Keyword: science

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  • Mars’ oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

    03/19/2018 4:16:16 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    UC Berkeley ^ | | March 19, 2018 | Robert Sanders,
    A new scenario seeking to explain how Mars’ putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million years earlier and were not as deep as once thought. The early ocean known as Arabia (left, blue) would have looked like this when it formed 4 billion years ago on Mars, while the Deuteronilus ocean, about 3.6 billion years old, had a smaller shoreline. Both coexisted with the massive volcanic province Tharsis, located on the unseen side of the planet, which may have helped support the existence of liquid water. The water...
  • The Moon WASN'T formed with one giant impact but had a bombardment birth after 20 moonlets hit...

    03/18/2018 6:36:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 65 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | January 9 2017 | AFP
    In such a scenario, scientists expect that about a fifth of the Moon's material would have come from Earth and the rest from the impacting body. The Moon, our planet's constant companion for some 4.5 billion years, may have been forged by a rash of smaller bodies smashing into an embryonic Earth, researchers have revealed. A bombardment birth would explain a major inconsistency in the prevailing hypothesis that the Moon splintered off in a single, giant impact between Earth and a Mars-sized celestial body. In such a scenario, scientists expect that about a fifth of the Moon's material would have...
  • The moon formed inside a hot cosmic doughnut, scientists say

    03/03/2018 8:09:56 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 65 replies
    nbc ^ | Denise Chow
    In recent decades the scientific consensus has been that the moon formed billions of years ago from debris cast off when a Mars-sized object dealt Earth a glancing blow. But a radical new theory holds that some long-ago giant collision actually disintegrated Earth, causing it to balloon out into a vast doughnut-shaped cloud of vaporized rock, which the scientists who developed the theory dubbed a “synestia." They say the moon subsequently formed within this cosmic maelstrom. In the long-accepted explanation of lunar formation, the collision between Earth and the Mars-sized object, known as Theia, ejected part of Earth's mantle —...
  • A Christian Perspective on Stephen Hawking’s Legacy

    03/17/2018 6:16:06 PM PDT · by pcottraux · 82 replies
    Depths of Pentecost ^ | March 17, 2018 | Philip Cottraux
    By Philip Cottraux Stephen Hawking passed away at the age of 76 this week. A theoretical physicist, professor of mathematics at Cambridge University (a position once held by Isaac Newton), and author of the best-selling book A Brief History of Time, he was a legend in the scientific community. When Hawking spoke, the world listened. At one time, he seemed to be ambiguously deist (open to the possibility of God, but not as a loving Creator). But by the end, he was a devout atheist. In light of his death, the media has proudly displayed some of his most notorious...
  • We’re probably not going to find anything by “listening” for extraterrestrials

    03/17/2018 4:21:03 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 118 replies
    Hot ^ | March 17, 2018 | JAZZ SHAW
    In the scientific community, there is still a great deal of energy devoted to “listening” for evidence or hints of intelligent, extraterrestrial civilizations out among the stars. Most of you are probably familiar with the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) and their decades of work in this field. They’re still at it and, in fact, are upping their game with a new generation of laser sensors. These projects drew fresh attention after the discovery of Tabby’s Star and the frantic speculation over whether or not some ancient civilization had built a Dyson Sphere around their own sun. This has led...
  • Asteroid Bennu: Target of Sample Return Mission

    03/13/2018 6:30:05 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 5 replies ^ | March 12, 2018 11:31pm ET | By Elizabeth Howell,
    Bennu has a shape that looks a bit like a spinning top. It is roughly 500 meters (1,640 feet) in diameter and orbits the sun once every 1.2 years, or 436.604 days. Every six years or so, it comes very close to Earth — about 0.002 AU, according to the University of Arizona. (... well within the orbit of Earth's moon.) Bennu is part of a small class of carbonaceous (dark) asteroids that likely have primitive materials in them. Called a B-type class, Bennu and other asteroids like it have materials such as volatiles (compounds with a low boiling point),...
  • Elon Musk projects Mars spaceship will be ready for short trips by first half of 2019

    03/11/2018 12:00:46 PM PDT · by Simon Green · 39 replies
    CNBC ^ | 03/11/18 | Michelle Castillo
    Tesla and SpaceX founder Elon Musk told an audience at South by Southwest that his timeline for sending a space vehicle to Mars could mark its first milestone early next year. The privately-funded venture, announced in September 2017, aims to send a cargo mission to the Red Planet by 2022. SpaceX's ultimate objective is to plant the seeds to put a human colony on Mars. Musk held a surprise question and answer session at the annual technology and culture festival in Austin, Texas on Sunday. The billionaire told attendees that "we are building the first Mars, or interplanetary ship, and...
  • How Did Uranus Form?

