HOME/ABOUT  Prayer  SCOTUS  ProLife  BangList  Aliens  StatesRights  ConventionOfStates  WOT  HomosexualAgenda  GlobalWarming  Corruption  Taxes  Congress  Fraud  MediaBias  GovtAbuse  Tyranny  Obama  ObamaCare  Elections  Polls  Debates  Trump  Cruz  Kasich  OPSEC  Benghazi  InfoSec  BigBrother  IRS  Scandals  TalkRadio  TeaParty  FreeperBookClub  HTMLSandbox  FReeperEd  FReepathon  CopyrightList  Copyright/DMCA Notice 

Please keep those donations coming in, folks. Our 2nd quarter FReepathon is off to a great start and we have a chance of getting 'er done early! Thank you all very much!!

Or by mail to: Free Republic, LLC - PO Box 9771 - Fresno, CA 93794
Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $34,502
39%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 39% is in!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: catastrophism

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • NASA Research Provides New Details On Mystery of How the Moon Got ‘Inked’

    05/01/2016 11:31:11 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    Lunar swirls can be tens of miles across and appear in groups or just as an isolated feature. Previous observations yielded two significant clues about their formation: First, they appear where ancient bits of magnetic field are embedded in the lunar crust (although not every “fossil” magnetic field on the moon has a lunar swirl). Second, the bright areas in the swirls appear to be less weathered than their surroundings. The space environment is harsh; many things can cause material exposed to space to change chemically and darken over time, including impacts from microscopic meteorites and the effects of the...
  • How earthquakes might trigger faraway volcanoes

    04/28/2016 9:03:59 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 21 replies
    Science ^ | 4/26/2016 | Ian Randell
    On 14 April, a magnitude-6.2 earthquake struck the Japanese island of Kyushu. Two days later, Japanese officials reported towering plumes of smoke at Mount Aso, a volcano 42 kilometers away from the quake’s epicenter. A small eruption was occurring. Could the distant earthquake have triggered it? Mount Aso has had far bigger eruptions over the past few years, well before the earthquake occurred, so it was probably just a coincidence. But a new study concludes that the idea of so-called far-field triggering is not so far-fetched. Big earthquakes can slosh around the bubbly magma underneath volcanoes hundreds of kilometers away,...
  • 'Trickle of food' helped deep sea creatures survive asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs

    04/25/2016 9:28:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | Thursday, April 14, 2016 | Cardiff University
    Study of fossil shells solves unanswered question of how deep sea creatures survived asteroid strike during immense upheaval of the world's oceans... Like the dinosaurs themselves, giant marine reptiles, invertebrates and microscopic organisms became extinct after the catastrophic asteroid impact in an immense upheaval of the world's oceans, yet deep sea creatures managed to survive. This has puzzled researchers as it is widely believed that the asteroid impact cut off the food supply in the oceans by destroying free-floating algae and bacteria. However, in a study published in the April issue of the journal Geology, a team led by researchers...
  • Venus Express' swansong experiment sheds light on Venus' polar atmosphere

    04/21/2016 9:54:04 AM PDT · by rktman · 24 replies
    sci.esa.int ^ | 4/19/2016 | unknown
    Some of the final results sent back by ESA's Venus Express before it plummeted down through the planet's atmosphere have revealed it to be rippling with atmospheric waves – and, at an average temperature of -157°C, colder than anywhere on Earth.
  • Scientist warns MEGA EARTHQUAKE threatening millions will hit USA as early as FRIDAY

    04/21/2016 7:57:16 AM PDT · by PROCON · 128 replies
    express.co.uk ^ | April 21, 2016 | JON AUSTIN
    Jim Berkland, a former US Geological Survey scientist, who once famously predicted the Loma Prieta quake, said mega quakes usually strike at a new moon or full moon because of the gravitation effect on the Earth…and the next full moon is on FRIDAY. The maverick, now retired, scientist spoke out after eight powerful earthquakes struck across south Asia and the pacific in the past 80 hours, claiming hundreds of lives in Japan and Ecuador. Mr Berkland predicted on October 13, 1989, an earthquake of magnitude 3.5 to 6.0 would strike San Francisco within the next week. Four days later on...
  • Egyptian Amulet Bearing Name of Pharaoh Found in Soil from Temple Mount

