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  • Discovery of Prehistoric Baby Bottles Shows Infants Were Fed Cow's Milk 5,000 Years Ago

    10/18/2019 6:22:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | September 26, 2019 | Julie Dunne, The Conversation
    ...we did some very delicate drilling to produce enough ceramic powder and then treated it with a chemical technique that extracts molecules called lipids... from the fats, oils and waxes of the natural world and are normally absorbed into the material of the prehistoric pots during cooking, or, in this case, through heating the milk. Luckily, these lipids often survive for thousands of years. We regularly use this technique to find out what sort of food people cooked in their ancient pots. It seems they ate many of the things we eat today, including various types of meat, dairy products,...
  • Prehistoric humans ate bone marrow like canned soup 400,000 years ago...

    10/18/2019 5:09:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | October 9, 2019 | American Friends of Tel Aviv University
    Tel Aviv University researchers, in collaboration with scholars from Spain, have uncovered evidence of the storage and delayed consumption of animal bone marrow at Qesem Cave near Tel Aviv, the site of many major discoveries from the late Lower Paleolithic period some 400,000 years ago. The research provides direct evidence that early Paleolithic people saved animal bones for up to nine weeks before feasting on them inside Qesem Cave... The researchers contend that the deer metapodials were kept at the cave covered in skin to facilitate the preservation of marrow for consumption in time of need. The researchers evaluated the...
  • Scientists 'discover two more' of the seven warships lost in the Battle of Midway (TR)

    10/18/2019 11:10:41 AM PDT · by DFG · 53 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 10/18/2019 | Milly Vincent
    Deep-sea explorers scouring the world's oceans for sunken World War II ships are investigating what they believe could be the third ship of seven lost to the Pacific during the Battle of Midway. Hundreds of miles off Midway Atoll, nearly halfway between the United States and Japan, a research vessel is launching underwater robots miles into the abyss to look for warships from the famed Battle of Midway. Weeks of grid searches around the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands have already led the crew of the Petrel to one sunken warship, the Japanese ship the Kaga. This week, the crew is deploying...
  • Time capsule from 1887 opened by Ogden school [UT]

    10/17/2019 7:16:25 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    Fox13now.com ^ | Posted 6:37 pm, October 16, 2019, | by Hailey Higgins
    OGDEN, Utah— A time capsule buried in an Ogden school in 1887 was opened to the public for the first time. During the construction of the Ogden Academy, educators, students, and even construction workers dropped what was important to them inside a capsule and closed it 132 years ago. The capsule was uncovered when the building was demolished in 1959 but sat in storage until Wednesday. “Nobody does this unless they think what they’re doing is important,” Alan Barnett said, local government archivist for the Utah State Archive. The building was also important to early Utahns. It was built for...
  • Lost in Combat? [3000 years ago]

    10/18/2019 6:35:30 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    University of Göttingen ^ | 15.10.2019 | Tobias Uhlig, et al
    Researchers discover belongings of a warrior on unique Bronze Age battlefield site Recent archaeological investigations in the Tollense Valley led by the University of Göttingen, the State Agency for Cultural Heritage in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and the University of Greifswald have unearthed a collection of 31 unusual objects. Researchers believe this is the personal equipment of a Bronze Age warrior who died on the battlefield 3,300 years ago. This unique find was discovered by a diving team headed by Dr Joachim Krüger, from the University of Greifswald, and seems to have been protected in the river from the looting, which inevitably followed...
  • Naica's crystal caves hold long-dormant life

    02/18/2017 3:01:39 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    BBC ^ | 02/18/2017 | Jonathan Amos
    Scientists have extracted long-dormant microbes from inside the famous giant crystals of the Naica mountain caves in Mexico - and revived them. The organisms were likely to have been encased in the striking shafts of gypsum at least 10,000 years ago, and possibly up to 50,000 years ago. It is another demonstration of the ability of life to adapt and cope in the most hostile of environments. "Other people have made longer-term claims for the antiquity of organisms that were still alive, but in this case these organisms are all very extraordinary - they are not very closely related to...
  • A prehistoric thirst for craft beer

    09/13/2018 12:48:50 PM PDT · by rdl6989 · 14 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | September 12, 2018
    ELSEVIER—Amsterdam, September 12, 2018—A new study* published in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports suggests beer brewing practices existed in the Eastern Mediterranean over five millennia before the earliest known evidence, discovered in northern China. In an archaeological collaboration project between Stanford University in the United States, and University of Haifa, Israel, archeologists analyzed three stone mortars from a 13,000-year old Natufian burial cave site in Israel. Their analysis confirmed that these mortars were used for brewing of wheat/barley, as well as for food storage.
  • Researchers uncover prehistoric art and ornaments from Indonesian 'Ice Age'

