Free Republic 4th Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $22,258
26%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 26% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: godsgravesglyphs

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Remarkable Digital Reconstruction of the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II

    10/20/2014 6:39:31 PM PDT · by xzins · 32 replies
    Patheos ^ | October 9, 2014 | Thomas L. McDonald
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art created this video flythrough of the spectacular Northwest Palace of Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (reigned: 883 to 859 BC) in the city alternately known as Numrud, Kalhu, and, in the Bible, Calah. The ruins are about 20 miles south of Mosul, Iraq. The palace walls were covered n reliefs (many of them now scattered throughout the world in various museums) depicting his reign and conquests. Genesis 10: 8 Cush became the father of Nimrod; he was the first on earth to be a mighty man. 9 He was a mighty hunter before the Lord; therefore...
  • Longest poem of classical-era unearthed in western Turkey

    10/19/2014 3:45:33 PM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 12 replies
    Hürriyet ^ | October/19/2014
    The stela is an extraordinary finding that offers a treasure trove of data to historians and philologists. Excavations around the Hecatomnus Mausoleum in the western province of Mugla’s Milas district have unearthed a written stela that dates back over two millennia. The stela is an extraordinary finding that offers very important data to historians and philologists, according to academics. The stela, which is estimated to have been written for the ruler of its era, is in the poetry format and the longest among other similar classical-era findings. According to information provided by the Milas Uzunyuva Project Epigraph Professor Christian Marek,...
  • Burnt Magna Carta read for first time in 283 Years

    10/13/2014 11:52:17 AM PDT · by dware · 18 replies
    Fox News/Live Science ^ | 10.13.2014 | Stephanie Pappas
    More than 280 years after it was damaged in a fire, one of the original copies of the Magna Carta is legible again. Written in 1215, the Magna Carta required the king of England King John to cede absolute power. Today, the Magna Carta is seen as a first step toward constitutional law rather than the hereditary power of royalty. There were four copies of the document created at the time. One, held by the British Library, was badly damaged in a fire in 1731.
  • Large mosaic in ancient tomb uncovered in Greece [Amphipolis update]

    10/13/2014 11:11:55 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 10/12/2014 | by Demetris Nellas
    Archaeologists digging through a vast ancient tomb in Amphipolis in northern Greece have uncovered a floor mosaic that covers the whole area of a room seen as the antechamber to the main burial ground. The mosaic, 3 meters (10 feet) long and 4.5 meters (15 feet) wide, depicts a horseman with a laurel wreath driving a chariot drawn by two horses and preceded by the god Hermes. According to a Culture Ministry announcement on Sunday, Hermes is depicted here as the conductor of souls to the afterlife. The mosaic is made up of pebbles in many colors: white, black, gray,...
  • 1000-year old Viking treasure hoard found in Scotland

    10/13/2014 12:12:29 PM PDT · by dware · 25 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 10.13.2014 | Reuters via Yahoo!
    LONDON (Reuters) - A hoard of Viking gold and silver artifacts dating back over 1,000 years has been discovered by a treasure hunter with a metal detector in Scotland, in a find hailed by experts as one of the country's most significant.
  • Storm god worship: Ancient cult complex discovered in Israel

    10/14/2014 10:58:37 AM PDT · by dware · 15 replies
    Fox News/Live Science ^ | 10.14.2014 | Owen Jarus
    A massive cult complex, dating back about 3,300 years, has been discovered at the site of Tel Burna in Israel. While archaeologists have not fully excavated the cult complex, they can tell it was quite large, as the courtyard alone was 52 by 52 feet. Inside the complex, researchers discovered three connected cups, fragments of facemasks, massive jars that are almost as big as a person and burnt animal bones that may indicate sacrificial rituals.
  • Giant sphinx from 'Ten Commandments' film unearthed 91 years later

    10/17/2014 3:21:54 PM PDT · by dware · 59 replies
    Fox News/Live Science ^ | 10.17.2014 | Laura Geggel
    Hidden for more than 90 years beneath the rolling sand dunes of Guadalupe, California, an enormous, plaster sphinx from the 1923 blockbuster movie "The Ten Commandments" has been rediscovered and is now above ground. The public will be able to see the sphinx on display as early as next year, once it has been reconstructed a necessity since it became weather-beaten during its stint beneath the sand, said Doug Jenzen, the executive director of the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center, who oversaw the recent excavation.
  • St. Mary's doctors determine 2,100-year-old "Mummy Girl" died of appendicitis

