Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $83,018
94%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 94%!! Less than $5k to go!! Let's git 'er done!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: godsgravesglyphs

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • How hunting with wolves helped humans outsmart the Neanderthals

    02/28/2015 7:20:56 PM PST · by E. Pluribus Unum · 78 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 02/28/2015
    Dogs are humanity’s oldest friends, renowned for their loyalty and abilities to guard, hunt and chase. But modern humans may owe even more to them than we previously realised. We may have to thank them for helping us eradicate our caveman rivals, the Neanderthals.
  • Found Islamic Coins Hidden Inside Viking Age Shield Boss

    02/28/2015 1:53:09 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    ThorNews ^ | Valentine's Day, February 14, 2015 | unattributed
    In August 2014 a hobby archaeologist found a Viking Age sword with metal detector in a field in Skaun, just south of Trondheim in Central Norway. Now, archaeologists have examined the finding and have some exciting news about the owner. Having examined the grave, archaeologists at the NTNU Museum of Natural History and Archaeology in Trondheim tell NRK that it is dated to about the year 950. In addition to the sword, researchers found the remains of a shield. 'We have not managed to find out who owned the sword, but we know that he was a well traveled man",...
  • Can You Dig It? More Evidence Suggests Humans From The Ice Age

    02/28/2015 2:26:30 AM PST · by Citizen Zed · 33 replies
    Montana Public Radio ^ | 2-28-2015 | GREG ALLEN
    In Florida, archaeologists are investigating a site that a century ago sparked a scientific controversy. Today, it's just a strip of land near an airport. But in 1915, it was a spot that became world-famous because of the work of Elias Sellards, Florida's state geologist. Sellards led a scientific excavation of the site, where workers digging a drainage canal found fossilized animal bones and then, human remains. Andy Hemmings of Mercyhurst University is the lead archaeologist on a project that has picked up where Sellards left off a century ago. "Quite literally, where we're standing, they found what they, at...
  • Archaeologists discover secret room in ancient Sidon temple [Phoenicians]

    02/28/2015 12:44:41 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    The Daily Star ^ | February 24, 2015 | Mohammed Zaatari
    ...The newly discovered monumental room is believed to be an extension of the underground Temple of Sidon, which dates back to the Bronze Age. This finding comes as workers prepare the foundations of a new national museum, which will be established beside the archaeological site. Construction of the museum led to urgent excavations at the site last month. Ten years ago, the delegation discovered an underground "holy of holies" room, dating back to 1300 B.C., where ancient residents are believed to have worshipped their gods. The newly discovered room was found adjacent to it, and is thought to be an...
  • It’s Time to Scrap Black History Month

    02/28/2015 4:57:44 AM PST · by Kaslin · 53 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | February 28, 2015 | Carl Jackson
    As we draw near the end of Black History Month one thing is for certain, it's done more to suppress American History than tell her story. According to history.com the origins of Black History Month begins in 1915 when Harvard-trained historian Carter G. Woodson and minister Jesse E. Moorland founded the then Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH), which is an organization dedicated to researching and promoting achievements of blacks and other peoples of African descent. In 1926, the group sponsored a national Negro History week, choosing the second week of February to coincide with the...
  • Pharaoh Brutally Killed in Battle, Analysis Shows

    02/27/2015 7:09:59 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    discovery,com ^ | Rossella Lorenzi
    Pharaoh Senebkay, one of the earliest kings of a forgotten Abydos Dynasty, was brutally killed in battle more than 3,600 years ago, says a study that has reconstructed, blow by blow, the king’s last moments. The research identified 18 wounds on the pharaoh’s bones. It also established that Senebkay is the earliest Egyptian pharaoh to have died in battle. Woseribre Senebkay was unknown to history until last year, when a University of Pennsylvania expedition led by archaeologist Josef Wegner, working with Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, found his remains in a four-chambered tomb at South Abydos in Sohag province, about...
  • Britain Imported Wheat 2,000 Years Before Growing It

