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Keyword: cryptography

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  • Researcher uses 379-year-old algorithm to crack crypto keys found in the wild

    03/18/2022 10:05:09 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 12 replies
    Techzine ^ | 15 Mar 2022 | Joseph Brunoli
    It takes only a second to crack the handful of weak keys. Are there more out there? Cryptographic keys generated with older software now owned by technology company Rambus are weak enough to be broken instantly using commodity hardware, a researcher reported on Monday. This revelation is part of an investigation that also uncovered a handful of weak keys in the wild. "The problem is that both primes are too similar," Böck said in an interview. "So the difference between the two primes is really small."
  • Satoshi Nakamoto and the Civil-War Within Bitcoin

    04/04/2021 8:39:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    YouTube ^ | April 2, 2021 | ColdFusion
    Satoshi Nakamoto and the Civil-War Within Bitcoin |
  • device that 'thinks like a murderer' and produces creepy poetry to help crack the [Zodiac] ciphers

    11/16/2017 1:34:37 PM PST · by mairdie · 37 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 16 November 2017 | Ariel Zilber
    A supercomputer programmed to think like the notorious Zodiac killer produced some creepy poetry when fed all the known writings of the elusive criminal, it was learned Thursday. A University of Southern California professor created an artificial intelligence software that was designed to help crack the code of the Z340, the Zodiac killer’s famous cipher. The ciphers, which were sent with letters to the police and newspapers in Northern California during the 1960s and 70s, contain letters and symbols that may hide clues as to the killer’s identity.
  • Volunteer sleuths crack 'Zodiac' serial killer's coded message

    12/15/2020 9:25:02 AM PST · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    https://www.ksl.com ^ | Sharon Bernstein | Dec. 14, 2020 at 2:02 p.m.
    SACRAMENTO - A team of volunteer codebreakers has cracked a mysterious cipher sent more than 50 years ago to a newspaper by the San Francisco serial killer who called himself the Zodiac, the FBI said on Friday. The Zodiac Killer — who was never caught — shot or stabbed seven people in the San Francisco Bay Area over the course of about a year in 1968 and 1969, killing all but two of them. During his murderous spree, he sent a series of terrifying letters to the San Francisco Chronicle newspaper. Some of the notes were in code, including a...
  • Zodiac ‘340 Cipher’ Cracked by Code Experts 51 Years After it Was Sent to the S.F. Chronicle

    12/11/2020 1:16:26 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 42 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | Dec. 11, 2020 | Kevin Fagan
    The solution to what’s known as the 340 Cipher, one of the most vexing mysteries of the Zodiac Killer’s murderous saga, has been found by a code-breaking team from the United States, Australia and Belgium. The cipher, sent in a letter to The Chronicle in November 1969, has been puzzling authorities and amateur sleuths since it arrived 51 years ago. Investigators hoped the Zodiac, who killed five people in the Bay Area in 1968 and 1969, would reveal his name in one of his many ciphers, but there is no such name in the 340. According to code-breaking expert David...
  • The intelligence coup of the century

    02/11/2020 11:37:48 AM PST · by posterchild · 16 replies
    Washington Post ^ | Feb 11, 2020 | Greg Miller
    or more than half a century, governments all over the world trusted a single company to keep the communications of their spies, soldiers and diplomats secret. The company, Crypto AG, got its first break with a contract to build code-making machines for U.S. troops during World War II. Flush with cash, it became a dominant maker of encryption devices for decades, navigating waves of technology from mechanical gears to electronic circuits and, finally, silicon chips and software. The Swiss firm made millions of dollars selling equipment to more than 120 countries well into the 21st century. Its clients included Iran,...
  • Donald Trump Urges Boycott of Apple Until Apple Gives Gov SB Terrorist Info

    One of the things here I've noticed is that there's a debate going on about this topic. Donald Trump is right and I've said it, but come under fire. See the tweet below: Boycott all Apple products until such time as Apple gives cellphone info to authorities regarding radical Islamic terrorist couple from Cal— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 19, 2016 It would be one thing to talk about doing this to people who are alive. But the Radical Islamic Terrorists who carried out San Bernadino are dead. I don't care about their civil liberties. Keep America safe, which will...
  • The trust machine

