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  • Fire Stone: First Fire-Scorched Petrified Wood Found

    08/24/2014 6:27:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    LiveScience ^ | August 12, 2014 | Becky Oskin
    After serving nearly 30 years as a doorstop for a nuclear physicist, a hunk of petrified wood from Arizona has finally been recognized as a one-of-a-kind find. The 210-million-year-old piece of wood contains the first fossilized fire scar ever discovered... Evidence for ancient forest fires predates the dinosaurs, but the clues come from charcoal, not from marks on fossilized trees. Charcoal remains of Earth's oldest fires date back more than 400 million years. No one has ever spotted a fire scar on petrified wood before, said lead study author Bruce Byers, a natural resources consultant from Falls Church, Virginia. That's...
  • Byzantine tomb turned into garbage dump

    08/22/2014 3:19:35 PM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 8 replies
    Hürriyet ^ | August/23/2014
    The Silivrikapı Crypt dates back to the fourth century A.D. at the time of the eastern Roman Emperor Theodosius. To the left of the Silivrikapi Walls in Istanbul’s Fatih neighborhood, there lies a tomb from the fourth century A.D., which is now in ruins. Known as the Silivri Crypt, the tomb, which has been suffering since its discovery in 1988, is now in its worst state. The Silivrikapi Crypt, which was found by Professor Ümit Serdaroglu, dates back to the fourth century A.D. at the time of the eastern Roman Emperor Theodosius. The tomb was restored in 1989 by the...
  • Ecosystem found under Antarctic ice sheet raises hopes for alien life

    08/21/2014 3:30:31 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 8 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 7:04PM BST 20 Aug 2014 | Sarah Knapton
    An entire ecosystem has been discovered under the Antarctic, raising hopes that life could exist in extreme environments, such as other planets in the solar system. Researchers have discovered that tiny life-forms are thriving in a lake under half a mile of pack ice, even though the habitat has not seen sunlight or fresh air for a million years. The discovery has led to excitement among the scientific community who had previously theorized that microorganisms may be able to survive by evolving novel ways to generate energy. And it raises the possibility that similar life could exist on Mars or...
  • Cold, Dark and Alive! Life Discovered in Buried Antarctic Lake

    08/21/2014 12:25:29 AM PDT · by blueplum · 8 replies
    Live Science ^ | August 20, 2014 01:00pm ET | Becky Oskin, Senior Writer
    Antarctica, the coldest place on Earth, teems with microscopic life. Tiny organisms dwell on the ice and live inside glaciers, and now, researchers confirm, a rich microbial ecosystem persists underneath the thick ice sheet, where no sunlight has been felt for millions of years. Nearly 4,000 species of microbes inhabit Lake Whillans, which lies beneath 2,625 feet (800 meters) of ice in West Antarctica, researchers report today (Aug. 20) in the journal Nature. These are the first organisms ever retrieved from a subglacial Antarctic lake. "We found not just that things are alive, but that there's an active ecosystem," said...
  • Oldest Yet Known Metal Object Discovered in the Middle East

    08/22/2014 8:00:53 PM PDT · by fatez · 70 replies
    Live Scient ^ | August 22, 2104 | Charles Q. Choi
    A copper awl is the oldest metal object unearthed to date in the Middle East. The discovery reveals that metals were exchanged across hundreds of miles in this region more than 6,000 years ago, centuries earlier than previously thought, researchers say.
  • Strangest Creature of Ancient Earth linked to Modern Animals

    08/20/2014 9:14:51 PM PDT · by null and void · 47 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | Tue, 08/19/2014 - 3:08pm | University of Cambridge
    Fossil Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale Courtesy of M. R. Smith / Smithsonian InstituteThe spines along its back were thought to be legs, its legs thought to be tentacles along its back, and its head was mistaken for its tail. The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered an important link with modern velvet worms, also known as onychophorans, a relatively small group of worm-like animals that live in tropical...
  • Modern Humans Arrived in Europe Earlier Than Previously Thought, Study Finds

