Keyword: godsgravesglyphs

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  • Scans give 3D look at Coughton Court’s priest hole

    12/01/2016 2:00:42 PM PST · by fishtank · 22 replies
    Stratford-upon-Avon Herald ^ | 30th November 2016 | Chris Smith
    Scans give 3D look at Coughton Court’s priest hole By Chris Smith - 30th November 2016 1 1694 One of the 3D images of the priest hole at Coughton Court which have been produced by researchers at the University of Nottingham. THE first 3D images of a hiding-hole at Coughton Court that was used by 17th-century Catholic priests escaping religious persecution have been created by university researchers. The priest hole was first discovered in the 1850s in Coughton – a key building in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605 – hidden in a turret of the main gatehouse, concealed between the...
  • Huge, Mysterious Settlement Discovered Near Stonehenge

    11/22/2016 10:14:10 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    Seeker.com ^ | Nov 22, 2016 02:40 PM ET | ROSSELLA LORENZI
    A vast, mysterious complex dating back more than 5,600 years has been unearthed just 1.5 miles from Stonehenge, British archaeologists have announced. The finding in Wiltshire reinforces the theory that Stonehenge was a sacred monument and suggests the entire region was ritually active hundreds of years before the enigmatic stone circle was erected. Found during excavations ahead of the construction of a new Army Service family accommodation, the 650-foot-diameter complex is known as a "causewayed enclosure." It consists of more than 3,100 feet of segmented ditches arranged in two concentric circles. According to archaeologists at Wessex Archaeology, the remains date...
  • You Are What You Eat: The Israelite Diet and Archaeology. Pig bones as an ethnic marker?

    11/16/2016 8:54:25 AM PST · by fishtank · 34 replies
    Biblical Archaeology dot org ^ | 11/14/2016 | Marek Dospěl
    You Are What You Eat: The Israelite Diet and Archaeology Pig bones as an ethnic marker? Jews don’t eat pork. Every kid knows that. Much fewer people know that the abstinence from swine’s flesh is rooted in the Biblical prohibition in Leviticus 11:7 and Deuteronomy 14:8, which means that for the ancient Israelites, pork was also off the menu. Only specialists, however, are aware of the fact that the Biblical ban on pork consumption from the Israelite diet can be interpreted from the archaeological or (more specifically) zooarchaeological record. In short: If people didn’t eat pork, they likely didn’t raise...
  • Mysterious Roman remains uncovered in Swiss town

    11/16/2016 8:29:18 AM PST · by fishtank · 16 replies
    The Local (Switzerland) ^ | Published: 15 Nov 2016 10:06 GMT+01:00 | Staff author
    Archaeologists are puzzled over the discovery of a Roman-era earthenware pot filled with oil lamps and bronze coins in the commune of Windisch, in the northern Swiss canton of Aargau.
  • Genes of This Tribe Carry A DNA of A Third Unknown

    10/31/2016 2:51:36 AM PDT · by Jacob Kell · 33 replies
    spasique.com ^ | October 29, 2016
    New evidence found by scientists has started to suggest that the people living on the islands of Melanesia could have human DNA the world has never seen. The theory is that the DNA does not come from a Neanderthal or Denisovan (which are the two ancient species we most closely relate humans with). Scientists believe that they come from a new undiscovered species that derived from the South Pacific, northeast of Austrailia.
  • Ancient Beverage Brewed In Milwaukee

    10/28/2016 9:51:13 AM PDT · by fishtank · 27 replies
    Archaeology ^ | 10-25-16 | NPR
    ANCIENT BEVERAGE BREWED IN MILWAUKEE MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN — NPR reports that archaeologist Bettina Arnold of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and her research team worked with Lakefront Brewery to try to re-create an alcoholic beverage that had been placed in a bronze cauldron and buried in a grave sometime between 400 and 450 B.C. in what is now Germany. The recipe was based upon the research of paleobotanist Manfred Rösch, who analyzed the residues in the Iron Age cauldron. He found evidence of honey, meadowsweet, barley, and mint—ingredients in a type of beverage known as a braggot.
  • Roman coins ID'd in Japanese ruins, but their origin baffles

