53:22 PM PDT · by FreedomCalls · 31 replies · 1,099+ views
    PhysOrg.com ^ | 05/09/2007 | Nicholas Paphitis
    (AP) -- Archaeologists in Greece have discovered a rare 2,700-year-old piece of fabric inside a copper urn from a burial they speculated imitated the elaborate cremation of soldiers described in Homer's "Iliad." The yellowed, brittle material was found in the urn during excavation in the southern town of Argos, a Culture Ministry announcement said Wednesday "This is an extremely rare find, as fabric is an organic material which decomposes very easily," said archaeologist Alkistis Papadimitriou, who headed the dig. She said only a handful of such artifacts have been found in Greece. The cylindrical urn also contained dried pomegranates -...
  • An epic battle on Homer's gender

    07/02/2006 7:46:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 80 replies · 2,586+ views
    The Australian ^ | July 03, 2006 | Dalya Alberge (The London Times)
    Historian and linguist Andrew Dalby is challenging the accepted gender of one of the most influential writers of all time -- the poet who created the Greek epics The Iliad and The Odyssey in the seventh century BC. Dr Dalby said: "There is no direct evidence of the poet's identity and therefore no justification for the customary assumption that the two epics were composed by a man." Women have a long tradition worldwide as makers of oral literature, he said, citing Sappho, the best-known female poet of ancient Greece, and Enheduanna, the woman mentioned on a Sumerian tablet who thus...
  • The Iliad and Islam

    06/25/2004 1:59:30 PM PDT · by Ed Hudgins · 41 replies · 430+ views
    The Objectivist Center ^ | June 24, 2004 | Edward Hudgins
    The Iliad and Islam By Edward Hudgins "Sing, oh Goddess, the wrath of Peleus' son Achilles, which brought pains a thousand-fold upon the Achaians." So opens "The Iliad," the world's first great literary work. Homer's poem about the Trojan War has intrigue, politics, sex, and vast battles—all the elements of an exciting epic, whether recited in the halls of ancient palaces or made into a Hollywood blockbuster. The Bronze-Age society of the Greeks who fought before Priam's fortress around 1250 BCE was in many ways primitive and brutal. After the sack of sacred Ilium that society collapsed. Five hundred years...
  • Geologists investigate Trojan battlefield

    02/07/2003 9:52:05 PM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 55 replies · 1,061+ views
    BBC NEWS ^ | 02/07/03 | N/A
    Friday, 7 February, 2003, 11:42 GMT Geologists investigate Trojan battlefield The Greeks armies would have attacked from the west Homer's description of the Trojan battlefield in his classic poem the Iliad is accurate, say scientists. The subject of the story - the Greeks' 10-year siege of Troy and the wooden horse they used to bring it to an end - may have been a myth, but its geography was not. It was right in front of Troy that we were drilling a hole and seashells came out Chris Kraft The researchers drilled sediments in northwest Turkey to map how the...