    02/26/2015 6:45:03 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    scientificamerican.com ^ | Cynthia Graber
    Early farming began in the Near East about 10,500 years ago. Farming first reached the Balkans in Europe some 8 to 9,000 years ago, and then crept westward. Locals in Britain, separated from the mainland by the relatively newly formed English Channel, did not start farming until about 6,000 years ago. But an analysis of sediment from a submerged British archaeological site called Bouldner Cliff found something unexpected. “Amongst our Bouldner Cliff samples we found ancient DNA evidence of wheat at the site, which was not seen in mainland Britain for another 2,000 years.” Robin Allaby of the University of...
  • Watch: ISIS fighters destroy ancient sculptures in sledgehammer rampage

    02/26/2015 5:49:21 AM PST · by Wiz-Nerd · 29 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | 02/26/2015 | Reuters
    BAGHDAD - Islamic State militants in northern Iraq have destroyed a collection of statues and sculptures dating back thousands of years, according to a video published online in the name of the radical Islamist group. The video showed the statues, some identified as antiquities from Iraq's 7th century BC Assyrian era, being toppled, smashed and broken up by sledgehammer. A man shown in the video said they were being destroyed because they promoted idolatry. "The Prophet ordered us to get rid of statues and relics, and his companions did the same when they conquered countries after him," the unidentified man...
  • Rats reprieved as giant gerbils are blamed for the Black Death

    02/24/2015 3:05:16 PM PST · by SteveH · 52 replies
    The Times of London ^ | February 24, 2015 | Valentine Low
    Gerbils are cute and furry creatures. They may also, according to scientists, have been responsible for killing millions of people across Europe by spreading the plague. Researchers now believe that gerbils from Asia, rather than native black rats, were behind the repeated outbreaks of the bubonic plague in Europe.
  • Egyptian Sheik Calls to Destroy Pyramids, Tax Christians, Says: Bin Laden Greater than Saladin

    11/15/2012 8:00:22 AM PST · by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis · 14 replies
    MEMRI TV ^ | November 10-13, 2012 | Dream 2 TV (Egypt)
    Following are excerpts from a show featuring Egyptian Salafi Sheikh Murgan Salem, which aired on Dream 2 TV, on November 10 and 13, 2012. Murgan Salem: They must pay the jizya poll tax. They cannot be exempted. TV host Wael Al-Abrashi: You mean the Christians...? Murgan Salem: I'll tell you, just bear with me. Yes, this should be one of the sources of income of the state. The Jews, Christians, and Zoroastrians are welcome to live in the Abode of Islam, as long as they pay the jizya poll tax, and abide by the terms set by the Emir of...
  • Egyptian Salafi Sheikh: Destroy Pyramids, Tax Christians, Bin Laden Greater Than Saladin

    11/14/2012 5:00:21 PM PST · by SJackson · 20 replies
    MEMRI ^ | 11-14-12
    Following are excerpts from a show featuring Egyptian Salafi sheikh Murgan Salem; the show aired on Dream 2 TV, on November 10 and 13, 2012.Click here to view this clip on MEMRI TV. "Jews, Christians, And Zoroastrians Are Welcome To Live In The Abode Of Islam, As Long As They Pay The Jizya" Murgan Salem: "They must pay the jizya poll tax. They cannot be exempted."TV host Wael Al-Abrashi: "You mean the Christians...?"Murgan Salem: "I'll tell you, just bear with me. Yes, this should be one of the sources of income of the state. The Jews, Christians, and Zoroastrians are welcome...
  • Hamas Bulldozes Heritage Site For Use As Terror Training Camp

    04/16/2013 7:10:18 AM PDT · by Nachum · 22 replies
    inn ^ | 4/16/13 | staff
    UN Watch, an independent Geneva-based monitoring group, has sent a letter to UNESCO, calling on the international body to take immediate action to stop Hamas from bulldozing of a 3000-year-old Gaza harbor for use as a terrorist training camp. The partial destruction of the ancient Anthedon Harbor—which includes the ruins of a Roman temple and archaeological remains from the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine eras—follows its nomination as a World Heritage site.
  • ISIS Burns 8000 Rare Books and Manuscripts in Mosul

    02/24/2015 9:14:14 AM PST · by NRx · 108 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 23 Feb 2015 | Riyadh Mohammed
    While the world was watching the Academy Awards ceremony, the people of Mosul were watching a different show. They were horrified to see ISIS members burn the Mosul public library. Among the many thousands of books it housed, more than 8,000 rare old books and manuscripts were burned.
  • Humans may have migrated out of Africa in phases based on the weather

