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  • Violence and climate change in prehistoric Egypt and Sudan

    07/21/2014 10:50:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    British Museum ^ | Monday, July 14, 2014 | Renée Friedman, curator
    Among the most exciting of the new acquisitions are the materials from the site of Jebel Sahaba, now in northern Sudan, which were donated to the Museum by Dr Fred Wendorf in 2002. Excavating here in 1965–66, as part of the UNESCO-funded campaign to salvage sites destined to be flooded by the construction of the Aswan High Dam, Dr Wendorf found a cemetery (site 117) containing at least 61 individuals dating back to about 13,000 years ago. This discovery was of great significance for two reasons. First, as a designated graveyard, evidently used over several generations, it is one of...
  • Archaeologists Uncover Lost Population of Ancient Amarna

    07/21/2014 9:34:54 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, July 17, 2014 | unattributed
    ...the burials of the deceased of the estimated 30,000 commoners and laborers remained elusive – until 2001, when archaeologist Barry Kemp of the University of Cambridge began to see the first signs. Kemp has directed excavations and surveys at Amarna for the Egypt Exploration Society since 1977. “The puzzle seems now to have been solved,” says Kemp. “ It has come about through the desert GPS survey begun in 2001 and continued in subsequent years. First came the discovery of two cemeteries (clearly robbed) of what must be relatively poor graves on the flat desert not far from tomb no....
  • Romanian cave holds some of the oldest human footprints

    07/21/2014 9:29:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Science News ^ | July 17, 2014 | Bruce Bower
    About 400 footprints were first discovered in the cave in 1965. Scientists initially attributed the impressions to a man, woman and child who lived 10,000 to 15,000 years ago. But radiocarbon measurements of two cave bear bones excavated just below the footprints now indicate that Homo sapiens made these tracks around 36,500 years ago, say anthropologist David Webb of Kutztown University in Pennsylvania and his colleagues. Analyses of 51 footprints that remain — cave explorers and tourists have destroyed the rest — indicate that six or seven individuals, including at least one child, entered the cave after a flood had...
  • Image found of Confederate White House housekeeper

    07/19/2014 4:15:19 PM PDT · by re_tail20 · 31 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 19, 2014 | Fox News
    Mary O'Melia left Ireland for America as a young widow with three children before she was hired as housekeeper at the White House of the Confederacy. An intimate witness to history, she also has been much of a mystery. That was until this year, when a woman with a distinctive Irish lilt to her voice called The American Civil War Museum. The housekeeper, the woman said, was related to her late husband, and she had in her possession a necklace that Confederate first lady Varina Davis gave O'Melia. But there was more. "What really took my breath away is she...
  • 'Italy's Ginger Gene Spread From Sicily'

    07/18/2014 1:53:50 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 32 replies
    Over the centuries, they’ve been scorned, persecuted and marginalized. But it was an example of modern-day disdain towards redheads that prompted an Italian photographer’s mission to safeguard their diversity, The Local has learned. Let’s face it, redheads get a tough time, especially in the early years of their life. I should know, because I am one. But more on that later. Marina Rosso, a 29-year-old fine art photographer and researcher from Udine, is not a redhead as the English translation of her surname might suggest. But after hearing in 2011 that flame-haired men were being rejected from the world’s largest...
  • 10,000-year-old rock paintings depicting aliens and UFOs found in Chhattisgarh[India]

    07/17/2014 3:56:53 PM PDT · by Theoria · 70 replies
    Times of India ^ | 15 July 2014 | Rashmi Drolia
    Chhattisgarh state department of archaeology and culture plans to seek help from Nasa and Isro for research on 10,000-year-old rock paintings depicting aliens and UFOs in Charama region in Kanker district in tribal Bastar region. According to archaeologist JR Bhagat, these paintings have depicted aliens like those shown in Hollywood and Bollywood flicks. Located about 130km from Raipur, the caves come under village Chandeli and Gotitola. "The findings suggest that humans in prehistoric times may have seen or imagined beings from other planets which still create curiosity among people and researchers. Extensive research is needed for further findings. Chhattisgarh presently...
  • The surprising ages of the Founding Fathers on July 4, 1776

