Keyword: astronomy

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  • Idaho wants to create a 1,400-square-mile reserve for the stars

    09/16/2017 5:48:44 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 82 replies
    The Week ^ | 9/15/17 | Jeva Lange
    Idaho is moving forward with plans to establish the first International Dark Sky Reserve in the United States, a designation for a location so remote from light pollution that you can even see the "interstellar dust clouds" of the Milky Way in the night sky, The Associated Press reports. Proponents of the reserve plan to file an application this fall to designate 1,400 square miles of central Idaho as part of the dark sky territory. Locals, who would voluntarily take measures to reduce light pollution, are almost unanimously behind the decision in part because they enjoy the celestial splendor as...
  • Starstruck: The Marveling of Job as He Looked to the Night Sky

    09/29/2016 7:12:54 AM PDT · by Salvation · 8 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 09-28-16 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    Starstruck: The Marveling of Job as He Looked to the Night Sky Msgr. Charles Pope • September 28, 2016 • The first reading for today (Wednesday of the 27th Week) says,The LORD alone stretches out the heavens. He made the Bear and Orion, the Pleiades and the constellations of the south; He does great things past finding out, marvelous things beyond reckoning (Job 9:8-10).Due to the light pollution common in our cities today, we urbanites really don’t have any idea what we’re missing when it comes to the night sky. Up until about a hundred years ago, the night...
  • BREAKTHROUGH DETECTS REPEATING FAST RADIO BURSTS COMING FROM DISTANT GALAXY

    08/31/2017 8:16:06 AM PDT · by C19fan · 55 replies
    Universe Today ^ | August 30, 2017 | Matt Williams
    In July of 2015, Russian billionaire Yuri Milner announced the creation of Breakthrough Listen, a decade-long project that would conduct the largest survey to date for signs of extra-terrestrial communications (ETI). As part of his non-profit organization, Breakthrough Initiatives, this survey would rely on the latest in instrumentation and software to observe the 1,000,000 closest stars and 100 closest galaxies. Using the Green Bank Radio Telescope in West Virginia, the Listen science team at UC Berkeley has been observing distant stars for over a year now. And less than a week ago, they observed 15 Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) coming...
  • What high-speed astronomy can tell us about the galactic zoo

    08/27/2017 1:22:08 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 21 replies
    Aeon ^ | Christopher Kochanek
    For most of human history, the distant celestial sphere was regarded as perfect and unchanging. Stars remained in place, planets moved predictably, and the few rogue comets were viewed as atmospheric phenomena. This began to change with the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahes observation of the supernova of 1572 apparently, a new star and his studies of the Great Comet of 1577, which he proved was actually a distant object. Nonetheless, the impression of permanence is strong. There are very few astronomical objects that noticeably vary to the naked eye: only the brightest comets, novae and supernovae. For observers...
  • The best ever image of a star other than our sun: Incredibly detailed view of Antares [tr]

    08/23/2017 8:56:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 27 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | August 23, 2017 | Shivali Best
    It is one of the most famous, bright stars in our galaxy, known for its strong red tint. And now scientists have used ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLTI) to capture the most detailed image of Antares yet. The stunning image reveals a mysterious process occurring in Antares' extended atmosphere - which the researchers still cannot explain.
  • Spat Over Design of New Chinese Telescope Goes Public

    08/16/2017 11:13:03 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 2 replies
    Science ^ | Aug. 11, 2017 | ongming Huang
    Spat over design of new Chinese telescope goes public By Yongming HuangAug. 11, 2017 , 12:13 PM A deep division among Chinese astronomers over the design of a proposed 12-meter telescope broke into public view this week as statements from competing camps went viral on social media. The dispute centers on whether to adopt a technically ambitious four-mirror design proposed by optical engineers or a conventional three-mirror option favored by astronomers. The stakes are high. It will be Chinas largest optical telescope and serve as the workhorse observational facility for several generations. In a 4 August letter to the Chinese...
  • Total eclipse towns stock toilet paper, add cell towers ahead of unprecedented crowds