    10/17/2014 7:10:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    WPTV ^ | October 17, 2014 | Marisa Gottesman, Sun Sentinel
    Doctors didn't have much of a medical history to help them unwrap the cause of death of their oldest patient, a 2,100-year-old female mummy... Doctors performed a CT scan on the mummy Oct. 10 to come up with the working diagnosis. Relying on the scans, they reviewed her bone structure, size and teeth. They compared their findings to X-rays that were taken of the mummy more than 40 years ago. The older scans had initially led doctors to believe the mummy was somewhere between the age of 4 and 9, and that she had died of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis had been...
  • Greek Bronze Age ended 100 years earlier than thought, new evidence suggests

    10/17/2014 3:37:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    University of Birmingham via EurekAlert! ^ | October 9, 2014 | Stuart Gillespie
    Conventional estimates for the collapse of the Aegean civilization may be incorrect by up to a century, according to new radiocarbon analyses. While historical chronologies traditionally place the end of the Greek Bronze Age at around 1025 BCE, this latest research suggests a date 70 to 100 years earlier. Archaeologists from the University of Birmingham selected 60 samples of animal bones, plant remains and building timbers, excavated at Assiros in northern Greece, to be radiocarbon dated and correlated with 95.4% accuracy using Bayesian statistical methodology at the University of Oxford and the Akademie der Wissenschaften Heidelberg, Germany. 'Until very recently...
  • Alaska Volcano Blanketed Europe with Ash 1,200 Years Ago

    10/17/2014 10:53:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    LiveScience ^ | October 06, 2014 | Becky Oskin
    Alaska's Mount Churchill volcano erupted some 1,200 years ago, spreading ash from Canada to Germany... Mount Churchill is also an impressive volcano, the tallest on land in the United States and one of the towering, snowy peaks of Alaska's Wrangell-St. Elias Mountains. But Churchill's blast in A.D. 843 ejected just 12 cubic miles (50 cubic km) of ash, a layer now called the White River Ash, according to the new study, published in the September 2014 issue of the journal Geology... If moderate volcanic eruptions can spread ash for thousands of miles, then these blowouts may be more hazardous than...
  • Ancient Rome’s German, Swiss legacy preserved

    10/17/2014 10:37:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    U-T San Diego ^ | October 10, 2014 | Carl H. Larsen
    More than 1,500 years after its demise, the Roman Empire remains a vibrant part of modern-day Trier. Near the borders of France, Luxembourg and Belgium, today’s city of 105,000 was once the administrative capital of the Western Roman Empire and with its monolithic architecture became known as Roma Segunda — the Second Rome. The Romans brought to Trier a high standard of living, exquisite artwork and their famed architectural and engineering skills. In northern Europe, on an arc from the Alps to the North Sea, in what was once called northeast Gaul and Upper Germania, the remnants of Roman civilization...
  • A New Type of Inscribed Copper Plate from Indus Valley (Harappan) Civilisation

    10/17/2014 10:28:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Ancient Asia Journal ^ | October 8, 2014 | Vasant Shinde, Rick J. Willis
    A group of nine Indus Valley copper plates (c. 2600–2000 BC), discovered from private collections in Pakistan, appear to be of an important type not previously described. The plates are significantly larger and more robust than those comprising the corpus of known copper plates or tablets, and most significantly differ in being inscribed with mirrored characters. One of the plates bears 34 characters, which is the longest known single Indus script inscription. Examination of the plates with x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrophotometry indicates metal compositions, including arsenical copper, consistent with Indus Valley technology. Microscopy of the metal surface and internal structure...
  • Archeologists unearth 3,300 year old complex in Israel