    07/06/2014 8:35:05 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 76 replies
    kottke.org ^ | August 13, 2013
    For the Journal of the American Revolution, Todd Andrlik compiled a list of the ages of the key participants in the Revolutionary War as of July 4, 1776. Many of them were surprisingly young: Marquis de Lafayette, 18 James Monroe, 18 Gilbert Stuart, 20 Aaron Burr, 20 Alexander Hamilton, 21 Betsy Ross, 24 James Madison, 25 This is kind of blowing my mind...because of the compression of history, I'd always assumed all these people were around the same age. But in thinking about it, all startups need young people...Hamilton, Lafayette, and Burr were perhaps the Gates, Jobs, and Zuckerberg of...
  • Ancient Chinese town’s Ming dynasty buildings under water

    07/16/2014 8:01:23 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 11 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 10:06AM BST 16 Jul 2014 | (AFP)
    One of ChinaÂ’s renowned ancient towns was under water on Wednesday as heavy rain hit the centre of the country, with tens of thousands of people evacuated from the area. The old town district of Fenghuang nestles on the banks of a winding river in a picturesque, mountainous part of Hunan province, and boasts stunning Qing and Ming dynasty architecture dating back hundreds of years. [Â…] According to ChinaÂ’s official Xinhua news agency, the Tuojiang river in the town had reached 1.1 meters above its previous highest recorded level, and several bridges had been damaged or destroyed. Â…
  • Chalcolithic catastrophe on the Mondsee

    07/15/2014 4:22:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Saturday, July 5, 2014 | Alexander Binsteiner
    This is what may have happened around 3,200 BC on the Lake of Mondsee (Lake Constance), resulting in the exodus of a metalworking community that lived there. When the site of this particular settlement was excavated in the 19th century, 595 stone axes and studded battleaxes, 451 arrowheads along with 12 copper axes and six daggers were discovered. These items represented highly sought-after status symbols, and would never have been left behind intentionally, unless of course the settlement had been abandoned as the result of a disaster. Well preserved foods such as charred hazelnuts, grain and pieces of apples were...
  • Positioning the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) Hunted by the Tyrolean Iceman...

    07/15/2014 3:34:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    PLOSone ^ | July 02, 2014 | Cristina Olivieri et al (see below)
    Abstract -- In the last years several phylogeographic studies of both extant and extinct red deer populations have been conducted. Three distinct mitochondrial lineages (western, eastern and North-African/Sardinian) have been identified reflecting different glacial refugia and postglacial recolonisation processes. However, little is known about the genetics of the Alpine populations and no mitochondrial DNA sequences from Alpine archaeological specimens are available. Here we provide the first mitochondrial sequences of an Alpine Copper Age Cervus elaphus. DNA was extracted from hair shafts which were part of the remains of the clothes of the glacier mummy known as the Tyrolean Iceman or...
  • Native Americans KILLED AND ATE DUMBO, say archaeologists

    07/15/2014 1:27:51 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 46 replies
    theregister.co.uk ^ | 15 Jul 2014 | Lewis Page,
    The primitive folk assessed by many archaeologists as being the original native Americans – that is, the Clovis people – killed and ate the lovable prehistoric elephants that inhabited the continent alongside them, scientists say. The proto-dumbo species in question is known as the gomphothere. Until recently, it had been thought that gomphotheres had disappeared from North America well before human beings showed up, but new fossil evidence appears to show that at least one cuddly tusker was brutally killed by Clovis people around 13,400 years ago. The luckless pachyderm was then scoffed by its peckish assailants. "This is the...
  • The Minoans were Caucasian

    07/12/2014 4:58:18 AM PDT · by Renfield · 37 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 5-16-2013 | Damien Gayle
    DNA analysis has debunked the longstanding theory that the Minoans, who some 5,000 years ago established Europe's first advanced Bronze Age culture, were from Africa. The Minoan civilisation arose on the Mediterranean island of Crete in approximately the 27th century BC and flourished for 12 centuries until the 15th century BC. But the culture was lost until British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans unearthed its remains on Crete in 1900, where he found vestiges of a civilisation he believed was formed by refugees from northern Egypt. Modern archaeologists have cast doubt on that version of events, and now DNA tests of...
  • The Mystery of the Copper Scroll

