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Solar System Ice: Source of Earth's Water
Carnegie Institution ^ | Thursday, July 12, 2012 | unattributed

Posted on 07/14/2012 6:12:51 AM PDT by SunkenCiv

Scientists have long believed that comets and, or a type of very primitive meteorite called carbonaceous chondrites were the sources of early Earth's volatile elements -- which include hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon -- and possibly organic material, too. Understanding where these volatiles came from is crucial for determining the origins of both water and life on the planet. New research led by Carnegie's Conel Alexander focuses on frozen water that was distributed throughout much of the early Solar System, but probably not in the materials that aggregated to initially form Earth...

It has been suggested that both comets and carbonaceous chondrites formed beyond the orbit of Jupiter, perhaps even at the edges of our Solar System, and then moved inward, eventually bringing their bounty of volatiles and organic material to Earth. If this were true, then the ice found in comets and the remnants of ice preserved in carbonaceous chondrites in the form of hydrated silicates, such as clays, would have similar isotopic compositions.

Alexander's team... analyzed samples from 85 carbonaceous chondrites, and were able to show that carbonaceous chondrites likely did not form in the same regions of the Solar System as comets because they have much lower deuterium content. If so, this result directly contradicts the two most-prominent models for how the Solar System developed its current architecture.

The team suggests that carbonaceous chondrites formed instead in the asteroid belt that exists between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. What's more, they propose that most of the volatile elements on Earth arrived from a variety of chondrites, not from comets.

(Excerpt) Read more at carnegiescience.edu ...


TOPICS: Astronomy; History; Science
KEYWORDS: armandhdelsemme; astronomy; bigsplash; catastrophism; emiliospedicato; godsgravesglyphs; louiefrank; louisafrank; louisbfrank; louisfrank; mars; origins; panspermia; science; spedicato; water
Caption: This is a cross-section of a chondritic meteorite.

Caption: This is a cross-section of a chondritic meteorite.

1 posted on 07/14/2012 6:13:05 AM PDT by SunkenCiv
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The Big Splash: A Scientific Discovery That Revolutionizes the Way We View the Origin of Life, the Water We Drink, the Death of the Dinosaurs, the Creation of the Oceans, the Nature of the Cosmos, and the Very Future of the Earth Itself
The Big Splash:
A Scientific Discovery
That Revolutionizes the Way
We View the Origin of Life,
the Water We Drink,
the Death of the Dinosaurs,
the Creation of the Oceans,
the Nature of the Cosmos,
and the Very Future of the Earth Itself

by Louis A. Frank
and Patrick Huyghe


2 posted on 07/14/2012 6:52:43 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: 75thOVI; agrace; aimhigh; Alice in Wonderland; AndrewC; aragorn; aristotleman; Avoiding_Sulla; ...



3 posted on 07/14/2012 7:00:37 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: KevinDavis; annie laurie; Knitting A Conundrum; Viking2002; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Mmogamer; ...
 
X-Planets
· join · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post new topic · subscribe ·
Google news searches: exoplanet · exosolar · extrasolar ·

4 posted on 07/14/2012 7:00:37 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: SunkenCiv

Why hasn’t there been more water discovered on Mars?


5 posted on 07/14/2012 7:01:14 AM PDT by HChampagne
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To: SunkenCiv
Earth's volatile elements -- which include hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon -- and possibly organic material, too.

Oh, dear. I guess all the scientists were out to lunch when it came time to proofread this?

I never thought of carbon as being particularly volatile. I suppose some carbon compounds might fit that description, but not elemental carbon. And I wonder what the "organic material" could possibly be, if not carbon and hydrogen?

