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Keyword: science

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  • Chimeras, Werewolves, and Pigmen Oh My! Science Stranger than Fiction

    05/05/2016 10:47:12 AM PDT · by Stand Up For America Today · 12 replies
    Stand Up For America Today ^ | 5/5/2016 | AJ Watson
    For those of us who remember bits and pieces of Greek mythology, or who play lots of role playing video games, a Chimera was a monstrous hybrid creature often depicted as part lion, part goat, and part snake. In today’s world however Chimeras are very real and in this writer’s humble opinion, very disturbing. The word Chimera today refers most often to animals that are gene spliced with other animals creating a kind of hybrid species. As if this attempt at playing God isn’t alarming enough, human cells are being added to pigs, sheep, goats, mice, and other animals that...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The SONG and the Hunter

    05/05/2016 6:49:49 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | Thursday, May 05, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Near first quarter, the Moon in March lights this snowy, rugged landscape, a view across the top of Tenerife toward La Palma in the Canary Islands Spanish archipelago. The large Teide volcano, the highest point in Spain, looms over the horizon. Shining above are familiar bright stars of Orion, the Hunter. Adding to the dreamlike scene is the 1 meter diameter prototype telescope of the global network project called the Stellar Observations Network Group or SONG. The SONG's fully robotic observatory was captured during the 30 second exposure while the observatory dome, with slit open, was rotated across the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Mercury Transit Sequence

    05/03/2016 11:41:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, May 04, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This coming Monday, Mercury will cross the face of the Sun, as seen from Earth. Called a transit, the last time this happened was in 2006. Because the plane of Mercury's orbit is not exactly coincident with the plane of Earth's orbit, Mercury usually appears to pass over or under the Sun. The above time-lapse sequence, superimposed on a single frame, was taken from a balcony in Belgium shows the entire transit of 2003 May 7. The solar crossing lasted over five hours, so that the above 23 images were taken roughly 15 minutes apart. The north pole of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Aurora over Sweden

    05/03/2016 12:44:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | Tuesday, May 03, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It was bright and green and stretched across the sky. This striking aurora display was captured last month just outside of Östersund, Sweden. Six photographic fields were merged to create the featured panorama spanning almost 180 degrees. Particularly striking aspects of this aurora include its sweeping arc-like shape and its stark definition. Lake Storsjön is seen in the foreground, while several familiar constellations and the star Polaris are visible through the aurora, far in the background. Coincidently, the aurora appears to avoid the Moon visible on the lower left. The aurora appeared a day after a large hole opened...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Crossing Mars

    05/03/2016 12:36:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | Monday, May 02, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Where is NASA's rover Curiosity going on Mars? Its geographical goals are on the slopes of Mount Sharp, whose peak is seen in the background on the right. A key scientific goal, however, remains to better assess when and where conditions on Mars were once suitable for life, in particular microbial life. To further this goal, Curiosity was directed to cross the rugged terrain of Nautkluft Plateau, visible in the featured image on the foreground left. Curiosity is crossing toward smoother uphill sites with rocks containing hematite and sulfates, sites that could give the rolling rover new clues on...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Contemplating the Sun

    05/03/2016 12:35:51 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | Sunday, May 01, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Have you contemplated your home star recently? Featured here, a Sun partially eclipsed on the top left by the Moon is also seen eclipsed by earthlings contemplating the eclipse below. The spectacular menagerie of silhouettes was taken in 2012 from the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area near Page, Arizona, USA, where park rangers and astronomers expounded on the unusual event to interested gatherers. Also faintly visible on the Sun's disk, just to the lower right of the dark Moon's disk, is a group of sunspots. Although a partial solar eclipse by the Moon is indeed a good chance to...
  • Weather Channel founder calls Bill Nye ‘a pretend scientist in a bow tie’