    07/11/2014 3:37:23 PM PDT · by robowombat · 25 replies
    CBN News Middle East Bureau ^ | Saturday, July 11, 2009 | Chris Mitchell
    The Mystery of the Copper Scroll By Chris Mitchell CBN News Middle East Bureau Chief Saturday, July 11, 2009 JERUSALEM, Israel - In 1947, a Bedouin shepherd wandered the hills of Qumran in search of a missing sheep. He threw a stone into a cave, hoping to drive the lost animal outside. Instead, the sound of shattered pottery drew the shepherd inside the cave. There he stumbled on the greatest archaeological find of the 20th century: the Dead Sea Scrolls. The Copper Scroll In the years that followed, archaeologists found eleven caves and more than 900 documents here at Qumran....
  • Cursed Warship Revealed With Treasure Onboard

    07/10/2014 10:31:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    National Geographic ^ | July 7, 2014 | Jane J. Lee
    It was the largest and fiercest warship in the world, named the Mars for the Roman god of war, but it went up in a ball of flames in a brutal naval battle in 1564, consigning 800 to 900 Swedish and German sailors and a fortune in gold and silver coins to the bottom of the Baltic Sea. Now, a few years after the ship's discovery, researchers have concluded that the one-of-a-kind ship is also the best preserved ship of its kind, representing the first generation of Europe's big, three-masted warships. Naval historians know a lot about 17th-century ships, but...
  • What Rome's Arch-Enemies Wore Into Battle

    07/10/2014 10:15:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Forbes ^ | July 8, 2014 | Paul Rodgers
    Naval archaeologists think they’ve found the only example of armor from Carthage to survive the destruction of the city-state by Rome in 146BC. The helmet, recovered from the site of the Battle of the Egadi Islands, northwest of Sicily, is dramatically different from the Celtic style worn across Europe, popularly known as a Roman helmet. It appears to have a nose guard, a broad brim protecting the back of the neck from ear to ear, and a high, narrow crest, said Dr Jeff Royal, director of archaeology at the RPM Nautical Foundation in Florida. Roman helmets, called montefortinos, are easily...
  • Mesolithic shamanistic meteorite talisman unearthed

    07/10/2014 10:08:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Monday, July 7, 2014 | PAP – Science and Scholarship in Poland
    Archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology (IAE) in Szczecin, Poland, have discovered a meteorite fragment inside the remains of a hut dating back more than 9,000 years at Bolków by Lake Świdwie in Western Pomerania... The archaeologists also excavated a rich assemblage of objects with a spiritual association: an amulet, a bone spear tip with engraved decoration and so-called magic wand made of antler, decorated with geometric motifs. In addition to the remains of the hut, which contained the meteorite, archaeologists discovered a second, almost identical structure. In both of them, within the peat layer, were the preserved...
  • 11,000 years old elk bones shrouded in mystery

    07/10/2014 10:03:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | July 1, 2014 | Anne Marie Lykkegaard
    Someone put elk bones in a bog several thousand years ago -- but archaeologists have no clue who it was... when the bones of several elks were excavated from Lundby bog in south Zealand in 1999, the archaeologists dated some of the animal remains back to sometime between 9,400 and 9,300 BC. Recently, however, the archaeologists did a new carbon 14 dating on some of the bones which revealed that they dated back to between 9,873 and 9,676 BC. These elk bones were clearly not buried in the bog over a short period, as originally thought, but were placed there...
  • Forestry officials unearth stone spearheads in northern Lapland

    07/10/2014 9:58:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    YLE ^ | July 4, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists in Finland are celebrating the discovery of a number of artefacts in Lapland, northern Finland. A series of surveys by the forestry watchdog Metsähallitus has unearthed hundreds of hunting pits, several prehistoric habitations, pottery shards and a stone spearhead. The most exceptional part of the archaeological find was a stone spear tip or a possible prehistoric knife, which was discovered close to the Norwegian border. The stone implement has been uncovered by high winds as it lay in a sand pit. Experts estimate that the rough blade had been used during the Stone Age or the early metal age,...
  • Mysterious Earthen Rings Predate Amazon Rainforest