    08/14/2017 12:05:29 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 30 replies
    www.accuweather.com ^ | 08-14-2017 | By Olivia Miltner, AccuWeather staff writer
    As the Aug. 21 solar eclipse nears, communities within the path of totality are preparing for masses of people traveling in search of the optimal viewing experience. The expected influx has placed an unprecedented task in front of cities and towns that are unaccustomed to large tourist populations. Places like Hopkinsville, Kentucky, are working to transform their communities to prepare for the event. This is unlike anything this community has ever seen or will probably ever see again, Hopkinsville Solar Eclipse Marketing and Events Consultant Brooke Jung said. Weve got people coming from 42 different states and 18 different countries....
  • Perseid Meteor Shower 2017: When, Where & How to See It

    08/12/2017 1:51:20 AM PDT · by Pontiac · 25 replies
    Space.com ^ | August 11, 2017 | Sarah Lewin
    The peak of the Perseid Meteor Shower is peaking this weekend! According to NASA meteor expert Bill Cooke, the Perseids are perhaps the most popular meteor shower of the year. Typical rates are about 80 meteors an hour, but in outburst years (such as in 2016) the rate can be between 150-200 meteors an hour. The meteor shower's actual peak is around 1 p.m. EDT Aug. 12, which means that the night before and the night after will both have good rates; Cooke said the show would be slightly better in the predawn hours of Aug. 12, but that there'd...
  • Get Thee to the Path!

    08/10/2017 11:58:04 AM PDT · by Thistooshallpass9 · 13 replies
    When the sun came up on May 28 in the year 585 BCE, the Medes and Lydians were still at war. They had been at each others throats for years, and it looked like there was no end in sight for their conflict. But something extraordinary happened on the battlefield that day, which changed everything. This episode also features an interview with Dr. Fred Espenak, an astrophysicist, and scientist emeritus at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.
  • How Big is the Biggest Possible Planet?

    08/05/2017 4:01:54 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 15 replies
    Discover ^ | 4 Aug, 2017 | Corey S. Powell
    Last week, a team of astronomers reported the first potential discovery of an exomoona satellite orbiting a planet around another star. Part of what is so striking about the report is the scale of this possible planet-moon system. In this case, the moon appears to be about the size of Neptune; the planet it orbits is some 10 times the mass of Jupiter, or about 3,000 times the mass of Earth! The system pushes at the limits of how we normally categorize objects in space and invites questions about where we stand in the scale of things. What is the...
  • Surprise! New Neptune Storm Appears in a Bizarre Location

    08/03/2017 9:13:43 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    space.com ^ | August 3, 2017 07:33am ET | Elizabeth Howell
    A nearly Earth-size storm system was spotted near Neptune's equator, surprising scientists because no bright clouds have ever been seen in that location. The storm is about 6,000 miles (9,000 kilometers) in length about three-quarters Earth's diameter and is even huge compared to the size of Neptune: it spans nearly 30 degrees in both longitude and latitude. When astronomers studied the storm between June 26 and July 2, it appeared to get brighter. "Seeing a storm this bright at such a low latitude is extremely surprising," Ned Molter, a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley, said...
  • A plane-size asteroid buzzes by Earth undetected

    07/27/2017 10:37:31 AM PDT · by John W · 22 replies
    cnet.com ^ | July 27, 2017 | Eric Mack
    Astronomers first spotted an asteroid about as long as a 737 passenger jet on Sunday and analyzed its path to determine it had made a close pass by our planet three days earlier. In other words, the big space rock slipped right by us without being detected and was only seen in our cosmic rear-view mirror. While the asteroid, now named 2017 001, flew right on by without incident, it was a relatively close pass. It came within about one-third the distance between Earth and the moon, roughly 76,448 miles (123,031 km). With an estimated size of between 82 and...
  • AMAZING NEW VIEWS OF BETELGEUSE COURTESY OF ALMA

    06/28/2017 7:08:31 AM PDT · by C19fan · 15 replies
    Universe Today ^ | June 27, 2017 | David Dickinson
    Just. Wow. An angry monster lurks in the shoulder of the Hunter. Were talking about the red giant star Betelgeuse, also known as Alpha Orionis in the constellation Orion. Recently, the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) gave us an amazing view of Betelgeuse, one of the very few stars that is large enough to be resolved as anything more than a point of light.
  • Artificial brain scans the galaxy for speeding stars

    06/27/2017 6:22:42 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 10 replies
    Cosmos ^ | 27 Jun, 2017 | Andrew Masterson
    Neural networks come to astronomy as a self-adapting algorithm digs through star maps to find rogue fast-moving stars, writes Andrew Masterson. An artificial neural network capable of learning from its own observations is helping astronomers identify a rare type of star that might offer clues to both the formation of the Milky Way and the role of dark matter in governing its motion. In research published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, a team led by Elena Maria Rossi from Leiden University in the Netherlands detail how the self-adapting algorithm is spotting rogue stars among millions mapped...
  • Is There Still an Astronomy Ping List?

