Free Republic 3rd Qtr 2020 Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $9,157
10%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 10%!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: velikovsky

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Baby Jupiter was likely slammed by planet 4.5 billion years ago

    08/15/2019 11:34:57 AM PDT · by rdl6989 · 19 replies
    New York Post ^ | August 15, 2019 | Mike Wehner
    Scans from NASA’s Juno spacecraft have hinted that Jupiter’s core isn’t exactly what scientists once thought it was. The core isn’t as dense as researchers suspected, but determining why that is has proven to be a challenge. “This is puzzling,” Andrea Isella, co-author of a new study published in Nature, said in a statement. “It suggests that something happened that stirred up the core and that’s where the giant impact comes into play.”
  • Object Survives Being Swallowed by a Star

    08/03/2006 10:40:47 AM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 16 replies · 421+ views
    Space.com on Yahoo ^ | 8/3/06 | Ker Than
    Long before the Bible's tale of Jonah being swallowed by a whale, a small wannabe star has emerged intact after being engulfed by a neighboring giant star, scientists say. The victim was a brown dwarf, a failed star too small to sustain the nuclear reactions that ignites regular stars. The purpetrator was a red giant, an ancient star that once resembled our Sun but which puffed up to enormous size after its hydrogen fuel was depleted. The red giant has since expelled most of its gas into space and transformed into a dense, Earth-sized star called a white dwarfs. Using...
  • Moving the Orbits of Planets

    02/02/2006 9:44:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies · 737+ views
    David Jewitt ^ | Last updated Sep 2004 | David Jewitt
    Meanwhile, the Doppler discovery of extrasolar planets orbiting very close to their parent stars has raised a different problem. Many of the planets are so close to their stars (<0.1 AU), and so hot, that they cannot be supposed to have formed where we now observe them. By inference, they could have formed at larger distances (several AU) and then migrated inwards. What would cause this inward migration? As with the solar system case, the root cause may be an exchange of angular momentum with material surrounding the planets at their formation. In particular, if the extrasolar planets formed in...
  • Science Says: A big space crash likely made Uranus lopsided

    12/21/2018 10:37:36 AM PST · by Red Badger · 42 replies
    AP ^ | 12/21/2018 | By SETH BORENSTEIN
    <p>WASHINGTON (AP) — Uranus is a lopsided oddity, the only planet to spin on its side. Scientists now think they know how it got that way: It was pushed over by a rock at least twice as big as Earth.</p>
  • A big space crash likely made Uranus lopsided

    12/21/2018 10:37:30 AM PST · by ETL · 23 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Dec 21, 2018 | Seth Borenstein
    <p>Uranus is a lopsided oddity, the only planet to spin on its side. Scientists now think they know how it got that way: It was pushed over by a rock at least twice as big as Earth.</p> <p>Detailed computer simulations show that an enormous rock crashed into the seventh planet from the sun, said Durham University astronomy researcher Jacob Kegerreis, who presented his analysis at a large earth and space science conference this month.</p>
  • Heavenly Bodies Stir Up Routine Catastrophes

    03/18/2003 9:33:33 AM PST · by blam · 9 replies · 842+ views
    IOL ^ | 3-18-2003 | Graeme Addison
    Heavenly bodies stir up routine catastrophes March 18 2003 at 01:30PM By Graeme Addison Legend has it that when two people get together and er... bond, the Earth will move – at least in a metaphorical sense. Likewise, it takes two heavenly bodies, an impactor and a target, to come together with Earth-shattering force to form a crater. There’s nothing dreamlike about this: it happens, frequently, throughout the solar system. Impact catastrophes are routine. Just over two-billion years ago, a chunk of asteroid at least the size of Table Mountain struck the landmass that is now South Africa. It hurtled...
  • Huge magnetic tail discovered behind Mars

    10/22/2017 10:43:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    Discovered by the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) spacecraft, the unusual phenomenon is thought to have been caused by the effects of the solar winds and could help to shine more light on how the Martian atmosphere escaped in to space. "We found that Mars' magnetic tail, or magnetotail, is unique in the Solar System," said NASA scientist Gina DiBraccio. "It's not like the magnetotail found at Venus, a planet with no magnetic field of its own, nor is it like Earth's, which is surrounded by its own internally generated magnetic field." "Instead, it is a hybrid between...
  • The Moon is Surrounded by Neon, NASA Probe Reveals

