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  • Myths about Roe v. Wade

    09/17/2014 10:43:47 PM PDT · by Morgana · 6 replies
    LIVE ACTION ^ | Deanna Wallace
    As both an active member of the pro-life movement and a law student, I am frequently confronted with the fact that the vast majority of activists on both sides of the abortion debate have many misconceptions about what Roe v. Wade actually says about the legality of abortion. Most of this arises from the fact that they have not read the case themselves, or if they did read it, they were unable to understand it due to a lack of legal training. My goal is to attempt to clear up four of the most common myths surrounding Roe v. Wade,...
  • Jurassic 'squirrels' push back clock on emergence of mammals

    09/17/2014 5:26:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | September 10, 2014 | Pete Spotts
    In placing three newly discovered species along the mammal family tree, researchers conclude that mammals emerged and exploded in diversity between 235 million and 201 million years ago... Over the past three years, a team of researchers has uncovered six 160-million-year-old fossils that represent three new species who were living in trees at the time of the dinosaurs. In placing these creatures along the mammal family tree, the researchers conclude that mammals emerged and exploded in diversity between 235 million and 201 million years ago, during the Triassic period. If the results hold up to additional scrutiny, they imply a...
  • Europeans drawn from three 'tribes'

    09/17/2014 11:19:24 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 19 replies
    BBC News Science and Environment ^ | 09/17/2014 | By Paul Rincon
    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed with one another within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports. Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East. But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent. The findings are based analysis of the genomes of nine ancient Europeans. Agriculture originated in the Near East - in modern Syria, Iraq and Israel - before expanding into Europe around 7,500 years ago. Multiple lines of evidence suggested this new way...
  • Europeans drawn from three 'tribes'

    09/17/2014 11:17:18 AM PDT · by Natufian · 13 replies
    BBC ^ | 09/17/2014 | Paul Rincon
    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed with one another within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports. Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East. But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent. The findings are based analysis of the genomes of nine ancient Europeans.
  • Ancient 'moon god' monument unearthed in Israel

    09/17/2014 11:02:24 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 39 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 12:55PM BST 17 Sep 2014 | By Inna Lazareva, Tel Aviv
    A structure once believed to form part of an ancient town is identified as a 5,000 year old monument believed to have been used to honour the Mesopotamian moon god 'Sin' A stone monument in the shape of a crescent moon found in northern Israel is more than 5,000 years old, archaeologists have said. The structure, known as Rujum en-Nabi Shua'ayb or Jethro Cairn, is located near the Sea of Galilee and predates the construction of Stonehenge, the Great Pyramid in Egypt, as well as the writing of the Bible. It was initially discovered in the early part of the...
  • 'Exosuit' Mission to 2,000-Year-Old Shipwreck Begins

    09/17/2014 8:59:08 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    livescience.com ^ | September 16, 2014 11:47am | Megan Gannon,
    Sponge divers first discovered the 2,000-year-old shipwreck off the Greek island Antikythera in 1900. They recovered fragments of bronze statues, corroded marble sculptures, gold jewelry and, most famously, the Antikythera mechanism, a clocklike astronomical calculator sometimes called the world's oldest computer. Teams led by Jacques Cousteau pulled up more artifacts and even found human remains when they visited the wreck in the 1950s and 1970s. But none of those previous expeditions had access to the Exosuit, a one-of-a-kind diving outfit that weighs 530 lbs. (240 kilograms), and can plunge to the extraordinary depths of 1,000 feet (305 meters) and stay...
  • Europe goes back to the Middle Ages: Map shows how patchwork continent would look if every

    09/17/2014 6:42:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 30 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | September 17, 2014 | Sam Webb
    This map shows how Europe would look if every separatist movement was granted its dream of independence. With the Scottish referendum just days away, the issue of regions breaking away from their traditional rulers is looming large over the continent. The map features well-known separatist movements, such as the powerful and vocal Basque Nationalist movement in northern Spain and southwestern France, as well as the more obscure, such as the Savoyan League, which supports the independence of the Savoy region of France, which has a population of around 405,500.
  • Britons gather stones at Scotland-England border to support the union before vote

