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  • ...Bizarre new pyramid ... opens in Pompeii to house volcano exhibition

    05/26/2015 7:03:14 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | By Jack Crone
    The 12-metre high pyramid allows visitors to walk along a track before entering it. It is built almost entirely out of wood with an inner dome made of fiberboard Inside, they will be find the casts of Roman citizens killed more than 1,900 years ago in 79AD when Mount Vesuvius erupted with devastating force destroying the Roman towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum. The plaster casts are placed in the centre, while the exhibition also features archival photographs documenting the work in the excavations in the 19th and 20th centuries. The photos are partly broken down into fragments and then reassembled...
  • Some Devoted New Englanders Went for a Stroll in 1651 and Haven't Stopped Since

    05/26/2015 7:46:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | Updated May 23, 2015 | Ben Leubsdorf
    Paul King hiked through deep woods and scrambled over boulder-strewn hills, hunting for his next clue. "It's still here," he exclaimed at the sight of a bent red pine tree, one of eight landmarks demarcating the border between two northern New Hampshire towns: Albany, population 735, and Madison, home to 2,500 people and a famously large rock. The towns hired Mr. King, a surveyor, to spend a sunny day in early May fulfilling a 17th-century duty that has survived into the era of Google Maps... [and GPS]
  • A friend of the American Revolution is reborn

    05/24/2015 10:40:26 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 35 replies
    CBS News ^ | 5-24-15
    "Freedom's Frigate" is the nickname of a sailing ship now on its way to America. It's a replica of the French vessel that helped our country win the war of independence. Before its departure, Mark Phillips went aboard: As memorials to American wars go, this one goes right back to the first one -- the Revolutionary War. And it is certainly among the most handsome and most intricate history lessons ever built. A newly-launched replica of the French frigate, Hermione, is now in mid-Atlantic, ploughing her way westward toward the U.S. East Coast. She's retracing the voyage of the original...
  • Computer Program Learning to Read Paleo-Hebrew Letters

    05/23/2015 11:40:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | 4/30/2015 | Robin Ngo
    Tel Aviv University researchers are writing a computer program that can read Paleo-Hebrew letters inscribed on First Temple period ostraca. Researchers from Tel Aviv University (TAU) are developing a computer program that can read a script used by the Israelites over 2,600 years ago... The project was begun by TAU Professor of Archaeology Israel Finkelstein and Professor of Physics Eliezer Piasetsky six years ago. Since then, the researchers have enlisted the help of epigraphy, archaeology and math experts along with TAU Ph.D. math students Arie Shaus, Shira Faigenbaum-Golovin and Barak Sober. At the center of this ambitious project are First...
  • Former UN Lead Author: Global Warming Caused By ‘Natural Variations’ In Climate

    05/22/2015 4:53:40 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 24 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | May 22, 2015 | by Michael Bastasch
    Global temperature change observed over the last hundred years or so is well within the natural variability of the last 8,000 years, according to a new paper by a former Intergovernmental Panel On Climate Change (IPCC) lead author. Dr. Philip Lloyd, a South Africa-based physicist and climate researcher, examined ice core-based temperature data going back 8,000 years to gain perspective on the magnitude of global temperature changes over the 20th Century. What Lloyd found was that the standard deviation of the temperature over the last 8,000 years was about 0.98 degrees Celsius– higher than the 0.85 degrees climate scientists say...
  • One of earliest known copies of Ten Commandments sees the light of day

    05/23/2015 12:49:47 AM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 34 replies
    Washington Post ^ | May 21, 2015 | By William Booth
    JERUSALEM — One of the earliest known copies of the Ten Commandments was written in soot on a strip of goatskin found among the trove of biblical material known as the Dead Sea Scrolls, widely considered to be one of the great archaeological finds of the 20th century. Penned on parchment by an unknown scribe more than 2,000 years ago, the scroll fragment is one of humanity’s most precious documents — and so fragile that its custodians rarely permit it to be moved from the secure vault where it rests in complete darkness. But for 14 days over the next...
  • Human hunting weapons may not have caused the demise of the Neanderthals

