Keyword: godsgravesglyphs

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  • The Last Days of Hattusa

    06/27/2016 4:41:20 PM PDT · by wildbill · 13 replies
    Biblical Archeology ^ | 5/072016 | Trevor Bryce
    Mysterious Collapse of a Great Ancient Empire. From his capital, Hattusa, in central Anatolia, the last-known Hittite king, Suppiluliuma II (1207 B.C.-?), ruled over a people who had once built a great empire—one of the superpowers (along with Egypt, Mittani, Babylon and Assyria) of the Late Bronze Age. The Kingdom of the Hittites, called Hatti, had stretched across the face of Anatolia and northern Syria, from the Aegean in the west to the Euphrates in the east. But now those days were gone, and the royal capital was about to be destroyed forever by invasion and fire.
  • First Images of 12,000-Year-Old Mexican Mammoth Skeleton Emerge

    06/27/2016 11:45:23 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 35 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 25 JUNE 2016 | Harry Yorke
    Paleontologists are in the final stages of extracting the skeleton of a huge mammoth discovered buried two metres underneath a busy street in the Mexican city Tultepec. New images of the excavation site have revealed the sheer size of the prehistoric animal, which experts believe died between 12,000 and 14,000 years ago in what is now the city's suburb of San Antonio Xahuento. With a metre-wide skull and tusks spanning more than ten feet, the skeleton belongs to Mammuthus Columbi, a North American mammoth which expects believe grew sixteen feet high and weighed up to 10 tonnes.
  • Archaeologists discover layers of Indo-Greek city in Swat

    06/26/2016 6:51:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    Dawn News ^ | Sunday, June 26, 2016 | Fazal Khaliq
    Archaeologists excavate Indo-Greek and Saka-Parthian structures at Bazira, Swat. -- Dawn photo Indo-Greek coins discovered during the recent excavation at Bazira, Barikot, Swat. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat Indo-Greek coins discovered during the recent excavation at Bazira, Barikot, Swat. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat Terracotta baroque female figurine, circa 3rd-2nd BC. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat Indo-Greek coins discovered during the recent excavation at Bazira, Barikot, Swat. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat
  • Rare Skull From Korea's Silla Kingdom Reconstructed

    06/26/2016 6:11:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Scientists have studied a rare skeleton from the Silla culture, which ruled over part of the Korean Peninsula from 57 B.C. to A.D. 935. “The skeletons are not preserved well in the soil of Korea,” bioanthropologist Dong Hoon Shin of Seoul National University College of Medicine told Live Science. The skeleton, of a woman in her late 30s, was found in a traditional coffin that had been buried near the historic capital of the Silla Kingdom, Gyeongju. Analysis of her mitochondrial DNA suggests that she belonged to a genetic lineage that is present in East Asia today. Carbon isotopes in...
  • Monastery new discovery in underground city in Cappadocia

    06/26/2016 6:02:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | June 23, 2016 | Anadolu Agency
    A monastery hewn from the rock has been found during excavations and cleaning works in an underground city that was discovered in 2014 in the Central Anatolian province of Nevsehir... Excavation and cleaning works have been continuing on an area of 400,000 square meters that includes 11 neighborhoods around Nevsehir Castle, which is situated in the city center and has been declared a third-degree archaeological area. At the beginning of the year, a historic church was discovered in the underground city. The church features frescoes depicting the ascension of Jesus to heaven as well as other important objects for the...
  • Wealthy 3,600-year-old Trading Hub Found in Gaza

    06/25/2016 6:29:28 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Haaretz ^ | May 20, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The remains of a vast Bronze Age town... has been discovered in Gaza, and has now been shown to be a rich trading hub. The prosperity of its Canaanite inhabitants is evident in discoveries of elaborate gold jewelry, vast amounts of imported pottery and an unprecedented number of scarabs... trade between the seaside Canaanite town and other Mediterranean peoples, notably the ancient Cypriots. Among the clay sherds discovered were over 200 of white slip I type of pottery, a type of ware rarely found outside of Cyprus. Tell el-Ajjul, which lies right on the Gazan coast, was first explored by...
  • Ancient Canaanites Imported Animals from Egypt