    03/09/2018 9:43:05 AM PST · by Simon Green · 83 replies ^ | 03/08/18 | Nola Taylor Redd,
    Although planets surround stars in the galaxy, how they form remains a subject of debate. Despite the wealth of worlds in our own solar system, scientists still aren't certain how planets are built. Currently, two theories are duking it out for the role of champion. The first and most widely accepted, core accretion, works well with the formation of the terrestrial planets but has problems with giant planets such as Uranus. The second, the disk instability method, may account for the creation of giant planets. "What separates the ice giants from the gas giants is their formation history: during...
  • Up for Grabs: In Science, When 'Anything Goes,' Everything Goes

    12/12/2017 11:58:16 AM PST · by Heartlander · 21 replies
    Salvo Magazine ^ | December 2017 | Denyse O'Leary
    Up for Grabs In Science, When 'Anything Goes,' Everything Goesby Denyse O'Leary Family values activist Austin Ruse's new book, Fake Science: Exposing the Left's Skewed Statistics, Fuzzy Facts, and Dodgy Data (Regnery, 2017), offers a look at a world growing increasingly hostile to evidence-based reasoning. We have not discovered better reasoning methods; rather, many people seem to have decided that reasoning is not relevant to our life together, and perhaps not relevant to the life of the mind generally. Ruse begins his book with a note about polls. Opinion pollsters claim that their work is a scientific enterprise. But in...
  • Cosmic dawn: astronomers detect signals from first stars in the universe

    03/03/2018 8:26:39 AM PST · by wastedyears · 28 replies
    The Guardian ^ | Feb 28 2018 | Hannah Devlin
    Astronomers have detected a signal from the first stars as they appeared and illuminated the universe, in observations that have been hailed as “revolutionary”.
  • Meet TESS, NASA’s Next Step in the Quest for Alien Earths

    03/02/2018 3:39:16 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 21 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 3/1/18 | Irene Klotz
    In a clean room inside a clean room at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, a petite telescope is perched on a stand for a final series of checkouts prior to launch. The extra fastidiousness is because the observatory’s four cameras will fly without protective covers—one of several simplifying design decisions made to help ensure the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, will meet its goal of measuring the masses of at least 50 small, rocky and potentially Earth-like worlds as part of the first all-sky, exoplanet survey. TESS was proposed even before NASA’s planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, launched in 2009, demonstrated...
  • The Wall of Death Around Black Holes Could Break Down

    02/28/2018 5:51:45 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 2/27/18 | Rafi Letzter
    Physicists have insisted for a long time that black holes are impenetrable ciphers. Whatever goes in is lost, impossible to study or meaningfully understand. Some small amount of matter and energy might escape a black hole in the form of "Hawking radiation," but anything still inside the black hole is functionally disappeared from the physical universe. The idea is a basic premise of modern physics: If something falls into a black hole, it can't be contacted, it's future can't be predicted. No observer could possibly survive traveling into the dark space, not even long enough to glance around and notice...
  • Quasars: Brightest Objects in the Universe

    02/24/2018 11:16:03 AM PST · by Simon Green · 12 replies ^ | 02/23/18 | Nola Taylor
    (The Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of ancient and brilliant quasar 3C 273, which resides in a giant elliptical galaxy in the constellation of Virgo. Its light has taken some 2.5 billion years to reach us. Despite this great distance, it is still one of the closest quasars to our home. It was the first quasar ever to be identified, and was discovered in the early 1960s by astronomer Allan Sandage.) Shining so brightly that they eclipse the ancient galaxies that contain them, quasars are distant objects powered by black holes a billion times as massive as our...
  • All The Wild Stuff We're Going To Do In Space And Physics In 2018