    10/17/2014 8:17:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | 10/16/2014 | Bob Yirka
    A team of archeologists working in Israel's Tel Burna dig site have unearthed the remains of a large stone complex dating back approximately 3,300 years. Information about the finding was presented at the recent European Association of Archaeologists' meeting held in Istanbul. Initial examination of the ruins suggests the site was an ancient cult complex—a rather large one at that with side walls measuring up to 52x52 feet. Thus far archeologists have uncovered mask fragments (parts that covered the nose), connected cups (their purpose has yet to be discovered), scarabs (stone representations of the beetle typically used as an amulet)...
  • Excavated Iron Age Chariot Pieces Are 'Find of a Lifetime'

    10/14/2014 1:43:10 PM PDT · by dware · 19 replies
    NBC News ^ | 10.14.2014 | Stephanie Pappas
    More than 2,000 years ago, pieces of an Iron Age chariot were burnt and buried, perhaps as a religious offering. Now, archaeologists have discovered the bronze remains of this sacrifice. The remains were discovered at the Burrough Hill Iron Age Hillfort, a fortified hilltop structure that was once surrounded by farms and settlements, used most heavily between about 100 B.C. and A.D. 50.
  • Archeologists unearth 3,300 year old complex in Israel

    10/17/2014 9:02:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | October 16, 2014 | Bob Yirka
    Initial examination of the ruins suggests the site was an ancient cult complex—a rather large one at that with side walls measuring up to 52x52 feet. Thus far arch[a]eologists have uncovered mask fragments (parts that covered the nose), connected cups (their purpose has yet to be discovered), scarabs (stone representations of the beetle typically used as an amulet) and very large vessels known as pithoi. The relics suggest the site was use as a cult complex, likely dedicated to the worship of a god, though the researchers can't say with any certainty which one that might have been. The most...
  • October 15th in history 1781 Siege of Yorktown & more

    10/15/2014 8:15:28 AM PDT · by Prophet2520 · 10 replies
    [the fighting raged on at Yorktown] "On the night of October 15-16, Cornwallis ordered an attack against the second line. This was launched, 350 strong, under Lt. Col. Robert Abercrombie at a point near the center of the line. It was a gallant sortie, yet it accomplished little, for, within a few hours, the guns which had been spiked by the British were again firing upon Yorktown." The articles of capitulation were signed four days later. Cornwallis' British men were declared prisoners of war,...Americans captured 8,000 troops, 214 artillery pieces, thousands of muskets, 24 transport ships, wagons and horses.
  • Choral music not heard since era of Henry VIII has been played for first time in 500 years

    09/29/2014 7:06:41 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 28 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 9-29-14 | Hannah Furness
    Choral music not heard since the time of Henry VIII has been brought to life for the first time in 500 years, as an academic unearths an untouched manuscript and shows it to a modern choir. The manuscript, a book of 34 religious songs, was given to Henry VIII as a lavish gift from a French diplomat in his early reign. Containing songs referencing Henry and his then-bride Catherine of Aragon, it is considered the most "luxurious" surviving diplomatic gift of its kind. It remained in the Royal Collection after the king's death, and was later given to the nation...
  • Archaeologist believes he's found 'Dracula's dungeon'

    09/30/2014 12:34:23 PM PDT · by dware · 20 replies
    Fox News ^ | 09.30.2014 | Kate Seamons
    An archaeologist who has been part of the restoration and excavation effort at Turkey's Tokat Castle believes he has uncovered the dungeons where Vlad the Impaler was once held. Ibrahim Cetin tells the Hurriyet Daily News that the two dungeons that were found were "built like a prison." And while he deems it "hard to estimate" which room the man who served as Dracula's inspiration was held in, "he was around here," he says.
  • 14,300-year-old Dried Human Feces found in Paisley Caves

    10/07/2014 6:42:39 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 44 replies
    austriantribune.com ^ | Tue, 10/07/2014 - 07:59 | Anja Prohaska on
    The discovery demonstrates the presence of an ancient human population in America's Far West at the end of the last ice age. It was found that human coprolites were of Siberia-east Asian origins and is between 13,000 and 13,200 years old. The findings also confirmed that these fossilized samples were a thousand years older than the Clovis civilization, Paleo-Indian people who were used to reside in New Mexico around 11,500 years ago. Jenkins's work at the site began in 2002, but archaeologists first began exploring the caves as early as 1938. He said, "As we have used increasingly sophisticated scientific...
  • Plague decoded: Researchers link 2 of the most devastating pandemics in history

