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Keyword: catastrophism

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  • Old trees reveal Late Antique Little Ice Age (LALIA) around 1,500 years ago

    02/10/2016 12:58:46 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Tree-ring measurements have revealed a period of extreme cold in Eurasia between 536 and around 660 CE. It coincides strikingly with the Justinian plague, migrations of peoples and political turmoil in both Europe and Asia... WSL dendroclimatologist Ulf Buntgen and his fellow researchers were able for the first time to precisely reconstruct the summer temperatures in central Asia for the past 2,000 years. This was made possible by new tree-ring measurements from the Altai mountains in Russia. The results complement the climatological history of the European Alps, stretching back 2,500 years, that Buntgen and collaborators published in 2011 in the...
  • Scientists question Tamil Nadu government's claim that meteorite blast killed bus driver in Vellore

    02/08/2016 7:25:12 AM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    timesofindia.indiatimes.com ^ | Feb 8, 2016, 08.18 PM IST | Bosco Dominique & Karthikeyan Hemalatha
    Witnesses said the blast left a crater 5ft deep and 2ft wide. =================================================================================================================================== A meteorite crashed into an engineering college in Vellore district on Saturday , causing an explosion that killed one man and injured three others, the Tamil Nadu government said on Sunday. Scientists, however, said it wasn't clear how the government concluded that a meteorite strike caused the blast. There has been no established death due to a meteorite hit in recorded history, they said. If a meteorite indeed caused the death, bus driver Kamaraj will be the first person ever to have died in a meteorite strike....
  • Phase of the moon affects amount of rainfall

    01/31/2016 3:46:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    phys.org ^ | January 29, 2016 by | Hannah Hickey
    When the moon is high in the sky, it creates bulges in the planet's atmosphere that creates imperceptible changes in the amount of rain that falls below. New University of Washington research to be published in Geophysical Research Letters shows that the lunar forces affect the amount of rain - though very slightly. ... Kohyama was studying atmospheric waves when he noticed a slight oscillation in the air pressure. He and co-author John (Michael) Wallace, a UW professor of atmospheric sciences, spent two years tracking down the phenomenon. Air pressure changes linked to the phases of the moon were first...
  • 100-Foot Asteroid to Buzz Earth Next Month

    02/06/2016 2:42:17 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 32 replies
    Discovery ^ | 2/5/16 | Mike Wall
    An asteroid as long as a basketball court will give Earth a close shave next month — though scientists aren’t sure just how close. The near-Earth asteroid 2013 TX68, which is thought to be about 100 feet (30 meters) in diameter, will zoom past our planet on March 5. The space rock could come as close as 11,000 miles (17,700 kilometers) — less than 5 percent of the distance from Earth to the moon — or stay up to 9 million miles (14.5 million km) away during the flyby, NASA officials said. “The variation in possible closest-approach distances is due...
  • Monstrous Cosmic Gas Cloud Set To Ignite The Milky Way

    01/29/2016 12:59:16 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 47 replies
    Fores ^ | 28 Jan, 2016 | Ethan Siegel
    There are hundreds of high-velocity gas clouds moving at hundreds of km/s through the outskirts of our galaxy, mostly in stable orbits that keep them out of the galactic plane. They're typically irregularly shaped, thousands of light years across, and contain many millions of times the mass of our Sun. However, one such cloud, known as the "Smith Cloud" (above), is very different from all the others. It's much more distant, and it's moving towards us incredibly rapidly: at about 310 km/s, or around 700,000 miles per hour. And when I say it's moving towards us, it's projected to collide...
  • New study zeros in on plate tectonics' start date

    01/25/2016 10:35:42 AM PST · by JimSEA · 28 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 1/21/2016 | University of Maryland
    Earth has some special features that set it apart from its close cousins in the solar system, including large oceans of liquid water and a rich atmosphere with just the right ingredients to support life as we know it. Earth is also the only planet that has an active outer layer made of large tectonic plates that grind together and dip beneath each other, giving rise to mountains, volcanoes, earthquakes and large continents of land. Geologists have long debated when these processes, collectively known as plate tectonics, first got underway. Some scientists propose that the process began as early as...
  • Wild new theory says Earth may actually be two different planets