    05/02/2016 6:12:31 PM PDT · by ghosthost · 23 replies
    NY Post ^ | 4-29-2016 | Natalie O'Neill
    “I have always been amazed that anyone would pay attention to Bill Nye, a pretend scientist in a bow tie,” Coleman said Friday, according to ClimateDepot.com. “As a man who has studied the science of meteorology for over 60 years and received the AMS (American Meteorological Society’s) ‘Meteorologist of the Year’ award, I am totally offended that Nye gets the press and media attention he does. And I am rooting for the ‘Climate Hustle’ film to become a huge hit — bigger than ‘An Inconvenient Truth’ by Al Gore,” Coleman said.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Moon over Makemake

    04/30/2016 2:03:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | Saturday, April 30, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Makemake, second brightest dwarf planet of the Kuiper belt, has a moon. Nicknamed MK2, Makemake's moon reflects sunlight with a charcoal-dark surface, about 1,300 times fainter than its parent body. Still, it was spotted in Hubble Space Telescope observations intended to search for faint companions with the same technique used to find the small satellites of Pluto. Just as for Pluto and its satellites, further observations of Makemake and orbiting moon will measure the system's mass and density and allow a broader understanding of the distant worlds. About 160 kilometers (100 miles) across compared to Makemake's 1,400 kilometer diameter,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Fermi's Gamma-ray Moon

    04/29/2016 5:07:09 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    NASA ^ | Friday, April 29, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: If you could only see gamma-rays, photons with up to a billion or more times the energy of visible light, the Moon would be brighter than the Sun! That startling notion underlies this novel image of the Moon, based on data collected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument during its first seven years of operation (2008-2015). Fermi's gamma-ray vision doesn't distinguish details on the lunar surface, but a gamma-ray glow consistent with the Moon's size and position is clearly found at the center of the false color map. The brightest pixels correspond to the...
  • Bizarre fourth state of water discovered

    04/28/2016 6:22:09 AM PDT · by Hostage · 56 replies
    gizmag ^ | April 26, 2016 | Michael Franco
    You already know that water can have three states of matter: solid, liquid and gas. But scientists at the Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) have discovered that when it's put under extreme pressure in small spaces, the life-giving liquid can exhibit a strange fourth state known as tunneling. The water under question was found in super-small six-sided channels in the mineral beryl, which forms the basis for the gems aquamarine and emerald. The channels measure only about five atoms across and function basically as cages that can each trap one water molecule. What the researchers found was that in this...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Dust Angel Nebula

    04/28/2016 4:21:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | Thursday, April 28, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The combined light of stars along the Milky Way are reflected by these cosmic dust clouds that soar some 300 light-years or so above the plane of our galaxy. Dubbed the Angel Nebula, the faint apparition is part of an expansive complex of dim and relatively unexplored, diffuse molecular clouds. Commonly found at high galactic latitudes, the dusty galactic cirrus can be traced over large regions toward the North and South Galactic poles. Along with the refection of starlight, studies indicate the dust clouds produce a faint reddish luminescence, as interstellar dust grains convert invisible ultraviolet radiation to visible...
  • Occasional Birdy Thread

    04/27/2016 9:42:40 AM PDT · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 26 replies
    Engraved-on-His-hands | April 27, 2016 | Engraved-on-His-hands
    With apologies to Islander7, but I haven't seen an “Occasional Birdy Thread” in awhile, so I thought that I would post one. My pictures aren't as great as those posted by Islander7 or fidelis, but it's kind of like singing. All that you really need to do is to sing (or take bird pictures) well enough to entertain yourself. Blue-winged Teal Greater Yellowlegs Greater Yellowlegs with Blue-winged Teal Greater Yellowlegs Blue-gray Gnatcatcher Osprey Eastern Phoebe Solitary Sandpiper
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Omega Centauri: The Brightest Globular Star Cluster