    12/31/2017 9:25:17 PM PST · by iowamark · 11 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | Jan 1, 2018 | George Dvorsky
    It's time to gaze into our crystal ball and see what the coming year has in store for science. From powerful new rockets and asteroid-sampling spacecraft to groundbreaking particle physics, there's plenty to look forward to in 2018. Aeronautics and space exploration A new tool to find exoplanets In March 2018, NASA will launch its Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) - a mission to find previously undiscovered exoplanets from the vantage point of low Earth orbit. The space-based telescope is expected to discover thousands of exoplanets over the next several years as it measures the luminosity of more than 200,000...
  • Astronomers Find Mass Limit for Neutron Stars Before Collapsing Into Black Holes

    01/19/2018 1:38:43 PM PST · by Red Badger · 38 replies ^ | 01/19/2018 | By John Wenz
    These remaining cores of dead stars can only get so massive before they become black holes. _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The subtle difference between when a massive dying star compresses into a core and when it collapses entirely may have been found. In a study published in Astrophysical Journal Letters, researchers at the Goethe University in Frankfurt say they’ve found the dividing line between compact objects called neutron stars and black holes. When a massive star reaches the end of its life, it goes out with an immense bang called a supernova. From there, one of two known things Can happen: it either...
  • Trio of dead stars upholds a key part of Einstein’s theory of gravity

    01/13/2018 9:09:23 AM PST · by MtnClimber · 16 replies
    Science News ^ | 12 Jan, 2018 | EMILY CONOVER
    Observations of a trio of dead stars have confirmed that a foundation of Einstein’s gravitational theory holds even for ultradense objects with strong gravitational fields. The complex orbital dance of the three former stars conforms to a rule known as the strong equivalence principle, researchers reported January 10 at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society. That agreement limits theories that predict Einstein’s theory, general relativity, should fail at some level. According to general relativity, an object’s composition has no impact on how gravity pulls on it: Earth’s gravity accelerates a sphere of iron at the same rate as a...
  • In 2018, we will see a black hole for the first time ever

    12/19/2017 3:38:07 AM PST · by Libloather · 59 replies
    Fox News ^ | 12/18/17 | Jamie Seidel
    We're about to see — for the very first time — the event horizon of a black hole, proving beyond any last vestige of doubt that Einstein’s interstellar monsters are real. And here’s what it will look like.
  • Martian Craters go splat!

    03/09/2018 2:24:14 PM PST · by Voption · 4 replies
    Behind the Black ^ | March 9, 2018 | Robert Zimmerman
    Cool image time! In continuing my exploration of this month’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) image release, I found two interesting images of small craters, one as part of that image release, the other found completely by accident...The map on the right, taken from the MRO HiRISE archive page, shows the locations of these two images...Both are located in the lava plains that surround the giant volcano Pavonis Mons, the central volcano of the three volcanoes to the east of Olympus Mons.
  • Human Skin Bacteria Have Cancer-Fighting Powers

    03/03/2018 5:01:18 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 14 replies
    Science News ^ | FEBRUARY 28, 2018 | Aimee Cunningham
    The microbes make a compound that disrupts DNA formation in tumor cellsCertain skin-dwelling microbes may be anticancer superheroes, reining in uncontrolled cell growth. This surprise discovery could one day lead to drugs that treat or maybe even prevent skin cancer. The bacteria’s secret weapon is a chemical compound that stops DNA formation in its tracks. Mice slathered with one strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis that makes the compound developed fewer tumors after exposure to damaging ultraviolet radiation compared with those treated with a strain lacking the compound, researchers report online February 28 in Science Advances. The findings highlight “the potential of...
  • What scientists found trapped in a diamond: a type of ice not known on Earth

    03/09/2018 10:09:59 AM PST · by Red Badger · 28 replies ^ | 03-09-2018 | Deborah Netburn
    Trapped in the rigid structure of diamonds formed deep in the Earth’s crust, scientists have discovered a form of water ice that was not previously known to occur naturally on our planet. The finding, published Thursday in Science, represents the first detection of naturally occurring ice-VII ever found on Earth. And as sometimes happens in the scientific process, it was discovered entirely by accident. Ice-VII is about one and a half times as dense as the regular ice we put in our drinks and skate on in winter, and the crystalline structure of its atoms is different as well. In...