Keyword: catastrophism

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  • NASA selects ‘Option B’ for Asteroid Redirect Mission

    03/28/2015 12:32:23 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 22 replies
    spaceflightinsider.com ^ | Collin Skocik
    NASA has announced that it has selected “Option B” for its Asteroid Redirect Mission (more commonly referred to as ARM), meaning that rather than towing an entire asteroid into lunar orbit, it will instead retrieve a boulder from an asteroid and bring it into a distant retrograde lunar orbit. Using Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP), an uncrewed spacecraft will retrieve a boulder from a yet-to-be-determined asteroid and tow it into lunar orbit, where it will be visited by astronauts on a future Orion / SLS mission. NASA Associate Administrator Robert Lightfoot said that Option B offers more choices for what object...
  • Did a volcanic cataclysm 40,000 years ago trigger the final demise of the Neanderthals?

    03/24/2015 7:28:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Science Daily ^ | March 20, 2015 | Geological Society of America
    In their climate simulations, Black and colleagues found that the largest temperature decreases after the eruption occurred in Eastern Europe and Asia and sidestepped the areas where the final Neanderthal populations were living (Western Europe). Therefore, the authors conclude that the eruption was probably insufficient to trigger Neanderthal extinction. However, the abrupt cold spell that followed the eruption would still have significantly impacted day-to-day life for Neanderthals and early humans in Europe. Black and colleagues point out that temperatures in Western Europe would have decreased by an average of 2 to 4 degrees Celsius during the year following the eruption....
  • World's largest asteroid impacts found in central Australia

    03/23/2015 5:53:18 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 26 replies
    Australian National University News Online ^ | 23 March 2015 | Australian National University
    A 400 kilometre-wide impact zone from a huge meteorite that broke in two moments before it slammed into the Earth has been found in Central Australia. The crater from the impact millions of years ago has long disappeared. But a team of geophysicists has found the twin scars of the impacts – the largest impact zone ever found on Earth – hidden deep in the earth’s crust. Lead researcher Dr Andrew Glikson from the ANU School of Archaeology and Anthropology said the impact zone was discovered during drilling as part of geothermal research, in an area near the borders of...
  • Young Jupiter wiped out solar system's early inner planets, study says

    03/23/2015 5:01:44 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    The more planetary systems astronomers discovered, the more our own solar system looked like an oddball. Exoplanets – at least the ones big enough for us to see – tended to be bigger than Earth, with tight orbits that took them much closer to their host stars. In multi-planet systems, these orbits tended to be much closer together than they are in our solar system. For instance, the star known as Kepler-11 has six planets closer to it than Venus is to the sun. Why does our solar system look so different? Astrophysicists Konstantin Batygin of Caltech and Greg Laughlin...
  • Why ancient myths about volcanoes are often true

    03/22/2015 6:17:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    BBC ^ | March 18, 2015 | Jane Palmer
    Story has it that many hundreds of years ago, Tanovo, chief of the Fijian island Ono, was very partial to a late afternoon stroll. Each day he would walk along the beach, watch the sun go down and undoubtedly contemplate this paradise on Earth. But one day Tanovo's rival, chief of the volcano Nabukelevu, pushed his mountain up and blocked Tanovo's view of the sunset. Enraged at this, and robbed of the pacifying effects of his daily meditation, Tanovo wove giant coconut-fibre baskets and began to remove earth from the mountain. His rival, however, caught Tanovo and chased him away....
  • 'Orbis Spike' in 1610 marks humanity's first major impact on planet Earth

    03/13/2015 9:58:50 AM PDT · by posterchild · 22 replies
    cnet.com ^ | Mar 12, 2015 | Michael Franco
    While 1492 may have been the year Columbus sailed the ocean blue, it also marks the start of a mass swapping of species between the Old World and the New World as Europe began colonizing the Americas. Research published Wednesday from University College of London (UCL) and Leeds University Professor Simon Lewis and UCL Professor Mark Maslin argues that just over 100 years later -- 1610 -- is when those actions dramatically changed the planet Earth. As a result, they say, 1610 deserves to be designated as the start of the Anthropocene Epoch.
  • Carl Sagan's Son Is a 9/11 Truther

