Free Republic 4th Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $20,338
23%  
Woo hoo!!! And the first 23% is in!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: astronomy

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Ancient Babylonian 'Omen' Has Helped Scientists Verify Timing of an Epic Solar Storm

    10/21/2019 7:03:29 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 45 replies
    Science Alert ^ | 19 OCT 2019 | MIKE MCRAE
    More than 2,600 years ago, strange red clouds over Mesopotamia drew the attention of soothsayers across the land. Their royal reports have now helped confine the date of a severe solar storm that washed over the planet. Based on readings of carbon isotopes trapped in tree rings deposited around that time, astronomers already suspected there was a period of intense solar activity around the middle of the 7th century BC... And it seemed like it had pretty far-ranging effects. Earlier in the year, geologists reported similar signs of a storm from around this period in traces of radioactive particles buried...
  • Argonne explores how ants, bees, and fruit flies can be the next big buzz in artificial intelligence

    10/19/2019 6:55:34 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 12 replies
    Argonne National Laboratory ^ | 12 Sept 2019 | DAVE BUKEY
    Powered by plutonium and drawing 400 watts of power each to run their electronics and heat, the probes still snap photos and send them back to NASA. After 42 years, though, only six of Voyager 2’s 10 instruments still work... Ultimately, the team aimed to better understand how to use novel and emerging materials to make chips more computationally efficient. Their efforts to design and simulate a new neuromorphic chip led Yanguas-Gil’s to two pivotal breakthroughs. They were able to use filters and weights that impact neural connections in real time, depending on what the system deems important and they...
  • NASA Announces All-Female Remake Of Staged Moon Landings (SATIRE)

    10/18/2019 5:22:20 PM PDT · by bitt · 11 replies
    babylonbee.com ^ | july 18, 2019 | admin
    As a tribute to the 50th anniversary of its fake moon landing, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has announced a reboot of the staged event that fooled billions worldwide, only this time featuring an all-female crew. NASA officials confirm they will release a shot-for-shot remake of the meticulously concocted phony moon landing, originally filmed at an undisclosed soundstage 50 years ago this week. The rejuvenated hoax will follow in the footsteps of other recent all-female reboots like Ghostbusters and Oceans 8. Those were some great buddy films, a NASA spokesperson told reporters, but we made the ultimate buddy movie...
  • Heres the Picture Weve Been Waiting for. Hubbles Photo of Interstellar Comet 2I/Borisov

    10/17/2019 10:32:15 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    Hubble Space Telescope. The workhorse telescope has given us a photo of the new interstellar comet 2I/Borisov... 2I/Borisov has wandered into our Solar System from the deep cold of interstellar space, but nobody knows from whence it came, or how long its been travelling. Boris only the second object weve observed thats come into our Solar System from somewhere else in the galaxy, and the Hubble snapped photos of it speeding along at about 177,000 kph (110,000 mph.) So far, the Hubble images are the sharpest ones yet. Comets contain a lot of water ice and other volatiles. When they...
  • Hubble telescope captures the best photo yet of the interstellar comet Borisov [tr]

    10/17/2019 6:47:34 AM PDT · by C19fan · 17 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | October 17, 2019 | Ian Randall
    An Astronomer has released our best and sharpest look to date at Comet Borisov, the second ever-known interstellar object to visit our solar system, using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to capture the new image. The comet was travelling at around 110,000 miles per hour when University of California Los Angeles astronomer David Jewitt studied it on October 12, 2019, when it was 260 million miles away. The comet which is named after the Crimean astronomer who discovered it will pass within around 177,000 miles (285,000 kilometres) of the Earth in early December this year. It is trailing behind...
  • Space shock as 'unidentified object' feeding mysterious black hole leaves experts baffled

    10/16/2019 10:46:11 AM PDT · by Innovative · 37 replies
    UK Express ^ | Oct. 16, 2019 | Brian McGleenon
    A MYSTERIOUS supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy is spitting high energy particles after being fed by an object that has never been seen before. The baffling phenomenon has put existing theoretical models on their head, and astrophysicists are puzzled as to what is creating such a regular excretion of material from within the bowels of this supermassive black hole. According to the paper titled, 'Nine-hour X-ray quasi-periodic eruptions from a low-mass black hole galactic nucleus', the energy erupts from the black hole every nine hours and last for one hour and it's that precision which has baffled scientists.
  • Liquifying a rocky exoplanet

