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History (General/Chat)

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  • OAS Calls Emergency Meeting on Venezuela’s Undemocratic Rule

    05/31/2016 9:51:12 PM PDT · by fella · 7 replies
    panampost.com ^ | 31 May 2016 | Sabrina Martin
    Politicians and human rights advocacy groups from around the world invoked the Democratic Charter for Venezuela on Tuesday May 31, the Secretary General of the Organization of American States (OAS) Luis Almagro has announced In a statement to all participating countries, Almagro requested a Permanent Council on June 10 and June 20 to continue carrying out the procedures required for implementing a defense of democracy in Venezuela, which is currently under dictatorship-like rule by Nicolás Maduro. The Permanent Council intends to make the “necessary diplomatic initiatives … to promote the normalization of democratic institutions” in Venezuela. In a press release,...
  • Philippines' Duterte endorses killing corrupt journalists

    05/31/2016 9:38:04 PM PDT · by fella · 16 replies
    channelnewsasia.com ^ | 01 June 2016
    Philippine president-elect Rodrigo Duterte said on Tuesday (May 31) that corrupt journalists were legitimate targets of assassination, as he amped up his controversial anti-crime crusade with offers of rewards for killing drug traffickers. Duterte won this month's elections by a landslide largely due to an explosive law-and-order platform in which he pledged to end crime within six months by killing tens of thousands of suspected criminals. The foul-mouthed politician has launched a series of post-election tirades against criminals and repeated his vows to kill them - particularly drug traffickers, rapists and murderers. In a press conference called on Tuesday to...
  • Stonehenge May Not Have Been So Difficult To Build After All, Archaeologists Have Found

    05/31/2016 4:33:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | May 24, 2016 | Sarah Knapton
    The Preseli stones from Stonehenge are approximately double the weight as the experimental block, but it is possible that one huge stone could have been brought by a group of just 20 people. The community living in the area during the Neolithic would have numbered several thousand so the absence of just a few dozen people was unlikely to cause any hardship. Doctoral student Barney Harris, who conducted the trial in Gordon Square, London, a stone's throw from UCL's Institute of Archaeology, said he was surprised that so few people had been required to move the block. "We were expecting...
  • Archaeologists and geographers team to predict locations of ancient Buddhist sites [Ashoka's Edicts]

    05/31/2016 3:51:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    UCLA ^ | May 26, 2016 | Jessica Wolf
    For archaeologists and historians interested in the ancient politics, religion and language of the Indian subcontinent, two UCLA professors and their student researchers have creatively pinpointed sites that are likely to yield valuable transcriptions of the proclamations of Ashoka, the Buddhist king of northern India's Mauryan Dynasty who ruled from 304 B.C. to 232 B.C. In a study published this week in Current Science, archaeologist Monica Smith and geographer Thomas Gillespie identified 121 possible locations of what are known as Ashoka's "edicts." First they isolated shared features of 29 known locations of Ashokan edicts, which were found carved into natural...
  • [T]housands of children run over the graves of fallen soldiers from WWI’s Battle Of Verdun[tr]

    05/31/2016 6:23:22 AM PDT · by C19fan · 25 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 30, 2016 | Peter Allen
    Images of thousands of laughing children jogging through one of the most sacred Great War battlefields in the world have caused outrage. They were taken on Sunday during commemorations at Verdun - scene of one of the bloodiest battles in military history. The Battle of Verdun between German and French troops lasted over 300 days, and saw the deaths of more than 300,000 soldiers on both sides in 1916.
  • Snoop Dogg lambasts Roots remake: 'I can't watch it'

    05/30/2016 7:31:30 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 82 replies
    The Guardian UK ^ | May 30, 2016
    The remake of Roots has gained widespread critical acclaim – but not from Snoop Dogg, who posted a short video on Instagram on Monday criticising the show, and suggesting that African Americans should not watch it. In the video, the rapper said that he was fed up with watching films and TV shows that depicted the abuse of black Americans. “12 Years a Slave, Roots, Underground, I can’t watch none of that shit,” Snoop Dogg said, also taking aim at the Steve McQueen-directed Oscar-winning film and the WGN TV series about slaves in Georgia escaping via an underground railroad, which...
  • Allman Brothers Live at the Fillmore East

    05/30/2016 5:42:52 PM PDT · by Mariner · 27 replies
    Youtube ^ | July, 1970 | The Allman Brothers
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWy3Q30Cn2A&list=PLD6245C6E0DE40AE1
  • Band of Gypsys (Live)

    05/30/2016 4:51:51 PM PDT · by Mariner · 27 replies
    Youtube ^ | February, 1970 | Jimi Hendrix
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyqC6_TgLOo&list=PLjts4JMIwgQyOGncBEXig6iOej899O-Bm
  • Get Yer Ya-Ya's Out!

    05/30/2016 4:14:10 PM PDT · by Mariner · 16 replies
    Youtube ^ | February, 1970 | The Rolling Stones
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YsJB_cI-cxU
  • "There can be no peace with the forces of evil...