    09/16/2014 11:28:05 PM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 43 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | Sept 16, 2014 | Griff Witte
    ... “When a relationship breaks, when one part of your country is trying to get a divorce, it doesn’t work to just say, ‘You’re never going to be able to survive on your own. You’re going to be too poor. You’re going to come running back,’ ” said Rory Stewart, a Parliament member who represents the English side of the border. He helped to lay the first stone in July and has overseen the cairn’s construction ever since. “You have to say, ‘I love you.’ ”
  • 10 Lessons From Real-Life Revolutions That Fictional Dystopias Ignore

    09/16/2014 8:05:57 AM PDT · by ctdonath2 · 14 replies
    io9 ^ | 9/16/14 | Esther Inglis-Arkell
    Today's genre books are full of future dystopias, which only have one weakness: teenagers. And everybody knows that most dystopias are kind of contrived. But here are 10 lessons from real-life rebellions against repressive regimes, that we wish the creators of fictional dystopias would pay attention to. 10. The Enemy of Your Enemy Is Not Your Friend [snip] 9. The Top Guy Isn't Always the Problem [snip] 8. Sometimes Making Concessions Leads To Rebellion [snip] 7. Two Downtrodden Groups Will Usually Be Fighting Each Other [snip] 6. Never Neglect the Practicalities [snip] 5. New Regimes Come With Crazy Ideology [snip]...
  • Book Review: 'Robert the Bruce' by Michael Penman

    09/16/2014 2:10:48 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 27 replies
    wsj.com ^ | Sept. 12, 2014 | Barton Swaim
    It is one of the tragedies of recent cultural history that, thanks to Mel Gibson's preposterous movie "Braveheart," the world knows more about William Wallace's short-lived Scottish rebellion of 1296-97 than about Robert the Bruce. For it was Bruce who, after 18 years of plotting and war making, finally threw off the yoke of the English king and consolidated a sense of Scottish identity. "Never will we on any conditions be subjected to the lordship of the English," said the Declaration of Arbroath, a diplomatic letter commissioned by Bruce in 1320. "It is in truth not for glory, nor riches,...
  • Vietnam soldiers to receive Medal of Honor

    09/15/2014 12:30:27 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 9 replies
    AP via Yahoo News ^ | 9/15/14 | DARLENE SUPERVILLE
    Congress granted an exemption so Army Command Sgt. Maj. Bennie G. Adkins and Army Spc. Donald P. Sloat could receive the medal, because recommendations typically must be made within two years of the act of heroism, and the medal presented within three. A soldier who fought in the Civil War was expected to receive the Medal of Honor posthumously at a later date. First Lt. Alonzo H. Cushing died in July 1863 during the Battle of Gettysburg. Adkins, who served 22 years and lives in Opelika, Alabama, planned to attend the Medal of Honor ceremony at the White House. Adkins...
  • Is the UN Fair to Israel? (video)

    09/15/2014 9:04:52 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 7 replies
    YouTube.com ^ | 9-15-2014 | PragerUniversity
    Israel is a vibrant democracy with full rights for women and gays, a free press and independent judiciary. You would think that the United Nations would celebrate such a country. Instead, the UN condemns Israel at every turn to the point of obsession. How did this happen? Anne Bayefsky, director of the Touro Institute on Human Rights, explains in five eye-opening minutes.
  • Francis Scott Key's Fourth Stanza

    09/15/2014 8:46:54 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 10 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 09/15/2014 | Thomas McGinley
    Two hundred years ago today, it was the unlikely convergence of a physician and a lawyer that produced the most recited poem in American history. Its inspiration occurred just a few miles from Fort McHenry, located in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, the site of one of our nation’s most important military conflicts. [SNIP] Key, not surprisingly gloats over the failure of the British in the third stanza which was mostly dropped after they became our allies in the 20th century. But the poem/song’s most powerful stanza is its last.  In the fourth stanza Key proclaims the primary reason for the republic’s...
  • Everybody Loved Their Browning Hi-Powers Back in the Day

    09/15/2014 8:06:42 AM PDT · by C19fan · 23 replies
    War is Boring ^ | September 15, 2014 | Paul Huard
    From the 1940s until recent times, if a soldier carried a nine-millimeter pistol into battle as part of his weaponry there was a good chance it was a Browning Hi-Power. The Hi-Power was a part of nearly every world conflict of the 20th century. On both sides. Saddam Hussein carried one—and liked to fire it into the air to rile up his supporters. Libyan strongman Muammar Gaddafi owned a customized, gold-plated Hi-Power with an image of his face etched in the grips.
  • Star Trek’s U.S.S. Enterprise to Boldly Go Back to the Workshop