    04/21/2016 1:29:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | April 19th, 2016 | JNi.Media
    The amulet was discovered by Neshama Spielman, a twelve year-old girl from Jerusalem who came with her family to participate in the Temple Mount Sifting Project. “While I was sifting, I came across a piece of pottery that was different from others I had seen, and I immediately thought that maybe I had found something special,” said Spielman. “It’s amazing to find something thousands of years old from ancient Egypt all the way here in Jerusalem! Celebrating Passover this year is going to be extra meaningful to me.” The Passover festival, commemorating the Biblical account of the ancient Israelites Exodus...
  • A Dig Into Jerusalem's Past Fuels Present-Day Debates [Palace of King David Found]

    12/02/2005 8:43:25 AM PST · by West Coast Conservative · 25 replies · 1,379+ views
    Washington Post ^ | December 2, 2005 | Scott Wilson
    Down the slope from the Old City's Dung Gate, rows of thick stone walls, shards of pottery and other remains of an expansive ancient building are being exhumed from a dusty pit. The site is on a narrow terrace at the edge of the Kidron Valley, which sheers away from the Old City walls, in a cliffside area the Bible describes as the seat of the kings of ancient Israel. What is taking shape in the rocky earth, marked by centuries of conquest and development, is as contested as the neighborhood of Arabs and Jews encircling the excavation. But the...
  • The Battleground (Who Destroyed Megiddo? Was It David Or Shishak?)

    10/23/2003 4:49:06 PM PDT · by blam · 19 replies · 1,175+ views
    Bibical Archaeology ^ | 10-23-2003 | Timothy P. Harrison
    The Battleground Who Destroyed Megiddo? Was It David or Shishak? Timothy P. Harrison Sidebar: Megiddo at A Glance Did King David conquer and destroy Megiddo? Well, that depends partly on the date of Stratum VI. Let me explain why. Most scholars accept David as a historical figure who was an active military ruler in the period portrayed in the Hebrew Bible (the early tenth century B.C.E.). However, there is considerably less agreement on how to interpret the archaeological evidence for this period. That’s where Megiddo Stratum VI figures in. The dispute is over which archaeological material relates to the time...
  • The Shaking Continues: The Most Dangerous Volcano In Mexico Has Erupted In Spectacular Fashion

    04/20/2016 8:41:25 AM PDT · by Perseverando · 62 replies
    ZeroHedge.com ^ | April 20, 2016 | Tyler Durden
    More than 25 million people live in the vicinity of Mt. Popocatepetl, including Mexico City’s 18 million residents. At 2:32 local time on Tuesday morning, the most dangerous volcano in Mexico roared to life in spectacular fashion, and this has many experts extremely concerned about what is coming next. Popocatepetl is an Aztec word that means “smoking mountain”, and historians tell us that once upon a time entire Aztec cities were buried in super-heated mud from this volcano. In fact, the super-heated mud flows were so deep that they buried entire Aztec pyramids. A full-blown eruption of Mt. Popocatepetl would...
  • Study claims: Ancient tectonic activity was trigger for ice ages (Decreased CO2)

    04/20/2016 12:00:18 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 21 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | April 20, 2016 | Anthony Watts
    From the MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY and the “thank goodness we have plenty of free CO2 in the atmosphere today” department comes this claim:Continental shifting may have acted as a natural mechanism for extreme carbon sequestrationIce ages may be related to tectonic carbon sequestration For hundreds of millions of years, Earth’s climate has remained on a fairly even keel, with some dramatic exceptions: Around 80 million years ago, the planet’s temperature plummeted, along with carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. The Earth eventually recovered, only to swing back into the present-day ice age 50 million years ago.Now geologists at MIT...
  • Shocking New Video Shows What Is Really Going on at Yellowstone

    04/20/2016 8:53:14 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 97 replies
    www.charismanews.com ^ | 10:00AM EDT 4/18/2016 | Michael Snyder
    Over the past week, our planet has been hit by large earthquake after large earthquake, and according to Volcano Discovery, there are 38 volcanoes around the world that are erupting right now. We have seen a dramatic spike in global seismic activity that is unlike anything that we have seen in ages, and that is why what is going on at Yellowstone is so incredibly alarming. Geologists tell us that a full-blown eruption of the Yellowstone supervolcano would have up to 2,000 times the power of the Mount St. Helen's volcanic eruption of 1980, and approximately two-thirds of the country...
  • Two volcanoes trigger crises of the late antiquity