    07/10/2014 12:35:30 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 43 replies
    Live Science ^ | July 07, 2014 03:37pm ET | Stephanie Pappas
    Carson and his colleagues wanted to explore the question of whether early Amazonians had a major impact on the forest. They focused on the Amazon of northeastern Bolivia, where they had sediment cores from two lakes nearby major earthworks sites. These sediment cores hold ancient pollen grains and charcoal from long-ago fires, and can hint at the climate and ecosystem that existed when the sediment was laid down as far back as 6,000 years ago. An examination of the two cores — one from the large lake, Laguna Oricore, and one from the smaller lake, Laguna Granja — revealed a...
  • Fossils Unearthed at Silicon Valley Construction Site

    07/07/2014 2:23:16 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | Monday, Jul 7, 2014
    Giant teeth from a 40-foot-long shark and portions of what could turn out to be an entire whale skeleton are among more than 500 fossils that have been unearthed at a dam construction site in Silicon Valley, a newspaper reported. Most of the fossils uncovered at the Calaveras Dam replacement project in Fremont, California, are believed to be about 20 million years old, dating to the Miocene Epoch, when the ocean extended as far inland as Bakersfield, California, the San Jose Mercury News reported on Monday. Scallops, clams, barnacles and the teeth of an extinct hippopotamus-like creature called a Desmostylus...
  • Meet Chiquita: A tiny, blonde, 500-year-old Wyoming mummy

    07/07/2014 8:43:10 AM PDT · by Theoria · 18 replies
    Casper Star-Tribune Online ^ | 06 July 2014 | Jeremy Fugleberg
    George Gill hands over the never-published photos of the infant he calls Chiquita. Her fine blond hair arches over her wrinkled, leathery skin. Her arms are wrapped around her, a tiny mouth frozen in an “O.” If she once had another name, Gill wouldn’t know it. After all, Chiquita has been dead for hundreds of years. She is one of only a handful of known infant mummies in existence with a particular birth defect. Two such mummies, Chiquita and one known as the Pedro Mountain mummy, were found in Wyoming. They both hold tantalizing clues about those who inhabited Wyoming’s...
  • Study: Fossil soaring bird had huge wingspan

    07/08/2014 8:57:10 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 36 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jul 7, 2014 3:12 PM EDT | Malcolm Ritter
    A fossil found in South Carolina has revealed a gigantic bird that apparently snatched fish while soaring over the ocean some 25 million to 28 million years ago. Its estimated wingspan of around 21 feet is bigger than the height of a giraffe. …
  • In pictures: Climate change could make red hair a thing of the past if Scotland gets sunnier

    07/06/2014 6:09:06 PM PDT · by BBell · 43 replies
    A DNA expert has has made the bold claim that ginger hair gene could die out if Scotland climate improves. REDHEADS could become extinct as Scotland gets sunnier, experts have claimed. The gene that causes red hair is thought to be an evolutionary response to the lack of sun in Scotland. Redhead colouring allows people to get the maximum vitamin D from what little sun there is. Only one to two per cent of the world’s population has red hair but in Scotland the figure is about 13 per cent, or 650,000 people.
  • Gingers could become extinct due to climate change, experts warn

    07/06/2014 5:09:47 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 73 replies
    The Mirror ^ | 7-6-14 | Natalie Evans
    Scientists believe the gene that causes red hair could die out if temperatures continue to rise Polar bears and Emperor penguins aren't the only species under threat due to climate change. Gingers could become extinct as a result of increasingly sunny skies, experts have warned. Scientists believe the gene that causes red hair is an evolutionary response to cloudy skies and allows inhabitants to get as much Vitamin D as possible. But if predictions of rising temperatures and blazing sunshine across the British Isles turn out to be correct, flaming red heads could cease to exist within centuries. While only...
  • The Case of the Missing Ancestor: DNA from Russia adds a mysterious new member to the human family