    08/18/2015 2:48:25 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Jason Major
    Measurements from NASA’s Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer, aka LADEE (pronounced “laddie”) have confirmed the long-suspected presence of neon in its atmosphere ... along with isotopes of argon and helium. The relative concentrations of each of these elements also appears to depend on the time of day. “The presence of neon in the exosphere of the moon has been a subject of speculation since the Apollo missions, but no credible detections were made,” said Mehdi Benna of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, lead author of a paper describing the...
  • Milky Way could hold hundreds of rogue black holes: study

    01/09/2008 3:07:12 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 14 replies · 191+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 1/09/08 | AFP
    CHICAGO (AFP) - Hundreds of rogue black holes may be roaming around the Milky Way waiting to engulf stars and planets that cross their path, US astronomers said Wednesday. The astronomers believe these "intermediate mass" black holes are invisible except in rare circumstances and have been spawned by mergers of black holes within globular clusters -- swarms of stars held together by their mutual gravity. These black holes are unlikely to pose a threat to Earth, but may engulf nebulae, stars and planets that stray into their paths, the researchers said. "These rogue black holes are extremely unlikely to do...
  • Why are the sun and moon the same size in the sky?

    01/31/2009 12:27:31 PM PST · by Daffynition · 62 replies · 1,859+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 30 January 2009 | Marcus Chown
    It is one of the most glorious pieces of natural theatre. Assuming you spend your life on the same part of the Earth's surface, you might witness it once - if you are particularly lucky or very long-lived, perhaps twice. But a total solar eclipse is worth the wait. At the height of totality, the fit of sun and moon is so perfect that beads of sunlight can only penetrate to us through the rugged valleys on the lunar surface, creating the stunning "diamond ring" effect. It is all thanks to a striking coincidence. The sun is about 400 times...
  • Solving Solar System Quandaries Is Simple: Just Flip-flop The Position Of Uranus And Neptune

    12/30/2007 5:44:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 96+ views
    Science Daily ^ | Thursday, December 13, 2007 | adapted from Arizona State University materials
    ...the planets weren't always in the order they are today. Four billion years ago, early in the solar system's evolution, Uranus and Neptune switched places. This is the result of recent work by Steve Desch, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University. The work appears in this week's Astrophysical Journal. Desch based his conclusion on his calculations of the surface density of the solar nebula. The solar nebula is the disk of gas and dust out of which all of the planets formed. The surface density -- or mass per area -- of...
  • On the Fringe: Astronomers look to the Kuiper belt for clues to the solar system's history

    01/14/2010 3:15:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 732+ views
    Science News ^ | January 16th, 2010 | Ron Cowen
    Beyond Neptune lies a reservoir of... icy debris left to roam the solar system's dim outer limits having never coalesced into planets... Named for astronomer Gerard Kuiper, who in 1951 predicted the existence of this 3-billion-kilometer-wide swath of icy chunks, the Kuiper belt didn't begin to reveal itself to observers until 1992. Since then, researchers have found more than a thousand bodies filling a doughnut-shaped belt, which extends 30 to about 50 astronomical units from the sun. One astronomical unit is the average distance between the Earth and sun... The puffed-up, elongated orbits and present-day sparseness of the belt all...
  • Stellar encounters as the origin of distant Solar System objects in highly eccentric orbits

    12/02/2004 4:51:41 PM PST · by nicollo · 40 replies · 1,349+ views
    Nature Magazine | Dec 2/ 2004 | Scott J. Kenyon and Benjamin C. Bromley
    If you can make sense of it, here's the article: Stellar encounters as the origin of distant Solar System objects in highly eccentric orbits SCOTT J. KENYON AND BENJAMIN C. BROMLEY The Kuiper belt extends from the orbit of Neptune at 30 AU to an abrupt outer edge about 50 AU from the Sun. Beyond the edge is a sparse population of objects with large orbital eccentricities. Neptune shapes the dynamics of most Kuiper belt objects, but the recently discovered planet 2003 VB12 (Sedna) has an eccentric orbit with a perihelion distance of 70 AU, far beyond Neptune's gravitational influence....
  • Spitzer Sees the Aftermath of a Planetary Collision