    02/24/2015 2:49:57 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | February 21, 2015 | editors
    Parton and colleagues writing in Geology, present a unique alluvial fan aggradation record from southeast Arabia spanning the past approx. 160,000 years. Situated along the proposed southern dispersal route, the Al Sibetah alluvial fan sequence provides a unique and sensitive record of landscape change in southeast Arabia. This record is to date the most comprehensive terrestrial archive from the Arabian Peninsula, and provides evidence for multiple humid episodes during both glacial and interglacial periods. Evidence from the Al Sibetah alluvial fan sequence indicates that during insolation maxima, increased monsoon rainfall led to the widespread activation of drainage systems and grassland...
  • Fish based diets cause archaeological dating problems

    02/24/2015 2:46:06 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | March 25, 2013 | Bente Philippsen and Rasmus Rorbaek
    Hard water contains less Carbon-14 than the atmosphere, because dissolved carbonates are Carbon-14 free. A fish caught in hard water has thus a higher Carbon-14 age than contemporaneous terrestrial samples. If such a fish is then cooked in a ceramic pot, the radiocarbon age of the food crust will be higher than if a terrestrial animal was cooked in the pot. This is known as the “reservoir effect” because the fish’s carbon actually comes from another “reservoir” than the carbon in terrestrial animals from the surrounding area. “Reservoir age” is the difference between the true age and the Carbon-14 date......
  • History's Largest Megalith

    02/24/2015 2:16:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, February 09, 2015 | Eric A. Powell
    A team of archaeologists at a 2,000-year-old limestone quarry in Lebanon’s Bekka Valley recently excavated around a megalith weighing approximately 1,000 tons and dubbed Hajjar al-Hibla, or “stone of the pregnant woman.” It was intended for the Temple of Jupiter, which sits on three limestone blocks of similar size at the nearby site of Baalbek. To the team’s shock, they unearthed yet another block, this one weighing an estimated 1,650 tons, making it the largest known megalith. The German Archaeological Institute’s Margarete van Esse says excavation was suspended when the trench became dangerously deep. “Hopefully in a following campaign we...
  • Zigzags on a Shell From Java Are the Oldest Human Engravings

    02/24/2015 1:44:07 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | December 3, 2014 | Helen Thompson
    Perhaps even more intriguing is a single shell with what appears to be a geometric pattern—zigzagged grooves carved into the center of the outer shell. Analysis points to the patterns being carved on purpose. Again the team turned to modern mussels; they tried carving similar patterns into Potamida littoralis with a shark tooth and compared that to weathering and natural abrasions. Sure enough, their carvings were the closest matches to the ancient pattern. “That must have been an appealing thing for Homo erectus,” says Joordens. “You can imagine sitting there with a shell in one hand and a tool in...
  • The Diffusionists Have Landed

    02/22/2015 4:49:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | January 1st, 2000 | Marc K. Stengel
    The Norwegian archaeologists Helge and Anne Stine Ingstad's famous identification, in 1961, of a Viking settlement at L'Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland, from just after A.D. 1000 is, of course, a notable exception, no longer in dispute. But that discovery has so far gone nowhere. The Norse settlers, who may have numbered as many as 160 and stayed for three years or longer, seem to have made no lasting impression on the aboriginal skraellings that, according to Norse sagas, they encountered, and to have avoided being influenced in turn. The traditions of the Micmac people, modern-day inhabitants of the area, have...
  • Israel unveils its largest find of medieval gold coins

    02/22/2015 8:07:05 AM PST · by Red Badger · 2 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 02-18--2015 | by By Ariel Schalit
    Kobi Sharvit of The Israel Antiquities Authority Fatimid period gold coins that were found in the seabed in the Mediterranean Sea near the port of Caesarea National Park in Caesarea, Israel, Wednesday, Feb. 18, 2015. A group of amateur Israeli divers have stumbled upon the largest collection of medieval gold coins ever found in the country, dating back to the 11th century and likely from a shipwreck in the Mediterranean Sea. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit) Israel on Wednesday unveiled the largest collection of medieval gold coins ever found in the country, accidentally discovered by amateur divers and dating back about a...
  • Paid sick days and physicians at work: Ancient Egyptians had state-supported health care