    05/30/2016 5:53:38 AM PDT · by stars & stripes forever · 5 replies
    http://americanminute.com/ ^ | 5/30/2016 | William Federer
    Southern women scattered spring flowers on graves of both northern Union and southern Confederate soldiers of the Civil War in which over a half-million died. Many places claimed to have held the original Memorial Day, such as:Warrenton, Virginia;Columbus, Georgia; Savannah, Georgia; Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; Boalsburg, Pennsylvania;Waterloo, New York. One such place was Charleston, South Carolina, where a mass grave was uncovered of 257 Union soldiers who had died in a prison camp. On May 1, 1865, former slaves organized a parade, led by 2,800 singing Black children, and reburied the soldiers with honor in gratitude for their freedom.
  • How Can We Return to the Roots of Memorial Day?

    05/30/2016 3:51:21 AM PDT · by SES1066 · 12 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 05/27/2016 | John Bussey
    This national day of remembrance, meant to honor men and women who died in military service, also morphed into a fiesta of shopping, barbecues and pool openings. There’s been no shortage of grumbling over the years about the stampede of “Memorial Day Sales”—ads brimming with bargains on a day intended for something else. ... [snip] ... The more we assign the soldiering to a select few volunteers—we don’t have an equalizing draft and there is no required national service—perhaps the easier it is to forget what it means to share a common citizenship or feel a sense of indebtedness or...
  • Shooting the Browning BAR, Full-Auto

    05/29/2016 8:30:47 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 40 replies
    Bearing Arms ^ | 29 May, 2016 | Bob Owens
    I’m jealous. Hickok45 has a circa 1919 full-auto Browning BAR that has been upgraded to World War II standards. It remains one of my two favorite machine guns of all time (the other is the late 1960s-early 1970s Smith & Wesson M76 9mm submachine gun).
  • Vietnam. Battle of Ia Drang. The real battle that inspired the movie We Were Soldiers.

    05/29/2016 6:32:21 PM PDT · by Pelham · 34 replies
    youtube ^ | June 4 2012 | video
    These are the people we should remember on Memorial Day. Hard fighting. Up close and personal, at a big cost.
  • Big & Rich - 8th Of November [OFFICIAL VIDEO]

    05/29/2016 3:56:11 PM PDT · by Biggirl · 5 replies
    YouTube.com ^ | May 29, 2016 | Big And Rich
    Song based on the true story of a veteran who gave his eye witness of the battle of November 8, 1965.
  • The Four Chaplains: Sacrifice At Sea

    05/29/2016 3:30:07 PM PDT · by Biggirl · 7 replies
    YouTube.com ^ | May 29, 2016 | YouTube
    The true story of four World War II U.S. Army chaplains who made the ultimate sacrifice so others could live.
  • The Vampire Was Right

    05/29/2016 1:16:30 PM PDT · by NRx · 11 replies
    Ad Orientem ^ | 05-29-2012 | Ad Orientem
    There is a great scene in the novel "The Historian" by Elizabeth Kostova where the famed vampire Dracula (Vlad III of Wallachia) is ruminating on the Fall of Constantinople which occurred today in 1453 (OS). He refers to it as the worst day in the history of the world. He was right.
  • Cave art trove found in Spain 1,000 feet underground

    05/29/2016 10:15:47 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 27, 2016 | by Ciaran Giles
    This image released by the Diputacion Floral de Bizkaia on Friday May 27, 2016, shows a cave drawing. Spanish archaeologists say they have discovered an exceptional set of Paleolithic-era cave drawings that could rank among the best in a country that already boasts some of the world's most important cave art. Chief site archaeologist Diego Garate said Friday that an estimated 70 drawings were found on ledges 300 meters (1,000 feet) underground in the Atxurra cave, Berriatua, in the northern Basque region. He described the site as being in "the Champions' League" of cave art, among the top 10 sites...
  • It's 'Our Jobs' As Journalists to Shift Conversation Away From Clinton's Past

    05/29/2016 7:48:25 AM PDT · by Mier · 22 replies
    http://newsbusters.org/blogs ^ | May 26, 2016 | Kristine Marsh
    During a conversation Wednesday night at a YMCA in New York City, CBS’ late night host Stephen Colbert interviewed CBS News political director John Dickerson on the race for the White House. At some point in the interview, they took audience questions in which one person asked if Bill Clinton’s past should affect Hillary Clinton’s future. Dickerson responded by admitting that it was one of journalists’ “jobs” to steer the conversation away from candidates' pasts.
  • Mongol Hordes Gave up on Conquering Europe Due to Wet Weather

    05/28/2016 12:05:00 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 80 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 26 May 2016 | Conor Gearin
    It has mystified historians ever since. After a string of major victories, the Mongol army suddenly retreated from central Europe in 1242. Some scholars claim Mongolian politics forced the withdrawal, while others credit the strength of fortified towns in present-day Hungary and Croatia. But Europe could have been rescued by its own bad weather, an analysis of tree rings and historical documents concludes. The Mongol cavalry fed its horses on the grass of the Eurasian steppe, says Nicola Di Cosmo of Princeton University, one of the study’s authors. A warm climate in the early 1200s helped make the grasslands lush...
  • DNA Captured From 2,500-Year-Old Phoenician