6 posted on 07/14/2012 7:07:26 AM PDT by exDemMom (Now that I've finally accepted that I'm living a bad hair life, I'm more at peace with the world.)
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 Life's Building Blocks from Interstellar Space

· 03/28/2002 12:35:53 PM PST ·
· Posted by Texaggie79 ·
· 13 replies ·
· Cosmiverse ·
· March 28, 2002 07:30 CST ·

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· 04/19/2002 12:42:27 PM PDT ·
· Posted by vannrox ·
· 28 replies ·
· Journal of New England
  Antiquities Research Assoc ·
· First version 1985 ·
· Emilio Spedicato ·
· University of Bergamo ·

The author acknowledges stimulating discussions with Thor Heyerdahl (Colle Micheri, Liguria and Guimar, Tenerife), Laurence Dixon (University of Hertfordhshire), Victor Clube (Oxford University), Emmanuel Anati (Centro Camuno di Studi Preistorici), Zdenek Kukal (Central Geological Survey, Prague), Donald Patten (Seattle), Flavio Barbiero (Livorno), Antonino Del Popolo (Bergamo), Lia Mangolini (Milano), Graham Hancock (Leat Mill, Lifton) and Andrew Collins (Leigh on Sea). Third revised version. First version published in 1985 as Quaderno 85/3. First revised version published in 1990 as Quaderno 90/22...


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· 08/27/2002 11:50:09 AM PDT ·
· Posted by blam ·
· 96 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 8-27-2002 ·

"I saw it fall from above roof height" The odds against being hit by a meteorite are billions to one - but a teenager in North Yorkshire may have had one land on her foot. Siobhan Cowton, 14, was getting into the family car outside her Northallerton home at 1030 BST on Thursday when a stone fell on her from the sky. This does not happen very often in Northallerton Siobhan Cowton Noticing it was "quite hot", she showed it to her father Niel. The family now...


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· 04/07/2003 12:45:47 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Mike Darancette ·
· 22 replies ·
· Space.com ·
· 2 April 2003 ·
· Robert Roy Britt ·

NEW STUDY: SOME ASTEROIDS MAY BE LAYERED LIKE ONIONS A new study of several meteorites collected on Earth and thought to have come from the same large asteroid reveal the structure of the parent space rock to have been something like an onion, with layer upon layer of differing structure. The asteroid, long ago destroyed in a collision, was once hot enough to have a molten core and cooled from the outside inward, the research shows, confirming a long-held expectation that had eluded supporting research. Asteroids are leftovers of planet formation. While some rocks got together to build planets about...


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· 02/27/2004 9:36:42 AM PST ·
· Posted by Mark Felton ·
· 47 replies ·
· Astrobiology Magazine ·
· 2/27/04 ·
· astrobiology ·

Finding dinosaurs in Antarctica is both easier and harder than finding them on another continent. Easier, because like looking for meteorites, dinosaur bones show up against the stark landscape. Harder, because the dinosaur's cold-bloodedness wouldn't have lasted long prior to continental drift and climate changes. Antarctic Lost Worlds Tale of Two Dinosaursbased on National Science Foundation report Against incredible odds, researchers working in separate sites, thousands of miles apart in Antarctica have found what they believe are the fossilized remains of two species of dinosaurs previously unknown to science. Life on the Edge. South Pole view from Space.Credit: NASA One...


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· 03/07/2004 2:21:58 AM PST ·
· Posted by LibWhacker ·
· 95 replies ·
· The Toronto Star ·
· 3/7/04 ·
· Terence Dickinson ·

The Mars rover Opportunity's examination of Martian rocks last week provided the first convincing evidence that our neighbour world was once "awash" in water, as one NASA scientist described it. But where did the water come from? And why does Mars have no liquid water now, while Earth apparently has been covered with the stuff for 4 billion years? Scientists are just beginning to piece the story together, and it goes right back to the beginning. Mars, like Earth, was formed from dusty and rocky debris left over after the sun was born 4.57 billion years ago. Initially, there were...


