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  • Peru: Archaeologists Uncover Ancient Astronomy Lab In Peruvian Ruins

    07/27/2014 6:49:07 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 8 replies
    IBTimes ^ | 7-26-14 | Kathleen Caulderwood
    Archeologists have stumbled upon a site where ancient people observed the stars thousands of years ago in Peru, a country famous for using drones to help uncover and map archeological treasures, as Reuters reported. Excavators working on a complex at Licurnique, in the country’s northern region, have uncovered evidence of an “astronomical laboratory,” that dates back between 3,500 and 4,000 years, according to Peru This Week.
  • Researchers find first sign that tyrannosaurs hunted in packs

    07/27/2014 6:46:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | Wednesday 23 July 2014 | Ian Sample
    The collective noun is a terror of tyrannosaurs: a pack of the prehistoric predators, moving and hunting in numbers, for prey that faced the fight of its life. That tyrannosaurs might have hunted in groups has long been debated by dinosaur experts, but with so little to go on, the prospect has remained firmly in the realm of speculation. But researchers in Canada now claim to have the strongest evidence yet that the ancient beasts did move around in packs. At a remote site in north-east British Columbia - in the west of Canada - they uncovered the first known...
  • Living Relatives Of Iceman Mummy Found (Ötzi, 5,300 Years Old)

    10/14/2013 9:09:02 PM PDT · by blam · 18 replies
    Fox News ^ | 10-14-2013 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Living Relatives Of Iceman Mummy Found By Rossella Lorenzi/ Published October 14, 2013/ Discovery News A reconstruction of Otzi the Iceman -- a remarkably well preserved 5,300-year-old mummy sometimes lovingly called "Frozen Frit" -- created by Dutch forensic experts. (HEIKE ENGEL-21LUX / SDTIROLER ARCHOLOGIEMUSEUM / NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DEUTSCHLAND) Ötzi the Iceman has at least 19 living male relatives in the Austrian Tirol, according to a genetic study into the origins of the people who now inhabit the region. Scientists from the Institute of Legal Medicine at Innsbruck Medical University analyzed DNA samples taken from 3,700 blood donors in the Tyrol...
  • “Out of Africa” Theory Officially Debunked

    07/27/2014 9:49:37 AM PDT · by djf · 51 replies
    Scientific evidence refuting the theory of modern humanity’s African genesis is common knowledge among those familiar with the most recent scientific papers on the human Genome, Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosomes. Regrettably, within mainstream press and academia circles, there seems to be a conspicuous – and dare we say it – deliberate vacuum when it comes to reporting news of these recent studies and their obvious implications.
  • Artists Recreate the Face Otzi, a 5,300-Year-Old Iceman Mummy

    02/25/2011 10:50:46 AM PST · by Kartographer · 47 replies · 2+ views
    FoxNews ^ | 2/25/11
    In the year 3289 BC, Otzi trekked up the Schnalstal glacier in the Italian Alps. The Neolithic guy -- dubbed Otzi the Iceman, or Frozen Fritz -- wore a coat and leggings made of sheep's fur and moccasins made of cattle leather as he climbed, having just polished off his last meal: unleavened bread and meat. Severely wounded by an arrow and possibly dispatched with a blow to the head by a cudgel, he died, his body froze and was mummified, and he lay in place for a very, very long time.
  • Ötzi's non-human DNA: Opportunistic pathogen discovered in Iceman tissue biopsy

    07/27/2014 2:08:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | July 15, 2014 | European Academy of Bozen/Bolzano
    Ötzi’s human genome was decoded from a hip bone sample taken from the 5,300 year old mummy. However the tiny sample weighing no more than 0.1 g provides so much more information. A team of scientists analyzed the non-human DNA in the sample. They found evidence for the presence of Treponema denticola, an opportunistic pathogen involved in the development of periodontal disease. Ötzi's human genome was decoded from a hip bone sample taken from the 5,300 year old mummy. However the tiny sample weighing no more than 0.1 g provides so much more information. A team of scientists from EURAC...
  • Egyptian Carving Defaced by King Tut's Possible Father Discovered