    04/19/2016 11:42:49 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Geology Page ^ | April 2016 | unattributed
    Contemporary chroniclers wrote about a "mystery cloud" which dimmed the light of the sun above the Mediterranean in the years 536 and 537 CE. Tree rings testify poor growing conditions over the whole Northern Hemisphere - the years from 536 CE onward seem to have been overshadowed by an unusual natural phenomenon. Social crises including the first European plague pandemic beginning in 541, are associated with this phenomenon. Only recently have researchers found conclusive proof of a volcanic origin of the 536 solar dimming, based on traces of volcanic sulfur from two major eruptions newly dated to 536 CE and...
  • Ancient tectonic activity was trigger for ice ages

    04/19/2016 2:48:05 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 19 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/19/2016 | Oliver Jagoutz, Francis A. Macdonald, Leigh Royden
    For hundreds of millions of years, Earth's climate has remained on a fairly even keel, with some dramatic exceptions: Around 80 million years ago, the planet's temperature plummeted, along with carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere. The Earth eventually recovered, only to swing back into the present-day ice age 50 million years ago. Now geologists at MIT have identified the likely cause of both ice ages, as well as a natural mechanism for carbon sequestration. Just prior to both periods, massive tectonic collisions took place near the Earth's equator -- a tropical zone where rocks undergo heavy weathering due to...
  • What's at Stake in the New York Primary

    04/18/2016 6:06:10 PM PDT · by MIA_eccl1212 · 64 replies
    abc news ^ | Apr 18, 2016 | Meghan Keneally
    A WNBC/WSJ/Marist poll released April 15 shows Trump with 54 percent support of Republican primary voters. Ohio Gov. John Kasich is in second place with 21 percent and Sen. Ted Cruz with 18 percent. ABC News political analyst Matt Dowd said that it seems pretty clear that Trump is going to win the state, and he could stand to pick up a sizable amount of the state's 95 delegates. "If he picks up north of 75 [delegates], he has a real path to 1,237," Dowd said, referring to the number of delegates a Republican...
  • Bermuda Triangle Discovery: Has the Mystery Finally Been Solved?

    03/15/2016 12:48:13 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 42 replies
    KFOR ^ | MARCH 15, 2016
    A new discovery has revived an old theory about ocean water gobbling up ships in the Bermuda Triangle—if, that is, the Bermuda Triangle even exists. Researchers from the Arctic University of Norway say they’ve spotted large craters apparently created by methane buildups off Norway’s coast, Atlas Obscura reports. “Multiple giant craters exist on the sea floor in an area in the west-central Barents Sea … and are probably a cause of enormous blowouts of gas,” they tell the Sunday Times. “The crater area is likely to represent one of the largest hotspots for shallow marine methane release in the Arctic.”...
  • West Antartic Ice Sheet began melting away 10,000 years ago: study

    01/06/2003 8:04:04 AM PST · by boris · 27 replies · 407+ views
    www.spacedaily.com ^ | 01-06-2003 | not given
    LINK West Antartic Ice Sheet began melting away 10,000 years ago: study WASHINGTON (AFP) Jan 04, 2003 The West Antartic Ice Sheet began melting away some 10,000 years ago and should continue to shrink, according to a study released Friday. A team of researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle found that rock fragments were left behind by glaciers that disappeared over 10,000 years ago, according to the study out Friday in the latest issue of Science. "This work establishes a background pattern of steady decline in the West Antarctic ice sheet," said John Stone, an associate professor of...
  • Boiling River Near Yellowstone National Park Heats Worries

    04/18/2016 9:23:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 55 replies
    Mysterious Universe ^ | April 14, 2016 | Paul Seaburn
    A river near Yellowstone National Park suddenly changed colors and began to boil and emit yellowish noxious gases. Some witnesses wondered if "we're all about to die." Is this just another volcanic vent or a sign of bad things to come? The Shoshone River runs through Cody, Wyoming, just east of Yellowstone National Park. It's close enough to be a 'canary in a coal mine' for unusual geothermic events and that's precisely what happened on March 25th when photographer Dewey Vanderhoff spotted the Shoshone River mysteriously boiling ... and more... Yes, it's most likely a volcanic vent, but it's in...
  • What Will Happen to Earth When the Sun Dies?