    04/03/2017 4:34:06 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/3/17 | Griffith University
    The Australian Research Centre for Human Evolution (ARCHE) team, based in Griffith's Environmental Futures Research Institute, together with Indonesian colleagues, have shed new light on 'Ice Age' human culture and symbolism in a paper published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The study was co-led by Associate Professor Adam Brumm, an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellow, and Dr Michelle Langley, who also holds a fellowship from the ARC, analysed the recovered artefacts, and is the country's leading expert in the study of ancient ornaments and bone technology. "Scientists have long been curious about the cultural...
  • Why Modern Meteorologists Use a 19th-Century Crystal Ball

    04/22/2016 12:04:14 PM PDT · by NYer · 14 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | April 19, 2016 | Ella Morton
    Crystal balls at the South Pole. (Photo: Eli Duke/CC BY-SA 2.0)It sounds like the premise for a riddle: At the South Pole are two crystal balls that provides unfailingly accurate information—not about the future, but about the past. This is no trick. It's just meteorology. The dual glass spheres at the South Pole are Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorders, orbs that capture the number of hours of direct sunlight each day, as well as its intensity.Sunshine recorders first came about in the 1850s, thanks to John Francis Campbell—the Campbell in Campbell-Stokes. Around 1853, Campbell, a Scottish author who focused on Celtic folklore, developed a desire to quantify...
  • Prince of darkness finds peace at church

    01/24/2007 8:42:52 PM PST · by xzins · 148 replies · 1,208+ views
    The Standard ^ | Jan 27, 2007 | Malcolm Moore
    Malcolm Moore Thursday, January 25, 2007 Five hundred years after he was killed in battle, the remains of Cesare Borgia, the notorious inspiration for Machiavelli's The Prince, are to be moved into a Spanish church. Banned from holy ground by bishops horrified by his sins, the remains of the ruthless military leader lie, at present, under a pavement in Viana in northern Spain. Borgia was the illegitimate son of Pope Alexander VI, and was made a cardinal by his father at the age of 17. He was an accomplished murderer by 25 and had conquered a good part of Italy...
  • Are We Close to Finding the Tomb of Queen Nefertiti in the Valley of the Kings?

    10/16/2019 8:20:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    YouTube ^ | July 9, 2019 | Ancient Architects
    In May 2018, media outlets around the world ran the headline: “Secret Chamber Does Not Exist”, referring to the possible burial chamber of Queen Nefertiti behind the walls of the tomb of King Tutankhamun in the Valley of the King's in Egypt. So you’ll image my surprise when this week I see that the major media outlets across the world are once again reporting that Nefertiti could be hiding behind a wall in King Tutankhamen’s tomb. The story was ran by a number of well known publications, including The Sun, New York Post, Fox News and more, but why have...
  • Archaeologists discover more than 20 sealed coffins just as the ancient Egyptians left them

    10/16/2019 7:49:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    WaPo ^ | October 16, 2019 | Lateshia Beachum
    The Egyptian government is hailing the discovery of more than 20 wooden coffins as “one of the largest and most important” archaeological finds in the past few years. The coffins were found in Assasif, a necropolis on the west bank of the Nile River. Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities tweeted images of the “intact and sealed coffins” Tuesday. The sarcophagi, which were stacked in two layers in a large tomb, still boasted their original carvings of faces and hands and colors of red, green, white and black that have not faded much over time... Egyptian officials have not given the time...
  • DNA study sheds new light on the people of the Neolithic battle axe culture

    10/14/2019 8:16:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | October 9, 2019 | Uppsala University
    In 1953, a significant burial site belonging to the Battle Axe Culture was found when constructing a roundabout in Linköping. 4,500 years ago, a man and a woman were buried together with a child, a dog and a rich set of grave goods including one of the eponymous battle axes. "Today, we call this site 'Bergsgraven'. I have been curious about this particular burial for a long time. The collaboration of archaeologists with geneticists allows us to understand more about these people as individuals as well as where their ancestors came from," says archaeogeneticist Helena Malmström of Uppsala University, lead...
  • Human Sacrifice In The Pre-Columbian Americas