    03/12/2015 4:27:21 PM PDT · by Kid Shelleen · 107 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 03/12/2015 | Ashley Feinberg ProfileFollow Ashley Feinberg
    Carl Sagan is arguably science's biggest rockstar—the ultimate champion for logic and reason. Which makes it all the more painful to find out that his son is a vehement 9/11 truther. In a recent interview for a radio show called 9/11 Free Fall (already off to a great start), Jeremy Sagan—the younger son of Sagan senior and his first wife, fellow scientist Lynn Margulis—went off on all us closed-minded sheeple. In response to a prompt asking when he first "woke up," Sagan remarks:
  • This Is The Asteroid That Didn’t Hit Us

    03/13/2015 12:51:46 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 19 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Jason Major
    The video above shows the passage of 2015 ET across the sky on the night of March 11–12, tracked on camera from the Crni Vrh Observatory in Slovenia. It’s a time-lapse video (the time is noted along the bottom) so the effect is really neat to watch the asteroid “racing along” in front of the stars… but then, it was traveling a relative 12.4 km/second! The description on the video reads: The asteroid starts as tiny dot just below the centre of the right image and drifts gradually downwards. Due to a software glitch a correction which was meant to...
  • The corrugated galaxy: Milky Way may be much larger than previously estimated

    03/13/2015 7:50:24 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Mar 11, 2015 | Provided by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
    The Milky Way galaxy is at least 50 percent larger than is commonly estimated, according to new findings that reveal that the galactic disk is contoured into several concentric ripples. The research, conducted by an international team led by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Professor Heidi Jo Newberg, revisits astronomical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey which, in 2002, established the presence of a bulging ring of stars beyond the known plane of the Milky Way. "In essence, what we found is that the disk of the Milky Way isn't just a disk of stars in a flat plane—it's corrugated," said...
  • Oil-Eating Microbes Have Worldwide Underground Connections

    03/13/2015 12:10:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Scientific American ^ | February 15, 2015 | David Biello 
    Living deep underground ain't easy. In addition to hellish temperatures and pressures, there's not a lot to eat. Which is why oil reservoirs are the microbes' cornucopia in this hidden realm. Microbes feast on many oil reservoirs, but it has been unclear how the microorganisms got to those locales. One proposal has been that the microbes colonize a pool of dead algae corpses and then go along for the ride as the pool gets buried deeper and deeper and the algae slowly become oil. That's the so-called "burial and isolation" hypothesis. But under that set of rules each pool of...
  • Jupiter's moon Ganymede has vast underground ocean

    03/12/2015 2:27:53 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    cbs ^ | WIlliam Harwood
    Larger than the planet Mercury, Ganymede is one of four moons discovered by Galileo in 1610, easily visible in small telescope and large binoculars. The subsurface ocean confirmed by Hubble is believed to be at least 60 miles thick, containing more water than all of Earth's ocean's combined. As such, Ganymede joins a growing list of planets and moons in Earth's solar system, including Jupiter's moon Europa and Saturn's moon Enceladus, that are known to harbor vast reservoirs of liquid water. The latest findings using the Hubble Space Telescope build on earlier observations by NASA's Galileo spacecraft that showed Ganymede...
  • Ancient Egyptian royal head puzzles archaeologists

    01/30/2006 11:36:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 256+ views
    Mail&Guardian online ^ | 30 January 2006 | Sapa-dpa
    The Sakhmet statues, which date to the New Kingdom's 18th dynasty (circa 1533 to 1292 BC), hail from the same period as most of the finds in the area. The head, believed to date to the 25th dynasty (circa 760 to 656 BC) that is characterised by its Nubian features, seems out of place, however.
  • Ancient Egyptian capital Amarna mapped through satellite imagery system

