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Comet's water 'like that of Earth's oceans'
BBC ^ | October 5, 2011 | Jason Palmer

Posted on 10/05/2011 6:41:44 PM PDT by decimon

Comet Hartley 2 contains water more like that found on Earth than prior comets seem to have, researchers say.

A study using the Herschel space telescope aimed to measure the quantity of deuterium, a rare type of hydrogen, present in the comet's water.

The comet had just half the amount of deuterium seen in comets.

The result, published in Nature, hints at the idea that much of the Earth's water could have initially came from cometary impacts.

Just a few million years after its formation, the early Earth was rocky and dry; something must have brought the water that covers most of the planet today.

Water has something of a molecular fingerprint in the amount of deuterium it contains, and only about a half-dozen comets have been measured in this way.

All of them have exhibited a deuterium fraction twice as high as the oceans, so the current theory holds that asteroids were likely to be the carriers for water; meteorites that they give rise to have roughly the same proportion of deuterium that the Earth's oceans contain.

(Excerpt) Read more at bbc.co.uk ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events; Technical; US: Iowa
KEYWORDS: bigsplash; catastrophism; chondrite; comet; comets; godsgravesglyphs; louisfrank; panspermia; velikovsky

1 posted on 10/05/2011 6:41:46 PM PDT by decimon
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To: SunkenCiv

Comet tale ping.


2 posted on 10/05/2011 6:42:23 PM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon
Small Comets and Our Origins, the Ecstasy and Agony of the Scientific Debate, Louis A. Frank, The Sixteenth Annual Presidential Lecture, The University of Iowa, 1999
3 posted on 10/05/2011 6:47:53 PM PDT by aruanan
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To: decimon
1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. 2 Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters.

3 And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. 4 God saw that the light was good, and he separated the light from the darkness. 5 God called the light “day,” and the darkness he called “night.” And there was evening, and there was morning—the first day.

6 And God said, “Let there be a vault between the waters to separate water from water.” 7 So God made the vault and separated the water under the vault from the water above it. And it was so. 8 God called the vault “sky.” And there was evening, and there was morning—the second day.

9 And God said, “Let the water under the sky be gathered to one place, and let dry ground appear.” And it was so. 10 God called the dry ground “land,” and the gathered waters he called “seas.” And God saw that it was good.

4 posted on 10/05/2011 6:49:57 PM PDT by stars & stripes forever ( Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord.)
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To: aruanan

Thanks.

Looks like this weighs in favor of that theory.


5 posted on 10/05/2011 6:51:39 PM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

It’s salty, has fish, plankton, sharks swimming it.


6 posted on 10/05/2011 6:53:51 PM PDT by ROCKLOBSTER ( Celebrate Republicans Freed the Slaves Month.)
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to add to what aruanan linked there:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1208497/posts
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/bloggers/1250694/posts


7 posted on 10/05/2011 6:56:00 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: decimon
deuterium, a rare type of hydrogen

Yikes, who writes this stuff. deuterium is "heavy water" which includes hydrogen obviously but hydrogen is hydrogen is hydrogen unless its something else.
8 posted on 10/05/2011 6:57:01 PM PDT by cripplecreek (MLB Playoff thread http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2786167/posts)
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To: 75thOVI; agrace; aimhigh; Alice in Wonderland; AndrewC; aragorn; aristotleman; Avoiding_Sulla; ...

Thanks decimon.




9 posted on 10/05/2011 6:57:41 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: cripplecreek

:’) Deuterium is indeed an isotope of hydrogen. Heavy water is Deuterium monoxide.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deuterium


10 posted on 10/05/2011 7:00:36 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: decimon; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks decimon.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


11 posted on 10/05/2011 7:00:58 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: aruanan

Lou Frank has been attacked for twenty years on this subject.


12 posted on 10/05/2011 7:01:50 PM PDT by iowamark (Rick Perry says I'm heartless.)
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To: decimon

“The result, published in Nature, hints at the idea that much of the Earth’s water could have initially came from cometary impacts. “

or maybe the other way around :)


13 posted on 10/05/2011 7:04:17 PM PDT by ari-freedom (I'm a heartless conservative because I love this country.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Makes sense I guess. Deuterium is just the most commonly used term for heavy water despite the inaccuracy.