    04/16/2016 3:54:28 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 114 replies
    Live Science ^ | 13 Apr, 2016 | Jesse Emspak
    Stars are born, they live, and they die. The sun is no different, and when it goes, the Earth goes with it. But our planet won't go quietly into the night. Rather, when the sun expands into a red giant during the throes of death, it will vaporize the Earth. Perhaps not the story you were hoping for, but there's no need to startbuying star-death insurance yet. The time scale is long — 7 billion or 8 billion years from now, at least. Humans have been around only about 40-thousandth that amount of time; if the age of the Earth...
  • Egypt: Exodus Film Presents a 'Racist' Image of Jews

    12/28/2014 11:03:11 PM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 18 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 29/12/14 | Ben Ariel
    Egypt’s Culture Ministry on Sunday explained for the first time why it banned Ridley Scott's biblical epic "Exodus: Gods & Kings", claiming the movie presents a "racist" image of Jews, reports The Associated Press (AP). The ban was announced several days ago, but Sunday’s statement from the Culture Ministry marks the first time that the reason for the ban was officially explained. According to AP, the statement said the film put forth a reading of Egypt's history that is at odds with the story of Moses told by the world's monotheistic religions. Censors objected to the "intentional gross historical fallacies...
  • South America's prehistoric people spread like 'invasive species'

    04/11/2016 8:23:37 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    Reuters ^ | Wednesday, April 6, 2016 | Will Dunham (ed by Sandra Maler)
    When the first prehistoric people trekked into South America toward the end of the Ice Age, they found a wondrous, lush continent inhabited by all manner of strange creatures like giant ground sloths and car-sized armadillos. But these hunter-gatherers proceeded to behave like an "invasive species," with their population surging then crashing as they relentlessly depleted natural resources. Only much later did people muster exponential population growth after forming fixed settlements with domesticated crops and animals... The researchers identified two distinct colonization phases: the first unfolding about 14,000 to 5,500 years ago, with the human population hitting around 300,000; the...
  • Planet Nine's profile fleshed out

    04/09/2016 7:29:13 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 52 replies
    BBC ^ | 4/8/2916 | Paul Rincon
    In January, researchers at Caltech in the US suggested a large, additional planet might be lurking in the icy outer reaches of the Solar System. Now, a team at the University of Bern in Switzerland has worked out what they say are upper and lower limits on how big, bright and cold it might be. The study has been accepted by the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics. Prof Mike Brown and Dr Konstantin Batygin made their case for the existence of a ninth planet in our Solar System orbiting far beyond even the dwarf world Pluto. There are no direct observations...
  • New Examination of Trans-Neptunian Objects Suggests Two Planets Lurk in Outer Solar System

    01/16/2015 11:06:16 AM PST · by lbryce · 20 replies
    From Quarks to Quasars ^ | January 16, 2015 | James Trosper
    Presently, our solar system is known to contain 4 fully-fledged rocky worlds: Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars; 2 ice-giants: Neptune and Uranus; 2 gas-giants, Saturn and Neptune; 5 dwarf-planets, Ceres. Pluto, Eris, MakeMake, Haumea; around 100 moons; and an unknowable number of comets, asteroids and minor planets. Indeed, we’ve only begun to understand the full scope of our local corner of our galaxy, and new information emerges on a monthly-basis, yet there a number of seemingly obvious things that remain unknown. For instance, long before Pluto’s existence was deduced, astronomers scoured the outer solar system in search of another large...
  • Astronomers are Predicting at Least Two More Large Planets in the Solar System

    01/15/2015 3:45:27 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 77 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on January 15, 2015 | Nancy Atkinson
    In their studies, the team analyzed the effects of what is called the ‘Kozai mechanism,’ which is related to the gravitational perturbation that a large body exerts on the orbit of another much smaller and further away object. They looked at how the highly eccentric comet 96P/Machholz1 is influenced by Jupiter (it will come near the orbit of Mercury in 2017, but it travels as much as 6 AU at aphelion) and it may “provide the key to explain the puzzling clustering of orbits around argument of perihelion close to 0° recently found for the population of ETNOs,” the team...
  • Easy as Alep, Bet, Gimel? Cambridge research explores social context of ancient writing

    04/08/2016 1:50:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 5, 2016 | University of Cambridge
    The project, called Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems (CREWS)... is led by Dr Philippa Steele of the University's Faculty of Classics... For instance, today the notion of "alphabetical order" is used to arrange everything from dictionaries to telephone books, but why is the alphabet organised the way it is? Alphabetical order as we would recognise it first appeared over three thousand years ago in Ugaritic, written in a cuneiform script made of wedge-shaped signs impressed on clay tablets. The Ugaritic alphabet was in use in the ancient city of Ugarit, uncovered at Ras Shamra in modern Syria....
  • Sneak a Peek at the Multi-Million Dollar Meteorites Soon up for Sale