    04/27/2016 4:48:35 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, April 27, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This huge ball of stars predates our Sun. Long before humankind evolved, before dinosaurs roamed, and even before our Earth existed, ancient globs of stars condensed and orbited a young Milky Way Galaxy. Of the 200 or so globular clusters that survive today, Omega Centauri is the largest, containing over ten million stars. Omega Centauri is also the brightest globular cluster, at apparent visual magnitude 3.9 it is visible to southern observers with the unaided eye. Cataloged as NGC 5139, Omega Centauri is about 18,000 light-years away and 150 light-years in diameter. Unlike many other globular clusters, the stars...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 6872: A Stretched Spiral Galaxy

    04/26/2016 11:24:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | Tuesday, April 26, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What makes this spiral galaxy so long? Measuring over 700,000 light years across from top to bottom, NGC 6872, also known as the Condor galaxy, is one of the most elongated barred spiral galaxies known. The galaxy's protracted shape likely results from its continuing collision with the smaller galaxy IC 4970, visible just above center. Of particular interest is NGC 6872's spiral arm on the upper left, as pictured here, which exhibits an unusually high amount of blue star forming regions. The light we see today left these colliding giants before the days of the dinosaurs, about 300 million...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Supernova Remnant Simeis 147: The Spaghetti Nebula

    04/26/2016 11:21:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | Monday, April 25, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: It's easy to get lost following the intricate strands of the Spaghetti Nebula. A supernova remnant cataloged as Simeis 147 and Sh2-240, the glowing gas filaments cover nearly 3 degrees -- 6 full moons -- on the sky. That's about 150 light-years at the stellar debris cloud's estimated distance of 3,000 light-years. This sharp composite includes image data taken through a narrow-band filter to highlight emission from hydrogen atoms tracing the shocked, glowing gas. The supernova remnant has an estimated age of about 40,000 years, meaning light from the massive stellar explosion first reached Earth about 40,000 years ago....
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- M16: Pillars of Star Creation

    04/24/2016 7:22:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | Sunday, April 24, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Newborn stars are forming in the Eagle Nebula. This image, taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995, shows evaporating gaseous globules (EGGs) emerging from pillars of molecular hydrogen gas and dust. The giant pillars are light years in length and are so dense that interior gas contracts gravitationally to form stars. At each pillars' end, the intense radiation of bright young stars causes low density material to boil away, leaving stellar nurseries of dense EGGs exposed. The Eagle Nebula, associated with the open star cluster M16, lies about 7000 light years away. The pillars of creation were imaged...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way in Moonlight

    04/23/2016 11:47:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | Saturday, April 23, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A waning crescent moon, early morning twilight, and Al Hamra's city lights on the horizon can't hide the central Milky Way in this skyscape from planet Earth. Captured in a single exposure, the dreamlike scene looks southward across the region's grand canyon from Jabal Shams (Sun Mountain), near the highest peak in Oman, on the Arabian Peninsula. Mist, moonlight, and shadows still play along the steep canyon walls. Dark rifts along the luminous band of the Milky Way are the galaxy's cosmic dust clouds. Typically hundreds of light-years distant, they obscure starlight along the galactic plane, viewed edge-on from...
  • Seven Earth Day predictions that failed spectacularly

    04/22/2016 9:39:01 PM PDT · by Stand Watch Listen · 18 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | April 22, 2016 | Anthony Watt
    Never Trust The Doom-Mongers: Earth Day Predictions That Were All WrongEnvironmentalists truly believed and predicted that the planet was doomed during the first Earth Day in 1970, unless drastic actions were taken to save it. Humanity never quite got around to that drastic action, but environmentalists still recall the first Earth Day fondly and hold many of the predictions in high regard. So this Earth Day, The Daily Caller News Foundation takes a look at predictions made by environmentalists around the original Earth Day in 1970 to see how they’ve held up. 1: (1970) “Civilization Will End Within 15 or...
  • Hubble captures birthday bubble