    06/25/2016 5:03:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 21, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The ancient Canaanites living in Gath some 5,000 years ago weren't sacrificing their own livestock to appease the gods. They were importing animals from ancient Egypt, archaeologists have now proven. A donkey, as well as some sheep and goats whose remains were found in Early Bronze Age layers at Gath dating to 4900 years ago turn out to have been born and bred in the Nile valley.The discovery at the archaeological site of Tell el-Safi shows that animals were part of the extensive trading relations between the Old Kingdom of Egypt and Early Bronze Age Canaan (circa 2900-2500 BCE).... Until...
  • Campsite dating back 12,000 years unearthed by Route 8 [New Brunswick, Canada]

    06/24/2016 10:51:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    CBC News ^ | June 23, 2016 | Alan White, Shane Fowler
    Archaeologists say a campsite unearthed just metres from a new highway in Fredericton could be more than 12,000 years old. The campsite held 600 artifacts, most of which were from tool making, as well as a fire pit containing ancient charcoal... Artifacts including stone tool fragments and arrowheads that would have been attached to rods to make spears have been found at the site. No ceremonial objects were found at the site. The campsite is located just metres from the shoulder of a stretch of Route 8. Suttie estimated the site to be between 11,600 and 12,200 years old. The...
  • Skeletons and Gold Coins Found in Pompeii Shop

    06/24/2016 10:31:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, June 24, 2016 | editors
    Archaeologists excavating a shop on the outskirts of Pompeii have found four skeletons, several gold coins, and a necklace pendant, according to an Associated Press report. The skeletons belonged to young people who died in the back of the shop when nearby Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79. There was an oven in the shop that the archaeologists believe may have been used to make bronze objects. There is evidence that the shop was targeted by looters seeking treasure after the eruption, but they apparently missed the gold coins and the gold-leaf-foil, flower-shaped pendant. Archaeologists have been excavating a second...
  • 72 Killed Resisting Gun Confiscation In Boston

    06/23/2016 5:03:52 PM PDT · by vannrox · 60 replies
    zero hedge ^ | Jun 20, 2016 1:33 PM | Tyler Durden
    It could never happen here, right? Boston – National Guard units seeking to confiscate a cache of recently banned assault weapons were ambushed by elements of a Para-military extremist faction. Military and law enforcement sources estimate that 72 were killed and more than 200 injured before government forces were compelled to withdraw. Speaking after the clash, the Massachusetts Governor declared that the extremist faction, which was made up of local citizens, has links to the radical right-wing tax protest movement. The Governor blamed the extremists for recent incidents of vandalism directed against internal revenue offices. The governor, who described the...
  • Archaeologist: Many thousands of years ago life flourished in the Gobi desert

    06/23/2016 11:33:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Science & Scholarship in Poland ^ | June 10, 2016 | Szymon Zdziebiowski (PAP) [szz/zan/mrt]
    Many thousands of years ago life flourished in the Mongolian Gobi desert... Archaeologists found many traces of old camps... located on the shores of lakes - now dried. Based on the findings, researchers concluded that thousands of years ago richness of species of animals lived in the study area, benefiting the ancient inhabitants of the desert. Archaeologists discovered mainly stone tools and the waste associated with their production... The oldest finds are represented by a massive stone tools made by the Middle Palaeolithic communities (200 thousand - 40 thousand years ago). Archaeologists have also discovered smaller stone products from later...
  • Nazi Germany: Lippisch P.13a Mach 2.6 range & fueled by coal

    06/23/2016 9:29:39 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    The Vintage News ^ | 03/11/2016
    The coal was to take the form of small granules instead of irregular lumps, to produce a controlled and even burn, and the basket was altered to a mesh drum revolving on a vertical axis at 60 rpm. A jet of flame from tanks of bottled gas would fire into the basket once the P.13a had reached operating speed (above 320 km/h), whether by using a rocket to assist take off or by being towed. The air passing through the ramjet would take the fumes from the burning coal towards the rear where they would mix under high pressure with...
  • Marine Corps admits it misidentified man in iconic Iwo Jima photo from World War II

    06/23/2016 7:53:45 AM PDT · by oh8eleven · 62 replies
    NY Daily News ^ | 23 June 2016 | Jason Silverstein
    The Marine Corps admitted Thursday that it misidentified one of the six men in the World War II photograph of a flag-raising in Iwo Jima — one of the most iconic images in American history. For more than 70 years, history said John Bradley, a Navy hospital corpsman, was one of the six men seen in the legendary photo from one of the war’s bloodiest battles. But the Marines now say Bradley is nowhere in the photo — and the man believed to be Bradley is in fact Harold Schultz, a private first class.
  • Bizarre, Long-Headed Woman from Ancient Kingdom Revealed