    09/15/2014 2:53:43 AM PDT · by markomalley · 29 replies
    Air & Space Magazine ^ | 9/11/2014 | Christopher Klimek
    Paramount Pictures didn’t know what they were giving up 40 years ago when they donated the 135-inch studio model of the U.S.S. Enterprise—the fictional, 23rd century starship at the center of the groundbreaking science fiction series Star Trek—to the Smithsonian. Star Trek had been canceled after three seasons five years earlier; the first of the now 12 Trek motion pictures was still five years away. Though the first Star Trek convention had taken place in 1972, there was little reason to suspect the beloved but low-rated TV show—unique for its optimistic vision of a future where men and women of...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "5 Fingers"(1952)

    09/14/2014 11:21:08 AM PDT · by ReformationFan · 11 replies
    You Tube ^ | 1952 | Joseph L Mankiewicz
  • Obama’s ship is sinking

    09/14/2014 10:15:18 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 35 replies
    New York Post ^ | September 14, 2014 | Michael Goodwin
    The rising clamor over the beheading of two Americans, and rapidly sinking polls, forced President Obama to reassure the nation last week he had a plan to deal with the Islamic State. He did some of what he had to do, but only some, and so most military analysts believe the expanded airstrikes will not be a sufficient match for the size and weaponry of the terrorist army. They miss the point. The disjointed speech wasn’t really about terrorism and launching a new war. It was about saving Obama’s presidency. He is sinking fast and could soon pass the point...
  • COLUMN: Historic ship found in Canadian arctic

    09/13/2014 10:59:28 PM PDT · by roses of sharon · 10 replies
    Statesville Record ^ | Sunday, September 14, 2014 1:00 am | O.C. Stonestreet
    Historically valuable items are continually being lost or destroyed or being found. For example, most R&L readers likely missed a two-paragraph item in the middle of page 10A of last Wednesday's edition. The title of the article was "Canada Finds One of Two Explorers Ships Lost in Arctic." I feel this discovery warrants more coverage. The two vessels were the HMS Erebus and the HMS Terror, both lost during an expedition to determine the feasibility of traversing the "Northwest Passage," a route over the top of North America to link the Atlantic Ocean and Europe to the Pacific Ocean and...
  • [2006] Assad Under Siege

    09/13/2014 10:34:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    Washington Times via FrontPage ^ | Tuesday, May 16, 2006 | Nir Boms and Daveed Gartenstein-Ross
    "Iran and Syria are in the same boat," said former Iranian President Hashemi Rafsanjani during a visit to Damascus on April 12. In likening the two countries' predicaments, Mr. Rafsanjani continued, "The enemies of Syria are trying to increase the pressure, but the resistance of the Syrian people will continue." He is right: The Syrian people are resisting more than ever before. But the new wave of resistance isn't what Mr. Rafsanjani had in mind. Two weeks before Mr. Rafsanjani's visit, Syrian military intelligence arrested 51-year-old Internet journalist and human-rights activist Mohammed Ghanem, most likely because of his work at...
  • Fight over World War II-era tank goes to court

    09/13/2014 4:05:00 PM PDT · by BBell · 33 replies
    REDWOOD CITY, Calif. (AP) - A company headed by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen has filed a lawsuit in the San Francisco Bay Area over a World War II-era German tank it says it paid $2.5 million for but never received. The Panzer IV tank was part of a fleet of military vehicles amassed by Stanford University-trained engineer Jacques Littlefield, who kept them on his family estate up a winding, forested road above Silicon Valley. After his death, his family turned them over to the Massachusetts-based Collings Foundation, which put some of them up for auction in Portola Valley in July
  • The 21 Sikhs of Saragarhi