    04/21/2016 10:07:08 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 7 replies
    phys.org ^ | April 21, 2016 | Provided by: ESA/Hubble Information Centre
    The Bubble Nebula, also known as NGC 7653, is an emission nebula located 11,000 light-years away. This stunning new image was observed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to celebrate its 26th year in space. Credit: NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage Team =============================================================================================================== This new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, released to celebrate Hubble's 26th year in orbit, captures in stunning clarity what looks like a gigantic cosmic soap bubble. The object, known as the Bubble Nebula, is in fact a cloud of gas and dust illuminated by the brilliant star within it. The vivid new portrait of this dramatic scene...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 7635: The Bubble Nebula

    04/22/2016 6:42:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | Friday, April 22, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Blown by the wind from a massive star, this interstellar apparition has a surprisingly familiar shape. Cataloged as NGC 7635, it is also known simply as The Bubble Nebula. Although it looks delicate, the 7 light-year diameter bubble offers evidence of violent processes at work. Above and left of the Bubble's center is a hot, O-type star, several hundred thousand times more luminous and around 45 times more massive than the Sun. A fierce stellar wind and intense radiation from that star has blasted out the structure of glowing gas against denser material in a surrounding molecular cloud. The...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Comet, the Owl, and the Galaxy

    04/21/2016 1:45:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | Thursday, April 21, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Comet C/2014 S2 (PanSTARRS) poses for a Messier moment in this telescopic snapshot from April 18. In fact it shares the 1.5 degree wide field-of-view with two well-known entries in the 18th century comet-hunting astronomer's famous catalog. Outward bound and sweeping through northern skies just below the Big Dipper, the fading visitor to the inner Solar System was about 18 light-minutes from our fair planet. Dusty, edge-on spiral galaxy Messier 108 (upper right) is more like 45 million light-years away. A planetary nebula with an aging but intensely hot central star, the owlish Messier 97 is only about 12...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Galaxy Einstein Ring

    04/21/2016 1:43:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, April 20, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Can one galaxy hide behind another? Not in the case of SDP.81. Here the foreground galaxy, shown in blue in an image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, acts like a huge gravitational lens, pulling light from a background galaxy, shown in red in an image taken in radio waves by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), around it, keeping it visible. The alignment is so precise that the distant galaxy is distorted into part of a ring around the foreground galaxy, a formation known as an Einstein ring. Detailed analysis of the gravitational lens distortions indicate that a...
  • Police: Man claiming to be from the future steals food from Arby's (Could it be?)

    04/20/2016 5:39:47 PM PDT · by ghosthost · 61 replies
    Fox News ^ | 4-18-2016 | Austin Prickitt
    The Arby's manager told police Anderson jumped on the front counter and demanded food. The man then jumped off the counter and allegedly grabbed the manager and forced her towards a wall. The manager told police the man then grabbed a hand full of bacon and chicken and walked out of the business. "He was possibly under the influence of some sort of narcotic or intoxicant or suffering from some type of break with reality. He did mention that he is from four years in the future and that is how people will get food during that period of time,"...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Andromeda Rising over Colombia

    04/19/2016 5:16:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    NASA ^ | Tuesday, April 19, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What’s that rising over the hill? A galaxy. Never having seen a galaxy themselves, three friends of an industrious astrophotographer experienced an exhilarating night sky firsthand that featured not only the band of our Milky Way galaxy but also Milky Way's neighbor -- the Andromeda galaxy. Capturing the scene required careful pre-shot planning including finding a good site, waiting for good weather, balancing relative angular sizes with a zoom lens, managing ground lighting, and minimizing atmospheric light absorption. The calculated shot therefore placed the friends on a hill about 250 meters away and about 50 meters up. The featured...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The International Space Station over Earth

    04/18/2016 1:11:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    NASA ^ | Monday, April 18, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The International Space Station is the largest object ever constructed by humans in space. The station perimeter extends over roughly the area of a football field, although only a small fraction of this is composed of modules habitable by humans. The station is so large that it could not be launched all at once -- it continues to be built piecemeal. To function, the ISS needs huge trusses, some over 15 meters long and with masses over 10,000 kilograms, to keep it rigid and to route electricity and liquid coolants. Pictured above, the immense space station was photographed from...
  • Big Science is broken

