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Keyword: catastrophism

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  • Geologists 'resurrect' missing tectonic plate

    10/20/2020 9:33:20 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 108 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 10/20/2020 | Sara Tubbs, University of Houston
    A team of geologists at the University of Houston College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics believes they have found the lost plate in northern Canada by using existing mantle tomography images—similar to a CT scan of the earth's interior. The findings, published in Geological Society of America Bulletin, could help geologists better predict volcanic hazards as well as mineral and hydrocarbon deposits. "Volcanoes form at plate boundaries, and the more plates you have, the more volcanoes you have," said Jonny Wu, assistant professor of geology in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. "Volcanoes also affect climate change. So, when...
  • Ancient Hittite cuneiform scripts will soon be accessible online

    10/18/2020 11:33:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | October 2020 | Universitaet Mainz
    They used clay tablets to keep records of state treaties and decrees, prayers, myths, and summoning rituals, using a language that researchers were only able to decipher around 100 years ago. Now, the Hittites' texts, which were written in cuneiform, are being made fully accessible online. The collection will be based on around 30,000 documents, most of which are written in the Hittite language, but other languages such as Luwian and Palaic will also be represented to a lesser extent. Participating in the joint project are researchers from the universities of Mainz, Marburg, and Würzburg, as well as of the...
  • A dangerous African lake with explosive power is about to erupt in the seismic active East African Rift Valley

    10/18/2020 5:50:17 PM PDT · by Roman_War_Criminal · 13 replies
    SS ^ | 10/18/20 | SS
    In central Africa is a deep lake that has a dangerous propensity to explode – but tapping it as a source of energy could help avert disaster. Lake Kivu is one of Africa’s strangest bodies of water. An unusual set of properties make it an intriguing subject for scientists, as well as a potential source of both peril and prosperity for the millions of people living nearby. Kivu doesn’t behave like most deep lakes. Typically, when water at the surface of a lake is cooled – by winter air temperatures or rivers carrying spring snowmelt, for example – that cold,...
  • An Original Copy of Shakespeare’s First Full Collection Sold for $10 Million at Auction

    10/15/2020 5:51:41 PM PDT · by libstripper · 16 replies
    InsideHook ^ | Oct. 15, 2020 | Carl Caminetti
    In what has been called a once-in-a-generation event, a complete and original copy of Shakespeare’s First Folio sold for a record-setting price just under $10 million at auction earlier this week. The First Folio, published in 1623, was the first complete printed collection of Shakespeare’s plays. Published seven years after the author’s death, the book marked not only the first complete collection of Shakespeare’s works, but also the first time those works were organized as comedies, tragedies and histories. There are around 235 copies known to exist, and only six complete ones owned privately.
  • Iceland's Most Active Volcano Looks Like It's Getting Ready to Erupt Again

    10/12/2020 9:07:13 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    sciencealert.com ^ | 9 OCTOBER 2020 | DAVE MCGARVIE,
    Grímsvötn volcano on Iceland produced an unusually large and powerful eruption in 2011, sending ash 20 kilometres into the atmosphere, causing the cancellation of about 900 passenger flights. In comparison, the much smaller 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull led to the cancellation of about 100,000 flights. Grímsvötn is a peculiar volcano, as it lies almost wholly beneath ice, and the only permanently visible part is an old ridge on its south side which forms the edge of a large crater (a caldera). And it is along the base of this ridge, under the ice, that most recent eruptions have occurred. Another...
  • World record waterspout outbreak over the Great Lakes

    10/11/2020 1:22:28 PM PDT · by Roman_War_Criminal · 23 replies
    watchers.news ^ | 10/7/2020 | Julie Celestial
    232 waterspouts/funnels have been confirmed over the Great Lakes from September 28 to October 4, 2020, in the second world record waterspout outbreak of the year, according to the International Center for Waterspout Research (ICWR). From August 16 to 19, 2020, a short-lived waterspout outbreak produced 88 funnels, setting a new world record waterspout outbreak -- the first of the year. Both outbreaks were a result of Canadian cold air sweeping over the region, which made surface air prone to rise. "There were an average of 33 per day," said ICWR director Wade Szilagyi, also a meteorologist at Environment Canada....
  • Asteroid Bennu Caries Organic Materials Consistent With Ingredients For Life