    01/27/2014 5:08:06 PM PST · by John W · 118 replies
    ctvnews.ca ^ | January 27, 2014 | Christina Commisso
    An international team of scientists has discovered that two of the most devastating pandemics in human history -- responsible for killing as much as half the population in Europe at the time -- were caused by strains of the same bacterium. The researchers announced Monday that the Plague of Justinian and the Black Death were caused by distinct strains of the same pathogen, and warned that similar pandemics can strike again. The Plague of Justinian struck in the 6th century and is estimated to have killed between 30 and 50 million people -- virtually half the world’s population as it...
  • Scientists Discover Why Plague Is So Lethal

    05/05/2008 3:19:54 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 137+ views
    Science Daily ^ | Society for General Microbiology
    Scientists Discover Why Plague Is So Lethal ScienceDaily (May 5, 2008) — Bacteria that cause the bubonic plague may be more virulent than their close relatives because of a single genetic mutation, according to research published in the May issue of the journal Microbiology.Yersinia pestis, direct fluorescent antibody stain (DFA), at 200x magnification. (Credit: CDC / Courtesy of Larry Stauffer, Oregon State Public Health Laboratory) "The plague bacterium Yersinia pestis needs calcium in order to grow at body temperature. When there is no calcium available, it produces a large amount of an amino acid called aspartic acid," said Professor Brubaker...
  • Bones discovered could reveal behaviour of extinct relatives

    10/11/2014 9:09:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    Telegraph ^ | Friday, October 10, 2014 | Leon Siciliano
    Pre neanderthal bones 200,000 years old have been discovered on a building site, and could shed light on every day behaviour of our extinct relatives It is thought that these pre neanderthal bones could shed light on the everyday behaviour of our closest extinct relative. They were discovered in Northern France by chance on a building site and it is though the arm bones could be as much as 200,000 years old. It is a rare find, only 12 other sites in Europe have discovered such significant archeological remains. The bones are of particular scientific interest because they hint at...
  • THE BATTLE OF LEPANTO (history by Buck Sexton)

    10/05/2014 12:43:19 PM PDT · by Varmint Al · 68 replies
    Buck Sexton Show ^ | 10/5/2014 | Buck Sexton
    If you want to hang out with this guy (below)- Don Juan of Austria (yes, THE Don Juan), hero of Christendom, then you need to listen to the Special Presentation of the Buck Sexton Show- "THE BATTLE OF LEPANTO"- this Tuesday, October 7th-- the anniversary of the battle in 1517 that changed the world.It will be unlike any radio show you have ever heard before.All you have to do is click theblaze.com/radio at 12 ET on Tuesday. TheBlaze is a news, information and opinion site brought to you by a dedicated team of writers, journalists & video producers. Our goal...
  • Remembering the Battle of Tours

    10/10/2014 4:04:21 AM PDT · by Biggirl · 19 replies
    Frontpagemag.com ^ | October 10, 2014 | Mark Tapson
    The month of October marks the anniversary of an epic event that unfortunately is no longer widely known but which nonetheless shaped the future of the Western world, and which may still hold inspiration for the West today.
  • 'The Crusades': EWTN to Separate Myth from History in New Docudrama

    10/05/2014 6:03:13 AM PDT · by Plainsman · 13 replies
    Breitbart Big Hollywood ^ | October 4, 2014 | Kate O'Hare
    The clash between Islam and the Western world is as old as Islam itself, but perhaps as misunderstood as any great historical conflict. In what is sure to shed light on this timely topic, worldwide Catholic satellite network EWTN will air special television episodes this coming week. As the Islamist radical group ISIS rampages through Christian and other minority religious communities from Syria to Iraq--killing, raping, driving out inhabitants, and wantonly destroying holy sites--the West seems paralyzed and reluctant to retaliate against Muslim aggressors.
  • The Crusades, a new docudrama from EWTN