    02/22/2015 9:14:50 AM PST · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 02-16-2015 | by Anne Austin, The Conversation
    We might think of state supported health care as an innovation of the 20th century, but it's a much older tradition than that. In fact, texts from a village dating back to Egypt's New Kingdom period, about 3,100-3,600 years ago, suggest that in ancient Egypt there was a state-supported health care network designed to ensure that workers making the king's tomb were productive. Paintings on the walls of King Merneptah’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings. Workers living in Deir el-Medina would have worked on tombs like this. Credit: Asmaa Waguih/Reuters Health care boosted productivity on the royal tombs...
  • A New Theory on How Neanderthal DNA Spread in Asia

    02/21/2015 9:25:21 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    NY Slimes ^ | February 19, 2015 | Carl Zimmer
    In 2010, scientists made a startling discovery about our past: About 50,000 years ago, Neanderthals interbred with the ancestors of living Europeans and Asians. Now two teams of researchers have come to another intriguing conclusion: Neanderthals interbred with the ancestors of Asians at a second point in history, giving them an extra infusion of Neanderthal DNA. The findings are further evidence that our genomes contain secrets about our evolution that we might have missed by looking at fossils alone. "We're learning new, big-picture things from the genetic data, rather than just filling in details," said Kirk E. Lohmueller, a geneticist...
  • Found! Largest Ever Cache of Gold Coins Discovered in Israel

    02/21/2015 6:29:11 PM PST · by kindred · 17 replies
    breakingchristiannews.com ^ | 02/19/15 | News Staff
    "The silver is mine and the gold is mine,' declares the LORD Almighty." -Haggai 2:8 (Jerusalem, Israel)—[CBN News] A group of divers came across the largest treasure trove of gold coins ever discovered in Israel. Nearly 2,000 gold coins dating to the 11th century were recovered in an Israel Antiquities Authority salvage mission led by the IAA's Marine Archaeology Unit. Members of a diving club in the ancient harbor in Caesarea National Park discovered the coins. At first they thought the coin they saw was a toy, but soon realized it was genuine. They returned to shore and reported the...
  • Cheap Laughs: A Weekly Review of the New York Times

    02/21/2015 10:24:42 AM PST · by Kaslin · 11 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | February 21, 2015 | Mark Nuckols
    The third Monday of February is President’s Day, when we celebrate the birthday of George Washington, at least when we’re not pre-occupied with President’s Days sales. This year the holiday fell on the 16th, and predictably the New York Times chose this day to publish a hatchet job on our first President. You see, for the op-ed page editors of the Times, America (or Amerikkk with an A!) is a fundamentally flawed, perhaps uniquely evil country. And so on a regular basis they will print the See How Bad America Was Back Then (And Still Is) op-ed piece. The Times’...
  • Just A Bit Of DNA Helps Explain Humans' Big Brains

    02/20/2015 11:40:45 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 23 replies
    National Public Radio ^ | February 19, 2015 | Nell Greenfieldboyce
    (AUDIO-AT-LINK)Scientists studying the difference between human and chimpanzee DNA have found one stretch of human DNA that can make the brains of mice grow significantly bigger. "It's likely to be one of many DNA regions that's critical for controlling how the human brain develops," says Debra Silver, a neurobiologist at Duke University Medical School. It could also help explain why human brains are so much bigger than chimp brains, says Silver, who notes that "there are estimates of anywhere from two to four times as big." In addition to having bigger brains, Silver says, humans also "have more neurons, and...
  • Israel Discovers Huge Hoard of Ancient Gold Coins in Deep Sea Trove

    02/20/2015 10:33:53 AM PST · by T Ruth · 23 replies
    New York Observer ^ | 02/19/15 | Brianna McGurran
    A group of divers in Israel has discovered almost 2,000 ancient gold coins—the largest cache in the country’s history—off the coast of the city of Caesarea, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Wednesday. The coins have been at the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea for about 1,000 years, said Robert Cole, a numismaticist for the Israel Antiquities Authority. * * * The majority of the coins were forged in Egypt and North Africa and have been traced to the 10th- and 11th-century Fatimid caliphs Al-Ḥākim and Al-Ẓāhir. The coins are still in near-perfect condition because gold isn’t affected by air or...
  • Roman Aqueducts and Water Mills