    10/18/2016 7:08:04 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 14 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 18, 2016 9:18 PM EDT | Mari Yamaguchi
    The eyes of a visiting archaeologist lit up when he was shown the 10 tiny, tarnished discs that had sat unnoticed in storage for two and a half years at a dig on a southern Japan island. He had been to archaeological sites in Italy and Egypt, and recognized the “little round things” as old coins, including a few likely dating to the Roman Empire. “I was so excited I almost forgot what I was there for, and the coins were all we talked about,” said Toshio Tsukamoto of the Gangoji Institute for Research of Cultural Property in Nara, an...
  • Badger Unearthed 4,200-Year-Old Bones In Ireland

    10/18/2016 7:29:53 AM PDT · by fishtank · 26 replies
    archaeology.org ^ | Thursday, October 13 | archaeology.org
    Badger Unearthed 4,200-Year-Old Bones In Ireland COUNTY CAVAN, IRELAND — The Irish Times reports that a badger unearthed ancient human remains at a burial site in Cavan Burren Park, known for its prehistoric monuments, megalithic tombs, rock art, and dwelling sites. A group of historians and archaeologists found the small pieces of cremated human bone and charcoal near a collapsed tomb. “Our badger just threw out the bones,” said historian Séamus Ó hUtlacháin. “They were no bigger than my nail, just scraps of bone. It is the oldest discovery in this region, a wonderful discovery.” Part of a femur from...
  • Vindolanda Roman Fort Yields Hundreds of Shoes

    10/11/2016 3:09:01 PM PDT · by fishtank · 14 replies
    Archeology ^ | Tuesday, October 11, 2016 | Chronicle Live
    Vindolanda Roman Fort Yields Hundreds of Shoes Tuesday, October 11, 2016 NORTHUMBERLAND, ENGLAND—Chronicle Live reports that more than 400 shoes sized for men, women, and children, were recovered at the Roman fort of Vindolanda over the summer, bringing the total of shoes from the site to more than 7,000. The 1,800-year-old shoes included ones made solely for indoor wear, boots, sandals, and bath clogs. The footwear was found in a defensive ditch, along with pottery and the remains of cats and dogs. Andrew Birley, director of Vindolanda’s excavations, thinks the contents of the ditches may have been discarded when the...
  • A meeting of two ancient empires: How did two Chinese skeletons find their way into a Roman [tr]

    09/23/2016 6:22:55 AM PDT · by C19fan · 28 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | September 23, 2016 | Richard Gray
    They were two powerful, ancient empires separated by more than 5,000 miles of imposing mountain ranges, barren desert and exposed steppe grasslands. Yet a collection of seemingly unremarkable bones discovered in a Roman cemetery in London has provided new insights into the links between the Roman Empire and Imperial China. Analysis has revealed that two skeletons dating from between the 2nd and 4th Century AD unearthed at the site in the city's Southwark area may have been Chinese.
  • Large Hominin Teeth Found in Hobbits’ Cave

    09/22/2016 9:29:30 AM PDT · by fishtank · 20 replies
    www.archaeology.org ^ | 9-21-16 | www.archaeology.org
    Large Hominin Teeth Found in Hobbits’ Cave Wednesday, September 21, 2016 NEW SOUTH WALES, AUSTRALIA—According to a report in Nature, archaeologist Thomas Sutikna and geochronologist Richard Roberts of the University of Wollongong say that two teeth from modern humans have been found in the Indonesian cave where the remains of Homo floresiensis were discovered in 2003. The teeth have been dated to 46,000 years ago, making them slightly younger than the estimated date for the extinction of the hobbits some 50,000 years ago. The upper premolar and lower molar are larger than the teeth of H. floresiensis, but some scholars...
  • World's oldest snowshoe found on a glacier in Italy's Dolomites

    09/13/2016 10:31:53 PM PDT · by aquila48 · 24 replies
    Telegraph ^ | 12 SEPTEMBER 2016 | Nick Squires
    Scientists in Italy’s Dolomite mountains have unveiled what they believe to be the world’s oldest snowshoe. Carbon-dating has shown that the rudimentary snow shoe, made of birch wood and twine, was made in the late Neolithic age, between 3,800 and 3,700 BC. “It is the oldest snowshoe in the world so far discovered, dating to around 5,800 years ago,” scientists said in a statement. It was discovered by chance at an altitude of 3,134 metres (10,280ft) on the Gurgler Eisjoch glacier, close to Italy’s border with Austria. The ice and freezing temperatures of the glacier had provided “ideal conditions for...
  • Scotland’s 5,000-Year-Old Cochno Stone Revealed