    10/15/2019 4:32:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    Science Daily ^ | October 9, 2019 | University of Bern
    A hot, molten Earth would be around 5% larger than its solid counterpart. The difference between molten and solid rocky planets is important for the search of Earth-like worlds beyond our Solar System and the understanding of Earth itself. Rocky exoplanets that are around Earth-size are comparatively small, which makes them incredibly difficult to detect and characterise using telescopes. What are the optimal conditions to find such small planets that linger in the darkness? ... In the characterization of exoplanets outside our solar system and the search for potentially habitable worlds, researchers at the University of Bern are among the...
  • Why NASA's Annoyed About Elon Musk's Giant Rocket [not]

    10/15/2019 12:46:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Space dot dumb, er, com ^ | Monday, October 7, 2019 | Rafi Letzter
    The Starship MK1 assembled at SpaceX's build and launch facility in Texas. On Sept. 30, Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX, told CNN that the Crew Dragon would be ready to carry astronauts into space in three to four months. But NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine told CNN he wasn't convinced, and due to delays from SpaceX and Boeing (which is at work on a similarly delayed, competitor capsule called Starliner), he anticipated NASA buying more seats aboard Russian capsules... "I am looking forward to the SpaceX announcement. In the meantime, Commercial Crew is years behind schedule. NASA expects to see...
  • Former NASA scientist says they found life on Mars in the 1970s

    10/15/2019 6:30:55 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 44 replies
    CNN ^ | Updated 0809 GMT (1609 HKT) October 15, 2019 | By Jessie Yeung
    We may have already discovered the essence of life on Mars 40 years ago, according to a former NASA scientist. Gilbert V. Levin, who was principal investigator on a NASA experiment that sent Viking landers to Mars in 1976, published an article in the ScientificAmerican journal last Thursday, arguing the experiment's positive results were proof of life on the red planet. The experiment, called Labeled Release, was designed to test Martian soil for organic matter. "It seemed we had answered that ultimate question," Levin wrote in the article. In the experiment, the Viking probes placed nutrients in Mars soil samples...
  • NASA Gets a Rare Look at a Rocky Exoplanet's Surface [LHS 3844b]

    10/14/2019 8:02:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Jet Propulsion Laboratory Spitzer Telescope site ^ | August 19, 2019 | Calla Cofield
    A new study using data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope provides a rare glimpse of conditions on the surface of a rocky planet orbiting a star beyond the Sun... the planet's surface may resemble those of Earth's Moon or Mercury: The planet likely has little to no atmosphere and could be covered in the same cooled volcanic material found in the dark areas of the Moon's surface, called mare. Discovered in 2018 by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Satellite Survey (TESS) mission, planet LHS 3844b is located 48.6 light-years from Earth and has a radius 1.3 times that of Earth. It orbits...
  • Model offers explanation for universe's most powerful magnets [magnetars]

    10/10/2019 9:31:09 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 22 replies
    UPI ^ | Oct. 10, 2019 / 8:54 AM | By Brooks Hays
    New research suggests magnetars are produced by the deaths of massive stars that were formed by stellar mergers. Photo ESO/L. Calada Oct. 10 (UPI) -- With the help of computer simulations, scientists have come up with an explanation for the formation of the strongest magnets in the universe, magnetars. Models suggest stellar mergers can produce strong magnetic fields. When the magnetic star produced by a merger dies, a magnetar can form. Magnetars are neutron stars -- collapsed stellar cores -- with extremely powerful magnetic fields. The sun features an outer layer of convective activity that produces strong magnetic fields, but...
  • What If Planet Nine Is a Bowling-Ball-Sized Black Hole?

    10/01/2019 6:44:19 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 29 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | September 28, 2019 | Ryan F. Mandelbaum
    Some of the most distant rocks in our solar system act in a way that suggests theres some massive object out there we havent been able to see. A planet? Maybe. But why not a small black hole? Thats a scenario a pair of scientists describe in a new paper. Of course, they recognise that a planet is more likely than an ancient black hole unlike any weve directly observed. But they simply want astronomers to think creatively while hunting for whatever this hypothetical object, often called Planet Nine, might be. By simply focussing on the concept of a planet,...
  • Navy Pilot Says Dark Mass Made Torpedo Disappear