    07/27/2014 2:02:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Live Science ^ | July 24, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The panel, carved in Nubian Sandstone, was found recently in a tomb at the site of Sedeinga, in modern-day Sudan. It is about 5.8 feet (1.8 meters) tall by 1.3 feet (0.4 m) wide, and was found in two pieces. Originally, it adorned the walls of a temple at Sedeinga that was dedicated to Queen Tiye (also spelled Tiyi), who died around 1340 B.C. Several centuries after Tiye's death — and after her temple had fallen into ruin — this panel was reused in a tomb as a bench that held a coffin above the floor. Scars of a revolution...
  • Archaeologists find bizarre burials in Burnt City

    07/27/2014 1:55:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Tehran Times ^ | Tuesday 22 July 2014 | Culture Desk/MMS/YAW
    “One of the odd burials is in Grave 1003, which had been excavated by our Italian colleagues,” Sajjadi said. The skeleton of 45-year-old man is located in the center of the circle-shaped grave and skulls of two dogs are placed above his head. In addition, 12 human skulls were placed on the north side of the grave, he stated, adding that to date, no other example of such a burial has been discovered in the Burnt City. Due to the structure of the grave, Sajjadi stated, “The grave undoubtedly belongs one of the peoples who had migrated from the Central...
  • West US cave with fossil secrets to be excavated

    07/27/2014 1:48:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | July 24, 2014 | unattributed
    For the first time in three decades, paleontologists are about to revisit one of North America's most remarkable troves of ancient fossils: The bones of tens of thousands of animals piled at the bottom of a sinkhole-type cave. Natural Trap Cave in Wyoming is 85 feet (25 meters) deep and almost impossible to see until you're standing right next to it. Over tens of thousands of years, many, many animals—including now-extinct mammoths, short-faced bears, American lions and American cheetahs—shared the misfortune of not noticing the 15-foot-wide (4 meters) opening until they were plunging to their deaths. Now, the U.S. Bureau...
  • Ancient naval ram found in Phanagoria reveals history of popular unrest in 63 B.C.

    07/27/2014 1:40:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Vol. 15 06052014 | unattributed
    ...an ancient naval ram used by the army of Mithradates VI of the Bosporan Kingdom to quell a popular uprising against him in Phanagoria in 63 B.C. One-meter long ram and presumably made of bronze, it has an engraving of Mithradates VI, the king of Pontus from 119 to 63 B.C. who was the most powerful king in Anatolia during the 1st century B.C... The ram was found in the submerged part of Phanagoria, the largest Greek colony on the Taman peninsula, not far from the 15-meter-long ship that was previously unearthed in 2012... and proves that the ship was...
  • Ancient graffiti proves Spain's Irish links

    07/26/2014 1:35:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    The Local ^ | July 22, 2014 | Alex Dunham
    An ancient inscription discovered on a 14th century church in Spain's Galicia region has been identified as Gaelic; the first written evidence of the northern region’s Irish and Scottish heritage. For centuries it has gone unnoticed, weathered by Galicia’s incessant drizzle but still visible to those with an eagle-eye. On one of the granite walls of Santiago church in the small town of Betanzos, a small previously unintelligible inscription five metres above ground kept historians and epigraphists, or people who study ancient inscriptions, baffled for decades. Researchers working for a private association called the Gaelaico Project now believe they've finally...
  • USO Canteen FReeper Style ~ Ancient Roman Military: Roman Tactics ~ August 19, 2003

    08/19/2003 2:52:17 AM PDT · by LaDivaLoca · 395 replies · 5,566+ views
    The Roman Empire ^ | August 19, 2003 | LaDivaLoca
    ANCIENT WARFARE   ANCIENT ROMAN MILITARY(continuation) PART II-C: ROMAN TACTICSFrom Creasy's Battle of the Metaurus (http://www.standin.se/fifteen04a.htm ) The tactics of the Roman legions had not yet acquired that perfection which it received from the military genius of Marius, and which we read of in the first chapter of Gibbon. We possess, in that great work, an account of the Roman legions at the end of the commonwealth, and during the early ages of the empire, which those alone can adequately admire who have attempted a similar description. We have also, in the sixth and seventeenth books of Polybius, an...
  • USO Canteen FReeper Style ~ Ancient Warfare: Ancient Egyptian Military ~ July 8, 2003