    09/13/2014 11:09:31 AM PDT · by cold start · 5 replies
    Business Standard ^ | 13 September 2014 | Jaisal Singh
    A small body of Sikhs defended a vital North-West Frontier post against 10,000 Afridi and Orakzai attackers. Yesterday was the 117th anniversary of their heroic effort Britain’s Parliament interrupted proceedings and rose to give a standing ovation on September 12, 1897 to 21 valorous soldiers — all of them Indians, all of them Sikhs — for what was undoubtedly a tremendous act of collective bravery, and one of the greatest ‘last-stands’ in military history, the Battle of Saragarhi. The North-West Frontier of undivided India, now a part of Pakistan known as Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, is a harsh place. Embroiled even today in...
  • ‘The Roosevelts’: Once you finish all 14 hours, you’re sorry to see them go

    09/13/2014 8:10:16 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 102 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | 9-12-14 | Hank Stuever
    Let’s start with the end. When it’s over — when you make it through the marathon that is Ken Burns’s beautiful, seven-part documentary “The Roosevelts: An Intimate History,” which begins Sunday night on PBS — you may find yourself with a lingering, nebulous grief. You’re sorry it’s over. You’re sorry they’re over. You’re sorry a certain expression of American ideals is, or often appears to be, completely over. My study habits haven’t improved since college; like an idiot, I put off watching all 14 hours of “The Roosevelts” until I absolutely had to watch them on a deadline binge this...
  • Video, "September Eleven 1683",first 9/11

    09/13/2014 7:10:43 AM PDT · by wtd · 23 replies
    YouTube ^ | January 5, 2014 | Dohaji Salim
    In the summer of 1683, 300,000 soldiers of the Ottoman empire began the Siege of Vienna. The fall of the city would open the way to conquer europe..
  • Hollywood’s History of Faking It - The Evolution of Greenscreen Compositing (video)

    09/12/2014 7:29:36 PM PDT · by servo1969 · 20 replies
    filmmakeriq.com ^ | Jul 16, 2013 | Filmmaker IQ
    With cameras and computers everywhere in our modern world, it’s easy to forget that the very first motion pictures were, themselves, essentially a special effect. It’s here at the beginning of filmmaking that we’ll start our journey:  the close of the 19th century with one of the world’s first prolific filmmakers – a man who spent his life studying the art of illusion – Georges Méliès.Georges Méliès In his 1898 film  Four Heads are better than one, (Un Homme De Tête) Méliès employs a visual trick that is the rudimentary beginnings of what we now think of as greenscreen compositing. The...
  • Battle of Lepanto

    09/12/2014 10:29:24 AM PDT · by MeneMeneTekelUpharsin · 18 replies
    Research ^ | 12 September 2014 | Mene Mene Tekel Upharsin
    Go search on the internet about the Battle of Lepanto. Read what happened in this historical naval conflict. The Muslim fleet commander was killed and BEHEADED and his head stuck up on a pike for all to see. Upon seeing their commander's head on a stick, the other Muslims lost heart and retreated...ending the battle. This is because they do NOT put their faith in a real god, but in men, their leaders, who are at one time powerful and vicious. When the leader is cut down, they run. The man who puts his faith in God will not run...
  • Beautiful mansion is Detroit's biggest sale in at least a decade

    09/11/2014 6:07:08 PM PDT · by upbeat5 · 8 replies
    Yahoo Homes ^ | September 10, 2014 | Ilyce R. Glink
    Detroit has recorded its biggest home sale in a long, long time. The historic and still-beautiful Alfred J. Fisher mansion sold to an anonymous all-cash buyer for $1.6 million, more than any Detroit home in recent memory, according to the Detroit Free Press. That might not sound like much, but this is a city where thousands of homes have been razed because they couldn’t be sold for anything. Detroit hasn't seen a sale price like that for at least a decade. The home has 15 bedrooms, 17 bathrooms, an indoor pool, a ballroom and 2 acres of landscaped grounds in...
  • Pictograph Photo Gallery

    09/11/2014 2:06:56 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 18 replies
    Geology.com ^ | 9/11/2014 | Staff
    Pictograph Photo Gallery A pictograph is a drawing or painting that is created on a rock. It is not "carved" into the rock - that would be a "petroglyph." This is a series of photographs of pictographs from around the world. There are many links to other galleries.
  • Ozzie and Harriet's haunted house remodeled, spirit gone (with before-and-after photos)

    09/11/2014 1:25:24 PM PDT · by upbeat5 · 43 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | September 10, 2014 | Jennifer Karmon
    Before the Pritchetts and Dunphys, or the Cosbys, or the Bradys -- before the Cleavers, even -- there were Ozzie and Harriet Nelson and their sons, David and Ricky. For 14 years and 435 episodes, the Nelsons starred in a TV show about themselves, filmed on sets that replicated their own Los Angeles home. They invited America into their living room from 1952 to 1966, and hundreds of thousands of American families returned the favor. Even now, the phrase "Ozzie and Harriet" is practically synonymous with clean-scrubbed 1950s America.
  • Find the Cost of Freedom

    09/11/2014 12:25:44 PM PDT · by chajin · 1 replies
    Youtube ^ | 05/01/1970 | CSN&Y
    Find the Cost of Freedom
  • Last American jurisdiction with a total handgun ban?