    02/04/2016 10:21:30 AM PST · by Smittie · 64 replies
    BGR News ^ | 02/03/2016 | Chris Smith
    A new theory says Earth is made of two planets, rather than just one. Apparently, our planet is the result of a collision that helped map the course of both Earth as we know it and the moon. According to new research from the University of California, Earth and a hypothesized early planet called Theia collided, and the two planets fused together 4.5 billion years ago. That impact also formed our moon, Science Alert explains. The initial working theory was that the Earth and Theia only side-swiped each other, sending the moon into orbit and then flying away into space....
  • Ancient rocks of Tetons formed by continental collisions

    02/01/2016 2:13:19 PM PST · by JimSEA · 36 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 1/29/2016 | Univ. of Wyoming
    University of Wyoming scientists have found evidence of continental collisions in Wyoming's Teton Range, similar to those in the Himalayas, dating to as early as 2.68 billion years ago. The research, published Jan. 22 in the journal Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, shows that plate tectonics were operating in what is now western Wyoming long before the collisions that created the Himalayas starting 40 million years ago. In fact, the remnants of tectonic activity in old rocks exposed in the Tetons point to the world's earliest known continent-continent collision, says Professor Carol Frost of UW's Department of Geology and Geophysics, lead...
  • Babylonians Were Using Geometry Centuries Earlier Than Thought

    01/28/2016 2:56:35 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 35 replies
    smithsonian ^ | 01/28/2016 | Jesse Emspak
    Mathieu Ossendrijver of Humboldt University in Berlin found the tablet while combing through the collections at the British Museum. The written record gives instructions for estimating the area under a curve by finding the area of trapezoids drawn underneath. Using those calculations, the tablet shows how to find the distance Jupiter has traveled in a given interval of time. Until now, this kind of use of trapezoids wasn't known to exist before the 14th century. ... By 400 B.C. Babylonian astronomers had worked out a coordinate system using the ecliptic, the region of the sky the sun and planets move...
  • Mammoth Bones Unearthed at Oregon State University

    01/27/2016 8:09:14 AM PST · by SteveH · 11 replies
    Oregon Live ^ | 1/26/2016 | John Rose
    The 10,000 year old bones of a mammoth and other extinct mammals have been unearthed in the north end zone of Oregon State University's Reser Stadium. Construction crews digging up earth during the expansion of the Valley Football Center expansion project...
  • Cuvier and Schaeffer’s Catastrophism:

    01/25/2016 4:24:32 PM PST · by Fred Nerks · 11 replies
    Thunderbolts website ^ | January 20, 2016 | Peter Mungo Jupp
    The Opening of the Key to the Electric Universe Criticized, ostracized, derided, scorned and rebuked; Cuvier and Schaeffer. These two French eccentric geniuses ranged their new practical paradigms against the sanitized teachings of the Royal Societys consensus science. Georges Cuvier and then later Claude Schaeffer, dared question the hidebound uniformitarian teachings demanded by the Royal Societys geology darlings, Hutton and Lyle. They insisted that the worlds development was a slow evolutionary process explained by millions of years of uniform steady change. This misneme eventually influenced Darwin to explain evolution as a child of slow natural selection that, by chance, produced...
  • Don't Blame 'Planet Nine' for Earth's Mass Extinctions

    01/26/2016 8:03:21 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    space.com ^ | 01/25/2016 | mike wall
    Planet Nine - a newly proposed but not yet confirmed world perhaps 10 times more massive than Earth that's thought to orbit far beyond Pluto — probably could not have triggered such "death from the skies" events, researchers said. Planet Nine likely has an elliptical orbit, coming within 200 to 300 astronomical units (AU) of the sun at its closest approach and getting as far away as 600 to 1,200 AU, Brown said. (One AU is the distance from Earth to the sun - about 93 million miles, or 150 million kilometers). Neptune orbits about 30 AU from the sun,...
  • Cosmic Cycles, not Carbon Dioxide, Control Climate