    07/04/2014 8:40:28 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    National Geographic ^ | July 2013 | Jamie Shreeve
    In the Altay Mountains of southern Siberia, some 200 miles from where Russia touches Mongolia, China, and Kazakhstan, nestled under a rock face about 30 yards above a little river called the Anuy, there is a cave called Denisova. It has long attracted visitors. The name comes from that of a hermit, Denis, who is said to have lived there in the 18th century. Long before that, Neolithic and later Turkic pastoralists took shelter in the cave, gathering their herds around them to ride out the Siberian winters. Thanks to them, the archaeologists who work in Denisova today, surrounded by...
  • On Plutarch and the idea of citizen

    06/29/2014 10:29:19 AM PDT · by Conservative Beacon · 7 replies
    The Conservative Beacon ^ | June 28, 2014 | Ellis Washington
    Prologue: Biography Plutarch, (born c. 46 ad, Boeotia [Greece]—died c. 120), biographer, historian, essayist and moralist whose works strongly influenced the development of the essay, the biography, and historical writing in Europe from the 16th to the 19th century. Plutarch has been called as one of the most important writers who ever lived. Among his roughly 227 works, the most significant are the Parallel Lives (Bioi parall?loi), in which he chronicles the noble acts and characters of Greek and Roman soldiers, legislators, orators, and statesmen, and the Moralia, or Ethica, a sequence of over 60 essays on ethical, religious, physical,...
  • French archaeologists discover an exceptional Gallic chariot tomb at Warcq in France

    07/04/2014 8:35:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Art Daily ^ | Friday, July 4, 2014 | unattributed
    A combined team composed of archaeologists from the Ardennes departmental archaeology unit and from Inrap is currently excavating a Gallic aristocratic tomb at Warcq (Ardennes)... This type of aristocratic tomb emerges in the 7th century B.C. – during the first Iron Age – and ends with the end of the Gallic period. The oldest chariots have four wheels (like that found at Vix), while those from the second Iron Age have only two. The deceased person – who could be male or female – was generally inhumed on the chariot, which was an object of prestige and a symbol of...
  • The Revolutionary War: By The Numbers

    07/04/2014 5:16:00 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 11 replies
    Jalopnik ^ | July 4th, 1776
    As we celebrate the 4th of July let's take a moment to reflect on the enormous cost, in lives and treasure, that it took us to earn our independence. •8.37 years was how long the war lasted •80,000 militia and Continental Army soldiers served at the height of the war •56,000 British soldiers fought at the height of the war •30,000 German mercenaries known as Hessians fought for Britain during the war •55,000 Americans served as privateers during the war •25,000 Revolutionary Soldiers died during the war •8,000 Revolutionary Soldiers died from wounds inflicted during battle •17,000 Revolutionary Soldiers died...
  • Lapps, Finns, Cold Winters And Intelligence

    Tuesday, 3 June 2014Dr James Thompson Renée Zellweger cropped.jpg Cold Winter theory is very simple: warm blooded, warm climate adapted humans drifted North in search of game, and perished unless they could hunt, cope with the climate, and plan wisely so as to live from one winter to the next. Hence, survivors had more forethought, more behavioural restraint regarding immediate gratification, and a whole lot of other changes to help them adapt to hunting and later farming in cold climates. If any of this is true, people living in the far North should be very bright. All the short-term-ist, happy...
  • King Mentuhotep II's chapel unearthed in Sohag

    07/04/2014 5:56:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Ahram Online ^ | Wednesday, July 2, 2014 | Nevine El-Aref
    At the Arabet Abydos area in Sohag, where the large temple of King Seti I is located, an Egyptian excavation mission from the Ministry of Antiquities and Heritage (MAH) stumbled upon a limestone ancient Egyptian chapel from the 11th Dynasty. The excavation work came within the framework of a cleaning programme carried out by the MAH in that area, after officers of the tourism and antiquities police caught red handed inhabitants trying to illegally excavate the area in front their residences in search of treasured artefacts. Ali El-Asfar, head of the ancient Egyptian Section at the MAH, told Ahram Online...
  • Blood residue from ancient tools reveals clues about past

    07/04/2014 5:45:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    Aiken Standard ^ | Saturday, June 28, 2014 | Dede Biles
    Blood residue on spear points and other ancient stone tools made by American Indians thousands of years ago is providing scientists based at the Savannah River Site with... interesting information that indicates what animals those early people hunted and when huge Pleistocene creatures such as mammoths and mastodons might have ceased to exist... The tools they looked at were made anywhere from 13,000 to 500 or 600 years ago. They were found at a Carolina bay at the Savannah River Site known as Flamingo Bay, at other locations in the CSRA and in the Fort Bragg area in eastern North...
  • Changes in Human Skin Studied [Vitamin D myth]