    10/09/2020 11:10:54 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 53 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 9 OCTOBER 2020 | MICHELLE STARR
    In just a few days, NASA is going to bounce its probe OSIRIS-REx off asteroid Bennu. The mission will collect a sample from the asteroid, and return it to Earth for closer study - one of the first missions of its kind. That return sample will help us to understand not just asteroids, but the earliest days of the Solar System's existence. However, that is not the sole mission of OSIRIS-REx. The probe arrived in Bennu orbit in December of 2018, and since that time has been using its suite of instruments to learn as much as it can about...
  • Strange spiral appears off Black Sea coast

    10/09/2020 8:37:01 AM PDT · by Roman_War_Criminal · 26 replies
    ss ^ | 10/06/20 | ss
    A rare phenomenon formed in Abkhazia, on the eastern coast of the Black Sea, on September 23, 2020. According to local and tourist eyewitnesses, the water started twisting into a gigantic spiral. The whirlpool most probably formed by the collision of water masses having different characteristics (salinity, temperature, etc.).
  • The Colorful [false color] Walls of an Exposed Impact Crater on Mars

    10/07/2020 6:38:56 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    Universe Today ^ | October 6, 2020 | Nancy Atkinson
    Impact craters have been called the “poor geologists’ drill,” since they allow scientists to look beneath to the subsurface of a planet without actually digging down. It’s estimated that Mars has over 600,000 craters, so there’s plenty of opportunity to peer into the Red Planet’s strata – especially with the incredible HiRISE (High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) camera on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter which has been orbiting and studying Mars from above since 2006. This beautiful image shows the interior of an impact crater in the Hellas Planitia region of Mars – just north of the gigantic Hellas impact...
  • We Now Have Proof a Supernova Exploded Perilously Close to Earth 2.5 Million Years Ago

    10/05/2020 11:50:05 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 41 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 4 OCTOBER 2020 | EVAN GOUGH, UNIVERSE TODAY
    In its 4.5 billion year history, Earth has had to run the gauntlet. Numerous catastrophes have imperilled the planet, from massive impacts, to volcanic conflagrations, to frigid episodes of snowball Earth. Yet life persists. Among all of the hazards that threaten a planet, the most potentially calamitous might be a nearby star exploding as a supernova. When a massive enough star reaches the end of its life, it explodes as a supernova (SN). The hyper-energetic explosion can light up the sky for months, turning night into day for any planets close enough. If a planet is too close, it will...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day - The Sun Rotating

    08/19/2020 6:10:57 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 41 replies
    SPOD.NASA.gov ^ | 19 Aug, 2020 | Video Credit: SDO, NASA; Digital Composition: Kevin M. Gill
    This one is a video, at link. Explanation: Does the Sun change as it rotates? Yes, and the changes can vary from subtle to dramatic. In the featured time-lapse sequences, our Sun -- as imaged by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory -- is shown rotating though an entire month in 2014. In the large image on the left, the solar chromosphere is depicted in ultraviolet light, while the smaller and lighter image to its upper right simultaneously shows the more familiar solar photosphere in visible light. The rest of the inset six Sun images highlight X-ray emission by relatively rare iron...
  • Superbolide changes night into day over Brazil (video)

    10/03/2020 5:32:20 PM PDT · by Roman_War_Criminal · 28 replies
    ss ^ | 10/03/20 | ss
    A superbolide was recorded flying over the states of Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina, Brazil on October 1, 2020. Trajectory Preliminary analyses show that the very bright fireball began to shine at about 89.5 km over the rural area to the east of Caxias do Sul and travelled north, at 16.9 km/s (60,900 km/h) at an entrance angle of 44° to the ground The bight meteor disintegrated during 6 seconds, easily overcoming the full moon’s brightness and finally exploded at an altitude of 22 km over the city of Vacaria, also in Rio Grande do Sul state. A...
  • A Supernova Exploded Dangerously Close to Earth 2.5 Million Years Ago

    10/03/2020 5:51:30 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 51 replies
    Universe Today ^ | 2 Oct, 2002 | EVAN GOUGH
    In its 4.5 billion year history, Earth has had to run the gauntlet. Numerous catastrophes have imperilled the planet, from massive impacts, to volcanic conflagrations, to frigid episodes of snowball Earth. Yet life persists. Among all of the hazards that threaten a planet, the most potentially calamitous might be a nearby star exploding as a supernova. Whan a massive enough star reaches the end of its life, it explodes as a supernova. The hyper-energetic explosion can light up the sky for months, turning night into day for any planets close enough. If a planet is too close, it will be...
  • There’s too much gold in the universe. No one knows where it came from