    09/29/2014 7:50:08 PM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 25 replies
    http://christendomblog.blogspot.co.uk ^ | September 25, 2014 | EWTN
    Let the truth be victorious The Crusades, a new docudrama from EWTN Episode one of the new EWTN mini-series, The Crusades will be broadcast on 8th October in the USA at 10pm and 9th October at 9.30pm in the UK, the following 3 episodes will be shown on consecutive days at the same time slot. There will also be a continuous showing of all 4 episodes on Saturday 11th starting at 7pm in the Britain and Ireland. The series is a co-production between EWTN, St Clare Media Foundation of the UK, Buckfast Abbey Devon and Lux communication of Slovakia. The...
  • Two Thumbs Up for EWTN's "The Crusades"

    10/11/2014 12:16:54 PM PDT · by marshmallow · 43 replies
    Catholic World Report ^ | 10/10/14 | Vincent Ryan
    The four-part series is intelligent, balanced, and features good production values As a professor with an academic specialization in the crusades, I'd like to think that I would be well informed about the existence of a new documentary series on those medieval campaigns (especially when the program features several professors from the institution where I did my graduate degrees). However, if it was not for a few email alerts from my parents earlier this week, I would have been completely unaware of the four-part documentary series, “The Crusades,” that EWTN has been showing over the last several nights. The last...
  • Remains of Alexander the Great's Father Confirmed Found

    10/11/2014 9:03:49 AM PDT · by Scoutmaster · 21 replies
    Discovery.com News ^ | October 10, 2014 | Rossella Lorenzi
    A team of Greek researchers has confirmed that bones found in a two-chambered royal tomb at Vergina, a town some 100 miles away from Amphipolis's mysterious burial mound, indeed belong to the Macedonian King Philip II, Alexander the Great's father. The anthropological investigation examined 350 bones and fragments found in two larnakes, or caskets, of the tomb. It uncovered pathologies, activity markers and trauma that helped identify the tomb's occupants. Along with the cremated remains of Philip II, the burial, commonly known as Tomb II, also contained the bones of a woman warrior, possibly the daughter of the Skythian King...
  • Stunning finds from ancient Greek shipwreck [Antikythera]

    10/10/2014 12:12:50 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 33 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 10/09/2014 | Provided by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    A Greek and international team of divers and archaeologists has retrieved stunning new finds from an ancient Greek ship that sank more than 2,000 years ago off the remote island of Antikythera. The rescued antiquities include tableware, ship components, and a giant bronze spear that would have belonged to a life-sized warrior statue. The Antikythera wreck was first discovered in 1900 by sponge divers who were blown off course by a storm. They subsequently recovered a spectacular haul of ancient treasure including bronze and marble statues, jewellery, furniture, luxury glassware, and the surprisingly complex Antikythera Mechanism. But they were forced...
  • Hi-tech scan of Descartes' skull reveals secret

    10/10/2014 12:35:59 PM PDT · by Sparklite · 36 replies
    Fox News ^ | October 10, 2014
    Charlier, for his part, has made a name for himself as a forensic scientist who has debunked several myths. Among them: that bone fragments in the Vatican's possession were those of Joan of Arc. He determined they were actually from a cat and Egyptian mummy.
  • Archaeologists discover one of the earliest-known images of Jesus — and he's beardles

    10/10/2014 1:57:19 PM PDT · by NYer · 167 replies
    The Week ^ | October 9, 2014
    Archaeologists have uncovered one of the earliest-known images of Jesus in the town of Cástulo in Andalusia, Spain. The image, engraved on a glass plate known as a paten, shows a beardless, short-haired Jesus.The archaeologists estimate the 8.6-inch paten is from the fourth century C.E., and they suspect it was used to hold Eucharistic bread. The image shows Jesus in a philosopher's toga, along with two other — also beardless — male figures, whom researchers suspect are Peter and Paul, two of Jesus' apostles. All three of the men are depicted with halos. "The scene takes place in the celestial...
  • 4 Amazing Archaeological Finds in Israel This Past Year: Sukkot is a good occasion to recall them.