    05/23/2015 12:17:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 28, 2015 | Journal of Human Evolution
    "We looked at the basic timeline revealed by similar stone points, and it shows that humans were using them in Europe before they appeared in the Levant - the opposite of what we'd expect if the innovation had led to the humans' migration from Africa to Europe," said Dr. Kadowaki. "Our new findings mean that the research community now needs to reconsider the assumption that our ancestors moved to Europe and succeeded where Neanderthals failed because of cultural and technological innovations brought from Africa or west Asia." By re-examining the evidence, the researchers showed that the comparable stone weapons appeared...
  • Video: Research team discovers plant fossils previously unknown to Antarctica

    05/23/2015 12:10:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 30, 2015 | National Science Foundation
    Sometime about 220 million years ago, a meandering stream flowed here and plants grew along its banks. Something, as yet unknown, caused sediment to flood the area rapidly, which helped preserve the plants. Gulbranson splits open a grey slab of siltstone in the quarry to reveal amazingly well-preserved Triassic plant fossils, as if the leaves and stems had been freshly pressed into the rock only yesterday. "It's a mixture of plants that don't exist anymore," he says, "but we have some plants in these fossil ecosystems that we might know today, like ginkgo." On the one end are fossils from...
  • Family Tree of Dogs and Wolves Is Found to Split Earlier Than Thought

    05/21/2015 10:13:44 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 14 replies
    New York Times ^ | MAY 21, 2015 | JAMES GORMAN
    The ancestors of modern wolves and dogs split into different evolutionary lineages 27,000 to 40,000 years ago, much earlier than some other research has suggested, scientists reported Thursday. The new finding is based on a bone fragment found on the Taimyr Peninsula in Siberia several years ago. When scientists studied the bone and reconstructed its genome — the first time that had been done for an ancient wolf, or any kind of ancient carnivore — they found it was a new species that lived 35,000 years ago. Based on the differences between the genome of the new species, called the...
  • Dogs have been man's best friend 'for 40,000 years'

    05/21/2015 10:15:08 AM PDT · by C19fan · 63 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | May 21, 2015 | Staff
    Dogs have been man's best friend for up to 40,000 years, suggests new research. The study shows dogs' special relationship with humans might date back 27,000 to 40,000 years. The findings, published in the journal Current Biology, come from genomic analysis of an ancient Taimyr wolf bone.
  • Scientists Discover World's Oldest Stone Tools

    05/20/2015 8:02:59 PM PDT · by OK Sun · 73 replies
    The Earth Institute ^ | 2015-05-20 | The Earth Institute
    Finds Challenge Ideas about Who Were the First Toolmakers Scientists working in the desert badlands of northwestern Kenya have found stone tools dating back 3.3 million years, long before the advent of modern humans, and by far the oldest such artifacts yet discovered. The tools, whose makers may or may not have been some sort of human ancestor, push the known date of such tools back by 700,000 years; they also may challenge the notion that our own most direct ancestors were the first to bang two rocks together to create a new technology. The discovery is the first evidence...
  • Breaking: Historic Palmyra, Syria FALLS to ISIS

    05/20/2015 12:03:49 PM PDT · by tcrlaf · 121 replies
    Gateway Pundit ^ | 5-20-2015 | Jim Hoft
    The ancient city of Palmyra, Syria fell to ISIS late Wednesday. Syrian television is airing nationalist songs over nature scenes.
  • How the Civil War Changed the World

    05/19/2015 10:33:26 PM PDT · by iowamark · 258 replies
    New York Times Disunion ^ | May 19, 2015 | Don Doyle
    Even while the Civil War raged, slaves in Cuba could be heard singing, “Avanza, Lincoln, avanza! Tu eres nuestra esperanza!” (Onward, Lincoln, Onward! You are our hope!) – as if they knew, even before the soldiers fighting the war far to the North and long before most politicians understood, that the war in America would change their lives, and the world. The secession crisis of 1860-1861 threatened to be a major setback to the world antislavery movement, and it imperiled the whole experiment in democracy. If slavery was allowed to exist, and if the world’s leading democracy could fall apart...
  • 'Eternal flames' of ancient times could spark interest of modern geologists