    09/09/2016 7:35:57 AM PDT · by fishtank · 30 replies
    archaeology.org ^ | September 07, 2016 | archaeology.org
    Scotland’s 5,000-Year-Old Cochno Stone Revealed Wednesday, September 07, 2016 Scotland Cochno Stone(University of Glasgow) CLYDEBANK, SCOTLAND—BBC News reports that Kenny Brophy of Glasgow University is leading a team of researchers in a new study of the Cochno Stone. “This is the biggest and, I would argue, one of the most important Neolithic art panels in Europe,” he said. The stone, which measures about 26 feet by 42 feet and is located in an urban area, was buried in 1965 to protect it from the weather, foot traffic, and vandals who carved graffiti into its surface. As a first step, the...
  • 10 amazing ancient wonders that still remain a mystery

    08/30/2016 7:35:03 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 66 replies
    Dwarka is one of the most ancient cities of India. The city, five miles long and two miles wide, is located 120 feet underwater in the Gulf of Cambay off the western coast of India. The discovery was particularly astonishing to scientists as the area predates all other finds in the area by at least 5,000 years, suggesting a much longer history of the civilization than was first assumed (carbon dating estimates the site to be almost 10,000 years old). Marine scientists used sonar images and sum-bottom profiling to locate the lost ruins and it is believed the area was...
  • The Rock-Hewn Churches of Lalibela

    08/25/2016 10:50:13 AM PDT · by fishtank · 13 replies
    Biblical Archeology ^ | 8-25-16 | Megan Sauter
    The Rock-Hewn Churches of Lalibela Ethiopian rock churches Megan Sauter • 08/25/2016 While many spectacular churches have been constructed in Ethiopia, perhaps the country’s most famous churches are the ones carved out of stone. Located 150 miles south of Aksum, Lalibela is the best example of Ethiopia’s hypogean (rock-hewn) architectural tradition. With 11 rock-hewn churches, Lalibela is understandably a place of pilgrimage for those in the Ethiopian Orthodox Church. The site Lalibela was originally called Roha, but it eventually took the name of King Lalibela, who ruled around 1200 C.E. as part of the Zagwe dynasty. King Lalibela is traditionally...
  • SunkenCiv ?

    08/04/2016 5:08:02 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 55 replies
    ‎SunkenCiv hasn't posted anything since 7‎/‎11‎/‎2016‎ ‎9‎:‎37‎:‎18‎ ‎AM. Anyone know anything?
  • Israel Find May Help Solve Mystery Of Biblical Philistines

    07/10/2016 10:06:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | Sunday, July 10, 2016 | Yaniv Zohar
    The Philistines left behind plenty of pottery. But part of the mystery surrounding the ancient people was that very little biological trace of them had been found -- until 2013. That's when archaeologists excavating the site of the biblical city of Ashkelon found what they say is the first Philistine cemetery ever discovered. They say they have uncovered the remains of more than 200 people there. The discovery was finally unveiled Sunday at the close of a 30-year excavation by the Leon Levy Expedition, a team of archaeologists from Harvard University, Boston College, Wheaton College in Illinois and Troy University...
  • Italians Restore 900-Year-Old Mosaics at Bethlehem Church

    07/10/2016 5:35:04 AM PDT · by marshmallow · 14 replies
    The Catholic Herald (UK) ^ | 7/8/16 | Judith Sudilovsky
    Restorers, after clearing away centuries of dirt, discovered the Church of the Nativity had a seventh mosaicAn Italian team has completed restoration of Crusader-era mosaics in the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem. The mosaics will only be unveiled publicly after work on lighting, electricity and a fire alarm system. The work involved removing the layers of centuries-worth of soot and dirt – a result of the smoke of candles lit by pilgrims coming to venerate the site traditionally believed to be the birthplace of Jesus – from about 1.55 million tiny mosaic pieces that were reviewed and restored. “I...
  • Chariot races bring ancient Roman city back to life in Jordan

