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  • 4,000-year-old Sumerian port found in southern Iraq

    03/22/2018 12:47:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Daily Sabah ^ | March 20, 2018 | DPA
    Sumerians settled in Mesopotamia, an area of modern Iraq known as the cradle of civilization, more than 6,000 years ago, where they invented writing, the wheel, the plough, irrigation, the 24-hour day and the first city-states. Mission co-leaders Licia Romano and Franco D'Agostino of Rome's Sapienza University said Tuesday they discovered one of their ancient ports in Abu Tbeirah, a desert site about 7 kilometers (4.3 miles) south of the town of Nasiriyah. The port's basin, measuring 130 meters (142 yards) in length and 40 meters (44 yards) wide, with a capacity equal to nine Olympics-sized pools, may have also...
  • Oldest DNA from Africa Offers Clues to Mysterious Ancient Culture

    03/20/2018 5:30:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Science ^ | March 15, 2018 | Ann Gibbons
    About 15,000 years ago, in the oldest known cemetery in the world, people buried their dead in sitting positions with beads and animal horns, deep in a cave in what is now Morocco. These people were also found with small, sophisticated stone arrowheads and points, and 20th century archaeologists assumed they were part of an advanced European culture that had migrated across the Mediterranean Sea to North Africa. But now, their ancient DNA -- the oldest ever obtained from Africans -- shows that these people had no European ancestry. Instead, they were related to both Middle Easterners and sub-Saharan Africans,...
  • Site of huge Iron Age feast celebration found on Orkney

    03/20/2018 12:35:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Scotsman ^ | Thursday, March 15, 2018 | Alison Campsie
    Archaeologists have identified the site of a huge Iron Age feast on Orkney where more than 10,000 animals were cooked and eaten in a vast cliff top celebration. Tests have shown that horses, cattle, red deer and otters were on the menu at the gathering above Windwick Bay, South Ronaldsay, more than 1,700 years ago... A large number of jewellery fragments and tools have already been discovered at the site, where the remains of an Iron Age broch and metalworking site can be found, with recent radiocarbon tests carried out at a midden -- or rubbish tip -- nearby. Examination...
  • Concrete Poured on World's Oldest Temple Gobeklitepe

    03/20/2018 12:03:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    BIA News ^ | 20 March 2018 | unattributed, soon to be political prisoner
    "They'd said they wouldn't pour concrete on the protected area" "They've dismantled some parts of wooden walkway project that started in 2013 because they plotted another route. The new route is right on where Klaus keeps spacious to prevent crowded guest groups. They had said that they would build the walkway down to the guest center and wouldn't pour concrete on the protected when Klaus was alive". "I say 'destruction', they say 'road'" "They are doing everything in a rush that Klaus didn't want as he knew it will destroy Göbeklitepe. I cannot explain the extend of the destruction which...
  • Cache of Iron Age Coins Discovered in England

    03/20/2018 5:00:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | editors
    CHIDDINGSTONE, ENGLAND -- Kent Live reports that a hoard of gold coins was discovered by a metal detectorist in a farmer’s field in southeast England. The ten coins are thought to have been minted in northern France about 2,000 years ago. The Gauls may have used the coins to pay or bribe mercenaries to fight against Julius Caesar. Archaeologist Claire Donithorn of the Eden Valley Museum said the coins are being held at the British Museum, but may be returned to the local area. "They date from precisely the time when Britain emerged from prehistoric to historic times," she said....
  • FBI dig at rumored site of fabled Civil War treasure comes up short

    03/20/2018 3:09:35 AM PDT · by BBell · 31 replies ^ | 3/20/18 | Lukas Mikelionis
    The FBI came out empty handed at the remote Pennsylvania site where Civil War-era gold treasure is rumored to be buried, officials said Monday. Dozens of FBI agents, Pennsylvania state officials and members of a treasure-hunting group dug in a rural site where local lore has it that a Civil War-era gold shipment bound for a U.S. Mint in Philadelphia was either lost or hidden around the time of the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. President Abraham Lincoln reportedly ordered the shipment to pay Union Army soldiers, according to a local treasure-hunting group called Finders Keepers.The FBI said it conducted...
  • Ballast: Creating Cultural Connections Across Time and Space

    03/20/2018 4:26:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    object matters ^ | probably March 2018 | Mats Burström
    Along the shores in Newfoundland there is an abundance of flint to be found although this material does not occur naturally in the area. The reason for the presence of flint is that it was used as ballast by sailing vessels in the transatlantic migratory fishery that started in the beginning of the sixteenth century and lasted for about four centuries. During this period several millions of tons of material were relocated as ballast from the coasts of England and France to Newfoundland. Among this huge amount of relocated material there are some supposedly Palaeolithic artefacts that have been brought...
  • Ancient Naples port found [2500 year old site of Palepolis]