    01/24/2016 8:32:58 AM PST · by Beave Meister · 25 replies
    The Heartland Institute ^ | 1/21/2016 | Viv Forbes
    Those who think the political war on carbon will cool the globe or keep climate stable need to study climate history. Temperatures on Earth dance to a cyclic rhythm every hour, every day, every month, every season, every year, and to every beat of the sun-spot and glacial cycles. The daily solar cycle causes continual changes in temperature for every spot on Earth. It produces the frosts at dawn, the mid-day heat and the cooling at sunset. It is regulated by rotation of the Earth. Superimposed on the daily solar cycle is the monthly lunar cycle, driven by the orbit...
  • Global warming is a historical repeating fact and is natural and not man made

    01/20/2016 2:09:17 PM PST · by Trumpinator · 26 replies
    infobritain.co.uk ^ | 1/20/2016 | infobritain.co.uk
    In Roman Britain the weather was warmer than it is now, and this warmer climate allowed extensive vine growing throughout Britain's Roman period, and for a long time after. By 1086 when the Domesday survey was carried out there were thirty nine vineyards officially recorded in England, although the actual figure may have been much higher. Then temperatures began to drop in the second half of the sixteenth century causing a retreat of vine growing from the north and east of Europe.
  • Explosive volcanoes ended Earth's time as a snowball: Huge eruptions broke our planet's deep freeze

    01/18/2016 9:00:01 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 33 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 01/18/2016 | Ryan O'Hare for
    In our planet's early history, 720 to 640 million years ago, thick sheets of ice covered the majority of the surface, as the Earth was locked in a deep freeze. But explosive underwater volcanoes changed the chemistry of the Earth's oceans and were key to breaking the planet from its icy state, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Southampton believe underwater volcanoes helped to thaw out "Snowball Earth", and even led to runaway chemical chain reactions, which created the conditions for an explosion of life on Earth. While much of the driving forces behind glaciation during...
  • King Midas and His Golden Touch at the Penn Museum

    01/17/2016 5:04:18 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | Friday, January 15, 2016 | Robin Ngo
    Everyone knows the story of King Midas and his golden touch. In Greco-Roman mythology, the Phrygian king Midas was offered anything he wished from Bacchus, the god of wine, for showing kindness to Bacchus's teacher, Silenus. Midas wished that everything he touched would turn to gold. While it amazed Midas that everything he then touched became gold -- from a twig to a husk of corn -- he soon discovered just how reckless his request was, for he could not eat or drink anything but gold (Ovid, Metamorphoses, XI:85-145). The historical King Midas inspired this character in Classical mythology. King...
  • 'Cave of forgotten dreams' may hold earliest painting of volcanic eruption

    01/16/2016 11:37:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Nature ^ | January 15, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Chauvet-Pont D'Arc cave, in southern France, is one of the world's oldest and most impressive cave-art sites. Discovered in 1994 and popularized in the Werner Herzog documentary 'Cave of Forgotten Dreams', Chauvet contains hundreds of paintings that were made as early as 37,000 years ago. Fearsome animals such as woolly rhinoceroses, cave lions and bears dominate Chauvet's imagery. But one of its innermost galleries -- named after a giant deer species, Megaloceros, that is depicted there -- also contains a series of mysterious spray-shaped drawings, partly covered by the Megaloceros painting. A nearby gallery holds similar spray imagery, as does...
  • A Mysterious Mammoth Carcass Could Change Human History

    01/14/2016 8:42:33 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 100 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 01/14/2016 | Maddie Stone
    The carcass was remarkably well preserved, but something was clearly wrong. A rounded hole through the interior jugal. Deep incisions along the ribs. Dents in the left scapula. A broken mandible. This 45,000 year-old mammoth's life ended violently at the hands of hunters. That wouldn't be surprising-it's well known that Pleistocene humans were expert mammoth killers=but for the location. It was excavated from a permafrost embankment at Yenisei bay, a remote spot in central Siberia where a massive river empties into the Arctic Ocean. That makes this brutalized mammoth the oldest evidence for human expansion into the high Arctic by...
  • World's largest canyon discovered beneath Antarctica