    05/18/2015 11:51:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-18-2015 | Provided by Springer
    Seeps from which gas and oil escape were formative to many ancient cultures and societies. They gave rise to legends surrounding the Delphi Oracle, Chimaera fires and "eternal flames" that were central to ancient religious practices - from Indonesia and Iran to Italy and Azerbaijan. Modern geologists and oil and gas explorers can learn much by delving into the geomythological stories about the religious and social practices of the Ancient World, writes Guiseppe Etiope of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Italy. His research is published in the new Springer book Natural Gas Seepage. "Knowing present-day gas fluxes...
  • 250 Year-Old Shipwreck Could Hold Thousands of Litres of Rum

    05/18/2015 6:26:51 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 49 replies
    The Spirits Business ^ | 18th May, 2015 | Annie Hayes
    Shipwreck Could Hold Thousands of Litres of Rum • Sunken British warship the Lord Clive could hold “treasure worth millions”, including “vast stocks” of 250-year-old rum which will be recovered later this year. The wreck, which sunk off the coast of Uruguay, was discovered in 2004, but the Uruguyan government has only given permission for its recovery this year. Salvage of the ship, which was sunk by Spanish cannons in 1763, will require cranes, excavators and around 80 workers and is expected to begin within two months. The ship, which was constructed in Hull for the Royal Navy and was...
  • Scientists Investigate a Medieval Mass Grave Under a French Supermarket

    05/17/2015 10:14:29 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 14 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 5-13-15 | Marissa Fessenden
    hen the Monoprix Réaumur-Sébastopol supermarket in Paris, France, decided to renovated their basement to get more storage space, they probably didn’t expect to uncover hundreds of human bones. But when they dug into the basement floor, that's exactly what they discovered. The human remains are, apparently, the legacy of a cemetery from a medieval hospital, reports Aurelien Breeden for The New York Times. Since the find in January, France’s National Institute for Preventive Archeological Research, or Inrap, has been excavating the site. The institute knows that the hospital itself was the Hôpital de la Trinité, built in the early 13th...
  • Syrian minister blames Turkey for looted antiquities

    02/25/2015 5:27:40 AM PST · by DeaconBenjamin · 2 replies
    Hürriyet ^ | February/24/2015
    The world will have to cooperate with Syria to halt the trade in looted antiquities that helps fund jihadist groups, Syria’s culture minister has said, putting the onus on Turkey to stop the smuggling across their shared frontier. Syrian Culture Minister Issam Khalil said a U.N. Security Council resolution aiming to stop groups, including the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), from benefiting from the illicit antiquities trade would not be effective without the help of Damascus, a pariah to many Arab and Western states since Syria’s war erupted in 2011. “We have the conclusive documents and evidence...
  • Relic hunters: Islamists in Syria earn their daily bread selling Christian trophies

    12/21/2013 5:00:08 AM PST · by NYer · 10 replies
    Voice of Russia ^ | December 20, 2013
    Photo: AFP In Syria, Islamists have again captured the Christian town of Maaloula. They took prisoner 12 nuns two weeks ago and have since held them in the neighbouring town of Yabroud. Meanwhile, Internet antique shops have featured offers to sell Maaloula relics. That's the way the Jabhat al-Nusra fighters are earning their daily bread. But clerics in the ancient Christian town of Maaloula continue ringing their church bells despite the ongoing fighting, blasts and the abduction of nuns.This is actually the only reminder of the once quiet life in the small town. The Islamists, - the Jabhat al-Nusra...
  • ISIL advances on Syria's ancient city of Palmyra

    05/16/2015 2:30:23 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    Al Jazeera ^ | May 16, 2015 | Various
    Governor of Homs province, where city is located, says army has sent reinforcements and is bombing fighters from air.Fighters belonging to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) have advanced on Syria's ancient city of Palmyra, one of the Middle East's most famous UNESCO heritage sites, with fierce clashes taking place close to the city's historic citadel. Photos circulating on social media sites on Saturday appeared to show intense clashes near the 13th century citadel of Fakhr-al-Din al-Ma'ani as ISIL fighters engaged the Syrian military. Talal Barazi, the governor of central Homs province, where the city is located,...
  • Analysis of bones found in Romania offer evidence of human and Neanderthal interbreeding in Europe