    04/07/2016 7:01:38 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 20 replies
    Smiyhsonian ^ | 6 Apr, 2016 | Jason Daley
    There’s an almost constant shower of debris from space that burns up in Earth’s atmosphere, streaking across the night skies as meteors. Only a select few of the hardiest space rocks make it through to the ground. And those surviving bits of iron and rock are dubbed meteorites. Scientists and the public alike itch to get their hands on these rare and often unusual pieces of debris from space, making many of them worth a lot of money. On April 20th, everyone will get a chance to own a piece of space when 83 lots of meteorites and related collectibles...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 05-23-04

    05/23/2004 4:37:49 AM PDT · by petuniasevan · 6 replies · 239+ views
    NASA ^ | 05-23-04 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2004 May 23 Working in Space Credit: , NASA Explanation: High above planet Earth, a human helps an ailing machine. The machine, in this potentially touching story, is the Hubble Space Telescope, which is not in the picture. The human is Astronaut Steven L. Smith, and he is retrieving a power tool from the handrail of the Remote Manipulator System before resuming in 1999 December. For most astronauts,...
  • How star blasts forged mankind

    02/18/2002 12:59:05 PM PST · by RightWhale · 60 replies · 684+ views
    observer ^ | 18 Feb 02 | Robin McKie
    http://www.observer.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,6903,651829,00.html How star blasts forged mankind Cosmic radiation two million years ago had a crucial impact on our evolution Robin McKie Sunday February 17, 2002 The Observer They are the most destructive events in the universe, vast eruptions that rip apart stars and blast radiation across space. But supernovae may also play constructive roles in the cosmos - recent scientific research has revealed that these stellar annihilations had a crucial impact on human evolution. Two million years ago, just as the Earth's primitive apemen were evolving into big-brained humans, a pair of supernovae explosions occurred near Earth. Our planet was ...
  • Supernova "Smoking Gun" Linked To Mass Extinctions

    01/09/2002 7:14:03 AM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 120+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 01-09-2002 | Eugenie Samuel
    Supernova "smoking gun" linked to mass extinctions 15:07 09 January 02 Eugenie Samuel, Washington DC Evidence of an astronomical "smoking gun" has been discovered that supports the idea that cosmic rays from a nearby supernova triggered at least one of the six mass extinctions on Earth. Luckily for us, the astronomers say, there is very little danger of it happening again anytime soon. Narcisco Benítez at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland and Jesús Maíz Appellániz of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Virginia traced the motion of a cluster of young, short lived stars formed from the debris of ...
  • Supernovae showered Earth with radioactive debris

    04/06/2016 3:50:53 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 27 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/6/2016 | Australian National University
    An international team of scientists has found evidence of a series of massive supernova explosions near our solar system, which showered Earth with radioactive debris. The scientists found radioactive iron-60 in sediment and crust samples taken from the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The iron-60 was concentrated in a period between 3.2 and 1.7 million years ago, which is relatively recent in astronomical terms, said research leader Dr Anton Wallner from The Australian National University (ANU). "We were very surprised that there was debris clearly spread across 1.5 million years," said Dr Wallner, a nuclear physicist in the ANU Research...
  • 3,400-Year-Old Necropolis Found in Egypt

    04/02/2016 10:58:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Discovery News ^ | March 30, 2016 | Rossella Lorenzi
    A remarkable 3,400-year-old necropolis has been discovered at an Egyptian quarry site, the Ministry of Antiquities announced on Wednesday. Consisting of dozens of rock-cut tombs, the New Kingdom necropolis was found at Gebel el Sisila, a site north of Aswan known for its stone quarries on both sides of the Nile. Blocks used in building almost all of ancient Egypt’s great temples were cut from there... The shrine is a small rock-cut sanctuary featuring two open chambers facing the river and an inner doorway crowned with the winged solar disc. The burials, meanwhile, consist of one to two undecorated rock-cut...
  • Researcher links mass extinctions to 'Planet X'

    04/02/2016 2:43:56 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 40 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | March 30, 2016 | Bob Whitby
    Periodic mass extinctions on Earth, as indicated in the global fossil record, could be linked to a suspected ninth planet, according to research published by a faculty member of the University of Arkansas Department of Mathematical Sciences. Daniel Whitmire, a retired professor of astrophysics now working as a math instructor, published findings in the January issue of Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society that the as yet undiscovered "Planet X" triggers comet showers linked to mass extinctions on Earth at intervals of approximately 27 million years. Though scientists have been looking for Planet X for 100 years, the possibility...
  • Holes in the sun threatening to throw birds and GPS off course