    01/13/2016 11:24:39 PM PST · by Fred Nerks · 27 replies
    ninemsn ^ | January 14, 2016 | James Gorman
    The worlds largest canyon may lie deep beneath the ice sheets on Antarctica, according to a new discovery by UK scientists. While the depth of the discovery is comparative to the Grand Canyon it dwarfs the US landmark by 555km in length. Satellite data recovered by a team of scientists led by Durham University revealed the previously unknown canyon system which is thought to be more than 1000km long and 1km deep buried under several kilometres of ice. While the discovery is yet to be confirmed by direct measurements, researchers believe the canyon beneath the ice sheet may be so...
  • Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution V

    01/10/2016 4:36:03 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | January 8, 2016 | Geological Society of America
    Impact cratering is one of the most fundamental geological processes. On many planets, impact craters are the dominant geological landform. On Earth, erosion, plate tectonics, and volcanic resurfacing continually destroy the impact cratering record, but even here, the geological, biological, and environmental effects of impact cratering are apparent. Impact events are destructive and have been linked to at least one of the 'big five' mass extinctions over the past 540 million years. Intriguingly, impact craters can also have beneficial effects. Many impact craters are associated with economic metalliferous ore deposits and hydrocarbon reservoirs. This Special Paper from The Geological...
  • Monster tsunami could devastate California: study (hypothetical 9.1 magnitude quake off Alaska)

    09/04/2013 5:53:38 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 67 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 9/4/13 | AFP
    A tsunami generated by a massive earthquake off Alaska could cause major damage to California's economy and force 750,000 people to evacuate, a report published Wednesday warned. One third of all boats in California's marinas could be damaged or sunk, costing some $700 million in losses, while major ports would struggle to get huge cargo vessels out to sea in time to avoid being buffeted by tsunamis. Experts from the US Geological Survey (USGS) based their damage assessment on the scenario of a 9.1 magnitude quake off Alaska's Pacific Coast, which it said was "hypothetical but plausible." "In this scenario...
  • Scientists: Tsunami Could Hit West Coast

    01/03/2005 12:34:11 PM PST · by Pyro7480 · 117 replies · 3,439+ views
    Yahoo! News (AP) ^ | 1/3/2005 | Joseph B. Verrengia
    Scientists: Tsunami Could Hit West Coast Tsunami scientists and public safety officials are closely watching an earthquake-prone nation with thousands of miles of crowded coastlines for signs of an imminent disaster. Indonesia? Japan? Try the United States. Experts say the West Coast could experience a calamity similar to the one they have been watching unfold half a world away. "People need to know it could happen," said geologist Brian Atwater of the U.S. Geological Survey. Scientists say grinding geologic circumstances similar to those in Sumatra also exist just off the Pacific Northwest coast. They are a loaded gun that could...
  • Violent shaking at El Hierro (Magnitude 5.3 earthquake preliminary)

    12/27/2013 10:23:47 AM PST · by winoneforthegipper · 124 replies
    usgs ^ | 12/27/13 | staff
    M5.4 - 31km NW of Frontera, Spain 2013-12-27 17:46:06 UTC
  • Experts concerned with abnormal seismic activity Azores

    10/19/2011 6:29:05 AM PDT · by winoneforthegipper · 30 replies · 2+ views
    PAJ ^ | 10/13/11 | STAFF
    Experts in the Azores have alerted the population of So Miguel Island for seismic activity which they considered to be above normal. The seismic events where located in the system of Fogo and Congro lakes, the central region of the island. The situation is ongoing and the number of microseisms is slightly above reference values said Wednesday Joo Lus Gaspar from the Center of Volcanology and Geological Risk Assessment (CVARG) of the University of the Azores.
  • Tsunami Could Hit Here, Geologists Say

    12/30/2004 9:02:59 AM PST · by M 91 u2 K · 115 replies · 2,540+ views
    The New York Sun ^ | 12/29/04 | JEREMY SMERD
    Tsunami Could Hit Here, Geologists Say BY JEREMY SMERD - Special to the Sun December 29, 2004 Could New York be next? The earthquake that ravaged coastline communities surrounding the Indian Ocean has reawakened a debate over the possibility that a tsunami could hit New York.
  • Mega-Tsunami (US East Coast to be Annihilated?)