    04/18/2016 6:44:09 AM PDT · by Fitzy_888 · 69 replies
    The Week ^ | April 18, 2016 | Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry
    Science is broken. That's the thesis of a must-read article in First Things magazine, in which William A. Wilson accumulates evidence that a lot of published research is false. But that's not even the worst part. Advocates of the existing scientific research paradigm usually smugly declare that while some published conclusions are surely false, the scientific method has "self-correcting mechanisms" that ensure that, eventually, the truth will prevail. Unfortunately for all of us, Wilson makes a convincing argument that those self-correcting mechanisms are broken. For starters, there's a "replication crisis" in science. This is particularly true in the field of...
  • How ‘Settled Science’ Helped Create A Massive Public Health Crisis

    04/18/2016 4:06:20 AM PDT · by IBD editorial writer · 31 replies
    Investor's Business Daily ^ | 4/18/2016 | John Merline
    Anyone who thinks it’s enough to rest an argument on “settled science” or a “scientific consensus” ought to read about John Yudkin.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Asperatus Clouds Over New Zealand

    04/17/2016 4:59:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    NASA ^ | Sunday, April 17, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What kind of clouds are these? Although their cause is presently unknown, such unusual atmospheric structures, as menacing as they might seem, do not appear to be harbingers of meteorological doom. Known informally as Undulatus asperatus clouds, they can be stunning in appearance, unusual in occurrence, are relatively unstudied, and have even been suggested as a new type of cloud. Whereas most low cloud decks are flat bottomed, asperatus clouds appear to have significant vertical structure underneath. Speculation therefore holds that asperatus clouds might be related to lenticular clouds that form near mountains, or mammatus clouds associated with thunderstorms,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transit System

    04/16/2016 12:00:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    NASA ^ | Saturday, April 16, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Want to take a fast trip to the edge of the Solar System? Consider a ride on a Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transit System (HERTS). The concept is currently being tested and it might take only 10 to 15 years to make the trip of over 100 Astronomical Units (15 billion kilometers). That's fast compared to the 35 years it took Voyager 1, presently humanity's most distant spacecraft, to approach the heliopause or outer boundary of the influence of the solar wind. HERTS would use an advanced electric solar sail that works by extending multiple, 20 kilometer or so long,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Mercury and Crescent Moon Set

    04/16/2016 11:57:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | Friday, April 15, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Innermost planet Mercury and a thin crescent Moon are never found far from the Sun in planet Earth's skies. Taken near dusk on April 8, this colorful evening skyscape shows them both setting toward the western horizon just after the Sun. The broad Tagus River and city lights of Lisbon, Portugal run through the foreground under the serene twilight sky. Near perigee or closest approach to Earth, the Moon's bright, slender crescent represents about 3 percent of the lunar disk in sunlight. Of course as seen from the Moon, a nearly full Earth would light up the lunar night,...
  • Never-before-seen galaxy spotted orbiting the Milky Way

    04/15/2016 7:44:48 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 21 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 14 Apr, 2016 | Ken Croswell
    The galaxy’s empire has a new colony. Astronomers have detected a dwarf galaxy orbiting the Milky Way whose span stretches farther than nearly all other Milky Way satellites. It may belong to a small group of galaxies that is falling into our own. Giant galaxies like the Milky Way grew large when smaller galaxies merged, according to simulations. The simulations also suggest that whole groups of galaxies can fall into a single giant at the same time. The best examples in our cosmic neighbourhood are the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, the Milky Way’s two brightest satellites, which probably orbit...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Full Venus and Crescent Moon Rise