    06/22/2016 7:15:27 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    livescience.com ^ | June 21, 2016 08:14am ET | Tia Ghose, Senior Writer
    | The grave of a woman with a bizarre, long-headed skull has been unearthed in Korea. The woman was part of the ancient Silla culture, which ruled much of the Korean peninsula for nearly a millennium. Unlike some of the deformed, pointy skulls that have been found throughout the world in other ancient t graves, however, it is unlikely that this woman had her head deliberately flattened, the researchers said. The ancient Silla Kingdom reigned over part of the Korean Peninsula from 57 B.C. to A.D. 935, making it one of the longest-ruling royal dynasties. Many of Korea's modern-day cultural...
  • Farming Invented Twice In Middle East, Genomes Study Reveals

    06/22/2016 11:55:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Nature ^ | June 20, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Study of 44 ancient Middle Eastern genomes supports idea of independent farming revolutions in the Fertile Crescent. Two Middle Eastern populations independently developed farming and then spread the technology to Europe, Africa and Asia, according to the genomes of 44 people who lived thousands of years ago in present-day Armenia, Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Iran. ...the research supports archaeological evidence about the multiple origins of farming, and represents the first detailed look at the ancestry of the individuals behind one of the most important periods in human history — the Neolithic revolution. Some 11,000 years ago, humans living in the...
  • Discovery Of Roman Coins In Devon Redraws Map Of Empire

    06/22/2016 11:47:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Wednesday, June 22, 2016 | Steven Morris
    The discovery of a few muddy coins in a Devon paddock by a pair of amateur metal detector enthusiasts has led to the redrawing of the boundary of the Roman empire in south-west Britain. Previously it had been thought that Ancient Rome’s influence did not stretch beyond Exeter but the find has resulted in a major archaeological dig that has unearthed more coins, a stretch of Roman road and the remnants of vessels from France and the Mediterranean once full of wine, olive oil and garum -- fish sauce. The far south-west of Britain has long been seen as an...
  • Rupert Murdoch Defends Moses Movie Casting: “Since When Are Egyptians Not White?”

    11/29/2014 10:56:58 AM PST · by CharlesOConnell · 82 replies
    Showbiz411 ^ | November 28, 2014 | Roger Friedman
    Rupert Murdoch took to Twitter tonight to defend 20th Century Fox's new movie "Exodus" that casts Christian Bale as Moses, and a variety of white actors as Egyptians. There’s been scuffle on Twitter ever since Murdoch made his observations. And a lot of this stems from a quote director Ridley Scott gave Variety about why he didn’t use Egyptian or Arab actors for the film. He said: "I can’t mount a film of this budget, where I have to rely on tax rebates in Spain, and say that my lead actor is Mohammad so-and-so from such-and-such," Scott says. "I'm just...
  • Hollywood producer attacks Angelina Jolie as 'spoiled brat with rampaging ego'

    12/12/2014 8:15:40 AM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 44 replies
    Telegraph ^ | 10 Dec 2014 | Nick Allen
    Hollywood producer attacks Angelina Jolie as 'spoiled brat with rampaging ego' In embarrassing emails leaked by Sony hackers Scott Rudin, producer of The Social Network and The Queen, claims the star's planned remake of Cleopatra will be an "ego bath" By Nick Allen, Los Angeles 8:14PM GMT 10 Dec 2014 An Oscar-winning Hollywood producer reportedly attacked Angelina Jolie as a "spoiled brat with a rampaging ego" in leaked emails. Scott Rudin, who produced films including The Social Network, Notes on a Scandal, Moneyball, and The Queen, made the comments in what appear to be a series of angry exchanges with...
  • Make It So! Sayeth Cleopatra

    06/21/2016 6:35:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Archaeology, Volume 54 Number 1 ^ | January/February 2001 | Angela M. H. Schuster
    A single Greek word, ginesthoi, or "make it so," written at the bottom of a Ptolemaic papyrus may have been written by the Egyptian queen Cleopatra VII herself, says Dutch papyrologist Peter van Minnen of the University of Groningen. Received in Alexandria on Mecheir 26 (February 23, 33 B.C.), the papyrus text, recycled for use in the construction of a cartonnage mummy case found by a German expedition at Abusir in 1904, appears to be a royal ordinance granting tax exemption to one Publius Canidius, an associate of Mark Antony's who would command his land army during the Battle of...
  • "On the Physical Death of Jesus Christ" JAMA Atticle