    12/28/2004 6:19:53 PM PST · by FormerACLUmember · 144 replies · 7,068+ views
    BBC ^ | 12 October 2000 | BBC Science staff
    Scattered across the worlds oceans are a handful of rare geological time-bombs. Once unleashed they create an extraordinary phenomenon, a gigantic tidal wave, far bigger than any normal tsunami, able to cross oceans and ravage countries on the other side of the world. Only recently have scientists realised the next episode is likely to begin at the Canary Islands, off North Africa, where a wall of water will one day be created which will race across the entire Atlantic ocean at the speed of a jet airliner to devastate the east coast of the United States. America will have been...
  • New Data Confirms Strong Earthquake Risk to Central U.S.

    06/22/2005 3:02:56 PM PDT · by QQQQQ · 74 replies · 1,653+ views
    Live Science ^ | June 22, 2005 | Robert Roy Britt
    A colossal earthquake that caused damage from South Carolina to Washington D.C. and temporarily reversed the course of the Mississippi River nearly two centuries ago could be repeated within the next 50 years, scientists said today. Strain is building on a fault near Memphis, Tennessee that was the site of a magnitude 8.1 earthquake in 1812, according to new observations that settle a debate on the risk of another huge quake. The odds of another 8.0 event within 50 years are between 7 and 10 percent, geologists said today. The assessment, based on new data from a recently installed array...
  • Engineers seek to deflect asteroids on collision course with Earth

    09/27/2005 5:00:09 PM PDT · by xcamel · 23 replies · 571+ views
    The Guardian ^ | September 28, 2005 | Alok Jha
    Three-year study will use computer simulations 'It's a small risk, but with a high consequence' British scientists are set to go where only Bruce Willis has gone before: chasing after asteroids on a collision course with Earth. In a three-year 300,000 study funded by the government-backed Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, engineers will use computer simulations to work out the feasibility of changing the direction of asteroids. "It's clear from geological records that the Earth has been impacted in the past by large objects," said Colin McInnes of Strathclyde University. Although none of the space objects currently...
  • How fast is the earth moving?

    01/09/2016 6:12:50 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 65 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 26 Oct, 1998 | Rhett Herman
    Consider the movement of the earth's surface with respect to the planet's center. The earth rotates once every 23 hours, 56 minutes and 4.09053 seconds, called the sidereal period, and its circumference is roughly 40,075 kilometers. Thus, the surface of the earth at the equator moves at a speed of 460 meters per second-or roughly 1,000 miles per hour. As schoolchildren, we learn that the earth is moving about our sun in a very nearly circular orbit. It covers this route at a speed of nearly 30 kilometers per second, or 67,000 miles per hour. In addition, our solar system--Earth...
  • “X” Marks the Spot of Convective Churning on Hot Pluto

    01/09/2016 4:45:38 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    universe today ^ | 01/08/2016 | Ken Kremer
    X marks the spot that's illustrative of "convective churning" resulting from subsurface planetary heating, as seen in a fascinating new super high resolution image received from NASA's New Horizons spacecraft on Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, 2015. Its situated at the very center of the left ventricle of Pluto's huge "heart" - an icy flow plain that's informally named "Sputnik Planum." The "X" feature - see image above - is located in an area of intersecting cells, shaped like polygons, on the plains of "Sputnik Planum" which are mostly comprised of frozen nitrogen ices. So what's really piqued the interest of...
  • Solomon & Sheba, Inc. -- New inscription confirms trade relations between "towns of Judah" and...

    01/24/2010 3:50:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 624+ views
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | January/February 2010 | Andre Lemaire
    Southern Arabia is 1,200 miles south of Israel. Naturally, skepticism about the reality of trade between South Arabia and Israel in ancient times seems justified. Yet the Bible documents this trade quite extensively -- most famously in the supposed affair between King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. And the land of Sheba is referred to two dozen times in the Hebrew Bible. Without addressing the historicity of the personal relations between Solomon and the queen of this South Arabian kingdom (or queendom?), I think it can be shown that the international trade between Judah and southern Arabia very probably...
  • The Trowel vs. the Text: How the Amarna letters challenge archaeology