    06/14/2005 11:48:57 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 4 replies · 686+ views
    Middle East Times ^ | June 14, 2005 | Hala Boncompagni
    The sun bears down and dust swirls as Roman centurions, followed by armor-clad legionnaires and bruised gladiators, tramp out of the ancient hippodrome to the trailing sounds of a military march. In the seats all around twenty-first century spectators in modern-day Jordan cheer and applaud the spectacle before them - a one-hour show held in honor of Julius Caesar and part of Jordan's newest tourist attraction. Starting mid-July visitors to Jordan can plunge into the past, reliving in a unique location just north of the capital, Amman, some of the high moments that made the Roman Empire. The setting is...
  • Carthage Archaeologists Dig Up Smart Cooling System For Chariot Racers

    07/09/2016 8:36:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 30, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    On the north coast of Africa lie the ruins of a city that came within a hairbreadth of defeating the might of Rome. Now archaeologists digging at the famous Circus of Carthage have revealed a startlingly advanced system to cool down horses and chariots during races... Key to the discovery of the clever cooling system at the Circus of Carthage, the biggest sporting arena outside Rome, was the detection of water resistant mortar... The discovery was made at the spina, the median strip of the circus, around the ends of which the charioteers would turn during races. The spina would...
  • St David link to 6th Century Pembrokeshire burial site

    07/09/2016 8:29:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    BBC ^ | 1 July 2016 | unattributed
    Skeletons uncovered at a Pembrokeshire burial site may be the remains of contemporaries of the Patron Saint of Wales, archaeologists believe. The discovery was made during the third and final excavation at St Patrick's Chapel at Whitesands Bay, St Davids. It found Christian burial sites dating from the early-6th Century when St David was a bishop. This means a medieval plot found during a previous dig there was not the earliest use of the site. Phil Bennett, cultural heritage manager for the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park Authority, which supported the dig, said: "Without doubt some of the people buried in...
  • Rites of the Scythians

    07/09/2016 3:17:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 13, 2016 | Andrew Curry
    ...As he and his team began to slice into the mound, located 30 miles east of Stavropol... It took nearly a month of digging to reach the bottom. There, Belinski ran into a layer of thick clay that, at first glance, looked like a natural feature of the landscape, not the result of human activity. He uncovered a stone box, a foot or so deep, containing a few finger and rib bones from a teenager... Nested one inside the other in the box were two gold vessels of unsurpassed workmanship. Beneath these lay three gold armbands, a heavy ring, and...
  • Etruscan Code Uncracked

    07/09/2016 1:51:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 13, 2016 | Rossella Lorenzi
    An inscribed stone slab unearthed at an Etruscan site in Tuscany is proving to contain one of the most difficult texts to decipher. It was believed that the sixth-century B.C. stela would shed light on the still-mysterious Etruscan language, but so far it remains a puzzle. “To be honest, I’m not yet sure what type of text was incised on the stela,” says Rex Wallace, professor of classics at the University of Massachusetts. Inscribed with vertical dots and at least 70 legible letters, the four-foot-tall and two-foot-wide slab had been buried for more than 2,500 years in the foundations of...
  • Here's What Happened When Neanderthals And Ancient Humans Hooked Up 80,000 Years Ago

    01/29/2014 3:14:52 PM PST · by blam · 64 replies
    BI ^ | 1-29-2014 | Dina Spector
    Here's What Happened When Neanderthals And Ancient Humans Hooked Up 80,000 Years Ago Dina Spector Jan. 29, 2014, 1:49 PM     Neanderthal REUTERS/Nikola Solic Hyperrealistic face of a neanderthal male is displayed in a cave in the new Neanderthal Museum in the northern Croatian town of Krapina February 25, 2010 By comparing the Neanderthal genome to modern human DNA, the authors of two new studies, both published on Wednesday, show how DNA that humans have inherited from breeding with Neanderthals has shaped us. Modern humans, Neanderthals, and their sister lineage, Denisovans, descended from a common ancestor. The...
  • Neanderthal bones show signs of cannibalism

    07/07/2016 1:18:52 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 41 replies
    The remains that were found were radiocarbon-dated to be about 40,500 to 45,500 years old, and it was determined that Neanderthals butchered and used the bones of their peers as tools, according to a press release from the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. The findings were published in the journal Scientific Reports. The team identified 99 "uncertain" bone fragments as belonging to Neanderthals, which would make this the greatest trove of Neanderthal remains ever found north of the Alps. The findings also shed light on the genetics of this lost human species, adding to previously collected data on Neanderthal genes....
  • India's Miracle River