    06/22/2017 6:44:36 PM PDT · by originalbuckeye · 24 replies
    6/22/17 | Originalbuckeye
    Sorry for the Vanity, but I was on an Astronomy Ping List and haven't seen any pictures in a good, long while. Is it still active?
  • http://www.unsealed.org/2017/06/debunkers-inadvertently-prove.html

    06/16/2017 9:41:50 AM PDT · by amessenger4god · 10 replies
    Unsealed ^ | 6/16/17 | Gary
    There have now been rebuttals of the Revelation 12 Sign by Joel Richardson, Danny Faulkner, Tim McHyde, Billy Crone, and now J.L. Robb from Omega Letter. We've been studying and teaching the Revelation 12 Sign since 2012 and after nearly five years this great sign has weathered every attack that could be thrown at it. We addressed all of the rebuttals, point-by-point (see here, here, here, and here) and what we discovered in the process is that all of the arguments against the #REV12SIGN fall flat. J.L. Robb's arguments have finally proven beyond a shadow of a doubt that...
  • Asteroid worth $10,000 quadrillion could transform global economy

    05/25/2017 10:52:57 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 94 replies
    www.rt.com ^ | 25 May, 2017
    NASA scientists are outdoing themselves yet again: by reworking the planned route for a robotic mission to a giant asteroid worth $10,000 quadrillion, theyve managed to cut costs, launch sooner and arrive four years earlier than planned. Not bad. The Psyche planetoid, measuring 240km (149 miles) in diameter, is located in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and is made almost entirely of iron and nickel. At current market prices, such an asteroid, a truly unique object in our solar system, is estimated to be worth $10,000 quadrillion ($10,000,000,000,000,000,000). That is, if you could successfully tow it into orbit...
  • Saturns Hexagon Will be the Star of the Cassini Finale

    05/10/2017 6:42:15 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 1 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | 10 May , 2017 | Matt Williams
    he Cassini spacecraft is nearing the end of its lifespan. This September, after spending the past twenty years in space twelve and a half of which were dedicated to studying Saturn and its system of moons the probe will be crash into Saturns atmosphere. But between now and then, the probe will be making its Grand Finale the final phase of its mission where it will dive between the planet and its rings 22 times. In addition to exploring this region of Saturn (something no other mission has done), the probe will also be using this opportunity...
  • The Celestial C-Section: A Defense Of The Revelation 12 Sign

    05/08/2017 9:24:13 AM PDT · by amessenger4god · 24 replies
    Unsealed World News ^ | May 5, 2017 | Gary
    A reader recently asked a question that many of us have probably wondered: if the Revelation 12 Sign occurs on September 23rd, why does it appear that the male child (Jupiter) is born two weeks earlier on September 9th? It's a good question that appears to have a Scriptural answer.  Not only an answer to the objection, but further confirmation and evidence of the precision and significance of this September's sign. In Revelation 12:1-2 the sign is described with all of its simultaneous details: the sun, the moon, the crown of twelve stars, and the woman in labor.  The...
  • Will we build a VILLAGE on the moon? China in talks with Europe about launching a lunar settlement

    04/26/2017 6:38:01 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 59 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 07:27 EDT, 26 April 2017 | By Daisy Dunne
    Tian Yulong, secretary general for China's space agency, confirmed the plans ESA has described its 'Moon Village' as a launching pad for missions to Mars The lunar site could also support space mining missions and even tourism It could also act as a 'pit stop' for the further exploration of deep space China is talking with the European Space Agency about collaborating on a human settlement on the moon. The secretary general for China's space agency, Tian Yulong, disclosed the talks today in Chinese state media. The ESA has previously described its 'Moon Village' as a potential international launching pad...