    12/30/2008 8:35:16 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 890+ views
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | Jan/Feb 2009 | Nadav Na'aman
    Caught Between A Rock And A Reed's Trace. The Amarna letters are a collection of more than 300 cuneiform tablets discovered at el-Amarna in Egypt in the late 1800s. Dating to the Late Bronze Age (1500-1150 B.C.E.), the archive consists of royal correspondence of Pharaoh Amenophis III (1391-1353 B.C.E.) and his son, Pharaoh Akhenaten (Amenophis IV, 1353-1337 B.C.E.) with local rulers of various Canaanite city-states. This tablet (catalogued as EA 289) and several others were sent to the pharaoh by 'Abdi-Heba, the ruler of Urusalim (Jerusalem), indicating that there was a significant city at the site in the 14th...
  • 3,400-year-old Canaanite Fort to Be Incorporated Into High-rise

    01/08/2016 3:20:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Ha'aretz ^ | January 6, 2016 | Ruth Schuster
    A 3,400-year-old Canaanite fort discovered in the heart of the modern Israeli city of Nahariya will be incorporated into a residential high-rise to be built at the spot. The Bronze Age citadel apparently served as an administrative center serving Mediterranean mariners... It had been destroyed at least four times by fire and was rebuilt each time... Among the artifacts discovered in the ruined citadel's rooms are ceramic figurines with human and animal forms, bronze weapons, and pottery vessels that hadn't been made locally -- they had been imported. That is further testimony to the extensive trading relations among the peoples...
  • Archaeological discovery yields surprising revelations about Europe's oldest city

    01/08/2016 2:21:28 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | January 6, 2016 | heritagedaily
    The discovery suggests that not only did this spectacular site in the Greek Bronze Age (between 3500 and 1100 BC) recover from the collapse of the socio-political system around 1200 BC, but also rapidly grew and thrived as a cosmopolitan hub of the Aegean and Mediterranean regions. Antonis Kotsonas, a University of Cincinnati assistant professor of classics, will highlight his field research with the Knossos Urban Landscape Project at the 117th annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America and Society for Classical Studies. The meeting takes place Jan. 7-10, 2016 in San Francisco. Kotsonas explains that Knossos, "renowned as...
  • New Take on the Biblical Flood story

    01/07/2016 1:19:30 PM PST · by Yollopoliuhqui · 44 replies
    Malaga Bay ^ | January 6, 2016 | Tim Cullen
    New interpretations of the Biblical Flood story
  • Yellowstone about to blow? Scientists warning over SUPER-VOLCANO that could kill MILLIONS

    01/07/2016 5:06:58 AM PST · by PreciousLiberty · 131 replies
    EXPRESS ^ | Jan 7, 2016 | JON AUSTIN
    Instances of volcanic eruptions are their highest for 300 years and scientists fear a major one that could kill millions and devastate the planet is a real possibility. Experts at the European Science Foundation said volcanoes - especially super-volcanoes like the one at Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, which has a caldera measuring 34 by 45 miles (55 by 72 km) - pose more threat to Earth and the survival of humans than asteroids, earthquakes, nuclear war and global warming. There are few real contingency plans in place to deal with the ticking time bomb, which they conclude is likely to...
  • Manipur earthquake: Strong quake strikes near Imphal in northeast India (Magnitude 6.8)

    01/03/2016 4:01:57 PM PST · by rdl6989 · 14 replies
    bnonews.com ^ | january 3, 2016
    A strong earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 6.8 has struck northeastern India, close the city of Imphal in the state of Manipur, seismologists say.
  • The Volcano That Shrouded the Earth and Gave Birth to a Monster

    01/02/2016 7:00:37 AM PST · by C19fan · 38 replies
    Nautilus ^ | December 31,2015 | GIllen D'Arcy Wood
    Two hundred years ago, the greatest eruption in Earth’s recorded history took place. Mount Tambora—located on Sumbawa Island in the East Indies—blew itself up with apocalyptic force in April 1815.
 After perhaps 1,000 years’ dormancy, the devastating evacuation and collapse required only a few days. It was the concentrated energy of this event that was to have the greatest human impact. By shooting its contents into the stratosphere with biblical force, Tambora ensured its volcanic gases reached sufficient height to disable the seasonal rhythms of the global climate system, throwing human communities worldwide into chaos. The sun-dimming stratospheric aerosols produced...
  • Polish archaeologists discovered an unknown temple of Hatshepsut