    03/20/2018 3:22:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    ANSA ^ | March 15, 2018 | unattributed
    An ancient port in Naples, believed to be the harbour 25 centuries ago when it was called Palepolis by the Greeks who ousted the Etruscans, has been discovered in the sea off the iconic Castel dell'Ovo, archaeologists said Thursday. Underwater archaeologists have found four submerged tunnels, a three-metre-wide street with cart-furrows still there and a long trench for soldiers, six meters down to the right of the castle, Neapolitan archaeologist Mario Negri said... The first settlements in the area were made in the ninth century BC, nearly 3000 years ago, when Anatolian and Achaean merchants and travellers arrived in the...
  • Diet of the Ancient Mariner

    03/20/2018 3:15:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Hakai Magazine ^ | March 14th, 2018 | Jeremy Hsu
    In 1619, a hurricane sank the English merchant ship Warwick in Bermuda's Castle Harbor. The struggling settlers of Jamestown, Virginia, were desperately awaiting the shipload of fresh supplies, and keenly felt the loss. Almost 400 years later, artifacts from the wreck are helping archaeologist Grace Tsai uncover if unrefrigerated food and drink remained edible and nutritious during long sea voyages. Since 2012, Tsai, a doctoral candidate in nautical archaeology at Texas A&M University, has been studying archaeological records of provisions from three different shipwrecks from the 16th and 17th centuries and analyzing shipboard diets based on modern nutritional guidelines. Now,...
  • USS Juneau, warship that sank with 600 aboard, discovered 4km down in Pacific

    03/20/2018 1:02:10 AM PDT · by US Navy Vet · 58 replies
    Guardian News ^ | 20 Mar 2018 | Eleanor Ainge Roy
    An expedition in the South Pacific ocean funded by Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Paul Allen has discovered the wreckage of a famous US warship that was attacked by the Japanese during the second world war, claiming more than 600 lives. The billionaire’s personal search team located the remains of the USS Juneau off the coast of the Solomon Islands on St Patrick’s Day. The Juneau was sunk by Japanese torpedoes in November 1942, claiming the lives of 687 men, including five brothers known as the Sullivans from Waterloo, Iowa. The men became navy heroes and had a destroyer named after...
  • The Mystery of Maine’s Viking Penny

    12/27/2017 4:51:40 PM PST · by Eurotwit · 45 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | DECEMBER 21, 2017 | BY SARAH LASKOW
    The coin is the real deal, but how did it get all the way from Norway? ON FEBRUARY 6, 1979, KOLBJØRN Skaare, a Norwegian numismatist with a tall, wide forehead, walked into the Maine State Museum to see the coin. Just a few years earlier, he had published Coins and Coinage in Viking-Age Norway, a doctoral thesis that grew from the decade-plus he had spent as a keeper at the University of Oslo’s Coin Cabinet. The first specialist to examine the coin in person, he had just a day with it before Bruce J. Bourque, the museum’s lead archaeologist, had...
  • Tree rings tell tale of drought in Mongolia over the last 2,000 years

    03/19/2018 9:41:20 PM PDT · by George - the Other · 15 replies
    Science News ^ | March 19, 2018 | DAN GARISTO
    "It was suspected that a harsh drought from about 2000 to 2010 that killed tens of thousands of livestock was unprecedented in the region’s history and primarily the result of human-caused climate change. But the tree ring data show that the dry spell, while rare in its severity, was not outside the realm of natural climate variability, researchers report online March 14 in Science Advances."
  • Famed Archaeologist 'Discovered' His Own Fakes at 9,000-Year-Old Settlement

    03/19/2018 6:05:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Live Science ^ | March 12, 2018 | Owen Jarus
    A famed archaeologist well-known for discovering the sprawling 9,000-year-old settlement in Turkey called Çatalhöyük seems to have faked several of his ancient findings and may have run a "forger's workshop" of sorts, one researcher says. James Mellaart, who died in 2012, created some of the "ancient" murals at Çatalhöyük that he supposedly discovered; he also forged documents recording inscriptions that were found at Beyköy, a village in Turkey, said geoarchaeologist Eberhard Zangger, president of the Luwian Studies Foundation. Zangger examined Mellaart's apartment in London between Feb. 24 and 27, finding "prototypes," as Zangger calls them, of murals and inscriptions that...
  • When Rome Fell, the Chief Culprits Were Climate and Disease. Sound Familiar?