    09/11/2014 10:02:38 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 5 replies
    The Volokh Conspiracy ^ | September 8, 2014 | Eugene Volokh
    The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands is part of U.S. sovereign territory. It also (1) totally bans handguns, (2) bans carrying all guns, even in the home, (3) requires licenses for long guns, which are allegedly not granted for months on end, though theoretically they are supposed to be granted within 60 days, and (4) bans all ammunition except .22 cartridges, .223 cartridges, and .410 shotgun shells. Radich v. Guerrero (D.N.M.I. Sept. 5, 2014) argues this violates the Second Amendment, and surely that must be so; and before you go all Insular Cases on me, note that § 501...
  • Egyptian chronology and the Bible.

    09/11/2014 7:49:21 AM PDT · by fishtank · 20 replies
    Egyptian chronology and the Bible. Framing the issues Do the dates ascribed to the Egyptian dynasties falsify the date of biblical creation? by Gary Bates Published: 2 September 2014 (GMT+10) Egyptian chronology can be a challenging subject for biblical creationists. That’s because the secular, majority view about these chronologies extends further back than an objective reading of the biblical chronogenealogies allows for creation: a little over 6,000 years ago. These chronologies are hotly debated among Christians and secularists alike, with the consensus being increasingly challenged. Moreover, some of the incredible Egyptian monuments like the great pyramids on the Giza Plateau...
  • In Berlin, a Memorial to German Euthanasia Victims

    09/11/2014 6:03:43 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 2 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | September 10, 2014 | Wesley J. Smith
    In Berlin, a Memorial to German Euthanasia Victims Wesley J. Smith September 10, 2014 4:46 PM | Permalink The Associated Press reports: Germany on Tuesday inaugurated a memorial to more than 200,000 people with physical and mental disabilities killed by the Nazis after their lives were deemed "worthless."The transparent 24-meter (79-foot) blue glass wall outside the Berlin Philharmonic concert hall is near memorials to the Jewish Holocaust victims and the Nazis' gay and Gypsy, or Roma, victims, opened over the past decade.It stands on the site of a villa where the murder of patients at hospitals and mental institutes was...
  • Underground map reveals mysteries of Stonehenge (+video)

    09/10/2014 2:54:42 PM PDT · by BBell · 50 replies
    http://www.csmonitor.com/A.P. ^ | September 10, 2014
    Using ground-penetrating radar and other high-tech devices, archaeologists at Stonehenge have discovered a complex of monuments buried beneath Britain's iconic paleolithic shrine.
  • Ancient swamp creature had lips like Mick Jagger

    09/10/2014 10:14:01 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Provided by Duke University
    Sir Mick Jagger has a new animal named after him. Scientists have named an extinct swamp-dwelling creature that lived 19 million years ago in Africa after the Rolling Stones frontman, in honor of a trait they both share—their supersized lips. "We gave it the scientific name Jaggermeryx naida, which translates to 'Jagger's water nymph,'" said study co-author Ellen Miller of Wake Forest University. The animal's fossilized jaw bones suggest it was roughly the size of a small deer and akin to a cross between a slender hippo and a long-legged pig. Researchers uncovered the fossils—consisting of multiple jawbone fragments—amid the...
  • Who's ashamed of the Confederate Flag?