    01/01/2016 11:28:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Science in Poland ^ | October 26, 2015 | PAP - Science and Scholarship in Poland
    Cut in the rock and consisting of two rooms, the walls of which are covered with poorly preserved decoration and hieroglyphic inscriptions: a team of archaeologists working under the auspices of the Polish Centre of Mediterranean Archaeology of the University of Warsaw started research in the ancient temple at Gebelein in Upper Egypt. This place was already known to the local authorities, but so far no archaeologist has studied it. Previous researchers could have been discouraged by the poor condition of the decorations. This year's results of Polish research were surprising... Detailed studies of reliefs and inscriptions, made by Daniel...
  • The Storm That Will Unfreeze the North Pole

    12/29/2015 2:10:51 PM PST · by Timpanagos1 · 43 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | Robinson Meyer
    The sun has not risen above the North Pole since mid-September. The sea ice—flat, landlike, windswept, and stretching as far as the eye can see—has been bathed in darkness for months.
  • The Ghost Empire - Climate Change, Global Warming, Drought and Desertification

    06/09/2013 7:45:49 AM PDT · by blam · 16 replies
    TMO ^ | 6-9-2013 | Richard Mills
    The Ghost Empire - Climate Change, Global Warming, Drought and Desertification Commodities / Climate Change June 08, 2013 - 07:29 PM GMT By: Richard Mills Drought is a normal recurring feature of the climate in most parts of the world. It doesnt get the attention of a tornado, hurricane or flood. Instead, its a slower and less obvious, a much quieter disaster creeping up on us unawares. Climate change is currently warming many regions, overall warmer temperatures increase the frequency and intensity of heat waves and droughts. We can prepare for some climate change consequences with public education, water conservation...
  • Ancient City Mysteriously Survived Mideast Civilization Collapse

    07/30/2011 7:26:54 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, July 28, 2011 | Owen Jarus
    As ancient civilizations across the Middle East collapsed, possibly in response to a global drought about 4,200 years ago, archaeologists have discovered that one settlement in Syria not only survived, but expanded. Their next question is -- why did Tell Qarqur, a site in northwest Syria, grow at a time when cities across the Middle East were being abandoned? "There was widespread abandonment of many of the largest archaeological sites and ancient cities in the region and also large numbers of smaller sites," said Jesse Casana, a professor of anthropology at the University of Arkansas. "At Tell Qarqur and probably...
  • Did Egypt's Old Kingdom Die -- or Simply Fade Away?

    12/28/2015 4:46:55 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    National Geographic ^ | December 24, 2015 | Andrew Lawler
    For nearly a millennium, Egypt's early pharaohs presided over a prosperous and wealthy state that built countless temples and palaces, enormous public works, and the famous Giza pyramids. Much of that prosperity depended on the regular inundations of the Nile River in a country that otherwise would be only desert. Then, around 2200 B.C., ancient texts suggest that Egypt's so-called Old Kingdom gave way to a disastrous era of foreign invasions, pestilence, civil war, and famines severe enough to result in cannibalism. In the past decade, climate data revealed that a severe and long-term drought afflicted the region during this...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Southern Craters and Galaxies

    12/26/2015 9:00:26 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | December 26, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The Henbury craters in the Northern Territory, Australia, planet Earth, are the scars of an impact over 4,000 years old. When an ancient meteorite fragmented into dozens of pieces, the largest made the 180 meter diameter crater whose weathered walls and floor are lit in the foreground of this southern hemisphere nightscape. The vertical panoramic view follows our magnificent Milky Way galaxy stretching above horizon, its rich central starfields cut by obscuring dust clouds. A glance along the galactic plane also reveals Alpha and Beta Centauri and the stars of the Southern Cross. Captured in the region's spectacular, dark...
  • Astrobiology Top 10: Earth's Moon May Not Be Critical to Life