    05/15/2015 1:52:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-14-2015 | Bob Yirka
    A Neanderthal skeleton, left, compared with a modern human skeleton. Credit: American Museum of Natural History DNA testing of a human mandible fossil found in Romania has revealed a genome with 4.8 to 11.3 percent Neanderthal DNA—its original owner died approximately 40,000 years ago, Palaeogenomicist Qiaomei Fu reported to audience members at a Biology of Genomes meeting in New York last week. She noted also that she and her research team found long Neanderthal sequences. The high percentage suggests, she added, that the human had a Neanderthal in its family tree going back just four to six generations. The finding...
  • Fears for Palmyra, the archaeological jewel of the Middle East which Islamists want to [tr]

    05/15/2015 6:30:27 AM PDT · by C19fan · 8 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 15, 2015 | Ted Thornhill
    Islamic State terrorists advanced to the gates of ancient Palmyra on Thursday, raising fears the Syrian world heritage site could face destruction of the kind the jihadists have already wreaked in Iraq. As it overran nearby villages, IS executed 26 civilians - 10 of whom were beheaded - for 'collaborating with the regime,' the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. Irina Bokova, head of the UN's cultural body UNESCO, called on Syrian troops and extremists to spare Palmyra, saying it 'represents an irreplaceable treasure for the Syrian people, and the world.'
  • U.S. ship held in $500M booty row

    10/17/2007 5:55:23 AM PDT · by Freeport · 32 replies · 35+ views
    CNN ^ | 17 October 2007 | Al Goodman
    MADRID, Spain (CNN) -- Spain has again seized an American treasure-hunting ship over a dispute with its owners over who has rights to millions of dollars worth of booty recovered from the sea, officials said. Spain seized the "Odyssey Explorer" -- owned by Odyssey Marine Exploration based Tampa, Florida -- as it sailed out of port in the British colony of Gibraltar on Tuesday. Armed Spanish government vessels were waiting for the Explorer when it reached 6.4 kilometers (4 miles) off Gibraltar's shore and entered what Spain considers its territorial waters. The vessels forced the Explorer to dock at Spain's...
  • A History of Hurricanes in the Western Florida Panhandle 1559-1999

    08/30/2005 6:41:24 PM PDT · by xzins · 20 replies · 2,697+ views
    Eglin AFB ^ | 46th Weather Squadron, Eglin AFB, FL
    A History of Hurricanes in the Western Florida Panhandle 1559-199946th Weather Squadron, Eglin AFB, FL This summary of hurricanes and tropical storms that have impacted the Panhandle focuses mainly on the area near Eglin AFB (coastal Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, and Walton Counties). It includes some storms for which the eye did not actually make landfall in this immediate area, but the local effects were significant. It also includes many storms which had a greater impact on Pensacola or the Panama City/Big Bend region than on the immediate Ft. Walton Beach area. It uses tracks and historical records compiled by...
  • Spain seizes ship in treasure row

    07/13/2007 7:11:39 AM PDT · by AU72 · 552+ views
    BBC News ^ | July 13, 2007 | BBC News
    The Spanish Civil Guard has intercepted a boat operated by a US company amid a row over treasure from a shipwreck. The guard had been ordered by a Spanish judge to seize the vessel as soon as it left the British colony of Gibraltar. Gibraltar officials and Odyssey Marine Exploration, which owns the ship, said Spain had boarded the ship illegally as it was in international waters. In May, Odyssey said it had found $500m (£253m) in coins from a 17th Century wreck somewhere in the Atlantic Ocean. Madrid suspects the sunken galleon may either have been Spanish or have...
  • Spain seizes ship in treasure row

    07/13/2007 7:11:19 AM PDT · by RDTF · 41 replies · 1,606+ views
    BBC ^ | July 23, 2007 | BBC
    The Spanish Civil Guard has intercepted a boat operated by a US company amid a row over treasure from a shipwreck. The guard had been ordered by a Spanish judge to seize the vessel as soon as it left the British colony of Gibraltar. Gibraltar officials and Odyssey Marine Exploration, which owns the ship, said Spain had boarded the ship illegally as it was in international waters. In May, Odyssey said it had found $500m (£253m) in coins from a 17th Century wreck somewhere in the Atlantic Ocean. Madrid suspects the sunken galleon may either have been Spanish or have...
  • Spanish Treasure Ship Missing Since 1681 Found