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· 07/28/2004 8:22:08 AM PDT ·
· Posted by blam ·
· 28 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 7-28-2004 ·
· Paul Rincon ·

Studies of asteroids would aid Earth-protection strategies A new space mission concept unveiled at a Paris conference aims to look inside asteroids to reveal how they are made. Deep Interior would use radar to probe the origin and evolution of two near-Earth objects less than 1km across. The mission, which could launch some time later this decade, would also give clues to how the planets evolved. The perceived threat of asteroids colliding with our planet has renewed interest in space missions to understand these...


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· 02/15/2005 3:27:08 AM PST ·
· Posted by ajolympian2004 ·
· 51 replies ·
· The New Zealand Herald ·
· February 15th, 2005 ·
· Steve Connor ·

A giant asteroid the size of three football pitches will make the closest flyby of Earth in recorded history for an object of its size, scientists said. It will pass between the Earth and the Moon and will even come closer than the orbit of many telecommunications satellites, although astronomers insisted that there is little chance of a collision with the massive rock. Anxious Earthlings need not worry too much for another 24 years, however, because asteroid 2004 MN4 is not due to make its closest approach to Earth until approximately 10pm London time on Friday 13th April 2029. The...


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· 07/27/2005 11:13:59 AM PDT ·
· Posted by LibWhacker ·
· 35 replies ·
· New Scientist ·
· 7/27/05 ·
· Celeste Biever ·

EARTH'S natural radioactivity has been measured for the first time. The measurement will help geologists find out to what extent nuclear decay is responsible for the immense quantity of heat generated by Earth. Our planet's heat output drives the convection currents that churn liquid iron in the outer core, giving rise to Earth's magnetic field. Just where this heat comes from is a big question. Measurements of the temperature gradients across rocks in mines and boreholes have led geologists to estimate that the planet is internally generating between 30 and 44 terawatts of heat. Some of this heat comes from...


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· 01/25/2006 8:52:11 PM PST ·
· Posted by blam ·
· 20 replies ·
· BBC ·
· 8-27-1999 ·

Scientists have made the first discovery of liquid water in a meteorite. The space rock was recovered by a group of boys in a small Texas town who saw it fall out of the sky in 1998. Specimens taken to Nasa's Johnson Space Center in Houston were subjected to tests by Michael Zolensky and his colleagues. When they cracked open the rock they found tiny, purple spots of halite - crystals of sodium chloride, or table salt - along with minute amounts of briny water. Others who have looked...


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· 09/05/2007 11:55:02 AM PDT ·
· Posted by LibWhacker ·
· 44 replies ·
· Centauri Dreams ·
· 9/5/07 ·

It's a disaster scenario that Hollywood has picked up on (think Deep Impact). An incoming object menaces the Earth. Scientists try to destroy it with nuclear weapons, but the horrified populace soon discovers that the blast has simply broken the object into pieces, each with the potential to wreak havoc planet-wide. Now we learn that an impact between two asteroids causing a similar crack-up may have resulted in the cataclysmic event some 65 million years ago that destroyed the dinosaurs. Researchers from Southwest Research Institute and Charles University (Prague) have been studying the asteroid (298) Baptistina, combining their observations with...


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· 10/30/2007 1:31:46 PM PDT ·
· Posted by crazyshrink ·
· 74 replies ·
· EurekAlert ·
· 10/30/07 ·
· Gerta Keller, etal ·

Dinosaur Deaths Outsourced to India? Boulder, CO, USA - A series of monumental volcanic eruptions in India may have killed the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, not a meteor impact in the Gulf of Mexico. The eruptions, which created the gigantic Deccan Traps lava beds of India, are now the prime suspect in the most famous and persistent paleontological murder mystery, say scientists who have conducted a slew of new investigations honing down eruption timing. "It's the first time we can directly link the main phase of the Deccan Traps to the mass extinction," said Princeton University paleontologist Gerta Keller....