    10/01/2020 9:43:14 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 62 replies
    Live Science ^ | 01 October 2020 | Rafi Letzter
    Gold is an element, which means you can't make it through ordinary chemical reactions — though alchemists tried for centuries. To make the sparkly metal, you have to bind 79 protons and 118 neutrons together to form a single atomic nucleus. That's an intense nuclear fusion reaction. But such intense fusion doesn't happen frequently enough, at least not nearby, to make the giant trove of gold we find on Earth and elsewhere in the solar system. And a new study has found the most commonly-theorized origin of gold — collisions between neutron stars — can't explain gold's abundance either. So...
  • Strange Precariously Balanced Rocks Provide Earthquake Forecasting Clues

    10/01/2020 9:33:01 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    scitechdaily ^ | October 1, 2020 | Imperial College London
    Precariously balanced rocks (PBRs) are formations found throughout the world where a slender boulder is balanced precariously on a pedestal boulder. They form as blocks preserved on cliffs, or when softer rocks erode and leave the harder rocks behind. They can also form when landslides or retreating glaciers deposit them in strange positions. Despite their delicate balancing act, many PBRs — like the Brimham Rocks in Yorkshire, or Chiricahua National Monument in Arizona — have survived earthquake shaking over thousands of years. They can therefore tell us the upper limit of earthquake shaking that has occurred since they were first...
  • Scientists Reveal More About Volcanic Eruption That Rocked the Ancient Maya

    09/30/2020 10:03:54 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 09/29/2020 | George Dvorsky
    Using a combination of archaeological and geological evidence, scientists have finally pinpointed the date of the infamous Tierra Blanca Joven eruption, which likely devastated Maya communities in what is now El Salvador. Ilopango volcano blew its stack 1,589 years ago—give or take a year or two—according to new research published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That this volcano erupted well over 1,000 years ago was well established, but the new research finally firms up the date, in a paper that will be of interest to archaeologists, historians, geologists, and climate scientists. The Ilopango caldera is...
  • Pseudoarchaeology [Wikipedia INSANITY]

    09/29/2020 11:54:45 AM PDT · by ml/nj · 15 replies
    Wikipedia - Pseudoarchaeology
    According to archaeologist John Hoopes, writing in the magazine of the Society for American Archaeology, "Pseudoarchaeology actively promotes myths that are routinely used in the service of white supremacy, racialized nationalism, colonialism, and the dispossession and oppression of indigenous peoples." [Emphasis added]
  • Since we started burning fossil fuels on a widespread, global scale, the number of people killed by natural disasters has gotten smaller, not bigger

    09/28/2020 2:07:11 PM PDT · by grundle · 11 replies
    wordpress ^ | September 28, 2020 | Dan from Squirrel Hill
    Since we started burning fossil fuels on a widespread, global scale, the number of people killed by natural disasters has gotten smaller, not bigger Since we started burning fossil fuels on a widespread, global scale, the number of people killed by natural disasters has gotten smaller, not bigger.Does this mean that we have fewer natural disasters now than in the past?No.Instead, what it means is that the huge amount of wealth that we have created by burning fossil fuels has made us better able to withstand natural disasters.This chart shows the number of people killed (per 100,000 population) by natural disasters...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day - Moon Pairs and the Synodic Month

    09/26/2020 6:50:34 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 11 replies
    APOD.NASA.gov ^ | 26 Sep, 2020 | Image Credit & Copyright: Marcella Giulia Pace
    Explanation: Observe the Moon each night and its visible sunlit portion will gradually change. In phases progressing from New Moon to Full Moon to New Moon again, a lunar cycle or synodic month is completed in about 29.5 days. They look full, but top left to bottom right these panels do show the range of lunar phases for a complete synodic month during August 2019 from Ragusa, Sicily, Italy, planet Earth. For this lunar cycle project the panels organize images of the lunar phases in pairs. Each individual image is paired with another image separated by about 15 days, or...
  • Mysterious Circles in The Desert Explained by Alan Turing Theory From 70 Years Ago

    09/24/2020 12:11:09 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 50 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 24 SEPTEMBER 2020 | PETER DOCKRILL
    It was 1952, and Alan Turing was about to reshape humanity's understanding of biology. Fairy circles in Namibia. (pum_eva/Getty Images) ============================================================================== In a landmark paper, the English mathematician introduced what became known as the Turing pattern – the notion that the dynamics of certain uniform systems could give rise to stable patterns when disturbed. Such 'order from disturbance' has become the theoretical basis for all sorts of strange, repeated motifs seen in the natural world. It was a good theory. So good, in fact, that decades later, scientists are still discovering stunning examples of it in unusual and exotic places:...