    11/02/2003 5:21:26 PM PST · by blam · 20 replies · 2,027+ views
    Seattle Times ^ | 11-2-2003 | Rich McKay
    Sunday, November 02, 2003 - Page updated at 12:00 A.M. Spanish treasure ship missing since 1681 found By Rich McKay The Orlando Sentinel JESSICA MANN / KNIGHT RIDDER NEWSPAPERS Hired treasure hunter Joel Ruth found a seafarer's map that led to the identification of the Spanish treasure ship Santa Maria De La Consolacion. E-mail this article Print this article Search archive ORLANDO, Fla. — Six pirate ships closed in on the Spanish treasure ship the Santa Maria De La Consolacion as the galleon sailed up the Pacific coast of South America, slow and bloated with silver, gold and gems mined...
  • Scientists Identify Mysterious, Sword-Filled Caribbean Shipwreck

    05/13/2015 6:44:07 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 33 replies
    huffingtonpost ^ | Posted: 05/13/2015 3:02 pm EDT | By Ryan Grenoble
    In 2011 archaeologists happened upon a stunningly well-preserved shipwreck off the coast of Panama. The wreckage, a mere 40 feet underwater, was untouched by looters and still carrying a full load of tools and weapons. Now, after years of work, scientists finally know the ship's story.
  • AMC’s “Turn”: The Best Television Show You’re Not Watching

    05/14/2015 2:12:05 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 155 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | May 14, 2015 | Michael Hausam
    As a huge television buff, I'm uniquely qualified to render this opinion: "Turn" is the best show currently playing on any network.It's the story of young father caught up in the American Revolution, who, trying to keep his head down and nose clean, ultimately decides to become a spy for the Continental Army. Based upon a book I'd neither read nor even heard of, Alexander Rose’s "Washington's Spies: The Story of America's First Spy Ring,” it adroitly weaves in the exploits of Abraham Woodhull with the better-known stories and events of the war.I was first drawn to it due its...
  • Civil War Historical Marker Ceremony To Be Held In June In Cleveland

    05/14/2015 3:16:55 PM PDT · by Tennessee Nana · 5 replies
    TheChattanoogan ^ | May 14,2015 | Staff
    The latest Civil War-related historical roadside marker will be dedicated during a special ceremony next month in Cleveland. The marker commemorates the difficult time during the Civil War when much of Bradley County lay between Union and Confederate lines. During this period, homes and businesses were vandalized and robbed by both pro-Union and pro-Confederate forces who took advantage of the prevailing lawlessness. This marker also commemorates the courageous actions of War of 1812 veteran Joseph Lusk II, who at 73, defended his home with determination against a group of outlaws attempting to steal his mules. He shot and killed one...
  • Dinosaur-like snouts grown on chicken embryos

    05/12/2015 2:35:40 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    Birds are thought to have evolved from dinosaurs, but have very different jaws. Bird-like dinosaurs such as the velociraptor have two bones at the tip of their upper jaws. In birds, those bones are fused to form a beak. By blocking two proteins that are activated when chicken embryos grow their beaks, U.S. researchers caused their jaws to "revert" to a velociraptor-like snout. The changes were observed in chick embryos that developed until they were close to hatching. To their surprise, the birds' palates, on the roof of their mouths, also became dinosaur-like. "This was unexpected and demonstrates the way...
  • MH370 search discovers a shipwreck not the missing plane

    05/13/2015 1:46:03 AM PDT · by naturalman1975 · 18 replies
    news.com.au ^ | 13th May 2015
    THE $90 million search for MH370 has discovered “man made objects” almost four kilometres under the surface of the southern Indian Ocean, but they are not the missing Boeing 777. Instead the debris is thought to be from an ancient shipwreck, comprising an anchor and other items. Australian Transport Safety Bureau Operational Search Director Peter Foley said they were “obviously disappointed” the discovery was not the missing aircraft.
  • Madagascar divers find silver believed part of pirate stash [Captain Kidd]