 Dinosaur killer may have struck oil

· 05/08/2008 12:11:16 PM PDT ·
· Posted by Berlin_Freeper ·
· 45 replies ·
· Australian Broadcasting Corporation ·
· May 07, 2008 ·
· Larry O'Hanlon ·

The dinosaur-killing Chicxulub meteor might have ignited an oilfield rather than forests when it slammed into the Gulf of Mexico 65 million years ago, say geologists. Smoke-related particles found in sediments formed at the time of the impact are strikingly similar to those created by modern high-temperature coal and oil burning, as opposed to forest fires, says Professor Simon Brassell of Indiana University. He and colleagues from Italy and the UK publish their report on the discovery in the May issue of the journal Geology. ...What he and his colleagues have found instead are particles called cenospheres, which resemble the...


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· 01/02/2009 10:44:35 AM PST ·
· Posted by Red Badger ·
· 19 replies ·
· www.physorg.com ·
· 01-01-2009 ·
· U of Oregon ·

Abundant tiny particles of diamond dust exist in sediments dating to 12,900 years ago at six North American sites, adding strong evidence for Earth's impact with a rare swarm of carbon-and-water-rich comets or carbonaceous chondrites, reports a nine-member scientific team. These nanodiamonds, which are produced under high-temperature, high-pressure conditions created by cosmic impacts and have been found in meteorites, are concentrated in similarly aged sediments at Murray Springs, Ariz., Bull Creek, Okla., Gainey, Mich., and Topper, S.C., as well as Lake Hind, Manitoba, and Chobot, Alberta, in Canada. Nanodiamonds can be produced on Earth, but only through high-explosive detonations or...


 Did a Comet Hit Earth 12,000 Years Ago?

· 01/02/2009 6:02:32 PM PST ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 35 replies ·
· Scientific American ·
· January 2, 2009 ·
· David Biello ·

Nanodiamonds found across North America suggest that major climate change could have been cosmically instigatedRoughly 12,900 years ago, massive global cooling kicked in abruptly, along with the end of the line for some 35 different mammal species, including the mammoth, as well as the so-called Clovis culture of prehistoric North Americans. Various theories have been proposed for the die-off, ranging from abrupt climate change to overhunting once humans were let loose on the wilds of North America. But now nanodiamonds found in the sediments from this time period point to an alternative: a massive explosion or explosions by a fragmentary...


 Meteorite Crammed with 'Millions' of Organic Compounds..

· 02/15/2010 8:30:53 PM PST ·
· Posted by TaraP ·
· 35 replies ·
· Discovery News ·
· Feb 15th, 2010 ·

A meteorite that hit the town of Murchison, Australia, hasn't quit giving up its secrets. The Murchison meteorite is one of the most studied space rocks because many pieces were recovered after it was seen breaking up as it fell through the atmosphere in 1969. Approximately 100 kg of the carbonaceous chondrite was recovered. Carbonaceous chondrites are extremely important to scientists as they were formed from material that existed in the solar system's planet-forming disk of gas and dust. They are, quite literally, time capsules holding onto a 4 billion year old record of the birth of our solar system....


 Minerals on the Ocean floor could provide resources for over 60 centuries

· 10/08/2010 6:25:52 AM PDT ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 16 replies ·
· Next Big Future ·
· October 7, 2010 ·
· Brian Wang ·

> The minerals, including sulfur, copper, zinc, iron and precious metals, are contained in volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits that form on the ocean floor where tectonic plates pull apart and allow magma (molten rock) to invade the Earth's 3.7-mile- (6 kilometer-) thick crust. The magma heats seawater to 662 degrees Fahrenheit (350 degrees Celsius) and moves it through the ocean crust via convection; and the seawater deposits the minerals where it discharges along the ridge axis. >


 Aluminium helps date solar system

· 08/28/2009 5:37:23 PM PDT ·
· Posted by neverdem ·
· 10 replies ·
· Chemistry World ·
· 21 August 2009 ·
· Matt Wilkinson ·

Aluminium is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust and is used to make bikes, cars and food cans. Now, thanks to research conducted at the University of Nancy, France, the metal may also be able to shed light on the processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system.Models of the evolution of the early solar system rely on knowing the precise times at which the oldest particles in the solar system formed. Some of the oldest particles clumped together to form chondrites - primitive meteorites - and these grain-like building blocks are known as calcium-aluminium rich...