    04/18/2014 6:40:36 AM PDT · by Oakleaf · 10 replies
    Journal of the American Medical Association ^ | March 21, 1986 | William D. Edwards, MD; Wesley J. Gabel, MDiv; Floyd E. Hosmer, MS, AMI
    ABSTRACT: Jesus of Nazareth underwent Jewish and Roman trials, was flogged, and was sentenced to death by crucifixion. The scourging produced deep stripelike lacerations and appreciable blood loss, and it probably set the stage for hypovolemic shock as evidenced by the fact that Jesus was too weakened to carry the crossbar (patibulum) to Golgotha. At the site of crucifixion his wrists were nailed to the patibulum, and after the patibulum was lifted onto the upright post, (stipes) his feet were nailed to the stipes. The major pathophysiologic effect of crucifixion was an interference with normal respirations. Accordingly, death resulted primarily...
  • 'Jesus's wife' papyrus is likely a fake, professor now says

    06/20/2016 11:26:12 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 74 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jun 20, 2016 2:16 PM EDT
    A Harvard professor who caused a huge splash when she unveiled a small fragment of papyrus that she said referred to Jesus being married now says it’s likely a forgery. In 2012, Harvard Divinity School Professor Karen King presented the fragment, which includes the phrase, “Jesus said to them, my wife.” Since then, other scholars have raised doubts about the fragment’s authenticity. …
  • Great Pyramid of Giza Is Slightly Lopsided

    06/21/2016 12:59:52 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 115 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | June 20, 2016 07:30am ET | By Owen Jarus
    Built for the pharaoh Khufu about 4,500 years ago, the Great Pyramid at Giza is considered a wonder of the ancient world. Credit: Nina Aldin Thune, CC Attribution 2.5 Generic ================================================================================================== The Great Pyramid of Giza may be a Wonder of the Ancient World, but it's not perfect: Its base is a little lopsided because its builders made a teensy mistake when constructing it, new research reveals. The west side of the pyramid is slightly longer than the east side, scientists have found. Although the difference is very slight, it's enough that a modern-day research team, led by engineer Glen...
  • Could Long-Lost Amber Room Be Stashed in a Nazi Bunker in Poland?

    06/20/2016 7:01:27 PM PDT · by Theoria · 35 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 10 June 2016 | Rick Lyman
    There is perhaps no lost-treasure mystery more seductive than that of the priceless Amber Room of Peter the Great, which disappeared in the chaotic closing hours of World War II. Now Bartlomiej Plebanczyk, an unassuming historian and museum director in northeastern Poland, believes he has found it. Elderly villagers told Mr. Plebanczyk that they had seen a German convoy unloading big crates into a secret chamber in a stark, moss-covered Nazi bunker near the Russian border in early 1945. So the Mamerki Museum, whichhe leads, recently completed a ground-penetrating radar scan of the derelict bunker that he said confirmed the...
  • Clemson's first harvest of ancient Southern wheat exceeds expectations

    06/20/2016 10:37:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    phys.org ^ | 06-20-2016 | by Jim Melvin & Provided by: Clemson University
    Clemson University scientist Brian Ward and his team harvested about 145 pounds of Purple Straw seed, which was grown from less than half a pound. Credit: Scott Miller / Clemson University ================================================================================================= The first step of an ongoing-process designed to bring a valuable heirloom wheat back from the brink of extinction has been completed with flying colors. Last month, Clemson University scientist Brian Ward and his team harvested about 145 pounds of Purple Straw seed, which was grown from less than half a pound. Purple Straw is the only heirloom wheat to have been cultivated continually in the South from...
  • Could the first Maltese have been Neanderthals?