    05/12/2015 12:09:07 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 13 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 08, 2015 | By Martin Vogl
    Divers in Madagascar have found a silver bar weighing about 50 kilograms (110 pounds) that they believe was part of the treasure of pirate Captain Kidd. The bar was presented to Madagascar's president, Hery Rajaonarimampianina, in a ceremony Thursday on the island of Sainte Marie, near the country's northeast coast. The bar was found in a bay off the island, the diving team said. The team was led by Barry Clifford, an American undersea explorer who has been searching for pirate treasure for many decades. Clifford believes there could be more treasure on the bay floor where he found the...
  • New archaeological finds challenge ideas of prehistoric Israel

    05/10/2015 1:27:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Haaretz ^ | Iyyar 18, 5775 | Nir Hasson
    Remains from three prehistoric periods were found in the dig. The oldest have been dated to about 7,000 years ago. during the Pottery Neolithic period. Archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority also found a fired ceramic clay figurine of a full-figured woman. The discovery brings the number of sites at which similar figures from the period have been found to nine, mostly around Sha'ar Hagolan. Of the 163 such figurines found so far, two were found elsewhere -- one in Lod and the other at Horvat Ptora, a site near Kiryat Gat and the one found now as said, in...
  • Archaeology, temples 'caged' against time in Selinunte

    05/10/2015 12:54:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    ANSA ^ | May 6th, 2015 | Giovanni Franco
    The archaeological park is located at the mouth of a river where wild parsley (selinon) grows, which was the origin of the name of the waterway. The city was founded by Megara Hyblaea residents in Sicily in the seventh century BC near two port-canals, now sanded over, and engaged in intense maritime trade. ''It was due to this expert use of the geographical role of Selinunte,'' historians say, ''that their inhabitants, in the space of just over two centuries, achieved an economic prosperity unrivaled in the Greek world or in that of Sicily/Magna Grecia.'' A city of grandiose size was...
  • Traces of flowers placed on a Palaeolithic tomb are found

    05/10/2015 10:18:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 8, 2015 | University of the Basque Country
    The burial of the so-called Red Lady, dating back to the Upper Palaeolithic, was discovered in El Mirón cave (Cantabria) in 2010. The Journal of Archaeological Science has devoted a special edition to all the studies conducted at this unique burial site, because there are hardly any Palaeolithic tombs like this one which is intact and which has not been contaminated. One study is the research led by the UPV/EHU's Ikerbasque lecturer Mª José Iriarte, who analysed the remains of fossilised pollen dating back more than 16,000 years ago and which appeared on the tomb. "They put whole flowers on...
  • New study of Iceman reveals oldest known example of red blood cells

    05/09/2015 9:34:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Phys.org ^ | May 08, 2015 | Bob Yirka
    The Iceman as he has come to be known, (also known as Ötzi) has been the object of intense scrutiny ever since being found embedded in an Alpine glacier back in 1991 -- he is believed to have died approximately 5,300 years ago... a [moving] nano-sized probe... allows for capturing 3D imagery -- it revealed the clear doughnut shape of red blood cells. To confirm that the images they were seeing represented real red blood cells, the team shone a laser on the same material and read the wavelengths that were reflected back -- that revealed that the molecular makeup...
  • Did King Harold II Die With an Arrow in His Eye?

    05/09/2015 9:08:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    NBC News ^ | October 13, 2014 | unattributed
    King Harold II, the last Anglo-Saxon king of England, has long been thought to have been killed at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. But British archaeologists are to test a theory he survived on the anniversary of the famous battle this Tuesday. The battle, on Oct. 14, 1066, marked a turning point in British history as the Normans conquered medieval England. There are different accounts of how he was killed, one of them pictured in the Bayeux Tapestry, which appears to have him gripping an arrow that had pierced his eye. Another account has Harold being killed by knights...
  • Alaska's first full mammoth skeleton may be lurking under Arctic lake

    05/09/2015 8:12:29 PM PDT · by skeptoid · 31 replies
    Alaska Dispatch ^ | Yereth Rosen
    Alaska's first full mammoth skeleton may be lurking under Arctic lake. When an aquatic ecologist was surveying shallow lakes in Northwest Alaska three years ago, she and the pilot who traveled with her came upon an unusual sight in the treeless Arctic region: a pair of terns that kept flying around and perching on what appeared to be a log sticking out of a muddy area. The protruding object, it turns out, was no log. It was the large and well-preserved leg bone of a woolly mammoth. Right by it was another bone, perfectly articulated, that was clearly from the...
  • Neanderthals changed hunting strategy with climate change