 British scientist claims we're all aliens on Earth

· 02/03/2010 12:54:07 PM PST ·
· Posted by Free ThinkerNY ·
· 36 replies ·
· nypost.com ·
· Feb. 3, 2010 ·
· Vince Soodin ·

The human race began as microbes brought to Earth by comets millions of years ago according to a British scientist, The Sun reported Wednesday. British professor Chandra Wickramasinghe said: "We are all aliens. We share a cosmic ancestry. "Each time a new planetary system forms, a few surviving microbes find their way into comets. "These then multiply and seed other planets. We are thus part of a connected chain that extends over a large volume of the cosmos. Evidence is pointing inexorably in this direction." Prof Wickramasinghe, an astrobiologist at Cardiff University, believes the first "seeds of life" were deposited...


 Mercury found to have comet-like appearance by satellites looking at sun

· 09/22/2010 8:33:02 AM PDT ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 15 replies ·
· Boston University Medical Center ·
· September 22, 2010 ·
· Unknown ·

ROME and BOSTON - Scientists from Boston University's Center for Space Physics reported today that NASA satellites designed to view the escaping atmosphere of the Sun have also recorded evidence of gas escaping from the planet Mercury. The scientists reported these findings at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) meeting in Rome, Italy this week. The STEREO mission has two satellites placed in the same orbit around the Sun that the Earth has, but at locations ahead and behind it (STEREO, or Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory, is the third mission in NASA's Solar Terrestrial Probes program). This configuration offers multi-directional...


 NASA Scientist Claims Evidence of Alien Life on Meteorite

· 03/05/2011 5:51:25 AM PST ·
· Posted by SonOfDarkSkies ·
· 34 replies ·
· FoxNews.com ·
· 3/5/2011 ·
· Garrett Tenney ·

We are not alone in the universe -- and alien life forms may have a lot more in common with life on Earth than we had previously thought. That's the stunning conclusion one NASA scientist has come to, releasing his groundbreaking revelations in a new study in the March edition of the Journal of Cosmology. Dr. Richard B. Hoover, an astrobiologist with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, gave FoxNews.com early access to the out-of-this-world research, published late Friday evening in the March edition of the Journal of Cosmology. In it, Hoover describes the latest findings in his study of an...


 Exclusive: NASA Scientist Claims Evidence of Alien Life on Meteorite

· 03/05/2011 10:27:15 AM PST ·
· Posted by Dallas59 ·
· 53 replies ·
· fox news ·
· 3/4/2011 ·
· Fox News ·

We are not alone in the universe -- and alien life forms may have a lot more in common with life on Earth than we had previously thought. That's the stunning conclusion one NASA scientist has come to, releasing his groundbreaking revelations in a new study in the March edition of the Journal of Cosmology. Dr. Richard B. Hoover, an astrobiologist with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, has traveled to remote areas in Antarctica, Siberia, and Alaska, amongst others, for over ten years now, collecting and studying meteorites. He gave FoxNews.com early access to the out-of-this-world research, published late...


 Did scientists discover bacteria in meteorites?

· 03/06/2011 9:08:21 AM PST ·
· Posted by Salman ·
· 46 replies ·
· Science Blogs ·
· March 6, 2011 ·
· PZ Myers ·

No, no, no. No no no no no no no no. No, no. No. Fox News broke the story, which ought to make one immediately suspicious -- it's not an organization noted for scientific acumen. But even worse, the paper claiming the discovery of bacteria fossils in carbonaceous chondrites was published in ... the Journal of Cosmology. I've mentioned Cosmology before -- it isn't a real science journal at all, but is the ginned-up website of a small group of crank academics obsessed with the idea of Hoyle and Wickramasinghe that life originated in outer space and simply rained down...