    07/04/2014 5:37:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, July 02, 2014 | unattributed
    It had been thought that Northern Europeans developed light skin in order to absorb more UV light to process more vitamin D, necessary for healthy bones and immune function. But a new study conducted by a team led by professor of dermatology Peter Elias from the University of California, San Francisco, shows that the changes in skin’s function as a barrier to water loss is more likely. The skin-barrier protein filaggrin is broken down into a molecule called urocanic acid, which Elias says is the most potent absorber of UVB light in the skin. “It’s certainly more important than melanin...
  • VIDEO: Five skeletons uncovered during big dig near Roman Villa

    07/04/2014 5:30:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies
    Bournemouth Echo ^ | Thursday, July 3, 2014 | Gayle McDonald
    Archaeologists from Bournemouth have uncovered ancient burials during a dig near a Roman villa in north Dorset... It’s thought the remains, which date back to the mid-4th century, could belong to three generations of the same family who owned the villa. The skeletons of two adult males, two adult females and one elderly female were discovered at the farm, which is currently being excavated as part of the Durotriges Big Dig project. Miles Russell, senior lecturer in archaeology at Bournemouth University and one of the archaeologists leading the dig, said: “The discovery is of great significance as it is the...
  • Tibetans get high-altitude edge from extinct Denisovans' genes

    07/03/2014 3:43:35 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    L.A. Times ^ | By Julia Rosen
    orget climbing Mt. Everest — for most humans, just eking out a living on the harsh Tibetan plateau is challenge enough. But Tibetan people have thrived there for thousands of years, and a new study says it's thanks to a genetic adaptation they inherited from an ancient human relative.. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, identifies a long segment of DNA shared by the extinct people known as Denisovans and modern-day Tibetans. The segment contains the gene scientists think gives Tibetans a lung up over lowlanders at high altitudes. No one knew the Denisovans ever roamed the Earth...
  • Mapping Pterosaurs on Google Earth

    06/30/2014 12:45:21 PM PDT · by Renfield · 10 replies
    Live Science ^ | 6-29-2014 | Pappas
    Want to find the nearest pterosaur? There's an app for that — or a database, at least. A newly developed website catalogs more than 1,300 specimens of extinct flying reptiles called pterosaurs, thus enabling users to map out the ancient creatures on Google Earth. The goal is to help researchers find trends in the evolution and diversity of these ancient winged reptiles. "Having a very specific database like this, which is just for looking at individual fossil specimens of pterosaurs, is very helpful, because you can ask questions that you couldn't have answered with bigger databases [of more animals]," said...
  • Archaeologists find 25 quipus at Inca site in Peru

    06/28/2014 1:47:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Peru this Week ^ | June 25, 2014 | Andina
    Quipus where used as a form of record-keeping in Inca society, which had no written language. A set of twenty-five well-preserved quipus were found in the archaeological complex of Incahuasi, south of Lima, Alejandro Chu, archaeologist in charge of the site reported on Tuesday. Chu told Andina News Agency that this is a major finding as the quipus were found in warehouses or kallancas and not in a funerary context, as most discoveries in the past, “what makes us believe they were used for administrative purposes”. According to the Peruvian archaeologist, these objects, used by the Inca empire and previous...
  • Divers begin Lake Michigan expedition to find fabled Griffin ship

    06/24/2014 4:53:36 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 10 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | June 16, 2013 | Associated Press
    ON LAKE MICHIGAN NEAR POVERTY ISLAND, Mich. – In a remote part of northern Lake Michigan, divers have started looking at an underwater pit, hoping to find the resting place of the Griffin, a ship commanded by the 17th century French explorer La Salle.
  • Archaeologists dig in for better rates of pay (Them too ??)