    08/20/2014 2:50:07 PM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 55 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 20 August 2014 | GAUTAM NAIK
    A new study concludes that modern humans arrived in Europe much earlier than previously believed, and clarifies more specifically the long time period they overlapped with Neanderthals. The significant overlap bolsters a theory that the two species met, bred and possibly exchanged or copied vital toolmaking techniques. It represents another twist in an enduring puzzle about human origins: why we triumphed while the better adapted and similarly intelligent Neanderthals died out. The study was published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Neanderthals are our closest known extinct relatives, with about 99.5% of DNA in common with humans. They had a brain...
  • Sea Lions And Seals Likely Spread Tuberculosis To Ancient Peruvians

    08/21/2014 1:43:29 PM PDT · by Theoria · 11 replies
    NPR ^ | 21 Aug 2014 | Michaeleen Doucleff
    When Europeans came to the Americas, they brought some nasty diseases — smallpox, cholera and typhus, to name a few.But one pathogen was already there. And it likely traveled to the shores of South America in a surprising vessel.By analyzing DNA from 1,000-year-old mummies, scientists have found evidence that sea lions and seals were the first to bring tuberculosis to the New World. The sea animals likely infected people living along the coast of Peru and northern Chile, a team from the University of Tubingen in Germany reported Wednesday in the journal Nature."We weren't expecting to find a connection to...
  • Before they left Africa, early modern humans were 'culturally diverse'

    08/21/2014 9:55:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | August 18th, 2014 | Oxford University
    Researchers have carried out the biggest ever comparative study of stone tools dating to between 130,000 and 75,000 years ago found in the region between sub-Saharan Africa and Eurasia. They have discovered there are marked differences in the way stone tools were made, reflecting a diversity of cultural traditions. The study has also identified at least four distinct populations, each relatively isolated from each other with their own different cultural characteristics. The research paper also suggests that early populations took advantage of rivers and lakes that criss-crossed the Saharan desert. A climate model coupled with data about these ancient water...
  • Neanderthals Died Out 10,000 Years Earlier Than Thought, With Help From Modern Humans

    08/21/2014 10:35:33 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 50 replies
    Nationalgeographic.com ^ | 08-20-2014 | Dan Vergano
    New fossil dates show our ancient cousins disappeared 40,000 years ago. The Neanderthals died out about 10,000 years earlier than previously thought, new fossil dating suggests, adding to evidence that the arrival of modern humans in Europe pushed our ancient Stone Age cousins into extinction. (Read "Last of the Neanderthals" in National Geographic magazine.) Neanderthals' mysterious disappearance from the fossil record has long puzzled scholars who wondered whether the species went extinct on its own or was helped on its way out by Europe's first modern human migrants. "When did the Neanderthals disappear, and why?" says Tom Higham of the...
  • Fowl play: Neanderthals were first bird eaters (Update)

    08/18/2014 8:00:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | August 07, 2014 | Brian Reyes
    Neanderthals may have caught, butchered and cooked wild pigeons long before modern humans became regular consumers of bird meat, a study revealed on Thursday. Close examination of 1,724 bones from rock doves, found in a cave in Gibraltar and dated to between 67,000 and 28,000 years ago, revealed cuts, human tooth marks and burns, said a paper in the journal Scientific Reports. This suggested the doves may have been butchered and then roasted, wrote the researchers—the first evidence of hominids eating birds. And the evidence suggested Neanderthals ate much like a latter-day Homo sapiens would tuck into a roast chicken,...
  • Archaeologists shocked to find 5,000-year-old battlefield in prehistoric Cardiff

    08/17/2014 1:17:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Culture24 ^ | 11 August 2014 | Ben Miller
    Archaeologists hoping to discover Roman and Iron Age finds at a Welsh hillfort were shocked to unearth pottery and arrowheads predating their predicted finds by 4,000 years at the home of a powerful Iron Age community, including flint tools and weapons from 3,600 BC. Caerau, an Iron Age residency on the outskirts of Cardiff, would have been a battleground more than 5,000 years ago according to the arrowheads, awls, scrapers and polished stone axe fragments found during the surprising excavation. “Quite frankly, we were amazed,” says Dr Dave Wyatt, the co-director of the dig, from Cardiff University... “But no-one realised...
  • Archaeologists compare Neolithic Kent site to Stonehenge, find Bronze Age funerary monument