 Asteroid 2005 YU55 to Approach Earth on November 8, 2011..

· 03/25/2011 9:39:33 AM PDT ·
· Posted by TaraP ·
· 46 replies ·
· NASA ·
· March 10th, 2011 ·

Near-Earth asteroid 2005 YU55 will pass within 0.85 lunar distances from the Earth on November 8, 2011. The upcoming close approach by this relatively large 400 meter-sized, C-type asteroid presents an excellent opportunity for synergistic ground-based observations including optical, near infrared and radar data. The attached animated illustration shows the Earth and moon flyby geometry for November 8th and 9th when the object will reach a visual brightness of 11th magnitude and should be easily visible to observers in the northern and southern hemispheres. The closest approach to Earth and the Moon will be respectively 0.00217 AU and 0.00160 AU...


 NASA Finds Hydrocarbons on Saturn's Moon Hyperion

· 07/16/2011 2:31:26 PM PDT ·
· Posted by mrjesse ·
· 44 replies ·
· NASA Website ·
· 07/04/2007 ·
· Ruth Dasso Marlaire ·

PASADENA , Calif. - NASA's Cassini spacecraft has revealed for the first time surface details of Saturn's moon Hyperion, including cup-like craters filled with hydrocarbons that may indicate more widespread presence in our solar system of basic chemicals necessary for life.


 Yale Scientists Discover the Last Living Dinosaur

· 07/16/2011 4:39:22 PM PDT ·
· Posted by nickcarraway ·
· 129 replies ·
· CTV ·
· Sat Jul. 16 2011 ·

A fossil discovered in Montana has given new momentum to the hypothesis that dinosaurs were thriving right up until a devastating meteor hit Earth 65 million years ago, causing their extinction. Scientists from Yale University have found what is believed to be the youngest dinosaur fossil ever found, thought to be from just before the mass extinction took place. The discovery, described in a study published in the online edition of the journal Biology Letters, contradicts the theory that the dinosaurs slowly went extinct before the cosmic impact. The fossil -- a 45-centimetre horn believed to be from a triceratops...


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· 08/25/2011 10:03:57 AM PDT ·
· Posted by BobZimmerman ·
· 54 replies ·
· Behind the Black ·
· August 26, 2011 ·
· Robert Zimmerman ·

Want to mine an asteroid? Rather than travel to it with all their mining equipment, three Chinese scientists have proposed a better way. In a paper published today on the Los Alamos astro-ph preprint website, they have calculated the energy required to shift the orbits of the six thousand near-Earth asteroids and place them in Earth orbit for later mining. Of these, they found 46 asteroids that had the potential for such an operation, and two likely candidates for a space mission. One 30-foot-wide asteroid, 2008EA9, will actually be in the right place for this technique in 2049.


 Comet's water 'like that of Earth's oceans'

· 10/05/2011 6:41:44 PM PDT ·
· Posted by decimon ·
· 39 replies ·
· BBC ·
· October 5, 2011 ·
· Jason Palmer ·

Comet Hartley 2 contains water more like that found on Earth than prior comets seem to have, researchers say. A study using the Herschel space telescope aimed to measure the quantity of deuterium, a rare type of hydrogen, present in the comet's water. The comet had just half the amount of deuterium seen in comets. The result, published in Nature, hints at the idea that much of the Earth's water could have initially came from cometary impacts. Just a few million years after its formation, the early Earth was rocky and dry; something must have brought the water that covers...