    06/19/2016 7:15:34 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 34 replies
    The Times of Malta ^ | June 19, 2016 | Ivan Martin
    Maltese prehistory may have just been extended by 30,000 years. The verdict of experts from the London Natural History Museum has revived the theory that a tooth discovered in Għar Dalam in 1917 may prove Neanderthals once roamed the island. The claim is not new. It was made in the 1920s by two British anthropologists, but four decades later the theory no longer had credence. “Anyone who wrote a history book from 1964 till today will say there were never any Neanderthals on Malta. According to them, the first people to come here were Sicilian farmers around 7,000 years ago,”...
  • Ancient Seafarers' Tool Sites, Up to 12,000 Years Old, Discovered on California Island

    06/19/2016 5:35:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Western Digs ^ | June 2, 2016 | Blake de Pastino
    On a rugged island just offshore from Ventura County, archaeologists have turned up evidence of some of the oldest human activity in coastal Southern California. On Santa Cruz Island, the largest of the Channel Islands, researchers have found three sites scattered with ancient tool-making debris and the shells of harvested shellfish. The youngest of the three sites has been dated to 6,600 BCE, but based on the types of tools found at the other two, archaeologists say they may be as much as 11,000 to 12,000 years old. The artifacts are traces of what's known as the Island Paleocoastal culture,...
  • Archaeologists Discover 6,500-Year-Old Grave of Man Holding Stone Ax Scepter... [Bulgaria]

    06/19/2016 5:30:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Archaeology In Bulgaria ^ | June 14, 2016 | Ivan Dikov
    A 6,500-year-old grave of a man holding in his hands a stone ax scepter has been discovered by archaeologists excavating a recently found necropolis from from the Chalcolithic (Aeneolithic, Copper Age) in the town of Kamenovo, Kubrat Municipality, Razgrad District, in Northeast Bulgaria. A total of seven graves were found in the Chalcolithic necropolis in Kamenovo when it was first discovered back in September 2015. However, these were all graves of women and children (of the Mediterranean anthropological type), with the newly discovered grave being the first male grave to be found there to date, reports local news site Darik...
  • Wine Used In Ritual Ceremonies 5000 Years Ago In Georgia, The Cradle Of Viticulture

    06/19/2016 5:23:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Science Daily ^ | Ca' Foscari University of Venice
    Georgian-Italian archaeological expedition of Ca' Foscari University of Venice in collaboration with the Georgian Museum of Tbilisi has discovered vine pollen in a zoomorphic vessel used in ritual ceremonies by the Kura-Araxes population. In the archeological site of Aradetis Orgora, 100 kilometers to the west of the Georgian capital Tbilisi, Ca' Foscari's expedition led by Elena Rova (Ca' Foscari University of Venice) and Iulon Gagoshidze (Georgian National Museum Tbilisi) has discovered traces of wine inside an animal-shaped ceramic vessel (circa 3,000 BC), probably used for cultic activities. The vessel has an animal-shaped body with three small feet and a pouring...
  • High Altitude Archaeology: Prehistoric Paintings Revealed

    06/19/2016 5:20:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Wednesday, May 25, 2016 | University of York
    Archaeologists at the University of York have undertaken pioneering scans of the highest prehistoric paintings of animals in Europe. Studying the rock paintings of Abri Faravel, a rock shelter in the Southern French Alps 2,133m above sea level, archaeologists used car batteries to power laser and white-light scanners in a logistically complex operation. Producing virtual models of the archaeological landscape, researchers have now published the scans in Internet Archaeology - an online, open-access journal. Abri Faravel was discovered fortuitously in 2010. The rock shelter has seen phases of human activity from the Mesolithic to the medieval period, with its prehistoric...
  • 'Eye-watering' Scale Of Black Death's Impact On England Revealed

    06/19/2016 5:11:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Last modified on Thursday 26 May 2016 | Maev Kennedy
    Scraps of broken pottery from test pits dug by thousands of members of the public have revealed the devastating impact of the Black Death in England, not just in the years 1346 to 1351 when the epidemic ripped Europe apart, but for decades or even centuries afterwards. The quantity of sherds of everyday domestic pottery -- the most common of archaeological finds -- is a good indicator of the human population because of its widespread daily use, and the ease with which it can be broken and thrown away. By digging standard-sized test pits, then counting and comparing the broken...
  • Lucy Had Neighbors: a Review Of African Fossils

    06/18/2016 3:47:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | June 6, 2016 | Cleveland Museum of Natural History
    The researchers trace the fossil record, which illustrates a timeline placing multiple species overlapping in time and geographic space. Their insights spur further questions about how these early human ancestors were related and shared resources... The 1974 discovery of Australopithecus afarensis, which lived from 3.8 to 2.9 million years ago, was a major milestone in paleoanthropology that pushed the record of hominins earlier than 3 million years ago and demonstrated the antiquity of human-like walking. Scientists have long argued that there was only one pre-human species at any given time before 3 million years ago that gave rise to another...
  • Current Diversity Pattern Of North American Mammals A 'Recent' Trend, Study Finds