    11/12/2002 3:35:45 PM PST · by BlackIce · 10 replies · 308+ views
    The legend of the mighty Saraswati river has lived on in India since time immemorial. Ancient Hindu scriptures called the Vedas, recorded thousands of years ago, are full of tantalising hymns about it being the life-stream of the people. In a new radio programme, Madhur Jaffrey recounts the legend of the Saraswati river - and explores startling new evidence that it may not have been a myth after all. Vast and awesome, the Saraswati's holy waters are supposed to have flowed from the Himalayas into the sea, nourishing the land along the way. But as the centuries passed and no...
  • Harappan Workshops Excavated in Northwest India

    07/07/2016 8:14:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, July 06, 2016 | editors
    A 5,000-year-old industrial production center featuring furnaces, hearths, and mud-brick structures has been found in northwest India between two channels of the Ghaggar River. According to a report in Frontline, the settlement, occupied for more than 1,000 years, lacked the fortification walls, streets at right angles, citadel, and area for traders and craftsmen usually seen in Harappan sites. One of the furnaces, used for smelting gold and copper, had a platform where the smith could sit and blow through an underground tube to the fire pit. Nearby hearths were used to produce gold jewelry and copper fish hooks and spear...
  • All transactions to be conducted in the presence of a tax collector

    07/05/2016 4:30:48 PM PDT · by vannrox · 22 replies
    SovereignMan.com ^ | April 17, 2012 | simon black
    In the terminal collapse of the Roman Empire, there was perhaps no greater burden to the average citizen than the extreme taxes they were forced to pay. The tax ‘reforms’ of Emperor Diocletian in the 3rd century were so rigid and unwavering that many people were driven to starvation and bankruptcy. The state went so far as to chase around widows and children to collect taxes owed. By the 4th century, the Roman economy and tax structure were so dismal that many farmers abandoned their lands in order to receive public entitlements. At this point, the imperial government was spending...
  • Archaeology suggests no direct link between climate change and early human innovation

    07/06/2016 5:10:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | Wednesday, July 6, 2016 | PLoS ONE
    Archaeological sites suggest climate may not have been directly linked to cultural and technological innovations of Middle Stone Age humans in southern Africa... The Middle Stone Age marked a period of dramatic change amongst early humans in southern Africa, and climate change has been postulated as a primary driver for the appearance of technological and cultural innovations such as bone tools, ochre production, and personal ornamentation. While some researchers suggest that climate instability may have directly inspired technological advances, others postulate that environmental stability may have provided a stable setting that allowed for experimentation. However, the disconnection of palaeoenvironmental records...
  • Warming pulses in ancient climate record link volcanoes, asteroid impact and dinosaur-killing...

    07/05/2016 12:04:27 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    phys.org ^ | July 5, 2016 | Provided by: University of Michigan
    Four specimens analyzed in this study, showing the range of sizes of different mollusc species (quarter for scale). Clockwise from the top shell: Lahillia larseni,Cucullaea antarctica, Eselaevitrigonia regina, and Cucullaea ellioti. Credit: Sierra Petersen. ================================================================================================ A new reconstruction of Antarctic ocean temperatures around the time the dinosaurs disappeared 66 million years ago supports the idea that one of the planet's biggest mass extinctions was due to the combined effects of volcanic eruptions and an asteroid impact. Two University of Michigan researchers and a Florida colleague found two abrupt warming spikes in ocean temperatures that coincide with two previously documented extinction...
  • Rare Thomas Jefferson letter railing against England discovered in attic trove

    07/06/2016 7:26:18 AM PDT · by C19fan · 18 replies
    FOX News ^ | July 5, 2016 | Perry Chiaramonte
    It pays to check those musty old boxes in your attic. An unidentified family in the Deep South made the discovery of a lifetime when they found a letter written by Founding Father Thomas Jefferson in which the third president extols the virtues of American independence and hails victory in the War of 1812. “As in the Revolutionary War, [the British] conquests were never more than of the spot on which their army stood, never extended beyond the range of their cannon shot,” Jefferson wrote in the letter, penned at his Monticello home on Valentine's Day, 1815. "We owe to...
  • WORD FOR THE DAY: DEMOTIC