    06/24/2014 9:54:04 AM PDT · by llevrok · 21 replies
    Irish Examiner ^ | 6/24/2014 | Noel Baker
    Archaeologists have formed a trade union grouping amid concerns that some highly qualified people are working for pay rates not much above the minimum wage — or in some cases, for free. Contract archaeologists, who mostly work in the private sector, have joined trade union Unite in an attempt to convince archaeological consultancies to sign up to a standardised pay agreement that would protect wage levels. The move comes after what the chairman of the new branch, Matt Seaver, described as “an apocalypse” in the sector. The union grouping comprises approximately 60 contract archaeologists — around half the total number...
  • Vessel Believed to be Russian Tsarist Submarine Discovered in the Baltic

    06/26/2014 10:41:11 PM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 6 replies
    The Moscow Times ^ | Jun. 26 2014 21:00 | The Moscow Times
    Estonian divers have discovered a watercraft in the Baltic Sea that they believe to be one of Russia's first battle submarines, Estonian media reported. The Shark, which was first launched in 1911, disappeared in 1915 at the height of World War I. It was carrying a crew of 35 at the time, whose fate has since remained unknown.
  • Fossilized Human Poop Reveals The Real Paleo Diet (Neanderthals)

    06/26/2014 7:54:45 PM PDT · by blam · 72 replies
    BI - Reuters ^ | 6-26-2014 | Will Dunham
    Will Dunham, Reuters Jun. 26, 2014 Don't laugh, but the discovery of the oldest known human poop is offering valuable scientific insight into the life of Neanderthals who lived in Spain some 50,000 years ago. Scientists said on Wednesday they found five samples of human fecal matter at an archeological site called El Salt, in the floor of a rock shelter where Neanderthals once lived. Analysis of the samples provided a new understanding of the diet of this extinct human species, offering the first evidence that Neanderthals were omnivores who also ate vegetables as part of their meat-heavy diet, they...
  • Omnivore Ancestors? Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat & vegetables

    06/27/2014 2:46:11 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    The Scientist ^ | June 26, 2014 | Jyoti Madhusoodanan
    Fossilized feces offer new evidence that Neanderthals ate both meat and plants. Chemical analysis confirmed the oldest-known ancient human fecal matter, according to a study published yesterday (June 25) in PLOS ONE. Previous isotope studies of bones suggested Neanderthals were primarily meat-eaters. Analyses of tartar from their teeth have indicated they may have also eaten plants, although some researchers noted that these plant remains could be traces from the stomach contents of herbivore prey. Stool, however, is "the perfect evidence because you’re sure it was consumed," study author Ainara Sistiaga from the University of La Laguna in Spain told BBC...
  • Neandertals ate their veggies, their feces reveal

    06/28/2014 8:43:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Science ^ | Wednesday, June 25, 2015 | Ann Gibbons
    Scientists excavating an archaeological site in southern Spain have finally gotten the real poop on Neandertals, finding that the Caveman Diet for these quintessential carnivores included substantial helpings of vegetables. Using the oldest published samples of human fecal matter, archaeologists have found the first direct evidence that Neandertals in Europe cooked and ate plants about 50,000 years ago... ...the team was able to detect the chemical byproducts created by bacteria in the gut in the digestion of cholesterol from meat, as well as sterols and stanols, which are lipids in plants that are similar to cholesterol. The tests revealed that...
  • Neanderthal-human sex bred light skins and infertility

    01/29/2014 8:00:02 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 47 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 01/29/2014
    IT IS surprising what a little hanky-panky can do. A handful of sexual encounters between humans and Neanderthals made many of us what we are today, affecting both our appearance and our vulnerability to disease. But the genetic legacy left by the Neanderthals also highlights just how different we are from our sister species. [SNIP] ... the adaptation took thousands of years to become universal. A third study published this week describes a DNA analysis of one person who lived in Stone Age Europe about 7000 years ago – 40,000 years after any Neanderthal interbreeding. His genes suggest his skin...
  • Global late Quaternary megafauna extinctions linked to humans, not climate change

    06/09/2014 4:13:04 AM PDT · by Paul46360 · 46 replies
    Royal Society Publishing ^ | May 13, 2014 | Christopher Sandom, Søren Faurby, Brody Sandel and Jens-Christian Svenning
    "A new study led by Jens-Christian Svenning of Aarhus University has strongly suggested that humans are squarely responsible for the disappearance of megafauna during the last 100,000 years. The results have been published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B."
  • Why did evolution stall during the 'boring billion'?