    10/29/2015 9:16:43 PM PDT · by Another Post-American · 8 replies
    The Economist ^ | 10/31/2015 edition | Jon Berkeley
    BITCOIN has a bad reputation. The decentralised digital cryptocurrency, powered by a vast computer network, is notorious for the wild fluctuations in its value, the zeal of its supporters and its degenerate uses, such as extortion, buying drugs and hiring hitmen in the online bazaars of the “dark net”. This is unfair. The value of a bitcoin has been pretty stable, at around $250, for most of this year. Among regulators and financial institutions, scepticism has given way to enthusiasm (the European Union recently recognised it as a currency). But most unfair of all is that bitcoin’s shady image causes...
  • Prime Diffie-Hellman Weakness May Be Key to Breaking Crypto

    10/18/2015 12:19:56 PM PDT · by Mycroft Holmes · 20 replies
    ThreadPost ^ | October 16, 2015 | Michael Mimoso
    The great mystery since the NSA and other intelligence agencies’ cyber-spying capabilities became watercooler fodder has not been the why of their actions, but the how? For example, how are they breaking crypto to decode secure Internet communication? A team of cryptographers and computer scientists from a handful of academic powerhouses is pretty confident they have the answer after having pieced together a number of clues from the Snowden documents that have been published so far, and giving the math around the Diffie-Hellman protocol a hard look. The answer is an implementation weakness in Diffie-Hellman key exchanges, specifically in the...
  • Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for police, even with search warrants

    09/18/2014 5:59:16 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 35 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | 9-18-2014 | Craig Timberg
    Apple said Wednesday night that it is making it impossible for the company to turn over data from most iPhones or iPads to police — even when they have a search warrant — taking a hard new line as tech companies attempt to blunt allegations that they have too readily participated in government efforts to collect user information. The move, announced with the publication of a new privacy policy tied to the release of Apple’s latest mobile operating system, iOS 8, amounts to an engineering solution to a legal quandary: Rather than comply with binding court orders, Apple has reworked...
  • Open Source Crypto TrueCrypt Disappears With Suspicious Cloud Of Mystery

    05/29/2014 8:05:00 PM PDT · by TChad · 27 replies
    Forbes ^ | 5/29/2014 | James Lyne
    Over the past 24 hours the website for TrueCrypt (a very widely used encryption solution) was updated with a rather unusually styled message stating that TrueCrypt is “considered harmful” and should not be used.
  • Mysterious announcement from Truecrypt declares the project insecure and dead

    05/29/2014 8:06:55 PM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 53 replies
    boing boing ^ | 5-29-14 | Cory Doctorow
    The abrupt announcement that the widely used, anonymously authored disk-encryption tool Truecrypt is insecure and will no longer be maintained shocked the crypto world--after all, this was the tool Edward Snowden himself lectured on at a Cryptoparty in Hawai'i. Cory Doctorow tries to make sense of it all.
  • Bletchley codebreaker dies aged 93

    03/27/2014 2:30:35 AM PDT · by Winniesboy · 43 replies
    The Guardian ^ | March 27th 2014 | Conal Urqhuart
    Raymond 'Jerry' Roberts was one of elite team who helped decode messages sent between Hitler and his high command. ne of the last of a team of wartime British codebreakers who deciphered Hitler's messages at Bletchley Park has died after a short illness. Raymond "Jerry" Roberts, 93, from Liphook in Hampshire, was part of a group that cracked the German high command's secret code. Roberts joined Bletchley Park as a German linguist and was among four founder members of the Testery section, named after its head Ralph Tester. Their target was a system known as Tunny, which carried messages between...
  • Bitcoin: The Sexiest Non-Solution Of All Time?

    01/08/2014 8:29:45 AM PST · by Errant · 14 replies
    Alt-Market.Com ^ | 8 January 2014 | Brandon Smith
    A few years back, at the end of 2009, I was approached on two separate occasions by people claiming to be “representatives” of a digital alternative currency format. I was, of course, intrigued by the initial proposal, being that I had been writing for some time on the concept of non-participation as a way to insulate average Americans from the dangers of our unstable fiat driven mainstream economy. Before that, I had already dealt with just about every currency alternative one could imagine; from paper scripts backed by goods, to scripts backed by time or labor, to gold and silver...
  • NSA seeks 'groundbreaking' spying powers, new leak reveals