    02/20/2015 11:37:37 AM PST · by wildbill · 28 replies
    The city of Arles, ARELATE, set up as a roman colony for veterans of Caesar's 6th legion on a low hill on the left bank of the Rhône near the river mouth, grew out to be one of the most important cities in the Western Roman empire, known as "Gallula Roma", the Rome of Gaul. Such an important city needed an aqueduct, and the most suitable area to provide the city with water was a 35 km long EW trending limestone massif to the NE, known as the Alpilles, with a maximum elevation of 492m. In roman times, the range...
  • Letter from Ireland: Mystery of the Fulacht Fiadh

    02/19/2015 2:24:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Archaeology ^ | January/February 2012 | Erin Mullally
    On a typically misty morning in the west of Ireland, just outside the medieval town of Athenry, County Galway, archaeologist Declan Moore... is taking me to visit an unexcavated fulacht fiadh (pronounced FULL-ahk FEE-add), or fulachtaí fia in plural, the most common type of prehistoric archaeological site in Ireland. Better known as a "burnt mound" in the neighboring United Kingdom, where they are also found, there are nearly 6,000 recorded fulacht fiadh sites dotted around Ireland alone... When we arrive at the site, Moore shows me the basic features of a fulacht fiadh -- a horseshoe-shaped mound of soil and...
  • Ancient artefacts at Tullaghoge [Ireland, 5000 BC]

    02/19/2015 1:31:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Belfast Telegraph ^ | February 15, 2015 | unattributed
    An archaeological bid to discover more about the hilltop where Ulster chieftains were crowned 700 years ago has uncovered artefacts dating back more than 7,000 years. Tullaghoge Fort in rural Co Tyrone was the place leaders of the dominant O'Neill clan came to be crowned from around the 14th Century to just before the arrival of the planters at the start of the 17th Century. Targeted excavation work around the picturesque tree encircled earthen mound ahead of the planned development of new visitor facilities hoped to find and preserve buried artefacts from that period -- but it ended up unearthing...
  • Neanderthal groups based part of the their lifestyle on the sexual division of labor

    02/19/2015 1:22:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | February 18, 2015 | Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Marta Garcia
    Neanderthal communities divided some of their tasks according to their sex. This is one of the main conclusions reached by a study performed by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)... which analyzed 99 incisors and canine teeth of 19 individuals from three different sites (El Sidron, in Asturias - Spain, L'Hortus in France, and Spy in Belgium), reveals that the dental grooves present in the female fossils follow the same pattern, which is different to that found in male individuals. Analyses show that all Neanderthal individuals, regardless of age, had dental grooves. According to Antonio Rosas, CSIC researcher at the...
  • Villa Owned by Ben-Hur's Rival Identified

    02/19/2015 1:12:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 64 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Friday, February 13, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Archaeologists investigating the Tuscan island of Elba have identified the remains of the villa belonging to the real-life individual that inspired one of the principal characters in the epic tale of Ben-Hur. Overlooking Portoferraio's bay, the once magnificent 1st-century B.C. villa has long been believed to have been owned by Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus, portrayed as Ben-Hur in the Hollywood blockbuster starring Charlton Heston. Now in ruins, the property was known as Villa Le Grotte (the Caves) because of the shape of its vaulted facades facing the sea. While Ben-Hur was a fictional villain dreamed up in Lew Wallace's 1880...
  • How Humankind Conquered the World (Tree of Knowledge Mutation)

    02/18/2015 5:29:30 PM PST · by Maelstorm · 13 replies
    http://www.wsj.com ^ | Feb. 2015 | By CHARLES C. MANN
    ... The book’s title is Mr. Harari’s reminder that, long ago, the world held half a dozen species of human, of which only Homo sapiens—thee and me—today survives. The trajectory of our species, Mr. Harari says, can be traced as a succession of three revolutions: the cognitive revolution (when we got smart), the agricultural revolution (when we got nature to do what we wanted), and the scientific revolution (when we got dangerously powerful). Humanity, Mr. Harari predicts, will see one more epochal event. We will vanish within a few centuries, either because we’ve gained such godlike powers as to become...
  • Diver discovers shipwreck cluster in Lake Michigan [victims of Mormon pirates off Beaver Island]