    04/02/2016 8:16:42 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 40 replies
    themalaymailonline.com ^ | April 1, 2016
    Three coronal holes spread across the sun are pointing at Earth. As a result, the US Space Weather Prediction Centre in Boulder, Colorado, and the Space Weather Operations Centre of the UK Met Office in Exeter have issued an alert for tomorrow of a minor geomagnetic storm. “Early on Day 3 (April 2), a high-speed stream from coronal hole 67 is expected to reach Earth,” said the Met Office. Forecasters in the US and UK predict this could confuse migrating birds and other animals, cause minor problems with satellites and make an aurora visible as far south as Maine and...
  • Scientists may have discovered 12,000 year old mother's milk, frozen in permafrost

    03/31/2016 5:54:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | March 21, 2016 | reporter
    The carcass of one of a pair of extinct big cat cubs will be scrutinised this autumn with the realistic possibility that a liquid found in the remains of the animal is milk from the mother. Separately, it was recently revealed that samples of the prehistoric infant are being examined by South Korean to clone an animal that once occupied Eurasia from modern day Great Britain to the extreme east of Russia. A source close to the case told The Siberian Times that there is 'hope' the frozen remains of a cave lion cub will show evidence of its mother's...
  • Ice Age puppies found preserved in Russian permafrost - were they caveman’s best friends?

    03/29/2016 9:22:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    www.scmp.com ^ | UPDATED : Monday, 28 March, 2016, 2:25pm | Staff
    The hunters searching for mammoth tusks were drawn to the steep riverbank by a deposit of ancient bones. To their astonishment, they discovered an Ice Age puppy’s snout peeking out from the permafrost. Five years later, a pair of puppies perfectly preserved in Russia’s far northeast region of Yakutia and dating back 12,460 years has mobilised scientists across the world. “To find a carnivorous mammal intact with skin, fur and internal organs - this has never happened before in history,” said Sergei Fyodorov, head of exhibitions at the Mammoth Museum of the North-Eastern Federal University in the regional capital of...
  • CT Scan Shows Pharoah Ramesses III Was Murdered by Multiple Assassins

    03/31/2016 12:28:49 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Smithsonian mag ^ | Jason Daley
    The reign of Ramesses III, the second pharaoh in Egypt’s 20th dynasty, was not the most stable chapter in the empire's history. There were endless wars with the “Sea Peoples”... which drained the treasury, bad weather that interrupted food supplies, along with political unrest... In 2012, eminent Egyptologist Zahi Hawass and Cairo University radiologist Sahar Saleem scanned Ramesses III mummy and revealed that an assassin cut through his esophagus and trachea, killing him almost instantly. But a new book by the pair... makes the story a little more complicated, suggesting that the pharaoh was likely murdered by multiple assailants. The...
  • Moons of Saturn May Be Younger Than the Dinosaurs

    03/30/2016 3:39:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | March 28, 2016 | SETI Institute
    New research suggests that some of Saturn's icy moons, as well as its famous rings, might be modern adornments. Their dramatic birth may have taken place a mere hundred million years ago, more recent than the reign of many dinosaurs... While Saturn's rings have been known since the 1600s, there's still debate about their age. The straightforward assumption is that they are primordial -- as old as the planet itself, which is more than four billion years. However, in 2012, French astronomers found that tidal effects -- the gravitational interaction of the inner moons with fluids deep in Saturn's interior...
  • 12 Supereruptions Pockmark Path of Yellowstone Hotspot

    03/28/2016 7:12:55 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    livescience.com ^ | Becky Oskin
    Up to 12 massive volcanic blasts occurred between 8 million and 12 million years ago in Idaho's Snake River Plain, leading up to today's Yellowstone supervolcano, new research reveals. A dozen of these ancient supereruptions took place along the Yellowstone hotspot track, researchers reported Feb. 10 in the journal Geological Society of America Bulletin. The trail of eruptions marks where the North American tectonic plate sailed over a superhot blob of mantle rock called a hotspot. (The mantle is the rocky layer between Earth's crust and core.) Though learning of more supereruptions in the West may seem unsettling, the findings...
  • Land bridges linking ancient India, Eurasia were 'freeways' for biodiversity exchange