    03/19/2018 5:36:17 AM PDT · by C19fan · 50 replies
    Undark ^ | March 16, 2018 | Madeline Ostrander
    ‘ARE WE ROME?” asked the author Cullen Murphy a decade ago, in a provocatively titled book that compared the 21st-century United States with the final days of the Roman Empire. Lately there’s been no shortage of Cassandras who emphatically answer yes. “The speed with which we’re recapitulating the decline and fall of Rome is impressive,” opined the conservative commentator Bill Kristol, in a tweet this past July, taking issue with President Trump’s treatment of the press. “What took Rome centuries we’re achieving in months.” And the Cornell historian Barry Strauss bemoaned the parallels between alleged American failings and those of...
  • UCLA archaeologist digs deep to reveal Easter Island torsos

    03/18/2018 2:16:18 PM PDT · by Aliska · 41 replies
    UCLA Newsroom ^ | May 30, 2012 | Cynthia Lee
    As the director of the Easter Island Statue Project — the longest-continuous collaborative artifact inventory ever conducted on the Polynesian island that belongs to Chile — Van Tilburg has opened a window on one of the greatest achievements of Pacific prehistory on one of the most remote inhabited islands in the world. She and her team of resident Rapa Nui have spent nine years locating and meticulously documenting the nearly 1,000 statues on the island, determining their symbolic meaning and function, and conserving them using state-of-the-art techniques. After spending four months over the last two years excavating two of the...
  • Has $55MILLION of gold lost during the Battle of Gettysburg finally been discovered? [tr]

    03/17/2018 5:25:21 AM PDT · by C19fan · 22 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 17, 2018 | Minyvonne Burke
    Has $55million worth of lost gold from the Civil War era been found in central Pennsylvania? That's what locals seem to believe after FBI agents, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and treasure hunters Dennis and Kem Parada were seen digging around a remote area in Benezette Township, called Dents Run. Dennis and his son Kem, the owners of the treasure hunting organization Finders Keepers, have claimed for years that 52 gold bars were buried under a fire pit at Dents Run more than 150 years ago during the Battle of Gettysburg.
  • Legend says a load of Union gold went missing during the Civil War. Did the FBI just find it?

    03/18/2018 1:25:48 PM PDT · by BBell · 35 replies ^ | 3/17/18 | Cleve R. Wootson Jr.
    As a 155-year-old legend goes, a Union Army wagon train left Wheeling, W.Va., before the Battle of Gettysburg, carrying two tons of gold, but never completed its 400-mile mission. The gold was supposed to be used to pay Union soldiers. But it first had to make it to the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia, according to the Associated Press. It never did. The wagon train traveled northeast and was last spotted in St. Marys, Pa. Searchers found the wagons and the bodies of dead soldiers — and the gold was gone. But maybe not forever. On Friday, dozens of FBI agents,...
  • Modern humans interbred with Denisovans twice in history

    03/16/2018 4:46:53 AM PDT · by Makana · 50 replies
    Science Daily ^ | March 15, 2018 | Cell Press
    Modern humans co-existed and interbred not only with Neanderthals, but also with another species of archaic humans, the mysterious Denisovans.
  • Medieval 'pot o' gold' discovered by construction workers

    03/16/2018 1:48:23 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 43 replies
    Just in time for Saint Patrick’s Day — two construction workers in Holland have discovered a real-life “pot o’ gold.” The workers from water company Oasen made the stunning find when they were laying pipes in the new town of Hoef and Haag, in the province of Utrecht, LiveScience reports. During the construction work, they dug up a medieval cooking pot that contained 12 gold and 462 silver coins. The coins have been dated to the 15th century. It's unclear at this point who will keep the coins. After finding the pot, "it literally and figuratively rained coins," the company...
  • Has lost Civil War gold bound for Philly been found?

    03/16/2018 5:54:42 PM PDT · by mdittmar · 20 replies ^ | March 16, 2018 | Jason Nark
    When Sgt. Jim Connors tipped back a few too many, he’d talk about the legend of lost Civil War gold, and boast about its whereabouts deep in the hills of Western Pennsylvania. Connors, according to a 1978 United Press International article in the Pittsburgh Press, was part of a special Union detachment tasked with transporting 26 gold bars, each weighing 50 pounds, from West Virginia to the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia in the summer of 1863.According to one version of the story, Connors staggered into Lock Haven, in north-central Pennsylvania, as the lone survivor of an ambush. The gold was...