    10/09/2014 8:31:09 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 7 replies
    Pajamas Media ^ | 10/09/2014 | P. DAVID HORNIK
    The eight-day Sukkot (Feast of Tabernacles) holiday, which begins on Wednesday evening, commemorates the Israelites’ 40-year trek from Egypt to the Promised Land. As God commands (Lev. 23:42-43): Ye shall dwell in booths seven days….That your generations may know that I made the children of Israel to dwell in booths, when I brought them out of the Land of Egypt…. Today, many generations later, sukkot—makeshift, decorated huts—sprout all over Israel for the holiday, recalling the ancient Israelites’ rude, temporary dwellings in the desert.But Sukkot is also an autumn harvest festival, and very much tied to the Land of Israel itself....
  • New paper: Influence of solar cycles on climate change during the Maunder Minimum

    09/29/2014 11:20:07 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 45 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | September 29, 2014 | Anthony Watts
    Both observational and proxy records of climate change often show quasi periodic variations similar to solar activity cycles over a wide range of time scales. However, the detailed mechanism and the extent of the influence of solar activity on climate change have not been clearly understood. Although the exact role of each of solar parameters on climate change has not been quantitatively clarified, several possible mechanisms are proposed; such as the forcing through total (e.g. Lean et al., 1995) and spectral irradiance (e.g. Haigh 1996; Kodera and Kuroda, 2005), solar wind (e.g. Tinsley, 1996) and the galactic cosmic rays...
  • Radiometric Dating, A Christian Perspective

    10/06/2014 1:10:19 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 64 replies
    Radiometric dating--the process of determining the age of rocks from the decay of their radioactive elements--has been in widespread use for over half a century. There are over forty such techniques, each using a different radioactive element or a different way of measuring them. It has become increasingly clear that these radiometric dating techniques agree with each other and as a whole, present a coherent picture in which the Earth was created a very long time ago. Further evidence comes from the complete agreement between radiometric dates and other dating methods such as counting tree rings or glacier ice core...
  • The Earliest Group Of Modern Humans To Branch Off Survived Until Just 2,300 Years Ago

    10/03/2014 8:26:08 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 10/03/2014 | STEPHEN LUNTZ, IFL SCIENCE
    Oxford Journals, Genome Biology and EvolutionBurial site and skeletal remains of the St. Helena marine forager, who was at least 50 years old when he died DNA from a 2,300-year-old skeleton suggests that the earliest known group of modern humans to branch off from the wider genetic population survived until astonishingly recently. The finding supports the case that southern, rather than eastern, Africa is humanity's ancestral home.Mitochondrial DNA, passed on only from the mother, demonstrates that all humanity is descended from a single ancestor around 200,000 years ago. Archaeological evidence points to the Omo Valley, where fossil evidence suggests that Homo sapiens roamed Africa 195,000...
  • Was Ebola Behind the Black Death?

    10/01/2014 6:26:49 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 52 replies
    ABC News ^ | July 30, 2014 | Jen Sterling
    Controversial new research suggests that contrary to the history books, the "Black Death" that devastated medieval Europe was not the bubonic plague, but rather an Ebola-like virus. History books have long taught the Black Death, which wiped out a quarter of Europe's population in the Middle Ages, was caused by bubonic plague, spread by infected fleas that lived on black rats. But new research in England suggests the killer was actually an Ebola-like virus transmitted directly from person to person. The Black Death killed some 25 million Europeans in a devastating outbreak between 1347 and 1352, and then reappeared periodically...
  • Did the Ancestors of the Jews Create the World's First Civilization?

    10/07/2014 9:06:12 AM PDT · by ComtedeMaistre · 51 replies
    Last month, I read a truly fascinating book, written by John Entine, titled: "Abraham's Children: Race, Identity, and the DNA of the Chosen People". Entine is a genetics expert, and a fellow of the American Enterprise Institute. http://www.amazon.com/Abrahams-Children-Identity-Chosen-People/dp/0446580635 It mentions that Jews have genetic markers, that can be detected by DNA tests. Of course, genetic markers also exist for Irishmen, Chinese people, Indians, etc. The Mizrahi Jews from the Middle East and the Ashkenazi Jews from Europe, have very similar genes. Genetics research and Archaeology are proving that many of the accounts in the Old Testament are true. Jews have...
  • Have they found Alexander the Great's tomb? Or maybe his mother's?