    11/11/2014 2:24:31 PM PST · by Alex Murphy · 77 replies
    Crescent News ^ | November 11, 2014 | Associated Press
    Ross Richardson of Lake Ann said he uncovered the wrecks this summer in the waters around the small Island of Skillagalee, located between Beaver Island and the northern Lower Peninsula community of Cross Village, The Grand Rapids Press (http://bit.ly/10KU6ac ) reported. An extensive reef system about four feet under the water was responsible for many shipwrecks in the area before advanced navigation. [SNIP] He found four other wreck sites during his three trips to the island. Richardson believes one of his other discoveries, the largest of the Skillagalee wreck sites with the greatest amount of artifacts present, is the wreck...
  • Largest trove of gold coins in Israel unearthed from ancient harbor

    02/17/2015 4:08:49 PM PST · by SJackson · 29 replies
    ·FoxNews.com ^ | February 17, 2015
    A group of divers in Israel has stumbled upon the largest hoard of gold coins ever discovered in the country. The divers reported the find to the Israel Antiquities Authority, and nearly 2,000 coins dating back to the Fatimid period, or the eleventh century, were salvaged by the authority’s Marine Archaeology Unit. The find was unearthed from the seabed of the ancient harbor in Caesarea National Park, according to a press release from the Israel Antiquities Authority. “The discovery of such a large hoard of coins that had such tremendous economic power in antiquity raises several possibilities regarding its presence...
  • Graveyard of the Atlantic coughs up another victim off Corolla

    02/16/2015 6:00:50 PM PST · by RegulatorCountry · 20 replies
    The Outer Banks Voice ^ | February 13, 2015 | Sam Walker
    The remains of a long-ago victim of the Graveyard of the Atlantic have been discovered on the beach off Corolla after this week’s rough surf. A pair of photos taken Thursday night show the remains of the wreck near Whalehead.
  • A Revisionist Muslim History of America (Greenfield)

    02/16/2015 8:21:36 PM PST · by Louis Foxwell · 22 replies
    Sultan Knish blog ^ | Monday, February 16, 2015 | Daniel Greenfield
    Monday, February 16, 2015 A Revisionist Muslim History of America Posted by Daniel Greenfield @ the Sultan Knish blogTurkish President Erdogan’s claim that Columbus encountered a mosque in Cuba (the explorer actually saw a rock whose shape he compared to the dome of a mosque) and a Saudi Imam claiming that Columbus had sailed to America to attack Muslims are typical of an emerging genre of Muslim revisionist history that lays claim to America based on an imaginary earlier Muslim presence here. While these examples may be laughable, Muslim historical revisionism has taken root in academia. It can be found...
  • Larger area analysis needed to understand patterns in ancient prehistory

    02/16/2015 5:24:21 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Phys Org ^ | February 13, 2015 | unattributed
    "We are looking at Eastern North America," said Milner. "Nowhere else in the world has similar archaeological data been compiled for such a large area." ... He notes that the popular view of warfare in small-scale societies in North America usually falls either at the extremes of excessively warlike or eternally peaceful. However, the reality, as seen in archaeological evidence, is the levels of warfare varied both through time and space... The researchers also looked at skeletal indications of conflict including embedded arrowheads, evidence of damage by stone axes or mutilation including scalping. Over an area that includes the East...
  • Judaculla Rock [ Sylva, North Carolina ]

    02/15/2015 12:13:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 52 replies
    Judaculla Rock website ^ | 2002-2014 | Presented by L.E.M.U.R.
    Deep in the mountains of Jackson County, just outside Sylva, North Carolina, sets a large, baffling stone. It is a soapstone boulder, and it's covered with a plethora of strange drawings that some archaeologists believe may be 2,000 to 3,000 years old. Even the Cherokee Indians consider the site ancient, pre-dating their presence in the area... According to Cherokee legend, the markings on the rock were created by Judaculla, a slant-eyed giant who dominated the mountains in years long past. He was the "Great Lord of the hunt," a powerful being who could leap from one mountain to another, and...
  • The Voyage of Hanno [The Periplus of Hanno]

    02/15/2015 10:41:05 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Metrum ^ | circa 1979 | Livio Catullo Stecchini
    In describing a volcanic eruption from a high mountain towering over the sea Hanno mentions such details as sulphuric fumes and streams of lava. The only volcanic area in West Africa is represented by Mount Cameroon, which is still active today. It is located at the deepest point of the Gulf of Guinea, where it rises suddenly from the seashore, reaching a height of over 4000 meters... Those who have seen it from the sea consider it one of the most impressive sights in the world. The natives call it Mongana-Loba, "Mountain of the Gods," which well agrees with the...
  • Modern Y-Chromosome Variation Surpasses Archaic Humans (article)