    03/26/2016 11:21:19 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 17 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 3/24/16 | Jesse L. Grismer, et. al.
    For about 60 million years during the Eocene epoch, the Indian subcontinent was a huge island. Having broken off from the ancient continent of Gondwanaland, the Indian Tectonic Plate drifted toward Eurasia. During that gradual voyage, the subcontinent saw a blossoming of exceptional wildlife, and when the trove of unique biodiversity finally made contact with bigger Eurasia, the exchange of animals and plants between these areas laid the foundations for countless modern species. "Today, mainland Asia and India have all this unique biodiversity -- but did the mainland Asian biodiversity come from India, or did the Indian biodiversity come from...
  • Ancient lunar polar ice reveals tilting of Moon’s axis

    03/26/2016 11:54:40 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    astronomynow.com ^ | 03/23/2016 | NASA
    New NASA-funded research provides evidence that the spin axis of the Moon shifted by about five degrees roughly three billion years ago. The evidence of this motion is recorded in the distribution of ancient lunar ice, evidence of delivery of water to the early solar system. “The same face of the Moon has not always pointed towards Earth,” said Matthew Siegler of the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Arizona, lead author of a paper in today’s journal Nature. “As the axis moved, so did the face of the “Man in the Moon.” He sort of turned his nose up at...
  • See Historic Comet BA14 Up Close In These New Radar Images

    03/25/2016 4:03:23 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    universetoday ^ | 03/25/2016 | Bob King
    On March 22, Comet P/2016 BA14 (Pan-STARRS) flew just 2.2 million miles (3.5 million kilometers) from Earth, making it the third closest comet ever recorded. The last time a comet appeared on our doorstep was in 1770, when Lexell’s Comet breezed by at about half that distance. Through a telescope, comet BA14 looked (and still looks) like a faint star, though time exposures reveal a short, weak tail. With an excellent map and large amateur telescope you might still find it making a bead across the Big Dipper and constellation Bootes tonight through the weekend.
  • Did Neutrinos Kill The Dinosaurs?

    03/25/2016 6:02:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    American Institute of Physics Bulletin of Physics News [PDF] ^ | January 11, 1996 | Phillip F. Schewe and Ben Stein
    Massive collapsing stars radiate most of their binding energy (about 10^53 ergs) in the form of neutrinos. The rate of such collapses in our galaxy is expected to be greater, perhaps by a large factor, than the supernova rate. John Bahcall estimates a rate of about one collapse every 11 years in our galaxy. Stellar collapses might not exhibit the conspicuous optical show of full-blown supernovas but can still be potent emitters of neutrinos. According to Juan Collar, recently of the University of South Carolina but now with the University of Paris, stellar-collapse neutrinos may have played a role in...
  • Planets Sometimes Blow Their Tops

    03/23/2016 8:06:54 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 12 replies
    Colorado Public Radio-News ^ | 22 Mar, 2016 | Adam Frank
    Atmospheres, like love, often don't last forever. That's the lesson we astronomers are learning (well, at least, the atmosphere part), as we push outward with our telescopes into a galaxy rich with planets. It's not an insignificant point, since the fate of atmospheres holds the key to science's most enduring question: Are we alone in the universe? Last Monday, I spent the day at Penn State working with James Kasting on how planets can lose their atmospheres into space. Kasting is a great scientist who has spent much of his career exploring what allows a planet to become habitable. In...
  • Stones May Hold Key To Why We Are Here

    01/28/2004 8:51:24 AM PST · by blam · 33 replies · 298+ views
    EDP24 ^ | 1-28-2004 | Isabel Cockayne
    Stones may hold key to why we are here ISABEL COCKAYNE January 28, 2004 10:06 They may not look like the greatest talkers, but these stones have a story to tell. Hundreds of thousands of years ago they were washed down to East Anglia with a vast river that cut through the middle of England. But what the experts are puzzling over today is where this river ran its course. If they can plot its course and date it accurately, they could prove there were humans living in Britain 500,000 years ago and fill a gap in our pre-historic knowledge....
  • Uncovering the mystery of very early humans in New Mexico

    03/20/2016 5:57:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | March 18, 2016 | Karen Wentworth
    Shaggy, heavy-shouldered bison... made a tempting target for the hunters who walked the empty landscape between 9,000 and 13,000 years ago. The bison were attracted to a lush landscape west of Socorro, New Mexico where wetlands created by mountain runoff stretched across hundreds of acres. The hunters were attracted to the bison... At Water Canyon Dello-Russo and his collaborators have found spear and/or atlatl (throwing stick) points from the Clovis people, who hunted here more than 13,000 years ago, from the Folsom people who hunted here more than 12,000 years ago, from the Cody Complex hunters who butchered bison and...
  • Two comets to cut it close to Earth’s orbit next week