    08/17/2014 1:10:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Culture24 ^ | 12 August 2014 | Ben Miller
    Archaeologists suspect a “sacred way” could have led to a henge 6,000 years ago at Iwade Meadows, to the west of the Kent industrial town of Sittingbourne. Positioned on a north-west slope, the 30-metre diameter structure is one of several prehistoric monuments on a north-west slope above the Ridham fleet stream running through the centre of the site. ...says Dr Paul Wilkinson, of... SWAT Archaeology... “The monuments are in a location that would have formerly had extensive views to the Swale Estuary and the Island of Sheppey beyond. “The archaeological evidence suggests that the outer ditch may have originated in...
  • Unearthed Neanderthal site rich in horse bones

    08/17/2014 12:02:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Horsetalk ^ | August 15, 2014 | unattributed
    A site in southwestern France found to be rich in the bones of horses and other large herbivores has provided important insights into the hunting and scavenging habits of Neanderthals. A team of archaeologists from the French archaeological agency Inrap have unearthed hundreds of bones at the Middle Paleolithic site in Quincieux dating back 35,000 to 55,000 years. The work was started due to roadworks in the area, with the outstanding discovery prompting local authorities to extend the time available for excavations. The excavation of the prehistoric site, on a hill overlooking the old bed of the Saone River, revealed...
  • ‘Significant’ human burial site uncovered by archaeologists in Cyprus

    08/17/2014 11:49:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Cyprus Mail ^ | Thursday, August 14th, 2014 | Elias Hazou
    The Department of Antiquities has announced the completion of the 2014 excavation season of the Kourion Urban Space project (KUSP) under the direction of Dr. Thomas W. Davis of the Tandy Institute for Archaeology at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas. This year’s excavations uncovered the remains of more victims of the massive earthquake that destroyed Kourion in the fourth century AD. According to an official announcement, initial analysis indicates the remains consist of two adults, a juvenile, and an infant. The family was found huddled together; the infant was found under the right arm of one of...
  • Ancient Maya Cities Found in Jungle

    08/16/2014 9:23:35 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Aug 15, 2014 12:01 PM ET // by | Rossella Lorenzi
    Sprajc and his team found the massive remains as they further explored the area around Chactun, a large Maya city discovered by the Slovenian archaeologist in 2013. No other site has so far been located in this area, which extends over some 1800 square miles, between the so-called Rio Bec and Chenes regions, both known for their characteristic architectural styles fashioned during the Late and Terminal Classic periods, around 600 - 1000 A.D. One of the cities featured an extraordinary facade with an entrance representing the open jaws of an earth monster. The site was actually visited in the 1970s...
  • 200-year-old booze found in shipwreck -- and it's still drinkable

    08/15/2014 5:24:51 PM PDT · by ButThreeLeftsDo · 29 replies
    CBSNews.com ^ | 8/15/14 | Agata Blaszczak-Boxe/
    A 200-year-old stoneware seltzer bottle that was recently recovered from a shipwreck at the bottom of the Baltic Sea contains alcohol, according to the results of a preliminary analysis. Researchers discovered the well-preserved and sealed bottle in June, while exploring the so-called F53.31 shipwreck in Gdańsk Bay, close to the Polish coast. Preliminary laboratory tests have now shown the bottle contains a 14-percent alcohol distillate, which may be vodka or a type of gin called jenever, most likely diluted with water. The chemical composition of the alcohol corresponds to that of the original brand of "Selters" water that is engraved...
  • Greek tomb at Amphipolis is 'important discovery'

    08/13/2014 10:23:09 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 3 replies
    BBC News ^ | 13th August 2014 | BBC News
    'Archaeologists unearthing a burial site at Amphipolis in northern Greece have made an "extremely important find", says Greek PM Antonis Samaras. Experts believe the tomb belonged to an important figure dating back to the last quarter of the Fourth Century BC. A large mound complex has been unearthed at the Kasta hill site in the past two years. Lead archaeologist Katerina Peristeri said it certainly dated from after the death of Alexander the Great.'
  • Mystery over massive Alexander-era tomb unearthed in Greece