    03/11/2015 12:23:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Cairo Post ^ | Wednesday, March 11, 2015 | Rany Mostafa
    The layout of Tell el-Amarna, ancient Egypt's capital during the reign of pharaoh Akhenaten (1353B.C-1336B.C), has been reveled through remote sensing techniques, the Antiquities Ministry stated Wednesday. The discovery is attributed to a spatial high resolution satellite imagery system that was carried out by the archaeology mission of Belgian University of Leuven, currently excavating at Amarna on the east bank of Upper Egypt's governorate of Minya, said Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damaty. "The team captured and analyzed images from satellites orbiting 450 kilometers above the earth, equipped with advanced cameras," Damaty said in the statement, adding that the images showed "the...
  • Mysterious 'bright green' fireball spotted over Colorado

    03/11/2015 9:09:15 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 60 replies
    mashable.com ^ | 03-11-2015 | Brian Reis
    So it's true: The early bird gets the fireballs. Coloradans who were up before the sun on Wednesday morning saw a "bright green" fireball soar across the sky before it burned out over the mountains. More than 60 eyewitnesses filed sightings on the American Meteor Society's website. Greg Moore, an analyst and contributor at Weather5280, told Mashable he was driving over the top of Vail pass, west of Denver, just before 6 a.m. local time when "a bright green fireball caught my eye." The object had a "flaming tail with a long trail behind it," Moore said. "As it moved...
  • Evidence indicates Yucatan Peninsula likely hit by tsunami 1,500 years ago

    03/09/2015 2:31:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    U of Colorado ^ | March 5, 2015 | press release
    The eastern coastline of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, a mecca for tourists, may have been walloped by a tsunami between 1,500 and 900 years ago, says a new study involving Mexico’s Centro Ecological Akumal (CEA) and the University of Colorado Boulder. There are several lines of evidence for an ancient tsunami, foremost a large, wedge-shaped berm about 15 feet above sea level paved with washing machine-sized stones, said the researchers. Set back in places more than a quarter of a mile from shore, the berm stretches for at least 30 miles, alternating between rocky headlands and crescent beaches as it tracks...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Enhanced Color Caloris

    03/05/2015 6:18:26 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | March 05, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The sprawling Caloris basin on Mercury is one of the solar system's largest impact basins, created during the early history of the solar system by the impact of a large asteroid-sized body. The multi-featured, fractured basin spans about 1,500 kilometers in this enhanced color mosaic based on image data from the Mercury-orbiting MESSENGER spacecraft. Mercury's youngest large impact basin, Caloris was subsequently filled in by lavas that appear orange in the mosaic. Craters made after the flooding have excavated material from beneath the surface lavas. Seen as contrasting blue hues, they likely offer a glimpse of the original basin...
  • Thousands Flee Huge Volcano Eruption In Southern Chile (pix of lava)

    03/03/2015 8:09:25 PM PST · by Loud Mime · 24 replies
    Buzzfeed ^ | March 3, 2015 | Francis Whittaker
    A volcanic eruption in Villarrica, central Chile, prompted evacuations of nearby towns and cities and emergency meetings of officials, local media reported.
  • Global Warming: A Chilling Perspective

    03/02/2015 6:34:18 AM PST · by rickmichaels · 15 replies
    For more than 2 million years our earth has cycled in and out of Ice Ages, accompanied by massive ice sheets accumulating over polar landmasses and a cold, desert-like global climate. Although the tropics during the Ice Age were still tropical, the temperate regions and sub-tropical regions were markedly different than they are today. There is a strong correlation between temperature and CO2 concentrations during this time. Historically, glacial cycles of about 100,000 years are interupted by brief warm interglacial periods-- like the one we enjoy today. Changes in both temperatures and CO2 are considerable and generally synchronized, according to...
  • NASA’s MMS Spacecraft Set for March Blastoff to study Earth’s Magnetic Reconnection Events