    10/03/2014 3:06:14 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 19 replies
    Mail Online ^ | 10-3-14 | Sarah Griffiths
    Speculation about who the mysterious ancient tomb recently unearthed in Greece belongs to continues, with one academic now suggesting Alexander the Great’s mother was buried there. A number of scholars believe that the presence of female figures, known as caryatids, show that the tomb in the Amphipolis region of Serres belongs to a female. However, one expert has gone as far as to state that he believes that archaeologists could eventually discover the remains of Alexander the Great's parent, Olympias, inside. Writer Andrew Chugg, who has published a book on the search for the legendary leader's tomb, as well as...
  • Italian-Spanish archeologists to launch dig into Luxor tomb

    09/27/2014 10:00:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    ANSAmed ^ | September 26, 2014 | Claudio Accogli
    An Italian-Spanish archeological team on Friday prepared to launch a dig in an extraordinary tomb whose discovery was announced six months ago. The tomb belongs to May, an important government officer of the XVIII dynasty, an era ruled by pharoahs such as Tutankhamon and the "heretic" pharoah Akhenaton, who established a sun cult dedicated to the sun disk Aton, among others... The team came upon the tomb of May through a horizontal tunnel located within the Min, which was also visited two centuries ago by the legendary Jean Francois Champollion, considered the father of Egyptology... The few images available show...
  • Did Marco Polo "Discover" America?

    09/27/2014 8:41:05 PM PDT · by Theoria · 29 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | Oct 2014 | Ariel Sabar
    For a guy who claimed to spend 17 years in China as a confidant of Kublai Khan, Marco Polo left a surprisingly skimpy paper trail. No Asian sources mention the footloose Italian. The only record of his 13th-century odyssey through the Far East is the hot air of his own Travels, which was actually an “as told to” penned by a writer of romances. But a set of 14 parchments, now collected and exhaustively studied for the first time, give us a raft of new stories about Polo’s journeys and something notably missing from his own account: maps. If genuine,...
  • A Viking Burial Described by Arab Writer Ahmad ibn Fadlan

    09/27/2014 2:26:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    Thor News ^ | May 12, 2012 | unattributed
    ...A 10th century Arab Muslim writer named Ahmad ibn Fadlan produced a description of a funeral of a Scandinavian, Swedish, chieftain who was on an expedition on the eastern route. The account is a unique source on the ceremonies surrounding the Viking funeral, of a chieftain. The dead chieftain was put in a temporary grave which was covered for ten days until they had sewn new clothes for him. One of his thrall women volunteered to join him in the afterlife and she was guarded day and night, being given a great amount of intoxicating drinks while she sang happily......
  • Home owner discovers ancient underground city beneath his house in Anatolia

    09/27/2014 2:17:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 64 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | August 25, 2014 | April Holloway
    A home owner living in the Melikgazi district of Kayseri province in Anatolia made a surprising discovery while clearing out an area under his house – a subterranean city, of which 4,000 square metres have been excavated so far, according to a report in Hurriyet Daily News. The region of Anatolia in Turkey is famous for its underground cities, particularly in the region of Cappadocia where more than 40 complete underground cities and 200 underground villages and tunnel towns complete with hidden passages, secret rooms, and ancient temples have been found. Mustafa Bozdemir, 50, was bequeathed a house in Melikgazi...
  • Iberian pig genome remains unchanged after five centuries

    09/27/2014 1:49:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | September 17, 2014 | Universitat Autňnoma de Barcelona
    A team of Spanish researchers have obtained the first partial genome sequence of an ancient pig. Extracted from a sixteenth century pig found at the site of the Montsoriu Castle in Girona, the data obtained indicates that this ancient pig is closely related to today's Iberian pig. Researchers also discard the hypothesis that Asian pigs were crossed with modern Iberian pigs. The study, published in Heredity, sheds new light on evolutionary aspects of pig species, and particularly on that of the Iberian breed, considered to be representative of original European Mediterranean populations... The sample dates approximately from the years 1520...
  • The evidence of polygamy is in our genes