    08/13/2014 1:25:20 AM PDT · by ApplegateRanch · 14 replies
    Yahoo ^ | Aug 12, 2014
    Archaeologists have unearthed a funeral mound dating from the time of Alexander the Great and believed to be the largest ever discovered in Greece, but are stumped about who was buried in it. Prime Minister Antonis Samaras on Tuesday described the find as "unique" after he visited the site, which dates to the era following Alexander's death, at the ancient town of Amphipolis in northern Greece. "It is certain that we stand before an exceptionally important find," Samaras said in a statement. "This is a monument with unique characteristics." Hidden under a hill at the ancient town, the Hellenistic-era mound...
  • Family Strikes Gold on Sunken Treasure Hunt -- Again

    08/02/2014 6:24:16 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 8 replies
    ABC News ^ | Jul 30, 2014
    A Florida man literally struck gold when he unearthed a "priceless" religious artifact from the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. The sunken treasure was discovered at the site of a shipwreck that happened nearly 300 years ago off the coast of Ft. Pierce. It's the missing piece of a necklace that was discovered at the same wreck in 1989. Called a pyx, the ornate gold trinket is a Spanish artifact used by priests to hold the communion host, Brent Brisben, the operations manager of Queens Jewels, told ABC News. "We find shipwrecked artifacts on a daily basis, but it's more...
  • Vikings Invade Spanish Village in 'Bloody' Festival

    08/04/2014 3:49:43 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 25 replies
    The Local ^ | 04 Aug 2014
    Fifty thousand 'Vikings' landed on the shores of a small village in northern Spain on Sunday, as part of an annual festival which commemorates a Scandinavian invasion which took place a thousand years ago. On the first Sunday of August, Catoria is flooded with ‘blood-thirsty’ men and women from all across Europe. Dressed in animal skins and armed with the finest plastic weaponry, they disembark on the rugged Galician coast with the aim of capturing the Towers of the West, just as Norway’s King Olaf did a millennia ago. The ‘blood’ spilt during the simulated battles does taste distinctly like...
  • As Islamic Militants Destroy Iraq Heritage, a Stunning Find in Kurdistan

    08/10/2014 5:13:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Rudaw ^ | July 22, 2014 | Alexandra Di Stefano Pironti
    While the history of civilization is being demolished by war and religious zealots in the rest of Iraq, in the Kurdistan Region archeologists are marveling at a stunning discovery: the remains of a long-lost temple from the biblical kingdom of Urartu, dating back to the 9th century BC. Kurdish archaeologist Dlshad Marf Zamua, who has studied the columns and other artifacts at the find, told Rudaw these were unearthed piecemeal over the past four decades by villagers going about their lives, digging for cultivation or construction. But only recently, after the discovery of life-size human statues and the unearthed columns,...
  • 5000-year-old Cochno Stone carving may be revealed

    08/10/2014 5:04:32 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    The Scotsman, tall and handsome built ^ | July 17, 2014 | Craig Brown
    The Cochno Stone in West Dunbartonshire bears what is considered to be the finest example of Bronze Age “cup and ring” carvings in Europe. The stone, which measures 42ft by 26ft, was discovered by the Rev James Harvey in 1887 on farmland near what is now the Faifley housing estate on the edge of Clydebank. It is covered in about 90 carved indentations, or “cups”, and grooved spirals, along with a ringed cross and a pair of four-toed feet... In 1964, Glasgow University archaeologists recommended it should be buried under several feet of soil to protect the carvings from further...
  • Warriors' Bones Reveal Bizarre Iron Age Rituals

    08/09/2014 3:17:33 PM PDT · by lbryce · 11 replies
    Live Science ^ | July 31, 2014 | Stephanie Pappas
    The bones of dozens of Iron Age warriors found in Denmark were collected and ritually mutilated after spending months on the battlefield, archaeologists say. At least six months after the soldiers died, their bones were collected, scraped of remaining flesh, sorted and dumped in a lake. Some were handled in a truly bizarre manner; for instance, four pelvises were found strung on a stick. "We think it's a kind of ritual closure of the war," said Mads Kähler Holst, project manager at the dig and head of the department of archaeology at the Moesgård Museum in Denmark. The victors seem...
  • Prehistoric animal remains discovered in U.S.