    07/08/2003 2:47:30 AM PDT · by LaDivaLoca · 419 replies · 6,119+ views
    militaryhistory.com ~ the Internet | July 8, 2003 | LaDivaloca
        For the freedom you enjoyed yesterday... Thank the Veterans who served in The United States Armed Forces.     Looking forward to tomorrow's freedom? Support The United States Armed Forces Today!     ANCIENT WARFARE The oldest remaining documentation of military campaigns come from the Middle East where the Egyptians, Assyrians, Hittites, and Persians were the main combatants. Read about the rise of standing armies and how battles were fought 4000 years ago.   PART I: Ancient Egyptian MilitaryThe Army     Until the takeover of Lower Egypt by the Hyksos, most conflicts the Egyptians had fought...
  • Blind luck helps archer make one-in-a-million Robin Hood shot[Blind Archer]

    03/29/2008 4:12:30 PM PDT · by BGHater · 25 replies · 1,452+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 27 Mar 2008 | Telegraph
    An archer has achieved a one-in-a-million feat of marksmanship after splitting one arrow with another. What makes the shot even more remarkable is that Tilly Trotter is blind. The 74-year-old grandmother pulled off the shot, known among archers as a "Robin Hood", at a practice session of the Wellington Bowmen in Somerset. Mrs Trotter, who has been an archer for two years at the invitation of granddaughter Charlotte, said: "The second arrow made such a noise going into the back of previous arrow I thought I had hit the ceiling or done some expensive damage. "Then I heard people jumping...
  • Bacteria-killing proteins cover blood type blind spot

    02/14/2010 12:43:08 PM PST · by decimon · 7 replies · 346+ views
    Emory University ^ | Feb 14, 2010 | Unknown
    A set of proteins found in our intestines can recognize and kill bacteria that have human blood type molecules on their surfaces, scientists at Emory University School of Medicine have discovered. The results were published online Feb. 14 and are scheduled to appear in the journal Nature Medicine. Many immune cells have receptors that respond to molecules on the surfaces of bacteria, but these proteins are different because they recognize structures found on our own cells, says senior author Richard D. Cummings, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of Biochemistry. "It's like having a platoon in an army whose...
  • George Patton's Summer of 1944

    07/24/2014 5:05:44 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 55 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | July 24, 2014 | Victor Davis Hanson
    Nearly 70 years ago, on Aug. 1, 1944, Lieutenant General George S. Patton took command of the American Third Army in France. For the next 30 days they rolled straight toward the German border. Patton almost did not get a chance at his summer of glory. After brilliant service in North Africa and Sicily, fellow officers -- and his German enemies -- considered him the most gifted American field general of his generation. But near the conclusion of his illustrious Sicilian campaign, the volatile Patton slapped two sick GIs in field hospitals, raving that they were shirkers. In truth,...
  • Göbekli Tepe Excavator Klaus Schmidt Passes Away

    07/24/2014 3:44:54 PM PDT · by fatez · 19 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Society ^ | July 21, 2014 | Robin Ngo
    Pioneering archaeologist Klaus Schmidt, who headed the excavations at Göbekli Tepe in southeastern Turkey, has died at the age of 61. Schmidt had been working on the excavations at Göbekli Tepe, sometimes called Turkey’s Stonehenge, with the German Archaeology Institute since 1995.
  • Germany puts 700,000 WWI docs online

    07/23/2014 3:36:07 PM PDT · by fso301 · 23 replies
    The Local ^ | 07/23/2014 | Staff Writers
    More than 700,000 records relating to WWI, as well as photos, films and audio recordings were made accessible on a new portal on the Federal Archive's website. The collection includes private material as well as files of military and civilian authorities, records left by politicians and military officers, documentaries and propaganda films. Access to the complete archive is free. The archive will also help people compiling family histories, say curators, since it has extensive information about locations where individual soldiers served. It also contains letters written to and by combatants in the war, which began on July 28, 1914, and...
  • Researchers Find Rare Coin, Other Artifacts at Bethsaida Dig Site

    07/22/2014 3:04:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    University of Nebraska Omaha ^ | July 17, 2014 | Charley Reed
    The highlight of the excavation was the discovery of a Judea Capta coin, which was minted by Roman Emporor Domitian during his reign of 81 – 96 CE in honor of the conquest of Judea and the destruction of Jersusalem in 70 CE by his father, Vespasian, and brother, Titus. Christie Cobb, a doctoral student at Drew University in New Jersey, discovered the coin. There are only 48 other versions of this coin that have been found, and fewer still at Biblical sites such as Bethsaida. “The coin confirms other ceramic data about the date of the large Roman period...
  • Violence and climate change in prehistoric Egypt and Sudan