    05/09/2015 8:44:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, May 07, 2015 | editors
    Gideon Hartman of the University of Connecticut and colleagues from an international group of universities and research institutions came to this conclusion by reconstructing the hunting ranges of Neanderthals who occupied the cave at two distinct Ice Age occupational phases separated by about 10,000 years. The first phase occurred during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 4 (71,000-129,000 years ago), and the second occurred during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (57,000-70,000 years ago). They analyzed the comparison of oxygen, carbon, and strontium isotope samples from the tooth enamel of excavated gazelle remains with modern isotope data from the Amud Cave region. What they...
  • Bulgarian Archaeologists Stumble Upon 'Oldest Children's Toy in Europe': Late Bronze Age Thracian...

    05/09/2015 6:54:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | May 5, 2015 | Ivan Dikov
    An Ancient Thracian bronze artifact in the shape of a stork's head described as "the oldest children's toy in Europe" has been identified by Bulgarian archaeologists among archaeological items found by local residents in the area of the southern town of Zlatograd in the Rhodope Mountains. The Thracian toy is made of bronze mixed with some silver, and is dated to the Late Bronze age, about 1500-1200 BC, the period of Ancient Troy and the Civilization of Mycenae. It consists of a tripod holding what appears to be a stork's head which can move and "drink water"; it weighs 30...
  • Stone bracelet is oldest ever found in the world [Denisovan, 40K ago]

    05/09/2015 6:48:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | May 7, 2015 | Anna Liesowska
    It is intricately made with polished green stone and is thought to have adorned a very important woman or child on only special occasions. Yet this is no modern-day fashion accessory and is instead believed to be the oldest stone bracelet in the world, dating to as long ago as 40,000 years. Unearthed in the Altai region of Siberia in 2008, after detailed analysis Russian experts now accept its remarkable age as correct.  New pictures show this ancient piece of jewellery in its full glory with scientists concluding it was made by our prehistoric human ancestors, the Denisovans, and shows...
  • Treasure-Filled Wreck Found in Finland

    05/09/2015 6:42:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Discovery News ^ | May 5, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    A fabulous sunken treasure may be recovered off Finland coast as archaeologist divers say they have found the wreck of a legendary 15th-century vessel. According to historic documents, the Hanneke Wrome was one of two ships that left Luebeck, Germany, for Tallinn, Estonia, on Nov. 11, 1468. Records also indicate the cargo included 10,000 gold coins and gold jewelry -- a treasure estimated to be worth more than $150 million today. Strong east winds, actually very rare in Finland, caught both vessels. While the other ship managed to get to Tallinn, the Hanneke Wrome went down in the storm with...
  • Scandinavian trade 'triggered' the Viking Age

    05/09/2015 6:31:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 7, 2015 (bravo, Cameron!) | David Garner, University of York
    Archaeologists from the University of York have played a key role in Anglo-Danish research which has suggested the dawn of the Viking Age may have been much earlier -- and less violent -- than previously believed. The study by Dr Steve Ashby, of the Department of Archaeology at York, working with colleagues from York and Aarhus University, identified the first signs of the Viking Age around 70 years before the first raid on England. Previously, the start of the Viking Age has been dated to a June 793 raid by Norwegian Vikings on Lindisfarne. But the new research published in...
  • Tales teeth can tell: Dental enamel reveals surprising migration patterns in ancient Indus civ...