 Deep-pocket dreamers aim high with space mining

· 04/24/2012 10:48:53 PM PDT ·
· Posted by presidio9 ·
· 23 replies ·
· Seattle Times ·
· April 24, 2012 ·
· Sandi Doughton ·

Space mining has been a longtime staple of science-fiction films -- and the companies are almost always the villains. The transport ship in "Alien" was towing a load of ore when sinister, corporate overlords diverted it into the clutches of the galaxy's baddest monster. "Avatar" was all about saving the inhabitants of Pandora from thugs clawing their home planet to shreds in search of "unobtanium." Nevertheless, a group of entrepreneurs received a hero's reception Tuesday in Seattle, when they unveiled a new company with the goal of extracting platinum, gold and other valuable resources from asteroids. Director James Cameron, who...


 Meteor hunters strike pay dirt (Recent meteor/fireball over CA)

· 04/30/2012 3:41:04 PM PDT ·
· Posted by dragnet2 ·
· 12 replies ·
· latimes.com ·
· 4/30/2012 ·
· Diana Marcum ·

COLOMA-LOTUS VALLEY, Calif -- In the week since a fireball shot across the sky and exploded, scattering a rare type of meteorite over California's Gold Country, Once again there are lively saloons, fortune hunters jockeying for prime spots.. including that of Brenda Salveson, a local who found a valuable space rock while walking her dog It started April 22, with a blazing streak across a morning sky and a sonic boom Eight hundred miles away, while windows were still rattling, Robert Ward in Prescott, Ariz., was getting alerts. A professional meteorite hunter .. after 16 hours of driving, he scanned...



7 posted on 07/14/2012 7:13:29 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Splish, splash ping.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


8 posted on 07/14/2012 7:13:29 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: HChampagne

>>Why hasn’t there been more water discovered on Mars?

Because God didn’t need to steer chondritic meteorites there.


9 posted on 07/14/2012 7:14:25 AM PDT by Bryanw92 (Sic semper tyrannis)
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To: HChampagne

Two possibilities come to mind, well, three: Mars is difficult to explore because of the distance and apparent foolish mistakes made by people trying to hit it. The first to hit Mars (other than Laz) was NASA, which failed to get its probe into Martian orbit back in the 1960s. The first to attempt it was the USSR when Khruschev was still in charge (i.e., a long time ago). The Soviets and now the Russians have the worst record in Mars probing.

The second possibility is, Mars doesn't have much water, which IMV is the correct conclusion.

The third one which came to mind as I began this is, Mars' slightly lower density than that of Earth (Mars has the lowest density of the known "rocky" planets, as opposed to the four gas giants; not enough is known about Pluto, which IMV remains among the planets) may be do to having been made up of lots of water ice.



 So, where did the water on Mars come from?

· 03/07/2004 2:21:58 AM PST ·
· Posted by LibWhacker ·
· 95 replies ·
· The Toronto Star ·
· 3/7/04 ·
· Terence Dickinson ·

The Mars rover Opportunity's examination of Martian rocks last week provided the first convincing evidence that our neighbour world was once "awash" in water, as one NASA scientist described it. But where did the water come from? And why does Mars have no liquid water now, while Earth apparently has been covered with the stuff for 4 billion years? Scientists are just beginning to piece the story together, and it goes right back to the beginning. Mars, like Earth, was formed from dusty and rocky debris left over after the sun was born 4.57 billion years ago. Initially, there were...



10 posted on 07/14/2012 7:19:07 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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11 posted on 07/14/2012 7:45:34 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: HChampagne

Mars had liquid water, seas and an atmosphere covering the planet billions of years ago.

The theory is that it once had a magnetic field generated by a spinning iron core just like Earth. However, because of its smaller size and other factors, the core went dead much sooner. The Earth’s eventually will too.

A ‘dead’ planet cannot shield itself from solar wind. The water and most of the atmosphere was slowly ‘blow dried’ by this radiation over billions of years. However, the ice caps remain since that water is permanently frozen and never saw enough energy from the sun to reach a gas state.