14 posted on 10/05/2011 7:04:48 PM PDT by cripplecreek (MLB Playoff thread http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2786167/posts)
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To: cripplecreek

Makes sense I guess.

Sure, Deuterium = heavy water = cold fusion.
Comets are driven by cold fusion.
Now why didn’t I think of that.
Oh yeah, I just did.


15 posted on 10/05/2011 7:47:09 PM PDT by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: tet68

And who says conservatives don’t do science. LOL


16 posted on 10/05/2011 7:48:39 PM PDT by cripplecreek (MLB Playoff thread http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2786167/posts)
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To: cripplecreek

“Yikes, who writes this stuff. ...”

It’s strangely worded, but correct. Deuterium is an isotope of Hydrogen. The abundant form of hydrogen has just a proton in the nucleus. Deuterium has a neutron and a proton. That’s why it’s “heavy”.


17 posted on 10/05/2011 8:05:35 PM PDT by brownsfan (Aldous Huxley and Mike Judge were right.)
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To: ROCKLOBSTER
It’s salty, has fish, plankton, sharks swimming it.

Sharks with laser beams.

Oh, and it the lost city of atlantis is there at the bottom, too.

18 posted on 10/05/2011 8:20:39 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand (...then they came for the guitars, and we kicked their sorry faggot asses into the dust)
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To: cripplecreek
Makes sense I guess. Deuterium is just the most commonly used term for heavy water despite the inaccuracy.

I recall many years ago being confused in trying to find out what deuterium is. I'd read different things.

19 posted on 10/05/2011 8:21:37 PM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

How much water is in a comet compared to that in the earth’s oceans? Is it plausible that a strike on the earth by a large dry rock could cause ocean water to splash out into outer space, in such a way that it would enter a highly elliptical orbit about the sun and become a comet?


20 posted on 10/05/2011 8:21:59 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (There's gonna be a Redneck Revolution! (See my freep page) [rednecks come in many colors])
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To: ari-freedom

And here I was thinking that the oceans were formed by early man drinking too much beer.


21 posted on 10/05/2011 8:27:51 PM PDT by Grimmy (equivocation is but the first step along the road to capitulation)
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To: HiTech RedNeck
How much water is in a comet compared to that in the earth’s oceans? Is it plausible that a strike on the earth by a large dry rock could cause ocean water to splash out into outer space, in such a way that it would enter a highly elliptical orbit about the sun and become a comet?

One of the links in the comments above has something about a whole lot of comets over a long time period.

22 posted on 10/05/2011 8:35:14 PM PDT by decimon
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To: Grimmy

There’s much to my comment that I’m not letting on :)


23 posted on 10/05/2011 8:35:19 PM PDT by ari-freedom (I'm a heartless conservative because I love this country.)
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To: decimon

Comet - it will make your teeth turn green
Comet - it tastes like gasoline

Comet- it will make you vomit
So get some Comet, and vomit, today


24 posted on 10/05/2011 8:37:24 PM PDT by dfwgator
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To: SunkenCiv

Fascinating stuff, but it still doesn’t solve the origin of life issue.


25 posted on 10/05/2011 8:40:50 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: decimon; HiTech RedNeck

Twenty per minute, IIRC. But, they’d have to be big enough to get through the atmosphere with their water intact and insufficient volume, unless there wasn’t any atmosphere back then.

That rate is nearly 29000 per day and over 10 million in the course of a year. How many gallons of water are there on earth?


26 posted on 10/05/2011 8:45:58 PM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: SunkenCiv
One reindeer did all that?
27 posted on 10/05/2011 9:15:07 PM PDT by Ken H
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To: cripplecreek; tet68
"And who says conservatives don’t do science. LOL "

Thanks. I just had the best laugh of the day.

28 posted on 10/05/2011 9:18:19 PM PDT by blam
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To: 1010RD

What’s this per minute stuff? Talking about a single comet.


29 posted on 10/05/2011 10:57:42 PM PDT by HiTech RedNeck (There's gonna be a Redneck Revolution! (See my freep page) [rednecks come in many colors])
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To: iowamark; decimon
Lou Frank has been attacked for twenty years on this subject.

