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Keyword: 40martyrs

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  • Oct 25 – The Forty Martyrs of England and Wales

    10/25/2018 8:20:44 PM PDT · by Coleus · 26 replies
    These forty men and women of England and Wales, martyred between 1535 and 1679, were canonised in Rome by Pope Paul VI on 25th October 1970. Each has their feast day but they are remembered as a group on 25th October. Patrick Duffy tells their story. Introduction When King Henry VIII, after his break with Rome, […]These forty men and women of England and Wales, martyred between 1535 and 1679, were canonised in Rome by Pope Paul VI on 25th October 1970. Each has their feast day but they are remembered as a group on 25th October. Patrick Duffy tells their story.IntroductionWhen...
  • Catholic Caucus - 40 English martyrs you may not know

    11/27/2017 7:26:06 PM PST · by Coleus · 12 replies
    Aleteia ^ | 10.25.17 | Philip Kosloski
    These saints were killed for their faith during a dark time in England's history. After King Henry VIII proclaimed himself supreme head of the Church in England and Wales, a violent wave of anti-Catholic persecution began — and lasted over a century. It started with the executions of Sts. Thomas More and John Fisher, but didn’t end there. Hundreds were killed between 1535 and 1679; the Church recognized the heroism of 40 martyrs from England and Wales in a canonization ceremony on October 25, 1970. (Later, a separate feast on May 4 was created to recognize the 284 canonized or beatified...
  • The Feast of the Forty Martyrs

    03/10/2015 3:18:08 PM PDT · by NYer · 8 replies
    New Liturgical Movement ^ | March 10, 2015 | GREGORY DIPIPPO
    The Forty Martyrs were a group of soldiers from the Roman Twelfth Legion, who died for the Faith at Sebaste in Armenia in the year 320. This is seven years after the Edict of Milan and the Peace of the Church under Constantine, whose brother-in-law Licinius at that point ruled in the East, and after a period of tolerance, renewed the persecution of Christians. When the Forty had been called to renounce the Faith and refused, they were sentenced first to various tortures, and then condemned to die a particularly horrible death, stripped naked and left on the ice...