    04/14/2016 6:02:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies
    NASA ^ | Thursday, April 14, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Inner planet Venus and a thin crescent Moon are never found far from the Sun in planet Earth's skies. Taken near dawn on April 6, this timelapse composite shows them both rising just before the Sun. The mountaintop Teide Observatory domes on the fortunate island of Tenerife appear in silhouette against the twilight. In fact, the series of telephoto exposures follows the occultation of Venus by the Moon in three frames. Far from Earth in its orbit and in a nearly full phase, Venus was 96 percent illuminated. Near perigee or closest approach to Earth, the Moon's slender crescent...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Orion in Red and Blue

    04/13/2016 2:15:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, April 13, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: When did Orion become so flashy? This colorful rendition of part of the constellation of Orion comes from red light emitted by hydrogen and sulfur (SII), and blue-green light emitted by oxygen (OIII). Hues on the featured image were then digitally reassigned to be indicative of their elemental origins -- but also striking to the human eye. The breathtaking composite was painstakingly composed from hundreds of images which took nearly 200 hours to collect. Pictured, Barnard's Loop, across the image bottom, appears to cradle interstellar constructs including the intricate Orion Nebula seen just right of center. The Flame Nebula...
  • Science fairs are as flawed as my solar-powered hot dog cooker

    04/13/2016 1:12:08 PM PDT · by Behind Liberal Lines · 71 replies
    Stat News ^ | 04.13.16 | Carl Zimmer
    Last fall, my daughter Veronica got an idea for the seventh grade science fair at her school. She’d compare different ways to clean a toothbrush. First she’d take a new toothbrush out of a package and brush her teeth, covering it with her mouth bacteria. Then, she’d clean it with one of three liquids: water, lemon juice, or vinegar. Finally, she’d wipe the brushes on Petri dishes and see how many bacteria grew on them... Veronica submitted her plan, and then reported back to me that we had to fill out some forms. These forms turned out to be an...
  • Yuri Gagarin: Celebrating first man in outer space 55 years later (slideshow)

    04/12/2016 11:02:11 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 31 replies
    Cleveland.com ^ | April 12, 2016
    Please click the link to view the slideshow. There are 40 images, minus a few ads.
  • I thought you liberals were all about science. Guess not.

    04/12/2016 9:12:18 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 12 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 04/12/16 | Dan Calabrese
    This is not a woman, you fools. Sincerely, Science Why, liberals tell us, do we need to believe everything they say about global warming and creation (or the lack thereof, according to them)? Because of science! Science says the Earth is warming and it’s man’s fault! (Not counting the scientists who dissent, but the left tells us not to listen to them.) Science says there was no intelligent creator and that that crazy creationists who think the earth is only 6,000 years old are wrong. (Actually the Bible says nothing that requires us to believe the Earth is only 6,000...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Combined Solar Eclipse Corona from Earth and Space

    04/12/2016 7:33:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    NASA ^ | Tuesday, April 12, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Sometimes, a total eclipse is a good time to eye the Sun. Taking advantage of an unusual juxtaposition of Earth, Moon and Sun, the featured image depicts the total solar eclipse that occurred last month as it appeared -- nearly simultaneously -- from both Earth and space. The innermost image shows the total eclipse from the ground, with the central pupil created by the bright Sun covered by a comparatively dark Moon. Surrounding the blocked solar disk is the tenuous corona of Sun imaged in white light, easily visible from the ground only during an eclipse. Normally, this corona...
  • What Is The Most Astounding Fact About The Universe?