    03/01/2015 5:13:53 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 7 replies
    Universe Today ^ | FEBRUARY 28, 2015 | by KEN KREMER
    Technicians work on NASA’s 20-foot-tall Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mated quartet of stacked observatories in the cleanroom at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., on May 12, 2014. Credit: Ken Kremer- kenkremer.com NASA’s first mission dedicated to study the process in nature known as magnetic reconnection undergoing final preparation for launch from Cape Canaveral, Florida in just under two weeks time. The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is comprised of a quartet of identically instrumented observatories aimed at providing the first three-dimensional views of a fundamental process in nature known as magnetic reconnection. Magnetic reconnection is the process whereby...
  • History's Largest Megalith

    02/24/2015 2:16:11 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, February 09, 2015 | Eric A. Powell
    A team of archaeologists at a 2,000-year-old limestone quarry in Lebanon’s Bekka Valley recently excavated around a megalith weighing approximately 1,000 tons and dubbed Hajjar al-Hibla, or “stone of the pregnant woman.” It was intended for the Temple of Jupiter, which sits on three limestone blocks of similar size at the nearby site of Baalbek. To the team’s shock, they unearthed yet another block, this one weighing an estimated 1,650 tons, making it the largest known megalith. The German Archaeological Institute’s Margarete van Esse says excavation was suspended when the trench became dangerously deep. “Hopefully in a following campaign we...
  • Earth's other 'moon' and its crazy orbit could reveal mysteries of the solar system

    02/26/2015 6:29:41 AM PST · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 02-25-2015 | by Duncan Forgan
    We all know and love the moon. We're so assured that we only have one that we don't even give it a specific name. It is the brightest object in the night sky, and amateur astronomers take great delight in mapping its craters and seas. To date, it is the only other heavenly body with human footprints. What you might not know is that the moon is not the Earth's only natural satellite. As recently as 1997, we discovered that another body, 3753 Cruithne, is what's called a quasi-orbital satellite of Earth. This simply means that Cruithne doesn't loop around...
  • What is Mars Made Of?

    02/25/2015 3:19:43 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 79 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | February 25, 2015 | Matt Williams on
    Like Earth, the interior of Mars has undergone a process known as differentiation. This is where a planet, due to its physical or chemical compositions, forms into layers, with denser materials concentrated at the center and less dense materials closer to the surface. In Mars’ case, this translates to a core that is between 1700 and 1850 km (1050 – 1150 mi) in radius and composed primarily of iron, nickel and sulfur. This core is surrounded by a silicate mantle that clearly experienced tectonic and volcanic activity in the past, but which now appears to be dormant. Besides silicon and...
  • Mystery Pharaoh Found in Egypt

    01/18/2014 10:50:21 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Discovery News ^ | January 16, 2014 | Rossella Lorenzi
    The remains of a previously unknown pharaoh who reigned more than 3,600 years ago have emerged from the desert sand at South Abydos in Sohag province, about 300 miles south of Cairo... The skeleton of Woseribre Senebkay, who appears to be one of the earliest kings of a forgotten Abydos Dynasty (1650–1600 B.C.) was found by a University of Pennsylvania expedition... It rested in a four-chambered tomb amidst the fragmented debris of his coffin, funerary mask and canopic chest... Senebkay's tomb dates to about 1650 B.C., during Egypt's Second Intermediate Period, when central authority collapsed, giving rise to several small...
  • Multiple Camera Drones Were Lost for This Imagery of a Volcano’s Insides

    02/24/2015 8:28:59 PM PST · by SWAMPSNIPER · 22 replies
    PETAPIXEL ^ | 02/24/15 | Michael Zhang
    Explorer Sam Cossman recently employed the help of multiple drones to capture photos and footage of the Marum Crater in an active volcano on the Pacific island nation of Vanuatu. He ended up losing multiple drones in the process, but he left the island with spectacular images that will help provide a better understanding of the volcano and the life that exists around it.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Unusual Plumes Above Mars

    02/24/2015 2:18:41 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    NASA ^ | February 24, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What is creating unusual plumes on Mars? No one is sure. Noted and confirmed by a global contingent of amateur astronomers on photos of the red planet in March 2012, possibly similar plumes have now been found on archived images as far back as 1997. Since the plumes reach 200 kilometers up, they seem too high to be related to wind-blown surface dust. Since one plume lasted for eleven days, it seemed too long lasting to be related to aurora. Amateur astronomers will surely continue to monitor the terminator and edge regions of Mars for new high plumes, and...
  • A close call of 0.8 light years [Nibiru?]