    10/08/2019 11:29:47 AM PDT · by C19fan · 28 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | October 8, 2019 | Andrew Daniels
    You might not know the name David Fravor, but you probably know what he saw even if hes still not sure what that was. Fravor is the retired U.S. Navy Commander who in 2017 told the New York Times that he spotted a Tic Tac-shaped UFO from the cockpit of his F/A-18F Super Hornetaround 40 feet long and oval in shape100 miles off the coast of San Diego in 2004. Theres video, of course, of Fravors now-legendary encounter, originally released for public viewing by The New York Times and To The Stars Academy of Arts & Science, a UFO...
  • The Weird History of Unidentified Submerged Objects

    10/09/2019 4:52:26 PM PDT · by RoosterRedux · 31 replies
    PopularMechanics.com ^ | Kyle Mizokami
    This past weekend, former U.S. Navy Commander David Fravor was a guest on the Joe Rogan Experience podcast. Fravor, who was the subject of a New York Times article about his 2004 UFO sighting, discussed a spooky new sighting a fellow pilot revealed to him after they were both out of the Navy. According to Fravor, the eyewitness was a former pilot of the MH-53E Sea Dragon, the Navy version of the Marine Corps CH-53E Sea Stallion, based at Naval Station Roosevelt Roads, on the island of Puerto Rico. Twice while recovering spent practice munitions out of the water, the...
  • Any other fans out there of "Fabric of the Cosmos?"

    01/07/2012 4:45:46 AM PST · by PJ-Comix · 40 replies
    Self | January 6, 2012 | PJ-Comix
    Are there any other fans of FABRIC OF THE COSMOS out there? I found it to be perhaps the most fascinating science show ever produced. The information in the show is nothing less than stunning and definitely changed my view of the universe. Some of the information is so stunning that it is hard to comprehend. But guess what? Even physicists have a hard time getting their minds around it. And an oatmeal cookie to the first person who can post who the major backer of this series is.
  • Dismantling Space and Time [Review of book by Brian Greene]

    07/15/2004 7:52:36 AM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 135 replies · 1,755+ views
    Tech Central Station ^ | 09 March 2004 | Kenneth Silber
    Space and time are pervasive in our everyday experience, and yet it is hard to say exactly what they are. They resist definition in terms other than themselves. Moreover, they have various subtle and elusive properties, with which science continues to grapple. Relativity and quantum mechanics, the physics breakthroughs of the 20th century, revolutionized scientific thinking about these subjects. And this revolution has not played itself out, since cutting-edge physics today involves further radical rethinking of time and space. The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality, by Brian Greene (Knopf, $28.95), is an excellent guide...
  • The Universe Made Simple

    05/25/2004 8:01:29 PM PDT · by Ronzo · 70 replies · 670+ views
    Atlantic Monthly ^ | 5/20/2004 | Bradley Jay
    <p>Can you access the flash of emancipation you felt the first time you were able to stay up on a bike or propel yourself through the water? Can you remember the way your new knowledge enhanced your life? And can you recall the gratitude you felt toward those people who had the skill and the patience to pass that knowledge along to you?</p>
  • Is String Theory About to Unravel?

    12/22/2014 7:40:57 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 52 replies
    smithsonianmag.com ^ | Brian Greene
    The idea underlying string unification is as simple as it is seductive. Since the early 20th century, natures fundamental constituents have been modeled as indivisible particlesthe most familiar being electrons, quarks and neutrinosthat can be pictured as infinitesimal dots devoid of internal machinery. String theory challenges this by proposing that at the heart of every particle is a tiny, vibrating string-like filament. And, according to the theory, the differences between one particle and anothertheir masses, electric charges and, more esoterically, their spin and nuclear propertiesall arise from differences in how their internal strings vibrate. Much as the sonorous tones of...
  • String Theory 'blog

    08/18/2006 8:55:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 116 replies · 6,962+ views
    various ^ | before, during, and after 2006 | various
    String Theory site:freerepublic.com Google
  • String Theory Does Not Win a Nobel, and I Win a Bet

    10/09/2019 8:12:24 AM PDT · by C19fan · 19 replies
    Scientific America ^ | October 9, 2019 | John Horgan
    I just won a bet I made in 2002 with physicist Michio Kaku. I bet him $1,000 that by 2020, no one will have won a Nobel Prize for work on superstring theory, membrane theory, or some other unified theory describing all the forces of nature. This years Nobel Prize in Physics, which recognized solid work in cosmology (yay Jim Peebles!) and astronomy, was Kakus last chance to win before 2020. Kaku and I made the bet under the auspices of Long Bets, a public arena for enjoyably competitive predictions, of interest to society, with philanthropic money at stake. Long...