    08/09/2014 12:18:58 PM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 12 replies
    abc 25 wpbf ^ | 8-9-2014 | By Jareen Imam
    The cave is cool and damp -- prefect for preserving prehistoric remains, Meachen says. "It's like a refrigerator in there, and probably has been for 20,000 years," she said. "Some of the bones we're finding there have collagen in them. That is where you could get the ancient DNA." The scientists saw bones falling out of a part of the cave, and decided to start digging there. "That was the fossil layer," she said. "There is so much to dig. We have two more years for funding that we can be out there, so we are going to try to...
  • Wyoming cave dig unearths bones of ancient horses, cheetahs and bison

    08/09/2014 2:33:26 AM PDT · by blueplum · 31 replies
    Reuters ^ | August 8, 2014 5:23pm EDT | LAURA ZUCKERMAN
    (Reuters) - Scientists excavating an ancient Wyoming sinkhole containing a rare trove of fossils of Ice Age mammals have unearthed hundreds of bones of such prehistoric animals as American cheetahs, a paleontologist said on Friday. The two-week dig by an international team of researchers led by Des Moines University paleontologist Julie Meachen marked the first exploration of Natural Trap Cave at the base of the Bighorn Mountains in north-central Wyoming since its initial discovery in the 1970s. Meachen said the extensive excavation that began late last month uncovered roughly 200 large bones of animals like horses that roamed North America...
  • Oldest Animal-Shaped Structures Discovered in Peru

    03/30/2012 1:02:21 AM PDT · by Theoria · 9 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 29 Mar 2012 | Stephanie Pappas
    Manmade mounds shaped like orcas, condors and even a duck may be the oldest evidence of animal mounds outside of North America, according to former University of Missouri anthropologist. Writing in the magazine Antiquity, Robert Benfer, a professor emeritus, describes a series of mounds, some more than 1,300 feet (400 meters) across, in coastal valleys in Peru. Archaeological evidence at the sites pegs some at more than 4,000 years old. "It's going to shake everybody's views," Benfer told LiveScience. "The previous oldest animal figures were at Nazca and they're 2,000 years old." The Nazca Lines are simple stone outlines of...
  • ‘Nazca Lines’ discovered in Kazakhstan

    09/27/2009 4:56:31 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 51 replies · 2,272+ views
    discoveryon ^ | September 24, 2009
    Media outlets as well as the official government website in Kazakhstan are reporting the surprise discovery of local geoglyphs or ‘Nazca Lines’. Geoglyphs are drawings created on the ground by arranging stones or removing the top layers of earth. These designs typically cover large areas. The most famous geoglyphs are those found in the Nazca desert in Peru. These show hummingbirds, spiders, monkeys, fish, sharks, llamas, and lizards. The Kazakhstan Geoglyphs (photo above, thanks to photojournalist N. Dorogov) appear to depict a humanoid figure wedged between two unusual structures. The drawings are located in the remote Karatau Mountains in South...
  • Mystery of the Nazca Lines deepens: Gales and sandstorms reveal geoglyphs of a 'snake and llama' ...

    08/06/2014 8:20:17 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 32 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | 19:51 EST, 4 August 2014 | Victoria Woollaston
    The mysteries of the Nazca Lines carved into the Peruvian desert have intensified after gales and sandstorms revealed previously unseen ancient designs. A pilot discovered a geoglyph of what appears to be a 196ft-long (60 metre) snake, as well as a type of camelid - such as a llama - above an unidentified bird. These new lines join existing geoglyphs of a dog, hummingbird, condor and a monkey, thought to have been drawn by the ancient Nazca people between the first and sixth centuries The discovery was made by pilot Eduardo Herrán Gómez de la Torre as he flew over...
  • Famous Italian statue in thong and feather boa row

    08/05/2014 4:12:13 AM PDT · by bryan999 · 14 replies
    A row has broken out in Italy after a photographer dressed up a famous 2,500-year-old statue in a leopard-skin thong and pink feather boa. The Riace Bronzes, of Greek warriors, are two of the nation's greatest archaeological treasures. Photographer Gerald Bruneau was given permission to shoot the warriors at their museum in Reggio Calabria. However, work was halted when he was discovered dressing the statues. The museum called the images "terrible". A local politician has now demanded a judicial inquiry. The images were published on Italy's Dagospia website.
  • The Mysterious Ancient Artifacts of Sanxingdui That Have Rewritten Chinese History