    10/14/2019 4:29:02 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 39 replies
    In modern minds, the term “human sacrifice” conjures up macabre satanic rituals performed by bloodthirsty barbarians. In the ancient Americas, however, cultures now considered to be highly influential and civilized saw human sacrifice as a necessary part of everyday life. Whether it was to appease the gods or ensure success in battle and agriculture, for the following peoples, the lines between sacrifice and simple survival were often blurred. The Mayans are mostly known for their contributions to astronomy, calendar-making, and mathematics, or for the impressive amount of architecture and artwork that they left behind. They are also believed to be...
  • Harold Bloom, Critic Who Championed Western Canon, Dies at 89

    10/14/2019 1:23:28 PM PDT · by Borges · 33 replies
    NYT ^ | 10/14/2019 | Dinitia Smith
    Harold Bloom, the prodigious literary critic who championed and defended the Western canon in an outpouring of influential books that appeared not only on college syllabuses but also — unusual for an academic — on best-seller lists, died on Monday at a hospital in New Haven. He was 89. His death was confirmed by his wife, Jeanne Bloom, who said he taught his last class at Yale University on Thursday.
  • A Mayan Archaeologist Has Discovered 27 Previously Unknown Ancient Sites—All (from his Computer)

    10/14/2019 4:20:59 AM PDT · by RoosterRedux · 43 replies
    artnet.com ^ | 10/10/2019 | Sarah Cascone
    A resourceful archaeologist has made the stunning discovery of 27 new ancient Mayan sites—all without ever leaving his desk. Takeshi Inomata, an researcher at the University of Arizona, made his discoveries using freely accessible light detection and ranging maps (LiDAR for short) published in 2011 by the National Institute of Statistics and Geography in Mexico, according to the New York Times. The organization created the map, which surveys 4,400 square miles of land in the Mexican states of Tabasco and Chiapas, with an eye toward serving businesses and researchers. An even though the imagery is low resolution, it still suited...
  • 10 Things People Get Wrong About Columbus

    10/13/2019 10:16:07 PM PDT · by Salvation · 102 replies
    TFPstudentaction.org ^ | 10-02-19 | Ben Broussard
    10 Things People Get Wrong About Columbus By Ben Broussard Every Columbus Day is the same:  Christopher Columbus is attacked.  His statues are desecrated.  Public monuments in his honor are threatened or removed.  Every year, more states and cities change Columbus Day to “Indigenous Peoples’ Day” or “Native Americans’ Day.” And left-wing professors smear the once-revered hero who discovered America in 1492. Should Columbus be vilified instead of honored? Was he really a villain? Should we believe these attacks on his good name and character?This post will debunk the most common lies about Columbus.Myth #1: Columbus was sailing to prove...
  • Bronze Age 'New York' discovered, Israeli archaeologists say

    10/13/2019 4:19:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Deutsche Welle ^ | October 2019 | unattributed
    Archaeologists in Israel announced Sunday that they had uncovered a 5,000-year-old city north of Tel Aviv. It is the largest Bronze Age urban area found in the region to date and could fundamentally change ideas of when sophisticated urbanization began taking place in the area, they said. Israel's Antiquities Authority said in a Facebook post that the city was discovered at the En Esur excavation site during road works near Harish, a town some 50 kilometers (30 miles) north of Tel Aviv. The archaeologists described the city as "cosmopolitan and planned." It covered 65 hectares (160 acres) and was home...
  • space Here's More Evidence That Earth Got Hit by Something Huge 12,800 Years Ago

    10/07/2019 9:42:49 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 113 replies
    gizmodo uk ^ | 06 Oct 2019 at 6:00AM | George Dvorsky on
    Along with locations in North and South America, Greenland, Western Europe, and the Middle East, we can now add southern Africa to the list of places where scientists have uncovered evidence of a calamitous event that happened 12,800 years ago. This evidence of a 12,800-year-old platinum spike in Africa is the first to be found on the continent, and it’s yet further evidence in support of the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis. According to this theory, either a comet or asteroid struck Earth during the Pleistocene, triggering an impact winter that saw temperatures plummet around the globe. The associated loss of...
  • Early humans evolved in ecosystems unlike any found today

    10/07/2019 8:00:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | University of Utah
    Because putting together the puzzle of millions-of-years-old ecosystems is a difficult task, many studies have reconstructed the environments by drawing analogies with present-day African ecosystems, such as the Serengeti. A study led by a University of Utah scientist calls into question such approaches and suggests that the vast majority of human evolution occurred in ecosystems unlike any found today... To test for differences between modern and ancient environments, the researchers analyzed a dataset of more than 200 present-day African mammal communities and more than 100 fossil communities spanning the past 7 million years in eastern Africa, a time period encompassing...