    07/05/2016 6:38:43 PM PDT · by Louis Foxwell · 33 replies
    2000 Most Challenging and Obscure Words | July 56, 2016 | Norman Schur
    In order that we might all raise the level of discourse and expand our language abilities, here is the daily post of "Word for the Day". demotic [dig MOT ik]hear it pronounced adjective Demotic pertains to anything relating to the common people. In that sense, it can be use as synonymous with "popular."Demotic has a narrow, specialized sense as a designation of a simplified form of ancient Egyptian writing in which the priests kept their records.The adjective comes from the Greek demotikus (popular, plebian), based on 111111111111,i1.demotes (a plebian) and demos (the common people, the populas.King Demos is a facetious...
  • April 16, 2012 Vilnius, Lithuania : $7 Gasoline. Thanks Ben.

    07/05/2016 4:36:48 PM PDT · by vannrox · 23 replies
    SovereignMan.com ^ | April 16, 2012 | simon black
    The consistent theme from my travels so far in Europe– the UK, Scandinavia, Lithuania– has been noticeably higher prices. Shockingly so, in some instances. London, where I spent a rather pleasant and rare sunny weekend with friends and colleagues, has gone from being ‘stupid’ pricey, to just plain absurd. Tube prices, taxi fares, food prices, restaurant bills, train fares… it all keeps going up. And to cap it all off, the British government’s VAT increases have ensured that absolutely everyone is paying a little bit more. Here in Lithuania, the buzz around town is the spiraling gasoline prices, which have...
  • The Forgotten Verses of “The Star-Spangled Banner”

    07/04/2016 8:43:34 PM PDT · by granite · 16 replies
    Dictionary.com ^ | July 1, 2016 | Francis Scott Key
    Do you know all the words to “The Star-Spangled Banner”? Many people have difficulty memorizing the lyrics of the first verse of this song, which is commonly performed at sports events and other public gatherings. But did you know that there are three additional verses that we almost never hear? In 1814, the poet and lyricist Francis Scott Key penned the lyrics to “The Star-Spangled Banner,” originally known as “Defense of Fort M’Henry.” During the War of 1812, Key witnessed the attacks on Baltimore and wrote the words based on his experiences this night. These lyrics were printed in local...
  • Meet Lyuba

    06/27/2016 6:27:06 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 5 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 06/27/16 | Dr. Klaus Kaiser
    Just hope that the current interglacial period will last for a few more decades to come. Anything else would spell disaster for much of mankind! Lyuba, of course, is the name bestowed upon the baby mammoth that was found a few years ago in the western Siberian tundra. The baby woolly mammoth is thought to be around 40,000 years old (by now) and is thought to have died by drowning at the age of two months. What’s so remarkable is Lyuba’s state of preservation, almost life-like, with skin and (sparse) hair fully intact. That kind of find is most uncommon.
  • 140 years ago, the lights were turned on in San Francisco for the first time

    07/04/2016 11:36:03 AM PDT · by thecodont · 31 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle / sfgate.com ^ | Updated 3:55 am, Monday, July 4, 2016 | Katie Dowd
    July 4, 1876 was the grandest day San Francisco had ever seen. For weeks, the city prepared for the young nation's centennial. They draped American flags and bunting on every doorway and balcony in town. In glowing terms, the San Francisco Bulletin reported that huge paintings of Revolutionary War heroes were placed in "conspicuous places here, there and everywhere." Businesses were on their third straight day of celebration closures. Reverends in the town's Protestant churches gave centennial-themed Sunday sermons. Catholic churches held a special High Mass. On the bay and on land, revolutionary battles were reenacted for thrilled crowds. Thousands...
  • Assault Rife Carried by Lewis & Clark Expedition

    07/05/2016 8:49:41 AM PDT · by dvan · 32 replies
    NRA Musem | NA | NA
    This 22-shot repeating air rifle is an original Girardoni military pattern rifle of the type used on the Lewis & Clark Expedition. It is a butt reservoir piece with a bore size of .462 caliber. Similar pieces were supplied by Bartolomeo Girardoni to the Austrian army circa 1780. As originally issued, each Girardoni air rifle had three detachable air reservoirs, each requiring about 1,500 strokes of a pump to completely pressurize the reservoir. Once filled to operating pressure (about 800 psi) the air rifle could fire up to 70 shots before the reservoir required replacing. A metal tube on the...
  • Early Written Signs