    02/22/2015 7:43:37 AM PST · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Provided by University of Rochester
    A group of astronomers from the US, Europe, Chile and South Africa have determined that 70,000 years ago a recently discovered dim star is likely to have passed through the solar system's distant cloud of comets, the Oort Cloud. No other star is known to have ever approached our solar system this close - five times closer than the current closest star, Proxima Centauri. In a paper published in Astrophysical Journal Letters, lead author Eric Mamajek from the University of Rochester and his collaborators analyzed the velocity and trajectory of a low-mass star system nicknamed "Scholz's star." The star's trajectory...
  • Star Blasted Through Solar System 70,000 Years Ago

    02/18/2015 1:11:46 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 113 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Ian O'Neill
    Highlighted by astronomers at the University of Rochester and the European Southern Observatory, the star — nicknamed “Scholz’s star” — has a very low tangential velocity in the sky, but it has been clocked traveling at a breakneck speed away from us. In other words, from our perspective, Scholz’s star is fleeing the scene of a collision with us. “Most stars this nearby show much larger tangential motion,” said Eric Mamajek, of the University of Rochester. “The small tangential motion and proximity initially indicated that the star was most likely either moving towards a future close encounter with the solar...
  • Russian Meteor's Origin Remains Mysterious 2 Years Later

    02/17/2015 5:55:47 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    space.com ^ | February 15, 2015 01:32pm ET | Elizabeth Howell,
    Originally, astronomers thought that the Chelyabinsk meteor came from a 1.24-mile-wide (2 kilometers) near-Earth asteroid called 1999 NC43. But a closer look at the asteroid's orbit and likely mineral composition, gained from spectroscopy, suggests few similarities between it and the Russian meteor. However, "the composition of [the] Chelyabinsk meteorite that was recovered after the event is similar to a common type of meteorite called LL chondrites," he added. "The near-Earth asteroid has a composition that is distinctly different from this." More generally, Reddy and his colleagues' work showed that it is difficult to make predictions about what particular asteroid could...
  • Mystery Mars haze baffles scientists

    02/16/2015 5:24:45 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 34 replies
    bbc ^ | Rebecca Morelle
    A mysterious haze high above Mars has left scientists scratching their heads. The vast plume was initially spotted by amateur astronomers in 2012, and appeared twice before vanishing. Scientists have now analysed the images and say that say the formation, stretching for more than 1,000km, is larger than any seen before. Writing in the journal Nature, the researchers believe the plume could be a large cloud or an exceptionally bright aurora. However, they are unsure how these could have formed in the thin upper reaches of the Martian atmosphere. Continue reading the main story “ Start Quote To begin with,...
  • 'Cloud' over Mars leaves scientists baffled

    02/16/2015 5:29:57 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 63 replies
    Phys dot Org ^ | February 16, 2015 | unattributed
    Plumes seen reaching high above the surface of Mars are causing a stir among scientists studying the atmosphere on the Red Planet. On two separate occasions in March and April 2012, amateur astronomers reported definite plume-like features developing on the planet. The plumes were seen rising to altitudes of over 250 km above the same region of Mars on both occasions. By comparison, similar features seen in the past have not exceeded 100 km. "At about 250 km, the division between the atmosphere and outer space is very thin, so the reported plumes are extremely unexpected," says Agustin Sanchez-Lavega of...
  • Subglacial Lake Vostok cracked for a second time

    02/12/2015 6:56:12 PM PST · by Fred Nerks · 62 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 03 February 2015 | by Catherine Brahic
    They've cracked it - again! A Russian team of ice explorers has broken through to a lake buried beneath nearly 4 kilometres of Antarctic ice. The lake has been isolated from the surface for 15 million years and could hold extreme forms of life never seen before, perhaps even offering clues as to what life on other planets might look like. Lake Vostok is Antarctica's largest subglacial lake. It was reached once before in 2012, when a Russian team finished drilling a hole some 3770 metres down to its surface. They claimed that water samples they obtained from this borehole...
  • The Copper Heart of Volcanos