    06/18/2016 3:05:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | June 13, 2016 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    It's called the latitudinal diversity gradient, a phenomenon seen today in most plant and animal species around the world: Biodiversity decreases from the equator to higher latitudes. A new study of fossils representing 63 million of the past 65 million years reveals that -- for North American mammals, at least -- the modern LDG is the exception rather than the rule. The findings, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, point to the importance of not assuming that the way things are today is the way they've always been, the researchers say... It may seem obvious that...
  • Ancient DNA Shows Perfect Storm Felled Ice Age Giants

    06/18/2016 2:53:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Friday, June 17, 2016 | University of Adelaide, Alan Cooper et al
    "Patagonia turns out to be the Rosetta Stone - it shows that human colonisation didn't immediately result in extinctions, but only as long as it stayed cold," says study leader Professor Alan Cooper, ACAD Director. "Instead, more than 1000 years of human occupation passed before a rapid warming event occurred, and then the megafauna were extinct within a hundred years." The researchers, including from the University of Colorado Boulder, University of New South Wales and University of Magallanes in Patagonia, studied ancient DNA extracted from radiocarbon-dated bones and teeth found in caves across Patagonia, and Tierra del Fuego, to trace...
  • 'Pristine' Landscapes Haven't Existed For Thousands Of Years Due To Human Activity

    06/18/2016 2:47:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | June 6th, 2016 | University of Oxford
    It draws on fossil evidence showing Homo sapiens was present in East Africa around 195,000 years ago and that our species had dispersed to the far corners of Eurasia, Australia, and the Americas by 12,000 years ago. This increase in global human populations is linked with a variety of species extinctions, one of the most significant being the reduction by around two-thirds of 150 species of 'megafauna' or big beasts between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, says the paper, with their disappearance having 'dramatic effects' on the structure of the ecosystem and seed dispersal. ...second... the advent of agriculture worldwide,...
  • How Southeastern Mayan People Overcame The Catastrophic Eruption Of Ilopango?

    06/18/2016 2:41:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Nagoya University
    A Nagoya University researcher and his leading international research group discovered a Great Platform built with different kinds of stone at the archeological site of San Andrés, El Salvador, and challenged the prevailing theory regarding the sociocultural development of Southeastern Maya frontier... Archaeological investigation conducted during 40's and 90's has shown that San Andrés had long human occupation beginning from the Middle Preclassic (ca. 600 BC) until the Early Postclassic (ca. AD 1200), in which had role as political, economic and religious center during the Late Classic period (AD 600-900)... Between February and May of 2016, the research group led...
  • New Cretaceous Fossils Shed Light On The Early Evolution Of Ants

    06/18/2016 2:33:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | May 30, 2016 | Current Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
    The vast majority of Cretaceous ants belong to stem-group Formicidae and comprise workers and reproductives of largely generalized morphologies... recent discoveries from the Cretaceous suggest relatively advanced social levels. Remarkable exceptions to this pattern of generalized morphologies are ants with bizarre mouthparts in which both female castes have modified heads and bladelike mandibles that uniquely move in a horizontal rather than vertical plane... with the mandibles apparently acting as traps triggered by sensory hairs in a way distinct from that of modern trap-jaw ants... some of the most effective predatory ants are solitary hunters with powerful trap jaws... Dr. WANG...
  • Roman Silver Hoard Discovered in Scotland

    06/18/2016 12:53:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, June 14, 2016 | editors
    Researchers led by Gordon Noble of the University of Aberdeen returned to a farmer’s field in northeastern Scotland where a hand pin, chain, and spiral bangle all made of silver in the fourth or fifth centuries A.D. had been found more than 170 years ago. According to a report in Live Science, on the second day of the investigation, the team, which had the assistance of metal detectorists, found three Roman silver coins, a silver strap end, a piece of a silver bracelet, and pieces of hack silver. Over a period of 18 months, they gathered a total of 100...
  • Italian team finds earliest footprints of Homo Erectus