    07/21/2014 10:50:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    British Museum ^ | Monday, July 14, 2014 | Renée Friedman, curator
    Among the most exciting of the new acquisitions are the materials from the site of Jebel Sahaba, now in northern Sudan, which were donated to the Museum by Dr Fred Wendorf in 2002. Excavating here in 1965–66, as part of the UNESCO-funded campaign to salvage sites destined to be flooded by the construction of the Aswan High Dam, Dr Wendorf found a cemetery (site 117) containing at least 61 individuals dating back to about 13,000 years ago. This discovery was of great significance for two reasons. First, as a designated graveyard, evidently used over several generations, it is one of...
  • Archaeologists Uncover Lost Population of Ancient Amarna

    07/21/2014 9:34:54 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, July 17, 2014 | unattributed
    ...the burials of the deceased of the estimated 30,000 commoners and laborers remained elusive – until 2001, when archaeologist Barry Kemp of the University of Cambridge began to see the first signs. Kemp has directed excavations and surveys at Amarna for the Egypt Exploration Society since 1977. “The puzzle seems now to have been solved,” says Kemp. “ It has come about through the desert GPS survey begun in 2001 and continued in subsequent years. First came the discovery of two cemeteries (clearly robbed) of what must be relatively poor graves on the flat desert not far from tomb no....
  • Romanian cave holds some of the oldest human footprints

    07/21/2014 9:29:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Science News ^ | July 17, 2014 | Bruce Bower
    About 400 footprints were first discovered in the cave in 1965. Scientists initially attributed the impressions to a man, woman and child who lived 10,000 to 15,000 years ago. But radiocarbon measurements of two cave bear bones excavated just below the footprints now indicate that Homo sapiens made these tracks around 36,500 years ago, say anthropologist David Webb of Kutztown University in Pennsylvania and his colleagues. Analyses of 51 footprints that remain — cave explorers and tourists have destroyed the rest — indicate that six or seven individuals, including at least one child, entered the cave after a flood had...
  • Image found of Confederate White House housekeeper

    07/19/2014 4:15:19 PM PDT · by re_tail20 · 31 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 19, 2014 | Fox News
    Mary O'Melia left Ireland for America as a young widow with three children before she was hired as housekeeper at the White House of the Confederacy. An intimate witness to history, she also has been much of a mystery. That was until this year, when a woman with a distinctive Irish lilt to her voice called The American Civil War Museum. The housekeeper, the woman said, was related to her late husband, and she had in her possession a necklace that Confederate first lady Varina Davis gave O'Melia. But there was more. "What really took my breath away is she...
  • 'Italy's Ginger Gene Spread From Sicily'

    07/18/2014 1:53:50 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 33 replies
    Over the centuries, they’ve been scorned, persecuted and marginalized. But it was an example of modern-day disdain towards redheads that prompted an Italian photographer’s mission to safeguard their diversity, The Local has learned. Let’s face it, redheads get a tough time, especially in the early years of their life. I should know, because I am one. But more on that later. Marina Rosso, a 29-year-old fine art photographer and researcher from Udine, is not a redhead as the English translation of her surname might suggest. But after hearing in 2011 that flame-haired men were being rejected from the world’s largest...
  • 10,000-year-old rock paintings depicting aliens and UFOs found in Chhattisgarh[India]

    07/17/2014 3:56:53 PM PDT · by Theoria · 71 replies
    Times of India ^ | 15 July 2014 | Rashmi Drolia
    Chhattisgarh state department of archaeology and culture plans to seek help from Nasa and Isro for research on 10,000-year-old rock paintings depicting aliens and UFOs in Charama region in Kanker district in tribal Bastar region. According to archaeologist JR Bhagat, these paintings have depicted aliens like those shown in Hollywood and Bollywood flicks. Located about 130km from Raipur, the caves come under village Chandeli and Gotitola. "The findings suggest that humans in prehistoric times may have seen or imagined beings from other planets which still create curiosity among people and researchers. Extensive research is needed for further findings. Chhattisgarh presently...
  • The surprising ages of the Founding Fathers on July 4, 1776