    02/12/2015 10:48:03 AM PST · by JimSEA · 24 replies
    Science 2.0 ^ | 2/10/2015 | News Staff
    The link between volcanism and the formation of copper ore could lead to discovery of new copper deposits. Copper has been in use for 6,000 years and it shows no signs of slowing down. The average home has about a hundred pounds of it and we are going to have more people and homes, not fewer. Volcanoes may be the answer. A research team led by Professor Jon Blundy of University of Bristol's School of Earth Sciences, studied giant porphyry copper deposits of the variety that host 75 percent of the world's copper reserves. Copper forms in association with volcanoes...
  • Early Sunspots and Volcanoes ( connections? )

    02/11/2015 11:55:50 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 10 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | February 10, 2015 | Willis Eschenbach
    Guest Post by Willis EschenbachWell, as often happens I started out in one direction and then I got sidetractored … I wanted to respond to Michele Casati’s claim in the comments of my last post. His claim was that if we include the Maunder Minimum in the 1600’s, it’s clear that volcanoes with a VEI greater or equal to 5 are affected by sunspots. Based on my previous analysis I figured “No way!”, but I thought I should take a look … and as is often the case, I ended up studying something entirely different.Now, the SIDC monthly sunspot record...
  • ‘Lopsided’ Supernova Could Be Responsible for Rogue Hypervelocity Stars

    02/10/2015 9:15:24 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | Dan Majaess
    Hypervelocity stars have been observed traversing the Galaxy at extreme velocities (700 km/s), but the mechanisms that give rise to such phenomena are still debated. Astronomer Thomas M. Tauris argues that lopsided supernova explosions can eject lower-mass Solar stars from the Galaxy at speeds up to 1280 km/s. “[This mechanism] can account for the majority (if not all) of the detected G/K-dwarf hypervelocity candidates,” he said. Several mechanisms have been proposed as the source for hypervelocity stars, and the hypotheses can vary as a function of stellar type. A simplified summary of the hypothesis Tauris favors begins with a higher-mass...
  • Heart of Earth's inner core revealed

    02/10/2015 12:54:42 AM PST · by moose07 · 38 replies
    BBC ^ | 10 February 2015 | Rebecca Morelle
    Scientists say they have gained new insight into what lies at the very centre of the Earth. Research from China and the US suggests that the innermost core of our planet has another, distinct region at its centre. The team believes that the structure of the iron crystals there are different from those found in the outer part of the inner core. The findings are reported in the journal Nature Geoscience. Without being able to drill into the heart of the Earth, its make-up is something of a mystery. So instead, scientists use echoes generated by earthquakes to study...
  • Inconvenient study: Methane seepage from the Arctic seabed has been occurring for millions of years

    02/07/2015 6:11:53 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 37 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | February 6, 2015 | Anthony Watts
    Despite the ever present wailing from green activists that we are sitting on a “methane catastrophe”, it’s simply business as usual for Earth in the Arctic. Even Dr. Gavin Schmidt of NASA GISS thinks the issue is “implausible”. This study further confirms that the issue is just another emotional overblown green issue of no merit.Methane seepage from the Arctic seabed occurring for millions of yearsFrom the Center for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Climate and EnvironmentMethane gas flares, up to 800 meters high, rise from the Arctic Ocean floor. That is the size of the tallest building in the world, Burj...
  • 9 Times The White House Declined To Endorse A Vaccination Mandate

    02/05/2015 1:21:31 PM PST · by Kaslin · 30 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | February 4, 2015 | Conn Carroll
    The White House press corps repeatedly tried to get White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest to endorse a vaccination mandate Tuesday, but Earnest rejected such invitations every time. We counted nine different denials.1. Because of that risk to the vulnerable population, does he believe that it's time to revisit state laws that allow some parents to opt out? MR. EARNEST: Well, I know that there has been substantial litigation around this, too. I think in the mind of the President -- I did have the opportunity to visit with him shortly before the briefing on this very issue -- the...
  • Experts Look For 'Watery Kingdom'