    05/09/2015 6:20:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    University of Florida ^ | April 29, 2015 | Gigi Marino [Sources: John Krigbaum, George Kamenov]
    When tooth enamel forms, it incorporates elements from the local environment -- the food one eats, the water one drinks, the dust one breathes. When the researchers looked at remains from the ancient city of Harappa, located in what is known today as the Punjab Province of Pakistan, individuals' early molars told a very different story than their later ones, meaning they hadn't been born in the city where they were found... The text of the Indus Valley Civilization remains undeciphered, and known and excavated burial sites are rare. A new study, published in today's PLOS ONE, illuminates the lives...
  • Excavations reveal new terracotta army at ancient emperor's tomb

    05/09/2015 6:13:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    News.com.au ^ | May 10, 2015 | China News Service
    CHINA's famous terracotta army is about to be reinforced: Fresh excavations on a burial pit in the ancient capital, Xi'an are expected to uncover 1500 more of the live-sized clay figurines. The excavation, which began last Thursday, is centred upon a 200sq/m patch of the 56sq/km underground mausoleum of China's first emperor, Emperor Qinshihuang, who reigned in 221BC. Archaeologist Yuan Zhongyi told media that he anticipated the burial pit would contain 1400 more terracotta warriors and archers, along with about 90 horse-drawn chariots. Progress has so far been promising, he said.: "Their colourful paint is also relatively well preserved." The...
  • Bone analysis reveals violent history of pre-Hispanic Mesoamerica

    05/09/2015 6:08:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Phys.org ^ | May 05, 2015 | Bob Yirka
    A pair of archeologists with Arizona State University has found evidence of different types of bone treatment among people that lived at the La Quemada archaeological site approximately 1,500 years ago in what is now modern Mexico... Ben Nelson and Debra Martin... looked at bones from the site dating back to 500-900 C.E. and discovered the remains of those who had died or were killed were treated very differently depending on whether they were from their own people or were those of enemies. Bones found inside the compound, they noted showed signs of being treated with respect, whereas those outside...
  • The Cult of Amun [ancient Egypt and Nubia]

    05/08/2015 3:25:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, April 17, 2015 | Daniel Weiss
    ...Through their shared history, Egyptians and Nubians also came to worship the same chief god, Amun, who was closely allied with kingship and played an important role as the two civilizations vied for supremacy. During its Middle and New Kingdoms, which spanned the second millennium B.C., Egypt pushed its way into Nubia, ultimately conquering and making it a colonial province. The Egyptians were drawn by the land's rich store of natural resources, including ebony, ivory, animal skins, and, most importantly, gold. As they expanded their control of Nubia, the Egyptians built a number of temples to Amun, the largest of...
  • Prehistoric man with shield found after dig [Pocklington UK]

    05/08/2015 1:23:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Pocklington Post ^ | Thursday 30 April 2015 | unattributed
    An archeological dig in Pocklington has unearthed a prehistoric man buried with a shield. The skeleton was found in one of the square barrows at the recently discovered Iron Age burial ground on Burnby Lane, which is where developer David Wilson Homes is planning to build 77 new houses. MAP Archaeological Practice, the company which is carrying out the excavation work, says it has also discovered a man "of an impressive stature." The site has so far yielded more than 38 square barrows and in excess of 82 burials... Several of the square barrows contain personal possessions, including jewellery, and...
  • Underwater graveyard of hundreds of World War Two planes revealed

    05/08/2015 12:36:52 PM PDT · by tcrlaf · 23 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 5-8-2015 | Lydia Wilgress
    A series of incredible photographs showing more than 150 lost World War Two aircraft 130-feet under the Pacific Ocean has been released. The stunning images show the planes surrounded by coral and fish as they lie - sometimes vertically - on the seabed more than seven decades after they were dumped there. The find includes historic American aircraft including Douglas SBD Dauntless dive bombers, F4U Corsair and TBF/TBM Avengers.Amazingly, many of the planes have remained intact, with only a few broken tails and wings littering the floor. Brandi Mueller, from Cameron, Wisconsin, discovered the planes while scuba diving around five...
  • Searching for Clues to Mystery of Ancient Americans

    05/08/2015 7:35:15 AM PDT · by Theoria · 31 replies
    National Geograhic ^ | 06 May 2015 | Simon Worrall
    Among the things they left behind are beautiful ruins, a gorgeously woven basket and a nearly impossible to get to granary on a cliff. David Roberts is a well-known mountaineer who made the first ascents of some of Alaska’s most challenging peaks. For his new book, The Lost World Of The Old Ones: Discoveries in The Ancient Southwest, he set off with a backpack to explore some of the remotest corners of the American Southwest. Rappelling down cliffs to reach ancient granaries, or stumbling across artifacts that have not been touched for 1,000 years, he follows the trail of long...