    09/26/2014 8:14:22 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    The Washington Post's Speaking of Science ^ | September 25, 2014 | Rachel Feltman
    In the genetic history of our species, the mamas outnumber the papas. A new study in Investigative Genetics reports that females have made a bigger contribution than men. By studying the DNA of 623 males from 51 populations, the researchers found more genetic diversity in the DNA inherited from mothers than they did in the DNA inherited from fathers. At first glance, these results could be taken to mean that there used to be more women than men. But if you know anything about history, it makes more sense to blame reproductive habits: In many cultures, more women reproduced than...
  • Rhinorex Condrupus: 75-Million-Year-Old Huge-Nosed 'Jimmy Durante' Dinosaur Discovered in Utah

    09/23/2014 11:59:55 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    International Business Times (UK) ^ | September 22, 2014 11:01 BST | By Lydia Smith
    Palaeontologists have discovered what they are calling the "Jimmy Durante" of dinosaurs, a type of hadrosaur with a distinctive nasal profile. Named Rhinorex condrupus, the fossil was found by researchers from North Carolina State University and Brigham Young University, and lived in what is now Utah approximately 75 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period. According to National Geographic, the date places the creature in the middle of a major dinosaur radiation, the process by which species adapt to new ecological niches. Rhinorex, which translates roughly into "King Nose", was a plant-eater and a close relative of other Cretaceous...
  • Experts: ISIS Destroying Ancient Archaeological Sites To Sell Artifacts On Black Market

    09/21/2014 6:11:48 PM PDT · by Biggirl · 44 replies
    Breitbart.com ^ | September 21, 2014 | Francis Martel
    The Islamic State captured Mosul, Iraq's second-largest city, in July, and within the month, reports surged that the jihadist terror group had either occupied or destroyed every Christian institution in the city. Not just the Christian legacy is threatened by their presence, however-- thousands of years of civilization may be destroyed under the group's reign of terror.
  • Europeans drawn from three ancient 'tribes'

    09/21/2014 1:32:49 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | 17 September 2014 | Paul Rincon
    ... Pigmentation genes carried by the hunters and farmers showed that, while the dark hair, brown eyes and pale skin of the early farmer would look familiar to us, the hunter-gatherers would stand out if we saw them on a street today. "It really does look like the indigenous West European hunter gatherers had this striking combination of dark skin and blue eyes that doesn't exist any more," Prof Reich told BBC News.
  • Village from the Roman period discovered in the Carpathians

    09/21/2014 2:11:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Naukaw Polsce ^ | September 17, 2014 | Science and Scholarship in Poland, tr. RL
    Village from the Roman period, dating from 3rd-4th century AD, has been discovered in Lipnica Dolna near Jasło (Subcarpathia). Among approx. one thousand archaeological objects there is a large pottery kiln, in which ceramics were fired. "The kiln is two meters in length and the same in width. It stands on a small tip in the Wisłoka valley. Its location shows that the wind blowing from the river was used to maintain the temperature during the firing cycle" - said Tomasz Leszczyński, archaeologist from the Subcarpathian Museum in Krosno. He added that "such kilns are extremely rare in the Carpathians"....
  • Hitting the jackpot on a dig in Gernsheim: Long lost Roman fort discovered

    09/21/2014 1:20:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | September 15, 2014 | Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
    In the course of an educational dig in Gernsheim in the Hessian Ried, archaeologists from Frankfurt University have discovered a long lost Roman fort: A troop unit made up out of approximately 500 soldiers (known as a cohort) was stationed there between 70/80 and 110/120 AD. Over the past weeks, the archaeologists found two V-shaped ditches, typical of this type of fort, and the post holes of a wooden defensive tower as well as other evidence from the time after the fort was abandoned. An unusually large number of finds were made. This is because the Roman troops dismantled the...
  • Highlight 14: Roman enamelled cockerel figurine. The Former Bridges Garage site, Cirencester

    09/21/2014 12:47:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Cotswold Archaeology ^ | retrieved September 20, 2014 | unattributed
    The find is believed to date to the middle decades of the second century AD. It came from the grave of a child aged 2–3 years. The child had been buried in a nailed wooden coffin and also accompanied by his or her shoes, of which only the iron hobnails survived, and a pottery feeding cup or ‘tettine’. Only eight finds of this type are known from the Roman world, from Britain, Germany and the Low Countries. It is believed that cockerel figurines of this type, together with other richly-enamelled bronze vessels of high workmanship, were made in northern Britain...