    06/08/2006 6:40:09 PM PDT · by blam · 33 replies · 927+ views
    BBC ^ | 5-25-2006
    Experts look for 'watery kingdom' The forest can been seen at low tide in Cardigan Bay Scientists are to carry out an underwater search for a supposed kingdom in Cardigan Bay said to have existed more than 5,000 years ago. Legend has it that the low-lying land of Cantre'r Gwaelod disappeared under the waves during a storm or a tsunami. Experts say the remains of an ancient forest seen sometimes at low tide is evidence that Cantre'r Gwaelod existed. Conservation group Friends of Cardigan Bay will begin the three-year project in Ceredigion this summer. The oldest part of the submerged...
  • Ancient underwater forest discovered off Norfolk coast

    01/31/2015 4:49:37 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 18 replies
    BBC ^ | 26 January 2015 Last updated at 00:28 GMT | Credit: The underwater diving footage is copyright and courtesy of Rob Spray and Dawn Watson
    Nature experts have discovered a remarkable submerged forest thousands of years old under the sea close to the Norfolk coast. The trees were part of an area known as 'Doggerland' which formed part of a much bigger area before it was flooded by the North Sea. It was once so vast that hunter-gatherers who lived in the vicinity could have walked to Germany across its land mass.
  • How close a huge asteroid just came to Earth and how to see it

    01/26/2015 2:53:31 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    NASA is saying amateur astronomers with small telescopes and strong binoculars may be able to see the asteroid, although stormy conditions in the Northeast will limit night-time viewing there. Here's how to try to view the asteroid. Editor's note: These times are Eastern Standard Time so adjust them three hours earlier for optimal Pacific Standard Time viewing.]
  • News Flash: Asteroid Flying Past Earth Today Has Mini-Moon!

    01/26/2015 6:34:33 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 49 replies
    Asteroid 2004 BL86, which passed closest to Earth today at a distance of 750,000 miles (1.2 million km), has a companion moon. Scientists working with NASA’s 230-foot-wide (70-meter) Deep Space Network antenna at Goldstone, California, have released the first radar images of the asteroid which show the tiny object in orbit about the main body. ... 2004 BL86 measures about 1,100 feet (325 meters) across while its moon is approximately 230 feet (70 meters) across. The asteroid made its closest approach today (Jan. 26th) at 10:19 a.m. (CST), however it will peak in brightness this evening around 10 p.m. (4:00...
  • Ancient Crash, Epic Wave

    01/26/2015 1:03:44 PM PST · by Sawdring · 36 replies
    New York Times ^ | November 14, 2006 | SANDRA BLAKESLEE
    At the southern end of Madagascar lie four enormous wedge-shaped sediment deposits, called chevrons, that are composed of material from the ocean floor. Each covers twice the area of Manhattan with sediment as deep as the Chrysler Building is high. On close inspection, the chevron deposits contain deep ocean microfossils that are fused with a medley of metals typically formed by cosmic impacts. And all of them point in the same direction — toward the middle of the Indian Ocean where a newly discovered crater, 18 miles in diameter, lies 12,500 feet below the surface. The explanation is obvious to...
  • Cosmic Impacts May Have Seeded Early Earth with Ingredients for Life

    01/24/2015 6:09:58 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 38 replies
    space.com Astrobiology Magazine ^ | | January 20, 2015 03:37pm ET | By Charles Q. Choi, Astrobiology Magazine
    A picture of the gun used in the experiments. The big white box at the left end of the gun is where the target is stored. Credit: Impact Laboratory, University of Kent Bullets of ice shot at high speeds can deposit organic compounds on surfaces they strike. New findings suggest that comets might, indeed, have helped deliver key ingredients of life to Earth and perhaps elsewhere, researchers say. The scientists detailed their findings in the June 13 issue of the journal Astrobiology.Craters on the moon are evidence that the Inner Solar System was prone to giant impacts from asteroids...
  • Planets in all the wrong places