    04/11/2016 6:26:44 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 68 replies
    Forbes/Science ^ | 8 Apr, 2016 | Ethan Siegel
    Back in 2008, Time Magazine interviewed Neil de Grasse Tyson, and asked him, “What is the most astounding fact you can share with us about the Universe?” His answer was indeed a very good, true, and astounding fact about the Universe: that all the complex atoms that make up everything we know owe their origins to ancient, exploded stars, dating back billions of years. It’s a great fact, and it’s definitely on the short list of the most remarkable things we’ve learned about the Universe. But if I were to choose the single most astounding fact about the Universe, I’d...
  • President Obama Will Guest-Host Science Channel Show This Week

    04/11/2016 1:35:19 PM PDT · by PROCON · 37 replies
    mediaite ^ | April 11, 2016 | Josh Feldman
    That’s right, according to Mashable, the leader of the free world will be a guest host on the Science Channel news program Science Presents DNews all five nights this week to discuss, well, science. This surprise new gig comes as the White House gears up for the annual Science Fair this Wednesday. The Science Channel’s general manager said, “The science initiatives the Obama administration promote continue to make bold breakthroughs and breaking news. We are thrilled to have President Obama, a champion of science, present DNews updates to the Science Channel audience.”
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Comet and the Star Cluster

    04/11/2016 5:37:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | Monday, April 11, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Image Credit & Copyright: Comet Linear has become unexpectedly bright. The comet, discovered in 2000, underwent a 100-fold outburst just a week before it passed a mere 14 lunar distances from Earth late last month. The comet was captured here last week at about magnitude 6 -- just bright enough to be seen by the unaided eye -- passing in front of the distant globular star cluster M14. Comet 252/P LINEAR is one of a rare group of comets that vacillate between the Earth and Jupiter every 5 years. How the comet will evolve from here is unknown, but...
  • New Examination of Trans-Neptunian Objects Suggests Two Planets Lurk in Outer Solar System

    01/16/2015 11:06:16 AM PST · by lbryce · 20 replies
    From Quarks to Quasars ^ | January 16, 2015 | James Trosper
    Presently, our solar system is known to contain 4 fully-fledged rocky worlds: Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars; 2 ice-giants: Neptune and Uranus; 2 gas-giants, Saturn and Neptune; 5 dwarf-planets, Ceres. Pluto, Eris, MakeMake, Haumea; around 100 moons; and an unknowable number of comets, asteroids and minor planets. Indeed, we’ve only begun to understand the full scope of our local corner of our galaxy, and new information emerges on a monthly-basis, yet there a number of seemingly obvious things that remain unknown. For instance, long before Pluto’s existence was deduced, astronomers scoured the outer solar system in search of another large...
  • Astronomers are Predicting at Least Two More Large Planets in the Solar System

    01/15/2015 3:45:27 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 77 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on January 15, 2015 | Nancy Atkinson
    In their studies, the team analyzed the effects of what is called the ‘Kozai mechanism,’ which is related to the gravitational perturbation that a large body exerts on the orbit of another much smaller and further away object. They looked at how the highly eccentric comet 96P/Machholz1 is influenced by Jupiter (it will come near the orbit of Mercury in 2017, but it travels as much as 6 AU at aphelion) and it may “provide the key to explain the puzzling clustering of orbits around argument of perihelion close to 0° recently found for the population of ETNOs,” the team...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Cassini Approaches Saturn

    04/10/2016 12:31:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    NASA ^ | Sunday, April 10, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Cassini, a robot spacecraft launched in 1997 by NASA, became close enough in 2002 to resolve many rings and moons of its destination planet: Saturn. At that time, Cassini snapped several images during an engineering test. Several of those images were combined into the contrast-enhanced color composite featured here. Saturn's rings and cloud-tops are visible toward the image bottom, while Titan, its largest moon, is visible as the speck toward the top. When arriving at Saturn in July 2004, the Cassini orbiter began to circle and study the Saturnian system. A highlight was when Cassini launched the Huygens probe...
  • THE JACKI DAILY Show! Listen live at 2PM Eastern!