    08/05/2014 7:13:08 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    theepochtimes.com ^ | August 3, 2014 | April Holloway
    The objects found in the sacrificial pits included animal-faced sculptures and masks with dragon ears, open mouths and grinning teeth; human-like heads with gold foil masks; decorative animals including dragons, snakes, and birds; a giant wand, a sacrificial altar, a 4-meter-tall (13-foot-tall) bronze tree; axes, tablets, rings, knives, and hundreds of other unique items. Among the collection was also the world’s largest and best preserved bronze upright human figure, measuring 2.62 meters (8 feet). However, by far the most striking findings were dozens of large bronze masks and heads represented with angular human features, exaggerated almond-shaped eyes, straight noses, square...
  • Researchers see violent era in ancient Southwest

    08/04/2014 9:45:52 AM PDT · by fishtank · 45 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 8-4-2014 | Phys Org
    Researchers see violent era in ancient Southwest
  • The Quest to Find 12 Hidden Treasures From a 1982 Treasure Hunt Book

    08/02/2014 6:03:11 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 13 replies
    The 1982 treasure hunt book, The Secret, has clues to 12 hidden gems. Only two have been found. James Renner is on a quest to discover the others, and he invites you to join the hunt.The Secret: A Treasure Hunt! first set its hooks in me when I was eight years old. My mother had taken me to the little library in Bedford, outside Cleveland, and in the stacks there, I discovered this small bound book with a strange painting on the cover that hinted at some fantastic mystery. I took the book home with me and read about the...
  • The American Flag Daily: Nautilus And The North Pole

    08/03/2014 7:07:31 AM PDT · by Master Zinja · 11 replies
    The American Flag Daily ^ | August 3, 2014 | JasonZ
    On this date in 1958, the USS Nautilus, the first nuclear-powered submarine, became the first naval vessel to reach the North Pole, having traveled under the icepack from the Barrow Sea across the North Pole and eventually surfacing north of Greenland. SSN-571 would be decommissioned in 1980, declared a National Historic Landmark in 1982, and is now a museum ship in Groton, Connecticut.
  • Merovingian Necropolis Reveals 300 Graves

    08/02/2014 12:51:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Thursday, July 31, 2014 | Source: INRAP
    A team of archaeologists working on a site at Saint-Aubin-des-Champs in France have discovered the remains of a Merovingian necropolis dating to the 5th -7th centuries AD... The graves were found at a variety of depths with some up to 1.50 m deep. Each burial contained the deceased once contained within a wooden coffin, now completely rotted away. An examination of the contents of these burials allowed them to be split into three main groups or periods of inhumation. Fewer grave goods are in evidence after 5th century AD as the population has become Christian. 7th century AD burials are...
  • Ice age lion figurine: Ancient fragment of ivory belonging to 40,000 year old animal figurine....

    08/02/2014 10:07:57 AM PDT · by Theoria · 12 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 30 July 2014 | Science Daily
    Archaeologists from the University of Tübingen have found an ancient fragment of ivory belonging to a 40,000 year old animal figurine. Both pieces were found in the Vogelherd Cave in southwestern Germany, which has yielded a number of remarkable works of art dating to the Ice Age. The mammoth ivory figurine depicting a lion was discovered during excavations in 1931. The new fragment makes up one side of the figurine's head, and the sculpture may be viewed at the Tübingen University Museum from 30 July. "The figurine depicts a lion," says Professor Nicholas Conard of Tübingen University's Institute of Prehistory...
  • Booty Makes Big Discovery On Treasure Coast Wreck Site. (17th century) Gold Pyx.

    08/02/2014 10:13:34 AM PDT · by NYer · 8 replies
    Shown below are two parts of the same item found 25 years apart.  The front part (on the right) was found 25 years ago, while the back (left) was recently found by the crew of the Booty.  Treasure Coast Finds. Photo source: Video from Orlando Sentinel link below. A truly great discovery was made this summer by a Treasure Coast salvage crew.  In fact a lot of discoveries were made, but the one I want to focus on today isn't a gold coin or even a bunch of gold coins, but something more important. 25 years ago a very intricate...
  • Viking warriors and treasures are buried beneath Dublin