    03/06/2006 5:16:39 PM PST · by KevinDavis · 20 replies · 870+ views
    The Christian Science Monitor ^ | 03/06/06 | Michelle Thaller
    At my age, I really should have expected this to happen. All of a sudden I'm seeing lots of little clues that the 1980s are making something of a nostalgic comeback. High school kids I speak to as part of my job have started wearing thin ties and studded belts, and I thoroughly approve of their newly spiked and teased hairstyles. The other day I saw a pair of plastic sandals (remember Jellies?) in a store window and heard Bon Jovi playing on a "classic rock" station. That's right; I'm a golden oldie. Take, for instance, the fact that when...
  • Moment Mystery Light Streaked Across Night Sky Captured on Video

    10/21/2014 7:51:07 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    abc ^ | Oct 21, 2014, 10:40 AM ET | ALYSSA NEWCOMB
    The sighting came as the Earth passed through the debris cloud from Halley’s Comet, which produces the annual Orionid meteor shower. Bill Cooke of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, told ABC News there were "several bright Orionids last night, as well as a spectacular fireball over middle Tennessee" that he said broke apart at 24 miles altitude just south of Nashville.
  • Mystery of ancient Chinese civilization's disappearance explained

    12/29/2014 1:22:59 PM PST · by SteveH · 17 replies
    Fox News ^ | december 29, 2014 | Tia Ghose
    An earthquake nearly 3,000 years ago may be the culprit in the mysterious disappearance of one of China's ancient civilizations, new research suggests. The massive temblor may have caused catastrophic landslides, damming up the Sanxingdui culture's main water source and diverting it to a new location. That, in turn, may have spurred the ancient Chinese culture to move closer to the new river flow, study co-author Niannian Fan, a river sciences researcher at Tsinghua University in Chengdu, China, said Dec. 18 at the 47th annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco. [Ancient Chinese Warriors Protect Secret Tomb]
  • Mystery of the glowing orb: Bizarre fireball that splits in two (trun title - video)

    01/07/2015 4:07:12 AM PST · by RoosterRedux · 24 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | Richard Gray
    A mysterious glowing orb has been filmed breaking away from an unidentified meteorite-like object as it streaked across the sky above California. The unusual object can be seen moving through the sky leaving a long tail behind that is characteristic of space debris or a meteorite burning up in the atmosphere. But after a few seconds a second round object separates from the main fireball and moves off in the opposite direction. UFO hunters have claimed the bright orb may have been some sort of escape pod from a crashing ship. However, others have said it is more likely to...
  • Monday, January 19th: Patterns Of Evidence: The Exodus (one day only)

    01/15/2015 2:01:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Patterns of Evidence ^ | January 19, 2015 | Peter Windahl and Diane Walker
    Official Trailer: Patterns Of Evidence: The Exodus
  • Study: Sea level rise accelerating more than once thought

    01/14/2015 6:00:39 PM PST · by artichokegrower · 60 replies
    Santa Cruz Sentinel ^ | 01/14/15 | SETH BORENSTEIN
    The world’s oceans are now rising far faster than they did in the past, a new study says. The study found that for much of the 20th century — until about 1990 — sea level was about 30 percent less than earlier research had figured. But that’s not good news, scientists say, because about 25 years ago the seas started rising faster and the acceleration in 1990 turns out to be more dramatic than previously calculated.
  • Modern Humans in India Earlier Than Previously Thought?

    09/15/2013 4:57:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Sat, Sep 14, 2013 | editors
    "We found the very first evidence for archaeological assemblages in association with the Toba ash", says Petraglia. "We found Middle Palaeolithic assemblages below and above the ash indicating the technologies being used at the time of the event. When the stone tool assemblages were analyzed from contexts above and below the ash, we found that they were very similar........We therefore concluded that the Middle Palaeolithic hominins survived the eruption and there was population continuity. This is not what would have been expected based on general theories that the Toba super-eruption decimated populations." Moreover, similar findings published by Christine Lane, et...