    04/10/2016 4:25:14 AM PDT · by RaceBannon · 9 replies
    The Jacki Daily Show ^ | The Jacki Daily Show
    THE JACKI DAILY Show! Listen live at 2PM Eastern! Now playing also on station KWEL in Midland-Odessa! The host of the Jacki Daily show has had an impressive career in energy, law, and politics.Most recently, Jacki served as General Counsel to an engineering firm specializing in energy, national security and environmental cleanup. Previously, she served many years as legal counsel on Capitol Hill to the Chairman of the Subcommittee on the Constitution and the former Ranking Member of the Commercial and Administrative Law Subcommittee, advising on the oversight of federal agencies. Prior to her career in Washington, she worked as...
  • Planet Nine's profile fleshed out

    04/09/2016 7:29:13 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 52 replies
    BBC ^ | 4/8/2916 | Paul Rincon
    In January, researchers at Caltech in the US suggested a large, additional planet might be lurking in the icy outer reaches of the Solar System. Now, a team at the University of Bern in Switzerland has worked out what they say are upper and lower limits on how big, bright and cold it might be. The study has been accepted by the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics. Prof Mike Brown and Dr Konstantin Batygin made their case for the existence of a ninth planet in our Solar System orbiting far beyond even the dwarf world Pluto. There are no direct observations...
  • Houston We've Got A Problem: NASA's Planet-Hunting Kepler Spacecraft Is In Emergency Mode

    04/09/2016 7:40:09 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 25 replies
    TechTimes ^ | 4/9/16 | Catherine Cabral-Isabedra
    Kepler spacecraft is in emergency mode, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) said in a statement. Charlie Sobeck, Kepler and K2 mission manager at NASA's Ames Research Center announced that after a scheduled contact with mission operations engineers last April 7, it was discovered that Kepler is presently in emergency mode (EM), the spacecraft's lowest operational mode. The team is working on recovering from EM, as it consumes significant amount of fuel. Since the spacecraft is 75 million miles away from Earth, even with the speed of light, communication takes about 13 minutes for the message to travel from the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Green Flash of Spring

    04/09/2016 4:40:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | Saturday, April 09, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Taken on March 20 from the top of Haleakala on the isle of Maui, planet Earth, the first sunrise of northern spring is pictured in this vacation snapshot. The telephoto view from the volcanic caldera above a sea of clouds also captures an elusive green flash near the Sun's upper limb. Atmospheric layers with sharp temperature changes cause the colorful flash as the Sun rises behind a distant cloud bank. Refraction along sight lines through the layers creates multiple distorted images of the Sun, and for a moment, can visibly deflect shorter wavelength green light.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Lapland Northern Lights

    04/08/2016 7:03:26 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | Friday, April 08, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Early spring in the northern hemisphere is good season for aurora hunters. Near an equinox Earth's magnetic field is oriented to favor interactions with the solar wind that trigger the alluring glow of the northern lights. On March 28/29 the skies over Kaunispää Hill, Lapland, Finland did not disappoint. That night's expansive auroral curtains are captured in this striking panoramic view that covers a full 360 degrees. Local skywatchers were mesmerized by bright displays lasted throughout the dark hours, shimmering with colors easily visible to the naked eye.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte

    04/07/2016 5:43:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | Thursday, April 07, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Named for the three astronomers instrumental in its discovery and identification, Wolf - Lundmark - Melotte (WLM) is a lonely dwarf galaxy. Seen toward the mostly southern constellation Cetus, about 3 million light-years from the Milky Way, it is one of the most remote members of our local galaxy group. In fact, it may never have interacted with any other local group galaxy. Still, telltale pinkish star forming regions and hot, young, bluish stars speckle the isolated island universe. Older, cool yellowish stars fade into the small galaxy's halo, extending about 8,000 light-years across. This sharp portrait of WLM...
  • The Universe Had a Beginning [Video & Transcript]

    04/06/2016 6:31:24 PM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 30 replies
    Ligonier ^ | 4/5/16 | Nathan Bingham
    In this excerpt from his message at our 2012 National Conference, Dr. Stephen Meyer tells the story of how Hubble showed Einstein that the universe was not eternal but must have had a beginning.-vid at link