    05/07/2013 7:58:39 AM PDT · by fishtank · 25 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 5-6-2013 | Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D.
    Modern Y-Chromosome Variation Surpasses Archaic Humans by Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D. * The human Y-chromosome has been a sore point among secular scientists in recent years because of its many anti-evolutionary surprises. Adding to the Darwinian grief, is yet one more shocking Y-chromosome study that more clearly illustrates the boundaries of human genetic diversity. Much controversy has brewed during the past few years over the genomic sequences of what have been termed "archaic" humans. This so-called "ancient DNA" was extracted from bone fragments of "Neandertal" and "Denisovan" specimens and then sequenced, providing draft blue prints of these respective genomes.1, 2 While...
  • DNA Traces Roots Back To Stone Age

    03/25/2002 5:34:27 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 369+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 3-24-2002 | Paul Lashmar
    26 March 2002 01:46 GMT DNA traces roots back to Stone Age By Paul Lashmar 24 March 2002 Are you a Viking, Saxon, Pict, Celt, or descendant of an ancient African tribe? New DNA testing methods will enable us to trace our family tree right back to the Stone Age. Until recently, researching your ancestry meant hours of painstaking digging through fusty old files in public record offices or asking older relatives about their family memories. When the 1901 census was released online, demand was so great that the system crashed. The new scientific technique for tracing relatives allows individuals...
  • People from Tuscany are most similar to Neanderthals

    02/15/2015 1:54:45 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Abroad in the Yard ^ | February 9, 2012 | AITY
    In a series of histograms (graphs showing the distribution of genome and population data), Hawks shows that Asian and European genomes have significantly more Neanderthal DNA than African genomes. The averages for Asian and European samples are around 3% higher than the average for African samples. Whatever gave Africans some degree of similarity to Neanderthals, non-Africans seem to have received around 3% more of it. Europeans average a bit more Neanderthal DNA than Asians, showing that Europeans probably mixed with Neanderthals as they moved into Europe, adding a secondary mix of Neanderthal DNA into their genome beyond the primary mix...
  • Chicago Ship: New Footage Discovered of 1915 Disaster That Killed 844

    02/14/2015 1:49:33 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    abc ^ | SUSANNA KIM
    The first-known footage of the Eastland disaster was found by Jeff Nichols, a doctoral student at the University of Illinois at Chicago, while he was looking for unrelated material about World War I, the Chicago Tribune reported. Nichols found the footage on Europeana’s 1914-1918 website. Nichols said he found the clips in Dutch newsreels. Title cards describing what happened precede them. "It's as easily recognizable to someone who cares about Chicago history as the Titanic, so I knew what I had right away," Nichols, who has lived in Chicago for 20 years, told the Chicago Tribune. "I knew folks would...
  • 'Lost' Leonardo da Vinci painting seized by Italy

    02/12/2015 8:23:23 AM PST · by C19fan · 13 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | February 10, 2015 | Nick Squires
    A long-lost painting attributed to Leonardo da Vinci was confiscated from a bank vault in Switzerland after Italian police said it had been exported illegally and was in danger of being sold for up to £90 million. Swiss police, acting on a request by their Italian counterparts, seized the portrait of Isabella d’Este, a Renaissance noblewoman, from a private bank vault in Lugano on Tuesday. After being lost for centuries, the painting was rediscovered in 2013 in a collection of 400 artworks kept in a Swiss vault. The authorities then were alerted to the existence of the painting, but it...
  • European languages linked to migration from the east

    02/13/2015 12:32:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Nature ^ | 12 February 2015 | Ewen Callaway
    Large ancient-DNA study uncovers population that moved westwards 4,500 years ago. A mysterious group of humans from the east stormed western Europe 4,500 years ago -- bringing with them technologies such as the wheel, as well as a language that is the forebear of many modern tongues, suggests one of the largest studies of ancient DNA yet conducted. Vestiges of these eastern emigres exist in the genomes of nearly all contemporary Europeans, according to the authors, who analysed genome data from nearly 100 ancient Europeans. ...last year, a study of the genomes of ancient and contemporary Europeans found echoes not...
  • Butchered Bones Found in Yukon Cave Bear Marks of Early Americans, Study Finds