    07/06/2014 8:35:05 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 76 replies
    kottke.org ^ | August 13, 2013
    For the Journal of the American Revolution, Todd Andrlik compiled a list of the ages of the key participants in the Revolutionary War as of July 4, 1776. Many of them were surprisingly young: Marquis de Lafayette, 18 James Monroe, 18 Gilbert Stuart, 20 Aaron Burr, 20 Alexander Hamilton, 21 Betsy Ross, 24 James Madison, 25 This is kind of blowing my mind...because of the compression of history, I'd always assumed all these people were around the same age. But in thinking about it, all startups need young people...Hamilton, Lafayette, and Burr were perhaps the Gates, Jobs, and Zuckerberg of...
  • Ancient Chinese town’s Ming dynasty buildings under water

    07/16/2014 8:01:23 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 11 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 10:06AM BST 16 Jul 2014 | (AFP)
    One of ChinaÂ’s renowned ancient towns was under water on Wednesday as heavy rain hit the centre of the country, with tens of thousands of people evacuated from the area. The old town district of Fenghuang nestles on the banks of a winding river in a picturesque, mountainous part of Hunan province, and boasts stunning Qing and Ming dynasty architecture dating back hundreds of years. [Â…] According to ChinaÂ’s official Xinhua news agency, the Tuojiang river in the town had reached 1.1 meters above its previous highest recorded level, and several bridges had been damaged or destroyed. Â…
  • Chalcolithic catastrophe on the Mondsee

    07/15/2014 4:22:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Saturday, July 5, 2014 | Alexander Binsteiner
    This is what may have happened around 3,200 BC on the Lake of Mondsee (Lake Constance), resulting in the exodus of a metalworking community that lived there. When the site of this particular settlement was excavated in the 19th century, 595 stone axes and studded battleaxes, 451 arrowheads along with 12 copper axes and six daggers were discovered. These items represented highly sought-after status symbols, and would never have been left behind intentionally, unless of course the settlement had been abandoned as the result of a disaster. Well preserved foods such as charred hazelnuts, grain and pieces of apples were...
  • Positioning the Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) Hunted by the Tyrolean Iceman...

    07/15/2014 3:34:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    PLOSone ^ | July 02, 2014 | Cristina Olivieri et al (see below)
    Abstract -- In the last years several phylogeographic studies of both extant and extinct red deer populations have been conducted. Three distinct mitochondrial lineages (western, eastern and North-African/Sardinian) have been identified reflecting different glacial refugia and postglacial recolonisation processes. However, little is known about the genetics of the Alpine populations and no mitochondrial DNA sequences from Alpine archaeological specimens are available. Here we provide the first mitochondrial sequences of an Alpine Copper Age Cervus elaphus. DNA was extracted from hair shafts which were part of the remains of the clothes of the glacier mummy known as the Tyrolean Iceman or...
  • Native Americans KILLED AND ATE DUMBO, say archaeologists

    07/15/2014 1:27:51 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 46 replies
    theregister.co.uk ^ | 15 Jul 2014 | Lewis Page,
    The primitive folk assessed by many archaeologists as being the original native Americans – that is, the Clovis people – killed and ate the lovable prehistoric elephants that inhabited the continent alongside them, scientists say. The proto-dumbo species in question is known as the gomphothere. Until recently, it had been thought that gomphotheres had disappeared from North America well before human beings showed up, but new fossil evidence appears to show that at least one cuddly tusker was brutally killed by Clovis people around 13,400 years ago. The luckless pachyderm was then scoffed by its peckish assailants. "This is the...
  • The Minoans were Caucasian

    07/12/2014 4:58:18 AM PDT · by Renfield · 37 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 5-16-2013 | Damien Gayle
    DNA analysis has debunked the longstanding theory that the Minoans, who some 5,000 years ago established Europe's first advanced Bronze Age culture, were from Africa. The Minoan civilisation arose on the Mediterranean island of Crete in approximately the 27th century BC and flourished for 12 centuries until the 15th century BC. But the culture was lost until British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans unearthed its remains on Crete in 1900, where he found vestiges of a civilisation he believed was formed by refugees from northern Egypt. Modern archaeologists have cast doubt on that version of events, and now DNA tests of...
  • The Mystery of the Copper Scroll