    08/02/2014 9:51:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    IrishCentral ^ | July 27,2014 | Staff Writers
    A massive research project, 15 years in the making, has revealed that beneath Dublin’s modern streets lies a trove of buried Viking warriors and artifacts. Archaeologists say the number of Viking warrior burials in Dublin is astounding. A project cataloguing these burials was began in 1999. Now nearing its conclusion, the project will result in the publication of an 800-page tome titled ‘Viking Graves and Grave Goods in Ireland.’ ...the National Museum of Ireland... houses a Viking exhibition, which includes a ninth century Viking skeleton with sword and spearhead, found in the War Memorial Park, Islandbridge in 1934. Between the...
  • Wari geoglyph found in southern Peru

    08/02/2014 9:09:20 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Peru this Week ^ | July 24, 2014 | Rachel Chase
    Archaeologists undertaking investigations in the Peruvian region of Arequipa discovered a large geoglyph last December. According to Peru21, the geoglyph is approximately 60 meters by 40 meters and is located in the province of Caylloma. Peru21 reports that the initial archaeological investigations were performed at the request of the Consorcio Angostura – Siguas, an agroindustrial company that is executing an irrigation project in the area. Consorcio Angostura – Siguas would have ordered the investigation in order to receive a certificate from the Ministry of Culture stating that there were no archaeological sites in the area, allowing them to continue with...
  • Analysis confirms dairy farming in prehistoric Finland

    08/02/2014 9:04:13 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Wednesday, July 30, 2014 | University of Bristol
    By comparing the residues found in the walls of cooking pots from two separate eras and cultures, dating to circa 3900 BC to 3300 BC and circa 2500 BC, the more recent pottery fragments showed evidence of milk fats. This coincided with the transition from a culture of hunting and fishing – relying mainly on marine foods – to the arrival of ‘Corded Ware’ settlements which we now know saw the introduction of animal domestication. Lead author Dr Lucy Cramp, from the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Bristol University, said: “This is remarkable evidence which proves that four and...
  • Buried secrets of medieval Leith uncovered

    08/02/2014 8:52:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Edinburgh Evening News ^ | July 25, 2014 | Katie Richardson
    Buried secrets of life in medieval Leith have been uncovered after the results of a five-year project to analyse bodies discovered during an archaeological dig were unveiled... the remains of almost 400 men, women and children were discovered on the Constitution Street site – previously a section of the South Leith Parish Church’s graveyard – during preparation work for the trams in 2009... bones which have been dated between the 14th and 17th centuries. One skeleton, of a woman aged between 25 and 35 who died anywhere between 1360 and 1435, was found to be 4ft 11in, 1.5 inches shorter...
  • The Atomic Bomb: It Was Always Right

    08/02/2014 8:08:59 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 251 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | August 2, 2014 | Larry Provost
    This week Major Theodore Van Kirk, the last surviving Veteran of the Enola Gay that dropped the first atomic bomb on Japan, joined the rest of his comrades. His passing is a reminder of why using the atomic bomb was the right thing. In August 1945 the Allied Powers, led by the United States, were at war with Imperial Japan in the latter days of World War II. Japan would not give up. For every ten thousand Japanese soldiers that were killed by the Allies only a minuscule amount gave up; usually in the single digits. We were at...
  • Warriors' Bones Reveal Bizarre Iron Age Rituals

    08/01/2014 1:05:34 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    Live Science ^ | | July 31, 2014 08:16am ET | Stephanie Pappas, Contributor
    The bones of dozens of Iron Age warriors found in Denmark were collected and ritually mutilated after spending months on the battlefield, archaeologists say. At least six months after the soldiers died, their bones were collected, scraped of remaining flesh, sorted and dumped in a lake. Some were handled in a truly bizarre manner; for instance, four pelvises were found strung on a stick. ... The site of the boneyard is in East Jutland, in a wetland area known as Alken Enge. Drainage work and peat digging have been turning up ancient human remains in this bog for decades, Holst...
  • Wine cup used by Pericles found in grave north of Athens