    02/13/2015 12:15:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Western Digs ^ | February 12, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    They're probably about half as old as scientists once thought they were. But a pair of butchered bones found in a cave near the Alaska-Yukon border are "definite" evidence of human presence in North America just after the end of the last Ice Age, perhaps as much as 14,000 years ago, according to a new study. The bones were originally discovered in the late 1970s by Canadian archaeologist Dr. Jacques Cinq-Mars at a site known as Bluefish Caves, high in northwestern Yukon Territory. In one of the caves, dubbed Cave 2, archaeologists found more than 18,000 fragments of bones from...
  • ...Why was the wine of the Negev so renowned in the Byzantine Empire...

    02/13/2015 12:07:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Israel Antiquities Authority ^ | February 2015 | unattributed
    For the first time, grape seeds from the Byzantine era have been found. These grapes were used to produce "the Wine of the Negev" -- one of the finest and most renowned wines in the whole of the Byzantine Empire. The charred seeds, over 1,500 years-old, were found at the Halutza excavation site in the Negev during a joint dig by the University of Haifa and the Israel Antiquities Authority. "The vines growing in the Negev today are European varieties, whereas the Negev vine was lost to the world. Our next job is to recreate the ancient wine, and perhaps...
  • Challenging History: The Dead Sea Scrolls

    02/12/2015 10:39:54 PM PST · by Jim Robinson · 13 replies
    The Evening Bulletin [PA] [re-post FR thread] ^ | 25 September 2007 | By: Neil Altman, For The Bulletin
    Challenging History: The Dead Sea Scrolls By: Neil Altman, For The Bulletin 09/24/2007 Editor's Note: According to an exhibit at the United States Library of Congress, young Bedouin shepherds, searching for a stray goat in the Judean Desert in 1947, entered a long-untouched cave and found scrolls in a jar and under debris on the floor. That initial discovery by the Bedouins began a search that lasted nearly a decade, eventually producing thousands of scroll fragments from 11 caves. During those same years, archaeologists tried to identify the people who deposited the scrolls. They found the Qumran ruin, a...
  • 700-year-old copy of Magna Carta found in scrapbook

    02/10/2015 4:37:13 PM PST · by canuck_conservative · 23 replies
    NYPost.com ^ | Tuesday February 10, 2015 | News.com.au
    A rare edition of the Magna Carta has been unearthed in a city library and is believed to be worth a staggering $21.3 million. An archivist stumbled upon the document, a third of which is missing, at the Kent History and Library Centre. The document was found in a Victorian scrapbook after archivist Dr. Mark Bateson was asked to search for another charter from the town of Sandwich. Modal Trigger The recently discovered copy of the Magna Carta is worth millions even though a third of the document is missing.Photo: Zuma Press The edition is believed to be one of...
  • Ancient Tablets Confirm Biblical Account of Jewish Exile in Nebuchadnezzar’s Babylon

    02/10/2015 7:51:05 AM PST · by Faith Presses On · 16 replies
    Christiannews.net ^ | 2/9/15 | Heather Clark
    JERUSALEM – Over 100 tablets that date back to the times of Nebuchadnezzar’s rule in Babylon, now modern-day Iraq, have been placed on display in Jerusalem as a further testament to the reliability of the Scriptures. The palm-sized tablets, which provide a glimpse into the lives of the Jews during the time they lived in exile in Babylon, had been discovered in Iraq and held by a UK-based Israeli collector. The artifacts contain writing in the ancient akkadian cuneiform script and detail transactions, trades and contracts between Jews in approximately 500 B.C. They also trace at least one Judean family...
  • Ancient Romans ate meals most Americans would recognize.

    02/10/2015 1:07:35 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    Inside Science ^ | February 3, 2015 | Joel N. Shurkin
    Let's pretend it is 56 B.C. and you have been fortunate enough to be invited to a party at the home of Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, a great social coup. Piso, after all, was Julius Caesar's father-in-law and a consul of Rome. What's for dinner? You need to prepare for pig. Archaeologists studying the eating habits of ancient Etruscans and Romans have found that pork was the staple of Italian cuisine before and during the Roman Empire. Both the poor and the rich ate pig as the meat of choice, although the rich, like Piso, got better cuts, ate meat...