    09/09/2014 8:46:43 PM PDT · by 3boysdad · 65 replies
    I'm just curious who is ashamed of the Stars and Bars. I was born and raised in the south and this flag always gave me comfort and identity. I slept with it over my bed during my youth. What about you? Today if you even mention it, it's like a fart in church. I say, where are the true southern men?!
  • Bob Suter, member of 'Miracle on Ice' team, dies at 57

    09/09/2014 5:28:28 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 17 replies
    NHL.com ^ | September 9, 2014
    Bob Suter, a member of the 1980 U.S. "Miracle on Ice" team and father of Minnesota Wild defenseman Ryan Suter, died Tuesday. He was 57. "We are very saddened by today's news that Minnesota Wild scout Bob Suter suddenly passed away," the Wild said in a statement. "The Wild organization sends its condolences to the entire Suter family during this difficult time. Not only was Bob a great hockey ambassador, he was a terrific person off the ice who will be greatly missed by all of us." The cause of death was not given.
  • Exploding Pianos - Periodic Table of Videos (video)

    09/09/2014 9:53:47 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 10 replies
    YouTube.com ^ | 9-9-2014 | Periodic Videos
    The Professor uncovers some old footage with an amazing story. Exploding pianos created by the legendary BD Shaw as part of his expert testimony. Flour and flash pot were put in a piano with terrible results.
  • The Nixon pardon 40 years later: The decision looks better and better with age

    09/09/2014 8:21:48 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 14 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 09/09/2014 | Silvio Canto Jr.
    It was President Ford’s biggest and most courageous decision.  It probably hurt the GOP in the 1974 midterm elections. In fact, I was a college volunteer on some campaigns in that election. The party people that I was listening to agreed with the pardon but screamed the same question: "Why didn't he do it after the election"? Many in the GOP correctly felt that the new Ford presidency would spare them the Watergate backlash and 6th year losses.   And it probably cost him the very close presidential election of 1976. The pardon was used by the Carter campaign to promote their campaign of...
  • Rebuilt 18th century ship tests French waters

    09/09/2014 8:00:18 AM PDT · by SWAMPSNIPER · 32 replies
    WOKV ^ | Sept 07/2014 | FRANCOIS MORI
    PARIS — A reconstruction of the 213-foot (65-meter) frigate used by France's Marquis de Lafayette to bring reinforcements to American revolutionaries in 1780 has tested the waters for the first time.
  • Prince Harry Dating Egyptian Muslim Heiress Enayat Younes?

    09/09/2014 6:08:32 AM PDT · by C19fan · 29 replies
    International Business Times ^ | September 8, 2014 | Kabita Maharana
    Prince Harry will soon celebrate his 30th birthday and rumours of the British royal's romantic link-ups keep surfacing after his high profile break-up with Cressida Bonas. The young royal, who will inherit millions of pounds left for him by his late mother Princess Diana when he turns 30, was spotted getting close to Enayat Younes, an Egyptian heiress, Cairoscene reported.
  • Identity of notorious serial killer Jack the Ripper finally revealed

    09/08/2014 5:50:43 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 28 replies
    Vital DNA evidence has finally uncovered the identity of notorious serial killer Jack the Ripper. The man behind the grisly killing spree in London’s East End has been unveiled as Aaron Kosminkski, a 23-year-old Polish immigrant who ended up dying in an asylum. A blood soaked shawl, purchased by author Russell Edwards, led to the breakthrough when a scientist matched DNA evidence left on it to descendants of Kosminski. Mr Edwards, 48, from Barnet, north London, was "captivated" by the murder mystery and had been investigating it in his spare time, but had come to the conclusion it could never...
  • Judge Who Let Ray Rice Off For Domestic Abuse Pushes Prosecution Of Philly Single Mom

    09/08/2014 12:56:27 PM PDT · by OL Hickory · 15 replies
    Real Defense ^ | 08/07/2014 | HomeGun Train
    Allen tried to avoid a trial and jail time by applying to a pre-trial intervention program in New Jersey for first-time offenders. Ray Rice, the Baltimore Ravens running back who knocked his then-fiancee unconscious during an altercation in Atlantic City in February, was accepted into the program in May.
  • 5 Tanks That Changed History

    09/08/2014 12:08:25 PM PDT · by C19fan · 144 replies
    The National Interest ^ | September 7, 2014 | Michael Peck
    Only the most techno-fanatic would argue that a certain type of tank has changed history. There are so many other causes -- military, political, economic, social -- that explain victory and defeat far better than size of gun or thickness of armor.
  • Viking 'ring fortress' discovered in Denmark

    09/08/2014 11:44:18 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | 12:22PM BST 06 Sep 2014 | Andrew Marszal
    The fortress found on the Danish island of Zealand, around 30 miles south of Copenhagen, is the fifth circular fortress to be unearthed, and the first in over 60 years. “This is great news,” said Lasse Sonne, a Viking historian from the Saxo Institute at the University of Copenhagen. “Although there were Vikings in other countries, these circular fortresses are unique to Denmark. Many have given up hope that there were many of them left.” Like previously discovered ring fortresses, the Vallř Borgring is thought to date back to the late tenth century and the reign of Harald Bluetooth, the...
  • A question for Mississippi FReepers: is the Delta safe for a tourist?