    07/31/2014 5:12:42 AM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 34 replies
    ekathimerini.com ^ | Wednesday Jul 30, 2014 (14:14)
    The cup was likely used in a wine symposium when Pericles was in his twenties, and the six men who drank from it scrawled their names as a memento, experts say. A cup believed to have been used by Classical Greek statesman Pericles has been found in a pauper's grave in north Athens, according to local reports Wednesday. The ceramic wine cup, smashed in 12 pieces, was found during building construction in the northern Athens suburb of Kifissia, Ta Nea daily said. After piecing it together, archaeologists were astounded to find the name "Pericles" scratched under one of its handles,...
  • Origins of Mysterious World Trade Center Ship Revealed

    07/29/2014 5:49:18 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 27 replies
    Yahoo UK News ^ | 29th July 2014 | Megan Gannon
    'In July 2010, amid the gargantuan rebuilding effort at the site of the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan, construction workers halted the backhoes when they uncovered something unexpected just south of where the Twin Towers once stood. At 22 feet (6.7 meters) below today's street level, in a pit that would become an underground security and parking complex, excavators found the mangled skeleton of a long-forgotten wooden ship. Now, a new report finds that tree rings in those waterlogged ribs show the vessel was likely built in 1773, or soon after, in a small shipyard near Philadelphia. What's more,...
  • Peru: Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Astronomy Lab In Peruvian Ruins

    07/27/2014 6:49:07 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 9 replies
    IBTimes ^ | 7-26-14 | Kathleen Caulderwood
    Archeologists have stumbled upon a site where ancient people observed the stars thousands of years ago in Peru, a country famous for using drones to help uncover and map archeological treasures, as Reuters reported. Excavators working on a complex at Licurnique, in the country’s northern region, have uncovered evidence of an “astronomical laboratory,” that dates back between 3,500 and 4,000 years, according to Peru This Week.
  • Researchers find first sign that tyrannosaurs hunted in packs

    07/27/2014 6:46:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | Wednesday 23 July 2014 | Ian Sample
    The collective noun is a terror of tyrannosaurs: a pack of the prehistoric predators, moving and hunting in numbers, for prey that faced the fight of its life. That tyrannosaurs might have hunted in groups has long been debated by dinosaur experts, but with so little to go on, the prospect has remained firmly in the realm of speculation. But researchers in Canada now claim to have the strongest evidence yet that the ancient beasts did move around in packs. At a remote site in north-east British Columbia - in the west of Canada - they uncovered the first known...
  • Living Relatives Of Iceman Mummy Found (Ötzi, 5,300 Years Old)

    10/14/2013 9:09:02 PM PDT · by blam · 18 replies
    Fox News ^ | 10-14-2013 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Living Relatives Of Iceman Mummy Found By Rossella Lorenzi/ Published October 14, 2013/ Discovery News A reconstruction of Otzi the Iceman -- a remarkably well preserved 5,300-year-old mummy sometimes lovingly called "Frozen Frit" -- created by Dutch forensic experts. (HEIKE ENGEL-21LUX / SDTIROLER ARCHOLOGIEMUSEUM / NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DEUTSCHLAND) Ötzi the Iceman has at least 19 living male relatives in the Austrian Tirol, according to a genetic study into the origins of the people who now inhabit the region. Scientists from the Institute of Legal Medicine at Innsbruck Medical University analyzed DNA samples taken from 3,700 blood donors in the Tyrol...
  • “Out of Africa” Theory Officially Debunked

    07/27/2014 9:49:37 AM PDT · by djf · 52 replies
    Scientific evidence refuting the theory of modern humanity’s African genesis is common knowledge among those familiar with the most recent scientific papers on the human Genome, Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomes. Regrettably, within mainstream press and academia circles, there seems to be a conspicuous – and dare we say it – deliberate vacuum when it comes to reporting news of these recent studies and their obvious implications.
  • Artists Recreate the Face Otzi, a 5,300-Year-Old Iceman Mummy

    02/25/2011 10:50:46 AM PST · by Kartographer · 47 replies · 2+ views
    FoxNews ^ | 2/25/11
    In the year 3289 BC, Otzi trekked up the Schnalstal glacier in the Italian Alps. The Neolithic guy -- dubbed Otzi the Iceman, or Frozen Fritz -- wore a coat and leggings made of sheep's fur and moccasins made of cattle leather as he climbed, having just polished off his last meal: unleavened bread and meat. Severely wounded by an arrow and possibly dispatched with a blow to the head by a cudgel, he died, his body froze and was mummified, and he lay in place for a very, very long time.