    03/18/2016 9:33:28 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 35 replies
    boston herald ^ | 03/18/2016
    Two comets will zoom by Earth next week within a couple million miles — a close shave, astronomically speaking — and many astronomers hope the double fly-by will tell them whether the celestial bodies were once one. At 8:14 a.m. Monday, comet 252P/LINEAR will pass within 3.3 million miles of Earth, making it the fifth-closest comet to skim by our planet. Then at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, comet P/2016 BA14 will pass within 2.1 million miles — the third-closest comet since 1770, according to NASA officials. ... “It could be by some amazing coincidence that we are wrong, but my best...
  • Ice volcanoes spotted on Pluto, suggest internal heat source

    03/18/2016 11:32:38 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 41 replies
    Science.com ^ | 9 Nov, 2015 | Eric Hand
    NATIONAL HARBOR, MARYLAND—Researchers on NASA’s New Horizons mission have discovered evidence on Pluto for what appears to be two cryovolcanoes—volcanoes built out of frozen ice that once oozed molten ice from the inside of the dwarf planet. The discovery points to an internal heat source that, at some point in Pluto’s past, drove the melting of interior reservoirs of volatile ices, such as nitrogen and methane, that then erupted at the surface. It also suggests that the cryovolcanoes were a way for Pluto to periodically rejuvenate surface supplies of these volatile ices, which sublimate into the thin atmosphere and are...
  • Japanese asteroid team reports on ball of rubble - Itokawa

    06/01/2006 10:21:27 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 7 replies · 571+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 6/1/06 | Maggie Fox
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A Japanese spacecraft that landed on an asteroid found a ball of rubble held loosely together by its own gravity, unlike other asteroids that have been visited, according to reports from the mission published on Thursday. The spacecraft Hayabusa, whose name means "falcon" in Japanese, hovered over the near-Earth asteroid Itokawa last autumn, taking several measurements before landing briefly on the orbiting gravel pile. Itokawa has two parts resembling the head and body of a sea otter, according to Akira Fujiwara and his colleagues in Friday's issue of the journal Science. Previously studied asteroids appeared to be...
  • Japan's Hayabusa Spacecraft Lands Successfully on Asteroid

    11/23/2005 7:26:09 AM PST · by Excuse_My_Bellicosity · 81 replies · 1,513+ views
    Space.com ^ | 11/23/2005 | Chisaki Watanabe
    TOKYO (AP) -- Japan's space agency said Wednesday its spacecraft had successfully touched down on an asteroid 180 million miles from Earth despite an earlier announcement that it had failed. On Sunday, JAXA officials had said the Hayabusa probe, on a mission to land on the asteroid named Itokawa, collect material, then bring it back to Earth, failed to touch down after maneuvering within yards of the surface. However, the agency said Wednesday that data confirmed that Hayabusa had landed on the surface Sunday for a half-hour, although it failed to collect material. JAXA officials had said earlier that Hayabusa...
  • Itokawa Image on September 10

    09/11/2005 11:18:47 AM PDT · by snowsislander · 22 replies · 851+ views
    ISAS / JAXA ^ | September 11, 2005
    Itokawa Image on September 10 Hayabusa continues approaching Itokawa, and its image is growing day by day. The left image is taken at 15:00 UTC on September 10 by the visible imager, AMICA. The distance from Hayabusa to Itokawa is approximately 30 km. The right image was obtained at 16:42 UTC on the day. The left image shows different face from the last release. Itokawa rotates about 50 degrees between left and right images. Surface features are more clearly seen.
  • Cold And Deep: Antarctica's Lake Vostok Has Two Big Neighbors

    02/08/2006 3:52:36 PM PST · by blam · 57 replies · 1,414+ views
    Science News Online ^ | 2-8-2006 | Sid Perkins
    Cold and Deep: Antarctica's Lake Vostok has two big neighbors Sid Perkins GREAT LAKES. Lake Vostok and the newly described 90°E and Sovetskaya Lakes lie beneath a kilometers-thick blanket of ice. The black square in the inset shows the outline of this satellite image on a map of Antarctica; the cross indicates the South Pole. R.E. Bell, et al. Trapped beneath Antarctica's kilometers-thick ice sheet are two bodies of water that rival North America's Great Lakes, new analyses suggest. The geological setting of these huge, unfrozen lakes hints that they may harbor ecosystems that have been isolated for millions of...