    09/08/2014 7:44:52 AM PDT · by Zionist Conspirator · 38 replies
    Self | 9/8/'14 | Zionist Conspirator
    Because of my heritage as a descendant of Southern Unionist Republicans, I used to really admire Black Americans and their culture, going all the way back to the works of Joel Chandler Harris and B.A. Botkin. Because of this I've long been a fan of traditional acoustic country blues, especially from the Mississippi Delta (Charlie Patton!). I've been longing for years to visit the Dockery Plantation between Ruleville and Cleveland, which is where the blues was allegedly born and where so many of the great Delta bluesmen played and/or worked as farm hands. Several years ago I actually took a...
  • September 8, 1900: When a hurricane changed history

    09/08/2014 6:08:29 AM PDT · by eastforker · 29 replies
    KPRC ^ | 9/8/2014 | Bill Read
    In 1900 Galveston was the largest and fastest growing city in Texas. Prospects were bright for the shining city by the sea. The port was important and growing as both exports and imports were rising rapidly with the move westward in America. Houston, on the other hand, was a smaller city still trying to find the path to destiny. The 1900 hurricane season had been unusually quiet through most of August – no storms at all in the Atlantic or Gulf. In late August a disturbance moved into the Atlantic from Africa and began its trek to the west. The...
  • Fever mounts as stunning statues found at ancient Greek tomb (Amphipolis)

    09/07/2014 5:44:48 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 17 replies
    AFP via Yahoo ^ | September 7, 2014
    Athens (AFP) - Two stunning caryatid statues have been unearthed holding up the entrance to the biggest ancient tomb ever found in Greece, archaeologists said. The two female figures in long-sleeved tunics were found standing guard at the opening to the mysterious Alexander The Great-era tomb near Amphipolis in the Macedonia region of northern Greece.
  • (Odd WWII Relic) This Steampunkish Nazi Belt Buckle Pistol Packs A Deadly Surprise

    09/07/2014 3:08:00 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 36 replies
    Foxtrot Alpha ^ | Thursday, September 4, 2014 | Tyler Rogoway
    This Steampunkish Nazi Belt Buckle Pistol Packs A Deadly Surprise The Nazis had some pretty wild engineering ideas, and some of them, like the jet engine, ended up being a vision of things to come. Yet others were just over-engineered, strange, and in some cases, downright creepy. This steampunkish Nazi belt buckle four-shooter is one of those things. The whole idea was to give high-ranking Nazis a way to kill their captors should they be captured on the battlefield. The concept was said to have originated from known German inventor, Louis Marquis, who designed the contraption while he was held...
  • Vintage PHOTO: Circa 1909 - Cat Photographer

    09/07/2014 11:54:21 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 73 replies
    Retronaut ^ | November 1909 | Retronaut
    Photograph taken in November, 1909 shows three members of the Payro family being “photographed” by their cat. Left to right: Edmund, age 12, Ernest, age 8, and Cecilia, age 5. Payro, J. (Joseph C.), 1862-1953
  • Jack the Ripper unmasked

    09/06/2014 5:59:54 PM PDT · by KosmicKitty · 130 replies
    Mail Online ^ | 9/6/2014 | Russell Edwards
    It is the greatest murder mystery of all time, a puzzle that has perplexed criminologists for more than a century and spawned books, films and myriad theories ranging from the plausible to the utterly bizarre. But now, thanks to modern forensic science, The Mail on Sunday can exclusively reveal the true identity of Jack the Ripper, the serial killer responsible for at least five grisly murders in Whitechapel in East London during the autumn of 1888. DNA evidence has now shown beyond reasonable doubt which one of six key suspects commonly cited in connection with the Ripper’s reign of terror...