    07/11/2014 3:37:23 PM PDT · by robowombat · 25 replies
    CBN News Middle East Bureau ^ | Saturday, July 11, 2009 | Chris Mitchell
    The Mystery of the Copper Scroll By Chris Mitchell CBN News Middle East Bureau Chief Saturday, July 11, 2009 JERUSALEM, Israel - In 1947, a Bedouin shepherd wandered the hills of Qumran in search of a missing sheep. He threw a stone into a cave, hoping to drive the lost animal outside. Instead, the sound of shattered pottery drew the shepherd inside the cave. There he stumbled on the greatest archaeological find of the 20th century: the Dead Sea Scrolls. The Copper Scroll In the years that followed, archaeologists found eleven caves and more than 900 documents here at Qumran....
  • Cursed Warship Revealed With Treasure Onboard

    07/10/2014 10:31:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    National Geographic ^ | July 7, 2014 | Jane J. Lee
    It was the largest and fiercest warship in the world, named the Mars for the Roman god of war, but it went up in a ball of flames in a brutal naval battle in 1564, consigning 800 to 900 Swedish and German sailors and a fortune in gold and silver coins to the bottom of the Baltic Sea. Now, a few years after the ship's discovery, researchers have concluded that the one-of-a-kind ship is also the best preserved ship of its kind, representing the first generation of Europe's big, three-masted warships. Naval historians know a lot about 17th-century ships, but...
  • What Rome's Arch-Enemies Wore Into Battle

    07/10/2014 10:15:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Forbes ^ | July 8, 2014 | Paul Rodgers
    Naval archaeologists think they’ve found the only example of armor from Carthage to survive the destruction of the city-state by Rome in 146BC. The helmet, recovered from the site of the Battle of the Egadi Islands, northwest of Sicily, is dramatically different from the Celtic style worn across Europe, popularly known as a Roman helmet. It appears to have a nose guard, a broad brim protecting the back of the neck from ear to ear, and a high, narrow crest, said Dr Jeff Royal, director of archaeology at the RPM Nautical Foundation in Florida. Roman helmets, called montefortinos, are easily...
  • Mesolithic shamanistic meteorite talisman unearthed

    07/10/2014 10:08:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Monday, July 7, 2014 | PAP – Science and Scholarship in Poland
    Archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology (IAE) in Szczecin, Poland, have discovered a meteorite fragment inside the remains of a hut dating back more than 9,000 years at Bolków by Lake Świdwie in Western Pomerania... The archaeologists also excavated a rich assemblage of objects with a spiritual association: an amulet, a bone spear tip with engraved decoration and so-called magic wand made of antler, decorated with geometric motifs. In addition to the remains of the hut, which contained the meteorite, archaeologists discovered a second, almost identical structure. In both of them, within the peat layer, were the preserved...
  • 11,000 years old elk bones shrouded in mystery

    07/10/2014 10:03:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Science Nordic ^ | July 1, 2014 | Anne Marie Lykkegaard
    Someone put elk bones in a bog several thousand years ago -- but archaeologists have no clue who it was... when the bones of several elks were excavated from Lundby bog in south Zealand in 1999, the archaeologists dated some of the animal remains back to sometime between 9,400 and 9,300 BC. Recently, however, the archaeologists did a new carbon 14 dating on some of the bones which revealed that they dated back to between 9,873 and 9,676 BC. These elk bones were clearly not buried in the bog over a short period, as originally thought, but were placed there...
  • Forestry officials unearth stone spearheads in northern Lapland

    07/10/2014 9:58:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    YLE ^ | July 4, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists in Finland are celebrating the discovery of a number of artefacts in Lapland, northern Finland. A series of surveys by the forestry watchdog Metsähallitus has unearthed hundreds of hunting pits, several prehistoric habitations, pottery shards and a stone spearhead. The most exceptional part of the archaeological find was a stone spear tip or a possible prehistoric knife, which was discovered close to the Norwegian border. The stone implement has been uncovered by high winds as it lay in a sand pit. Experts estimate that the rough blade had been used during the Stone Age or the early metal age,...
  • Mysterious Earthen Rings Predate Amazon Rainforest