    08/29/2013 1:39:29 PM PDT · by Jim Robinson · 10 replies
    cnet ^ | Aug 29, 2013 | Seth Rosenblatt by Seth Rosenblatt
    The US government's spying budget includes funds to invent new technologies "to defeat adversarial cryptography and exploit Internet traffic," leaked documents show. Among the NSA's annual budget of $52.6 billion are requests to bankroll "groundbreaking cryptanalytic capabilities" that can beat cryptography and mine regular Internet traffic, new documents leaked by Edward Snowden to the Washington Post reveal. The document in question, the Fiscal Year 2013 Budget Justification -- referred to as the "Black Budget" -- states on page 4: "...we are investing in groundbreaking cryptanalytic capabilities to defeat adversarial cryptography and exploit Internet traffic." Because of its mention in the...
  • Government Lab Reveals It Has Operated Quantum Internet for Over Two Years

    05/06/2013 6:00:49 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 38 replies
    Government Lab Reveals It Has Operated Quantum Internet for Over Two Years A quantum internet capable of sending perfectly secure messages has been running at Los Alamos National Labs for the last two and a half years, say researchers One of the dreams for security experts is the creation of a quantum internet that allows perfectly secure communication based on the powerful laws of quantum mechanics.The basic idea here is that the act of measuring a quantum object, such as a photon, always changes it. So any attempt to eavesdrop on a quantum message cannot fail to leave telltale signs...
  • Wanted for one last mission: call for Bletchley Park codebreakers to crack the D-Day pigeon cipher

    11/23/2012 1:31:55 AM PST · by Winniesboy · 36 replies
    Daily Telegraph (London)_ ^ | Nov 23 2012 | Hannah Furness
    Historians from GCHQ are appealing for the veteran codebreakers of Bletchley Park to volunteer for one last act of service for their country: cracking the D-Day carrier pigeon cipher that has stumped Britain's finest minds. The coded message had been carefully filed in a small red capsule and attached to a carrier pigeon to be delivered 70 years ago. But instead of arriving safely at its destination, the unfortunate bird got stuck in a chimney en-route and lost. The message was found earlier this month by homeowner David Martin, who ripped out a fireplace to find the skeleton while renovating...
  • Remains Of World War II Military Pigeon Ignites Code Mystery (Bird Skeleton w/ Top Secret Code)

    11/05/2012 1:21:19 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 32 replies
    IO9 ^ | November 2, 2012 | George Dvorsky
    Remains Of World War II Military Pigeon Ignites Code Mystery Back in 1982, David Martin discovered the remains of a pigeon while renovating his chimney. Upon closer inspection he noticed that the dead bird had a red capsule attached to its leg, what has now been confirmed as a top secret message that was en route to an unknown location in Britain during World War II. Ignored for three decades, code experts are now trying to decrypt the secret message. Though rarely discussed, pigeons were widely used during the war as an old-school way to transmit messages. Among the benefits,...
  • 10-year-old problem in theoretical computer science falls

    07/31/2012 11:57:26 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 17 replies
    MIT News Office ^ | 7/31/12 | Larry Hardesty
    Interactive proofs — mathematical games that underlie much modern cryptography — work even if players try to use quantum information to cheat.Interactive proofs, which MIT researchers helped pioneer, have emerged as one of the major research topics in theoretical computer science. In the classic interactive proof, a questioner with limited computational power tries to extract reliable information from a computationally powerful but unreliable respondent. Interactive proofs are the basis of cryptographic systems now in wide use, but for computer scientists, they’re just as important for the insight they provide into the complexity of computational problems. Twenty years ago, researchers showed...
  • The Spanish Link in Cracking the Enigma Code

    03/25/2012 12:05:24 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 7 replies · 3+ views
    BBC ^ | 23 March 2012 | Gordon Corera
    A pair of rare Enigma machines used in the Spanish Civil War have been given to the head of GCHQ, Britain's communications intelligence agency. The machines - only recently discovered in Spain - fill in a missing chapter in the history of British code-breaking, paving the way for crucial successes in World War II. A row of senior Spanish military and intelligence officers stand upright in a line in front of a long elegant table in the country's Army Museum in Toledo. In front of them are two modest, slightly battered wooden boxes that are the subject of the day's...