    12/25/2015 12:03:24 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    Astrobiology ^ | Wednesday, December 23, 2015 | Keith Cooper
    In 1993, French astronomer Jacques Laskar ran a series of calculations indicating that the gravity of the Moon is vital to stabilizing the tilt of our planet. Earth's obliquity, as this tilt is technically known as, has huge repercussions for climate. Laskar argued that should Earth's obliquity wander over hundreds of thousands of years, it would cause environmental chaos by creating a climate too variable for complex life to develop in relative peace. So his argument goes, we should feel remarkably lucky to have such a large moon on our doorstep, as no other terrestrial planet in our solar system...
  • 2,800-Year-Old Zigzag Art Found in Greek Tomb

    08/28/2014 6:00:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Wednesday, August 20, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The tomb was built sometime between 800 B.C. and 760 B.C., a time when Corinth was emerging as a major power and Greeks were colonizing the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea. The tomb itself consists of a shaft and burial pit, the pit having a limestone sarcophagus that is about 5.8 feet (1.76 meters) long, 2.8 feet (0.86 m) wide and 2.1 feet (0.63 m) high. When researchers opened the sarcophagus, they found a single individual had been buried inside, with only fragments of bones surviving. The scientists found several pottery vessels beside the sarcophagus, and the tomb also contained...
  • Earth-Smashing Space Rocks Undercounted

    12/23/2015 10:12:19 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    discovery.com ^ | 12/22/2015 | Mariette Le Roux, AFP
    Most studies of potential Earth-smashers focus on objects in the asteroid belt roughly between Mars, Earth's outside neighbour, and Jupiter on its other flank, said the researchers. But they noted that the discovery in the last two decades of hundreds of giant comets dubbed centaurs, albeit with much larger orbits, requires expanding the list of potential hazards. These balls of ice and dust, typically 50-100 kilometres (31-62 miles) wide, have unstable, elliptical orbits that start way beyond Neptune, the most distant planet from the Sun. Their paths cross those of the giant planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, whose gravity...
  • Intelligence genes discovered by scientists

    12/22/2015 4:43:59 AM PST · by SkyPilot · 93 replies
    Photo: AP The Telegraph ^ | 21 Dec 15 | Sarah Knapton
    Imperial College London has found that two networks of genes determine whether people are intelligent or not so bright. Genes which make people intelligent have been discovered and scientists believe they could be manipulated to boost brain power. Researchers have believed for some time that intellect is inherited with studies suggesting that up to 75 per cent of IQ is genetic, and the rest down to environmental factors such as schooling and friendship groups. But until now, nobody has been able to pin-point exactly which genes are responsible for better memory, attention, processing speed or reasoning skills. Now Imperial College...
  • Ancient Egyptians described Algol's eclipses

    12/20/2015 7:14:57 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Science News ^ | December 17, 2015 | University of Helsinki
    The Ancient Egyptian papyrus Cairo 86637 calendar is the oldest preserved historical document of naked eye observations of a variable star, the eclipsing binary Algol -- a manifestation of Horus, a god and a king. This calendar contains lucky or unlucky prognoses for each day of one year. Researchers have performed a statistical analysis of the Cairo Calendar mythological texts. Their analysis revealed that the periods of Algol (2.85 days) and the Moon (29.6 days) strongly regulate the actions of deities in this calendar. "Until now, there were only conjectures that many of the mythological texts of the Cairo Calendar...
  • The Backwards Earthquakes

    12/19/2015 10:02:24 AM PST · by JimSEA · 29 replies
    Eos.org ^ | 12/15/2016 | Erin Ross
    Earthquakes in Idaho's panhandle are usually caused by the Earth's crust pulling apart. So why were earthquakes on 24 April pushing the crust together? Last April, a swarm of earthquakes shook the ground near Sandpoint, Idaho. Unused to shaking, Sandpoint’s residents took notice. So did local media, widely reporting on the events. But it wasn’t the size or location of the earthquakes that surprised scientists. Sandpoint lies along the Lewis and Clark Fault Zone, and previous earthquakes in the region were caused when the Earth’s crust pulled apart, which geologists call extension. But the earthquakes that struck on 24 April...