    07/10/2014 12:35:30 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 43 replies
    Live Science ^ | July 07, 2014 03:37pm ET | Stephanie Pappas
    Carson and his colleagues wanted to explore the question of whether early Amazonians had a major impact on the forest. They focused on the Amazon of northeastern Bolivia, where they had sediment cores from two lakes nearby major earthworks sites. These sediment cores hold ancient pollen grains and charcoal from long-ago fires, and can hint at the climate and ecosystem that existed when the sediment was laid down as far back as 6,000 years ago. An examination of the two cores — one from the large lake, Laguna Oricore, and one from the smaller lake, Laguna Granja — revealed a...
  • Fossils Unearthed at Silicon Valley Construction Site

    07/07/2014 2:23:16 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | Monday, Jul 7, 2014
    Giant teeth from a 40-foot-long shark and portions of what could turn out to be an entire whale skeleton are among more than 500 fossils that have been unearthed at a dam construction site in Silicon Valley, a newspaper reported. Most of the fossils uncovered at the Calaveras Dam replacement project in Fremont, California, are believed to be about 20 million years old, dating to the Miocene Epoch, when the ocean extended as far inland as Bakersfield, California, the San Jose Mercury News reported on Monday. Scallops, clams, barnacles and the teeth of an extinct hippopotamus-like creature called a Desmostylus...
  • Meet Chiquita: A tiny, blonde, 500-year-old Wyoming mummy

    07/07/2014 8:43:10 AM PDT · by Theoria · 18 replies
    Casper Star-Tribune Online ^ | 06 July 2014 | Jeremy Fugleberg
    George Gill hands over the never-published photos of the infant he calls Chiquita. Her fine blond hair arches over her wrinkled, leathery skin. Her arms are wrapped around her, a tiny mouth frozen in an “O.” If she once had another name, Gill wouldn’t know it. After all, Chiquita has been dead for hundreds of years. She is one of only a handful of known infant mummies in existence with a particular birth defect. Two such mummies, Chiquita and one known as the Pedro Mountain mummy, were found in Wyoming. They both hold tantalizing clues about those who inhabited Wyoming’s...
  • Study: Fossil soaring bird had huge wingspan

    07/08/2014 8:57:10 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 36 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jul 7, 2014 3:12 PM EDT | Malcolm Ritter
    A fossil found in South Carolina has revealed a gigantic bird that apparently snatched fish while soaring over the ocean some 25 million to 28 million years ago. Its estimated wingspan of around 21 feet is bigger than the height of a giraffe. …
  • In pictures: Climate change could make red hair a thing of the past if Scotland gets sunnier

    07/06/2014 6:09:06 PM PDT · by BBell · 43 replies
    A DNA expert has has made the bold claim that ginger hair gene could die out if Scotland climate improves. REDHEADS could become extinct as Scotland gets sunnier, experts have claimed. The gene that causes red hair is thought to be an evolutionary response to the lack of sun in Scotland. Redhead colouring allows people to get the maximum vitamin D from what little sun there is. Only one to two per cent of the world’s population has red hair but in Scotland the figure is about 13 per cent, or 650,000 people.
  • Gingers could become extinct due to climate change, experts warn

    07/06/2014 5:09:47 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 73 replies
    The Mirror ^ | 7-6-14 | Natalie Evans
    Scientists believe the gene that causes red hair could die out if temperatures continue to rise Polar bears and Emperor penguins aren't the only species under threat due to climate change. Gingers could become extinct as a result of increasingly sunny skies, experts have warned. Scientists believe the gene that causes red hair is an evolutionary response to cloudy skies and allows inhabitants to get as much Vitamin D as possible. But if predictions of rising temperatures and blazing sunshine across the British Isles turn out to be correct, flaming red heads could cease to exist within centuries. While only...
  • The Case of the Missing Ancestor: DNA from Russia adds a mysterious new member to the human family

    07/04/2014 8:40:28 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    National Geographic ^ | July 2013 | Jamie Shreeve
    In the Altay Mountains of southern Siberia, some 200 miles from where Russia touches Mongolia, China, and Kazakhstan, nestled under a rock face about 30 yards above a little river called the Anuy, there is a cave called Denisova. It has long attracted visitors. The name comes from that of a hermit, Denis, who is said to have lived there in the 18th century. Long before that, Neolithic and later Turkic pastoralists took shelter in the cave, gathering their herds around them to ride out the Siberian winters. Thanks to them, the archaeologists who work in Denisova today, surrounded by...
  • On Plutarch and the idea of citizen