    06/12/2014 7:44:28 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 83 replies
    New Scientist ^ | Jeff Hecht
    LONG before evolution on Earth kicked in with a vengeance, it seemed to stall completely. From 1.7 billion years ago, for a billion boring years, Earth remained a slimy, near-static world of algae and microbes. The pace picked up 750 million years ago: glaciers spread, complex animals appeared, and by 520 million years ago the Cambrian revolution – an explosion of varied life – was under way. The reason for that long stasis has been a mystery. We may now have the answer: the gradual cooling of the planet's interior. Just as turning down a stove burner slows the boiling...
  • A collision 4.5 billion years ago nearly destroyed our planet but instead helped start path to life

    06/15/2014 2:13:49 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 45 replies
    National Post ^ | June 13, 2014 | Joseph Brean
    Creation stories tend to be outlandish, in keeping with the near impossibility of explaining why the world is the way it is — from the week-long labours of the Old Testament God, to the eternal cycles of the Hindu creator Brahma, to Raven’s metaphysical trickery in Pacific Northwest First Nations tradition. Fanciful as they are, however, these myths have nothing on modern science, whose creation story — which already involves a mysterious Big Bang, perhaps one of many creations ex nihilo in infinite succession — this week got even weirder. At a geophysics conference in California, a series of discoveries...
  • Sea Levels are Never Still

    06/18/2014 6:36:50 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 22 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 06/18/2014 | Viv Forbes
    Sea levels have been rising and falling without any help from humans for as long as Earth’s oceans have existed. The fastest and most alarming sea changes to affect mankind occurred at the end of the Pleistocene Ice Age. Seas rose about 130m about 12,000 years ago, at times rising at five metres per century. Sea levels then fell as ice sheet and glaciers grew in the recent Little Ice Age – some Roman ports used during the Roman Warm Era are now far from the sea even though sea levels have recovered somewhat during the Modern Warm Era. Many...
  • Frozen Underworld Discovered Beneath Greenland Ice Sheet (Mountains of Ice)

    06/15/2014 10:11:51 AM PDT · by Up Yours Marxists · 30 replies
    The Guardian ^ | June 15, 2014 16:00 GMT | Suzanne Goldenberg
    Scientists have discovered a frozen underworld beneath the ice sheet covering northern Greenland. The previously unknown landscape, a vast expanse of warped shapes including some as tall as a Manhattan skyscraper, was found using ice-penetrating radar loaded aboard Nasa survey flights. The findings and the first images of the frozen world more than a mile below the surface of the ice sheet are published on Sunday in the journal Nature Geoscience. ... Until recently, scientists studying the Greenland ice sheet for evidence of change under global warming had thought the shapes they discerned beneath the ice sheet were mountain ranges....
  • Mystery Surrounding Lost Army of Persian King Cambyses II May Have Been Solved

    06/21/2014 7:05:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Sci-News ^ | June 19, 2014 | Enrico de Lazaro
    According to the Greek historian Herodotus, Cambyses II, the oldest son of Cyrus the Great, sent his army to destroy the Oracle of Amun at Siwa Oasis. 50,000 warriors entered the Egypt’s western desert near Luxor. Somewhere in the middle of the desert the army was overwhelmed by a sandstorm and destroyed. Although many scientists regard the story as a myth, amateur as well as professional archaeologists have searched for the remains of the Persian soldiers for many decades. Prof Kaper never believed this story. “Some expect to find an entire army, fully equipped. However, experience has long shown that...
  • Cavemen among us: Some humans are 4 percent Neanderthal

    05/25/2014 2:05:03 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 79 replies
    csmon ^ | May 6, 2010 | Pete Spotts
    A new study concludes that humans mated with Neanderthals 50,000 to 80,000 years ago, leaving traces of the Neanderthal genome in some modern humans. This picture shows the reconstruction of a Neanderthal woman at the Neanderthal Museum in Mettmann, Germany, on March 20, 2009. A new study is offering insights into how early humans and Neanderthals were similar and different.