12 posted on 07/14/2012 8:46:44 AM PDT by varyouga
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To: SunkenCiv

Every comet we have visited HAS NO WATER. They are essentially identical to every other asteroid, dry and essentally a rock. The cometary appearance is an electrical phenomenum, not an outgassing of water vapor from ice. That alone falsifies this flawed premise.


13 posted on 07/14/2012 9:06:49 AM PDT by Swordmaker (This tag line is a Microsoft insult free zone... but if the insults to Mac users continue...)
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To: Swordmaker

Are you familiar with Van Flandern’s ‘exploding planet’ hypothesis? He posited that a watery world larger than Earthc existed approximately where MArs now orbits, and Mars was then a moon of that planet, which exploded and caused the very strange surface pattern on Mars and essentially blew away an atmosphere there, while ‘seeding the solar system with lots of water blobs which have since impacted other planets like Earth. Some of the extinction boundaries may in fact be when large amounts of this ‘blob water entered Earth’s atmosphere and caused massive cloud cover which lasted perhaps a century or more at the time. It is an intriguing hypothesis and he did a huge amount of astro-physical data collection and correlation for his hypothesis. Wal Thornhill’s Electric Universe combined with Hoagland’s hyper-dimensional physics notions (the ones not simply so idiotic as to be dismissed) almost works to fill in the gaps.


14 posted on 07/14/2012 9:15:54 AM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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To: MHGinTN

Don’t you know that Howard Walowitz’s date accidentally steered the Mars rover into a ditch, thus discovering water. But he can’t claim credit becuase she wasn’t supposed to be in the Mars lab?

Son-of-a-b!tch!


15 posted on 07/14/2012 12:38:03 PM PDT by bicyclerepair ( REPLACE D-W-S ! http://www.karenforcongress.com)
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To: bicyclerepair
No, but I do know that an Airforce techy summoned to try and help get a glitch out of equipment which was processing data from a Lunar mission while it was going on was shown NASA footage, by another on-site techy, of someone's base on the backside of the Moon, and that during the era of Lunar landings by our rocket propelled multi-stage disposable crafts.

Did you know that there's a monolith sticking waaaay up off the surface of the Mars moon, Phobos? Did you know that our missions to Mars have photographed artificially produced structures on Mars, and massive ruins on the Martian surface and catastrophically exposed tubular structures that once lay below and just at the surface of Mars, tubular structures large enough for London double decker buses to pass three abreast inside the tubes, and that these tubes are interconnected and appear to evidence reflective objects that have to be inside the tubes, and that we can tell this because of the reflective nature or lack thereof with different satellite passes over the same regions? Did you know that we have several Astronauts who have revealed that they have seen what they feel are extra-terrestrial crafts on earth and in space on the way to and from the Moon? ... And I could go on and on and on, even bringing in eyewitness accounts from credible fellow citizens who have things to tell that you might not want to hear, invoilving involuntary interactions with what these people believe are non-human entities. But what's the point?

16 posted on 07/14/2012 11:54:20 PM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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To: bicyclerepair
Here's his date cleaned up.


17 posted on 07/15/2012 12:10:29 AM PDT by Bratch
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To: MHGinTN

18 posted on 07/15/2012 12:15:07 AM PDT by Bratch
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To: Bratch
Richard is a mixed bag. His ego outstrips his rational mind on too many occasions. But he's not insane and he is not uneducated. It remains to be seen if he is onto something regarding hyper-dimensional 'Physics'.

The best handling of the Cydonia material has been done by Tom Vanflandern. [ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VkXsQbaDg5g ] There's a lengthy three part Youtube video of Tom explaining the face on the Cydonian plane, if you're interested in a rational discussion on it.

19 posted on 07/15/2012 12:31:34 AM PDT by MHGinTN (Being deceived can be cured.)
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To: Swordmaker

Thanks Swordmaker. And BTW, FR is close to unusable today.


20 posted on 07/15/2012 1:58:20 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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