    06/29/2014 10:29:19 AM PDT · by Conservative Beacon · 7 replies
    The Conservative Beacon ^ | June 28, 2014 | Ellis Washington
    Prologue: Biography Plutarch, (born c. 46 ad, Boeotia [Greece]—died c. 120), biographer, historian, essayist and moralist whose works strongly influenced the development of the essay, the biography, and historical writing in Europe from the 16th to the 19th century. Plutarch has been called as one of the most important writers who ever lived. Among his roughly 227 works, the most significant are the Parallel Lives (Bioi parall?loi), in which he chronicles the noble acts and characters of Greek and Roman soldiers, legislators, orators, and statesmen, and the Moralia, or Ethica, a sequence of over 60 essays on ethical, religious, physical,...
  • French archaeologists discover an exceptional Gallic chariot tomb at Warcq in France

    07/04/2014 8:35:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Art Daily ^ | Friday, July 4, 2014 | unattributed
    A combined team composed of archaeologists from the Ardennes departmental archaeology unit and from Inrap is currently excavating a Gallic aristocratic tomb at Warcq (Ardennes)... This type of aristocratic tomb emerges in the 7th century B.C. – during the first Iron Age – and ends with the end of the Gallic period. The oldest chariots have four wheels (like that found at Vix), while those from the second Iron Age have only two. The deceased person – who could be male or female – was generally inhumed on the chariot, which was an object of prestige and a symbol of...
  • The Revolutionary War: By The Numbers

    07/04/2014 5:16:00 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 11 replies
    Jalopnik ^ | July 4th, 1776
    As we celebrate the 4th of July let's take a moment to reflect on the enormous cost, in lives and treasure, that it took us to earn our independence. •8.37 years was how long the war lasted •80,000 militia and Continental Army soldiers served at the height of the war •56,000 British soldiers fought at the height of the war •30,000 German mercenaries known as Hessians fought for Britain during the war •55,000 Americans served as privateers during the war •25,000 Revolutionary Soldiers died during the war •8,000 Revolutionary Soldiers died from wounds inflicted during battle •17,000 Revolutionary Soldiers died...
  • Lapps, Finns, Cold Winters And Intelligence

    Tuesday, 3 June 2014Dr James Thompson Renée Zellweger cropped.jpg Cold Winter theory is very simple: warm blooded, warm climate adapted humans drifted North in search of game, and perished unless they could hunt, cope with the climate, and plan wisely so as to live from one winter to the next. Hence, survivors had more forethought, more behavioural restraint regarding immediate gratification, and a whole lot of other changes to help them adapt to hunting and later farming in cold climates. If any of this is true, people living in the far North should be very bright. All the short-term-ist, happy...
  • King Mentuhotep II's chapel unearthed in Sohag

    07/04/2014 5:56:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Ahram Online ^ | Wednesday, July 2, 2014 | Nevine El-Aref
    At the Arabet Abydos area in Sohag, where the large temple of King Seti I is located, an Egyptian excavation mission from the Ministry of Antiquities and Heritage (MAH) stumbled upon a limestone ancient Egyptian chapel from the 11th Dynasty. The excavation work came within the framework of a cleaning programme carried out by the MAH in that area, after officers of the tourism and antiquities police caught red handed inhabitants trying to illegally excavate the area in front their residences in search of treasured artefacts. Ali El-Asfar, head of the ancient Egyptian Section at the MAH, told Ahram Online...
  • Blood residue from ancient tools reveals clues about past

    07/04/2014 5:45:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    Aiken Standard ^ | Saturday, June 28, 2014 | Dede Biles
    Blood residue on spear points and other ancient stone tools made by American Indians thousands of years ago is providing scientists based at the Savannah River Site with... interesting information that indicates what animals those early people hunted and when huge Pleistocene creatures such as mammoths and mastodons might have ceased to exist... The tools they looked at were made anywhere from 13,000 to 500 or 600 years ago. They were found at a Carolina bay at the Savannah River Site known as Flamingo Bay, at other locations in the CSRA and in the Fort Bragg area in eastern North...