    02/14/2016 9:12:52 AM PST · by Jandy on Genesis · 5 replies
    Just Genesis ^ | February 13, 2016 | Alice C. Linsley
    George and I have had several meaningful conversations via email. This one might be of interest to other readers and George gave me permission to reproduce the conversation. George: I want to thank you for your blogs. I read them all the time and they have been a BIG help! I've been trying to sell others on the fact that the Hebrew lettering system goes back further than the 4th century millennium BC thanks to your findings of the Ainu/Annu culture and their lettering system in their later homeland of Japan - but with no success. I definitely believe your...
  • Archaeologists unearth 87,000 artifacts including wig curlers and a punch bowl... (Philly)

    07/04/2016 4:15:31 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 17 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | July 3, 2016 | Ollie Gillman
    Excavating toilets might not seem like glamorous work. But this team of archaeologists were not complaining when they unearthed 87,000 artifacts dating back to the American Revolution while digging up 250-year-old outhouses in Philadelphia. The Commonwealth Heritage Group made the fascinating find on a dig at the site of the new Museum of the American Revolution, which opens next year. Twelve of the brick bathrooms were uncovered during the dig just two blocks away from Philadelphia's Independence Hall, the Huffington Post reported. Intricate crockery, finely detailed jugs, wig curlers and an array of beads were found during the excavation....
  • Earliest Roman Restaurant Found in France: Night Life Featured Heavy Drinking

    07/03/2016 8:14:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Haaretz ^ | February 23, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    An ancient tavern believed to be more then 2,100 years old has been found in the town of Lattes, southern France, making it the oldest Roman restaurant found in the Mediterranean. They also found evidence that while Romanization changed the locals' dining habits, it didn't do much for the cuisine. Evidently some things never change, though. The excavators in the town of Lattes found indoor gristmills and ovens for baking pita, each about one meter across. This oven, called a tabouna or taboon, is still used throughout the Middle East and Israel. In another room, across the courtyard from the...
  • The Civil War in Four Minutes

    07/03/2016 11:22:22 AM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 53 replies
    http://www.civilwar.org/education/in4/ ^ | Jun 26, 2013 | Civil War Trust
    "Historian Garry Adelman describes the events that took place during the Battle of Gettysburg from July 1-July 3, 1863." I found this video very well done in just 4 minutes. Gave me a good start to understanding this complex battle and also something to think about on this day of Pickett's Charge. I don't know how many of you here are well versed with the way the battle went but for me it's still a learning experience.
  • Crowdsourcing a modern means to crack code on Civil War texts

    07/03/2016 11:32:13 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    The Wall Street Journal reported on a trove of Civil War era telegrams — many of them to and from Abraham Lincoln — that have never been decoded. The telegrams are owned by the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens in San Marino. They have started a project, "Decoding the Civil War," to transcribe and decipher their collection of nearly 16,000 Civil War telegrams between Lincoln, his Cabinet and Union Army officers. About a third of the telegrams were written in code. The library is crowdsourcing the project through the largest online platform for collaborative volunteer research, Zooniverse. They...
  • Were Hebrews Ever Slaves in Ancient Egypt? Yes

    07/03/2016 10:06:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Haaretz ^ | April 14, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    Conclusively, Semitic slaves there were. However, critics argue there's no archaeological evidence of a Semitic tribe worshiping Yahweh in Egypt. Because of the muddy conditions of the East Delta, almost no papyri have survived -- but those that did, may provide further clues in the search for the lost Israelites. The papyrus Anastasi VI from around 3200 years ago describes how the Egyptian authorities allowed a group of Semitic nomads from Edom who worshiped Yahweh to pass the border-fortress in the region of Tjeku (Wadi Tumilat) and proceed with their livestock to the lakes of Pithom. Shortly afterwards, the Israelites...
  • As Rabbis Face Facts, Bible Tales Are Wilting

    03/09/2002 6:05:30 AM PST · by eddie willers · 143 replies · 844+ views
    N.Y. Times online ^ | March 9, 2002 | MICHAEL MASSING
    As Rabbis Face Facts, Bible Tales Are Wilting By MICHAEL MASSING braham, the Jewish patriarch, probably never existed. Nor did Moses. The entire Exodus story as recounted in the Bible probably never occurred. The same is true of the tumbling of the walls of Jericho. And David, far from being the fearless king who built Jerusalem into a mighty capital, was more likely a provincial leader whose reputation was later magnified to provide a rallying point for a fledgling nation. Such startling propositions — the product of findings by archaeologists digging in Israel and its environs over the last 25 ...
  • Israel to pay for 10 Plagues?