    06/18/2016 12:42:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    The Local (Italy) ^ | June 16, 2016 | unattributed
    A team of Italian researchers have possibly uncovered the oldest ever fossilized footprint left behind by modern man's ancestor, Homo Erectus. The prints are thought to date back some 800,000 years and were unearthed in the desert of south eastern Eritrea... Alfredo Coppa... from Rome's Sapienza university... and his Italian colleagues were working with researchers from Eritrea's National Museum when they unearthed the 26 m2 slab of stone containing the footprints. Today, the area lies in the middle of an arid desert, but 800,000 years ago the environment was very different. The fossilized footprints, which are almost indistinguishable to those...
  • Throne of Homer’s hero is unearthed

    06/18/2016 2:45:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    The Times of London ^ | June 18 2016 | Anthee Carassava
    A chunk of worked limestone unearthed at a dig came from to the lost throne of Agamemnon, the ancient Greek hero revered by Homer in The Iliad, his epic story of the Trojan War, according to an archaeologist. Christofilis Maggidis, who leads excavations in Mycenae, in the north-eastern Peloponnese, said that the 110lb (50kg) slab was found two years ago in a streambed metres from a palace that collapsed during an earthquake in about 1200 BC. “This is one of the most emblematic and significant finds from the Mycenaean era,” Mr Maggidis said after an elaborate, year-long study of the...
  • Tools that may be a million years old discovered near Tarragona

    06/18/2016 2:34:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 113 replies
    Catalan News Agency (CNA) ^ | Monday, 13 June 2016 | unattributed
    A set of 50 flint tools has been discovered in Barranc de la Boella, near Tarragona, a city 80 kilometres south of Barcelona. The tools are estimated to be between 800,000 and a million years old... Co-director of the excavation and researcher at IPHES, Josep Vallverdú, stated that the site “contains the oldest files on human evolution in Catalonia and on the Iberian Peninsula”, of which the potential is still unknown. These tools were found in an area known as La Mina, and are supposedly very well preserved, along with animal skeletal remains and coprolites, most notably related to deer,...
  • Did a supernova two million years ago brighten the night sky and give our ancestors cancer?

    06/17/2016 4:22:29 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 37 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | June 17, 2016 | Cheyenne Macdonald
    Millions of years ago, a series of nearby supernovae sent radiation and debris raining down to Earth. The events left traces of radioactive iron-60 embedded in the sea floor and even on the Moon, and now, researchers are saying they may have had life-altering effects on the early inhabitants of our planet. At just hundreds of light-years away, two major stellar explosions may have spurred changes to the environment, and even increased the rates of cancer and mutation.
  • Church of the Nativity’s Face-Lift Reveals Ancient Treasures

    06/17/2016 8:30:08 AM PDT · by marshmallow · 12 replies
    Pilgrims who visit next Easter will be able to see the extraordinary work that has been done to the roof, walls and 900-year-old mosaics.BETHLEHEM — Christians planning on making a Holy Land pilgrimage — for many, a once-in-a-lifetime journey — may want to wait until Easter 2017, when the scaffolding used to restore the ancient Church of the Nativity is expected to come down. While the $15-million repair, conservation and restoration of the church, which is revered as the site of Jesus’ birth, will not be absolutely completed for another couple of years, due to a funding gap, pilgrims who...
  • Study aims to uncover mystery of Luxor's tomb KV55

    06/17/2016 11:10:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    al-Ahram (English) ^ | Tuesday, June 14, 2016 | Nevine El-Aref
    This week, the Ministry of Antiquities will start the second phase of a study aimed at uncovering the mystery behind an unidentified sarcophagus found in 1906 inside tomb KV55 at the Valley of the Kings on Luxor’s west bank. The study is being operated with a grant of $28,500 from the American Research Centre in Egypt (ARCE) Endowment Fund. This tomb was thought to hold the body of the monotheistic king Akhenaten, though no definitive evidence has been presented to back up this speculation. Elham Salah, head of the ministry’s Museums Department, told Ahram Online that the study is being...
  • Seventy-Two Killed Resisting Gun Confiscation In Boston

    06/16/2016 8:13:52 AM PDT · by dware · 65 replies
    DC Gazette ^ | 07.29.2014 | Ed Schriber Col. USMC (Ret.)
    National Guard units seeking to confiscate a cache of recently banned assault weapons were ambushed by elements of a para-military extremist faction. Military and law enforcement sources estimate that 72 were killed and more than 200 injured before government forces were compelled to withdraw. Speaking after the clash, Massachusetts Governor Thomas Gage declared that the extremist faction, which was made up of local citizens, has links to the radical right-wing tax protest movement. Gage blamed the extremists for recent incidents of vandalism directed against internal revenue offices. The governor, who described the group's organizers as criminals, issued an executive order...
  • 'Believe Me, Father, the Latin for Hot Pants Is Brevissimae Bracae'