    01/13/2005 8:50:18 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 1,862+ views
    Universe Today ^ | Jan. 10, 2005 | Dolores Beasley and Gay Yee Hill
    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has found a dusty ring of material orbiting nearby Vega which was probably the result of a series of protoplanets smashing into each other. Vega is the fifth brightest star in the sky, located only 25 light-years away in the constellation of Lyra. This dust is constantly being blown out by Vega's intense radiation, so it's unlikely that the star has had this much dust for its entire lifetime. Instead, this ring must have been formed recently, perhaps when a Pluto-sized object was pulverized within the last million years or so.
  • Rogue Planet Find Makes Astronomers Ponder Theory

    12/28/2005 1:02:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 559+ views
    CNN / Reuters ^ | October 5, 2000 | Maggie Fox
    Eighteen rogue planets that seem to have broken all the rules about being born from a central, controlling sun may force a rethink about how planets form, astronomers said on Thursday... "The formation of young, free-floating, planetary-mass objects like these is difficult to explain by our current models of how planets form," Zapatero-Osorio said... They are not linked to one another in an orbit, but do move together as a cluster, she said... Many stars in our own galaxy, the Milky Way, may have formed in a similar manner to the Orion stars, she said. So there could be similar,...
  • Planets in all the wrong places

    03/06/2006 5:16:39 PM PST · by KevinDavis · 20 replies · 870+ views
    The Christian Science Monitor ^ | 03/06/06 | Michelle Thaller
    At my age, I really should have expected this to happen. All of a sudden I'm seeing lots of little clues that the 1980s are making something of a nostalgic comeback. High school kids I speak to as part of my job have started wearing thin ties and studded belts, and I thoroughly approve of their newly spiked and teased hairstyles. The other day I saw a pair of plastic sandals (remember Jellies?) in a store window and heard Bon Jovi playing on a "classic rock" station. That's right; I'm a golden oldie. Take, for instance, the fact that when...
  • Evening Lectures on Migrating Planets, Hazardous Asteroids Search

    09/19/2009 8:05:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 379+ views
    University of Arizona ^ | September 4, 2009 | University Communications
    The University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory is launching its Fall 2009 Evening Lecture Series with talks on wandering solar system planets and searches for hazardous asteroids from Mount Lemmon... Planetary sciences professor Renu Malhotra will speak on "Migrating Planets" on Tuesday, Sept. 15. [whoops] Did the solar system always look the way it is now? New studies by Malhotra and others find that the outer planets -- Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune -- were more tightly clustered in the early solar system, then moved away from each other. Malhotra's models show that as the solar system evolved, Jupiter...
  • Neptune may have eaten a planet and stolen its moon

    04/03/2010 9:16:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 771+ views
    New Scientist ^ | March 22, 2010 | David Shiga
    Neptune's own existence was a puzzle until recently. The dusty cloud that gave birth to the planets probably thinned out further from the sun. With building material so scarce, it is hard to understand how Uranus and Neptune, the two outermost planets, managed to get so big. But what if they formed closer in? In 2005, a team of scientists proposed that the giant planets shifted positions in an early upheaval (New Scientist, 25 November 2006, p 40). In this scenario, Uranus and Neptune formed much closer to the sun and migrated outwards, possibly swapping places in the process. That...
  • When Stars Play Planetary Pinball

    02/15/2012 6:43:00 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Universe Today ^ | Monday, February 7, 2012 | Paul Scott Anderson
    The gravitational pull of large gas giant planets can affect the orbits of smaller planets; that scenario is thought to have occurred in our own solar system. In some cases, the smaller planet may be flung into a much wider orbit, perhaps even 100 times wider than Pluto's. In the case of single stars, that's normally how it ends. In a binary star system, however, the two stars may play a game of "cosmic pinball" with the poor planet first. Moeckel and Dimitri conducted simulations of binary star systems, with two sun-like stars orbiting each other at distances between 250...
  • How Many Loose Planets in the Milky Way?

    03/10/2012 11:28:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 83 replies
    Sky & Telescope ^ | February 29, 2012 | Monica Young
    Researchers at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC) at Stanford University estimate that "nomad" planets, ejected from their home stellar system and now free-floating through the Milky Way, could outnumber stars by as many as 100,000 to 1. Earlier estimates were more like a handful to 1, though previous studies have only counted unbound planets more massive than Jupiter. To estimate the number of unbound planets as small as Pluto that could be roaming the galaxy, Louis Strigari (KIPAC), lead author of the study, began with a basic rule of nature: where a few big objects are...