    03/31/2014 11:27:43 PM PDT · by kingattax · 36 replies
    The Times of Israel ^ | 3-31-14 | ARON DÓNZIS
    Egyptian journalist demands that his government sue Jewish state for heavenly punishments described in Exodus Bible study meets modern litigiousness in a story that may one day yield a riveting courtroom drama. Ahmad al-Gamal, an Egyptian columnist for Egyptian daily Al-Yawm Al-Sabi, advocated in the newspaper on March 11 that Egypt sue the State of Israel for damages caused by the 10 Biblical plagues, “We want compensation for the plagues that were inflicted upon [us] as a result of the curses that the Jews’ ancient forefathers [cast] upon our ancient forefathers, who did not deserve to pay for the mistake...
  • Egyptians Want Reparations From Jews

    08/26/2003 2:26:41 PM PDT · by Jean S · 34 replies · 151+ views
    NewsMax.com ^ | 8/26/03 | Carl Limbacher and NewsMax.com Staff
    Jesse Jackson ought to get a charge out of this one: Egyptians are preparing an enormous lawsuit against "all the Jews of the world" for "trillions" of tons of gold supposedly stolen during the Exodus. According to Middle East Media Research Institute, Nabil Hilmi, dean of law at the University of Al-Zaqaziq, and some Egyptian expatriates in Switzerland are behind the stunt. Hilmi is quoted as telling the Egyptian weekly Al-Ahram Al-Arabi: "Since the Jews make various demands of the Arabs and the world, and claim rights that they base on historical and religious sources, a group of Egyptians in...
  • Ancient Greek 'computer' came with a user guide

    07/02/2016 1:00:20 AM PDT · by blueplum · 63 replies
    Fox News ^ | 28 June 2016 | Megan Gannon
    ....With the turn of a hand crank, the ancient Greeks could track the positions of the sun and the moon, the lunar phases, and even cycles of Greek athletic competitions. The 82 corroded metal fragments of the Antikythera mechanism contain ancient Greek text, much of which is unreadable to the naked eye. But over the past 10 years, new imaging techniques, such as 3D X-ray scanning, have revealed hidden letters and words in the text...
  • For Peaceable Humans, Don’t Look to Prehistory

    07/01/2016 9:22:43 AM PDT · by SES1066 · 37 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 06/30/2016 | MELVIN KONNER
    Along a river in northern Germany, thousands of men lined up for a pitched battle. Some had come great distances, determined to seize or hold this modest waterway. They went at it mercilessly, leaving hundreds dead, many shot in the back while fleeing. Victory was decisive. [1250 BC]
  • Real Viking Ship Completes North Atlantic Crossing

    06/30/2016 11:32:36 AM PDT · by Ketill Frostbeard · 44 replies
    GCaptain.com ^ | June 30, 2016 | GCaptain Staff
    The world’s largest viking ship has arrived in North America after crossing the North Atlantic Ocean on a journey from its homeport in Haugesund, Norway. The Viking ship, named Draken Harald Hårfagre, set sail from Norway with its approximately 32 crew members in late April and made stops in Iceland, Greenland and Newfoundland, Canada, before making its way through the Saint Lawrence Seaway to Toronto for the Tall Ships Challenge Great Lakes 2016 festival this weekend. Future stops for the Viking ship include Chicago, Green Bay and Duluth, before heading to U.S. east coast with stops in New York City...
  • Goths Vs.Greeks: Epic battle revealed in newfound text

    06/30/2016 8:01:58 AM PDT · by wildbill · 23 replies
    Fox News ^ | March 2016 | Owen Jarus
    Fragments of an ancient Greek text telling of an invasion of Greece by the Goths during the third century A.D. have been discovered in the Austrian National Library. The text includes a battle fought at the pass of Thermopylae. Researchers used spectral imaging to enhance the fragments, making it possible to read them. The analysis suggests the fragments were copied in the 11th century A.D. and are from a text that was written in the third-century A.D. by an Athens writer named Dexippus.