    08/28/2004 5:12:23 PM PDT · by quidnunc · 29 replies · 1,028+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | August 29, 2004 | Elizabeth Day
    As the iuvenis voluptarius might say, put on your brevissimae bracae femineae and let's go to the taberna nocturna and drink some vinum rubrum Burdigalense. The Vatican has helpfully produced a new lexicon of modern words in Latin, providing translations for such non-classical terms as playboy, hot pants, nightclub and Merlot. The lexicon, which has just been launched, is intended to provide updated vocabulary for theologians writing in Latin about current issues. For those wishing to write about anarchy or dissent in the 21st century, entries include tromocrates (terrorist) and punkianae catervae assecla (punk). Theologians referring to the modern vices...
  • (Vanity) Sunday Morning Chuckles: Latin Phrases for the Here-and-Now

    05/23/2004 6:59:08 AM PDT · by yankeedame · 27 replies · 1,602+ views
    Sunday May 23,'04 | submitted by Yankeedame
    (Gang, what you see is what I recieved from the friend of a friend kind of person. So if the Latin isn't exactly...well, "Latin" ... remember --as our liberal friends would say-- it's the intention that counts! [grin] -- YD.) -Pecunia in arbotis non cresat Money doesn't grow on trees. -Sane ego te vocavi. Forsitan capedictum tuum desit. I did call. Maybe your answering machine is broken.-Ne feceris ut ridram Don't make me laugh.-Te precor dulcissime supplex! Pretty please with a cherry on top!-Fac ut nemo me vocet Hold my calls-Ita erat quando hic adveni It was that way when...
  • Underwater Remains of Ancient Naval Base Found

    06/15/2016 7:15:08 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 11 replies
    Seeker ^ | 16 Jun, 2016 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Danish and Greek archaeologists have discovered the remains of one of the largest building complexes of the ancient world -- a naval base that 2,500 years ago housed Athens's enormous fleet. Featuring massive harbor fortifications and sheds designed to hold hundreds of war ships called triremes, the base played a key role in the most decisive naval battle of antiquity. The remains lay hidden under the water of the Mounichia fishing and yachting harbor in the Piraeus. University of Copenhagen archaeologist Bjørn Lovén, who led the expedition as part of the Zea Harbor Project, identified and excavated six ship-sheds that...
  • Magna Carta was signed on June 15, 1215: history, quotes, and Monty Python's explanation

    06/15/2016 12:43:32 PM PDT · by harpygoddess · 36 replies
    VA Viper ^ | 06/15/2016 | HarpyGoddess
    The Magna Carta, the basis of the thesis that leaders are not above the law, the beginning of the path from absolute monarchy to the rule of law, and an important foundation of our Anglo-Saxon liberties, was signed on June 15, 1215.
  • Ancient, still-edible chunk of butter unearthed in Irish bog

    06/14/2016 10:22:57 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 39 replies
    Fox News ^ | Published June 14, 2016 | By James Rogers
    The 2,000 year-old bog butter found in Emlagh Bog, County Meath on June 1 (Cavan County Museum/Copper Tree Photography). ============================================================================================ Would you eat ancient butter? A 2,000-year-old 20-pound chunk of butter has been unearthed from a peat bog in Ireland, which is said to still be edible. The large lump of butter was discovered by farmer Jack Conway while cutting turf for fuel in Emlagh Bog, County Meath on June 1. The strange rugby-ball shaped object was buried about 16 feet down in the bog. Conway quickly realized that he had found what is known as ‘bog butter’ and contacted...
  • Archaeologists Find Ancient Collector's Hoard of Hasmonean Coins

    06/14/2016 12:54:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 10, 2016 | Nir Hasson
    A rare cache of silver coins dating to the Hasmonean period, some 2,140 years ago, has been discovered in a salvage excavation in central Israel. The 16 coins, shekels and half-shekels (tetradrachms and didrachms), date from around 126 BCE. They had been minted farther north, in the city of Tyre, and bear the images of the king, Antiochus VII and his brother Demetrius Israeli, stated Avraham Tendler, director of the excavation on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority... Closer analysis of the coins showed that the cache contains one or two coins from every year between 135 to 126 BCE... Aside...