I thought it was hilarious how the radar data of small meteorites, the 1980s small comet satellite data, and the 1990s small comet satellite data all give exactly the same graph. And that astronomer who developed the skeet shoot method of getting an exposure on these objects was great. Too bad he died so soon. I think it was diabetes.

Something everyone who accepts the reality of stones falling from space but not water should remember is what the scientists were saying about folks who claimed that stones were falling to the ground from space back in the 18th century:
The German physicist, Ernst Florens Chladni, was the first to publish the then audacious idea that that meteorites were actually rocks from space.[35] He published his booklet, "On the Origin of the Pallas Iron and Others Similar to it, and on Some Associated Natural Phenomena", in 1794. In this he compiled all available data on several meteorite finds and falls concluded that they must have their origins in outer space. The scientific community of the time responded with resistance and mockery.[36] It took nearly 10 years before a general acceptance of the origin of meteorites was achieved through the work of the French scientist Jean-Baptiste Biot and the British chemist, Edward Howard. Biot's study, initiated by the French Academy of Sciences, was compelled by a meteorite fall of thousands of meteorites on April 26, 1803 from the skies of L'Aigle, France.[37][38]
I have a feeling that this "community" is a lot more resistant now to new ideas than it was then. Of course, that very public fall of thousands of meteorites in France helped a lot. Too bad we couldn't luck out on this one with something like that over, say, Washington, D.C..
30 posted on 10/06/2011 3:36:47 AM PDT by aruanan
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To: Ken H

Right after it ran over grandma.


31 posted on 10/06/2011 4:06:56 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: decimon
The result, published in Nature, hints at the idea that much of the Earth's water could have initially came from cometary impacts.
I haven't pulled out my slide rule, but I have a *problem* with that theory.

To wit: If you calculated, or estimated, the volume of all the water in the earth's oceans (not even all the lakes and rivers), then factored in the size of the 'average' comet head containing ice you would need a 'googol' of Comets hitting the earth during its 'formative' years - after it cooled but had no water.

Then after 'a while' (scientific term) some of that water would have formed a young atmosphere creating friction for the latter comets with water ice hitting the earth, which would evaporate the water into a gas. And that friction factor would then increase exponentially ('e') as our atmosphere increased. And keep in mind the comet(s) couldn't be too large or the debris field expelled 'up' would create an added friction factor for the other comets to pass through.

Granted, the young solar system was a violent place, just look at the moon. But comets being the source of all our water? I can't imagine the number ('n') of comets involved which would result in getting a '+' = 'water'.

Think I'll fire off an email to Stephan Hawking today for his take on this.

32 posted on 10/06/2011 4:23:03 AM PDT by Condor51 (Yo Hoffa, so you want to 'take out conservatives'. Well okay Jr - I'm your Huckleberry)
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To: 1010RD

Since the water burned off in descent would not escape back into space, it would wind up in the oceans.

It’s amusing to contemplate how much rain results from this.


33 posted on 10/06/2011 4:34:57 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

In a word, no.


34 posted on 10/06/2011 4:35:07 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: aruanan

Thanks aruanan. The “stones don’t fall from the sky” idiocy comes straight down from Aristotle. He also originated the ridicule of people who said that they did.


35 posted on 10/06/2011 4:38:04 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Condor51

The atmosphere absorbed any water that melted off the comets, which is what is being observed now. Just having an atmosphere doesn’t result in the melt being able to achieve escape velocity.


36 posted on 10/06/2011 4:40:46 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's never a bad time to FReep this link -- https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: ari-freedom

My thought also.


37 posted on 10/06/2011 5:27:45 AM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: HiTech RedNeck

One of the links provided by a poster leads to a postulation by two scientists who made observations on the meteorites. Their theory is what I am referring to.


38 posted on 10/06/2011 5:55:30 AM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: SunkenCiv

So atmosphere or no the water gets here. Does it matter at what height in the atmosphere the water is deposited? That is could it have formed static ice crystals in space after burning off the meteor?


39 posted on 10/06/2011 5:57:13 AM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: decimon

We can't let the Nazis get the heavy water. The ancient aliens said they would come back for it.">

40 posted on 10/06/2011 11:38:40 AM PDT by colorado tanker
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