    05/28/2016 10:34:05 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    This is the first ancient DNA to be obtained from Phoenician remains. Known as “Ariche,” the young man came from Byrsa, a walled citadel above the harbor of ancient Carthage. Byrsa was attacked by the Roman general Scipio Aemilianus “Africanus” in the Third Punic War. It was destroyed by Rome in 146 B.C. Analysis of the skeleton revealed the man died between the age of 19 and 24, had a rather robust physique and was 1.7 meters (5’6″) tall. He may have belonged to the Carthaginian elite, as he was buried with gems, scarabs, amulets and other artifacts. Now genetic...
  • Grim reality of life in ancient Rome revealed: Average worker was DEAD by 30 [tr]

    05/28/2016 5:01:59 AM PDT · by C19fan · 35 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 28, 2016 | Ekin Karasin
    The average ancient Roman worker was riddled with arthritis, suffered broken bones and was dead by 30 thanks to a diet of rotting grains and a lifetime of hard labour. The grim realities of the Eternal City were revealed in a study carried out by an Italian team of specialists that used modern-scanning techniques to analyse 2,000 ancient skeletons. The majority of the skeletons from the first and third century AD, found in the suburbs of the ancient city, had broken collar bones, noses and hand bones.
  • Extremely Rare Shipwreck Unearthed Beneath Boston Streets

    05/27/2016 7:54:05 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 22 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | May 27, 2016 | Michael Sebastian
    A construction crew in Boston stumbled upon an "incredibly rare" find beneath the city's street: a 19th-century shipwreck. "Nothing like this has been found in Boston, in filled-in ground, before," City of Boston archeologist Joe Bagley said. "This is incredibly rare and incredibly amazing." The ship is a wooden sloop that's at least 50 feet long, according to CBS News, dating to the mid-to-late 1800s. It was discovered last week about 25 feet below grade during construction on a new office building. But Bagley, according to the Boston Globe, said the ship could be even older.
  • In Flanders Fields

    05/27/2016 9:57:43 AM PDT · by Biggirl · 17 replies
    Arlingtoncemetery.net ^ | May 27, 2016 | Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD
    In Flanders Fields By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918) Canadian Army In Flanders Fields the poppies blow Between the crosses row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We...
  • Stunning cave paintings found 300 metres below Spain

    05/27/2016 1:19:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    The Local ^ | May 26, 2016 | Jessica Jones
    The cave joins that at Altamira as one of Spain’s most exciting and best-preserved set of cave paintings and for Garate, marks a career high. "Without doubt it is the most important discovery of my career," he told The Local. "I have been searching the caves of the Basque Country for ten years and have discovered lots of new caves but none as important as Atxurra. It could very well be the cave with the most animal figures in the Basque Country," he added. The Atxurra caves were originally discovered in 1929, but as the paintings are at a depth...
  • Migration back to Africa took place during the Paleolithic

    05/26/2016 11:59:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 26, 2016 | University of the Basque Country
    A piece of international research led by the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has retrieved the mitogenome of a fossil belonging to the first Homo sapiens population in Europe. The Palaeogenomics study conducted by the Human Evolutionary Biology group of the Faculty of Science and Technology, led by Concepción de la Rua, in collaboration with researchers in Sweden, the Netherlands and Romania, has made it possible to retrieve the complete sequence of the mitogenome of the Pestera Muierii woman (PM1) using two teeth. This mitochondrial genome corresponds to the now disappeared U6 basal lineage, and it is from this lineage...
  • Hotter That Usual Summer Coming.Not Good For Either Convention,Rust Belt Or Chicago.

    05/26/2016 7:56:02 PM PDT · by Cruz_West_Paul2016 · 17 replies
    The entire rust belt just may be in for a scorcher come June, and maybe thru October. By now most of us have seen the forecast. The worst thing about heat waves in the rust belt is either lack of rain or breezes. Are we going to have a repeat of the deadly 1995 Chicago summer? And what about the DNC/GOP Conventions? It's probably going to be around 95 to 100 degrees those weekends. Are the Democrats still going to protest and "Break Stuff" while baking in that heat? And will the Leftist Loonies start up again blaming the excessive...
  • "The choice before us is plain: Christ or chaos." - U.S. Senate Chaplain Peter Marshall

    05/26/2016 6:21:41 PM PDT · by stars & stripes forever · 13 replies
    On January 13, 1947, U.S. Senate Chaplain Peter Marshall stated: "The choice before us is plain: Christ or chaos, conviction or compromise, discipline or disintegration. I am rather tired of hearing about our rights... The time is come to hear about responsibilities... America's future depends upon her accepting and demonstrating God's government."
  • * VANITY * JUST FOR FUN * VANITY *

    05/26/2016 3:15:36 AM PDT · by knarf · 13 replies
    American culture ^ | 1958 | DION AND THE BELMONTS
    Older people are easily sidetracked when researching serious stuff in the wee hours of the morning
  • The work of Neanderthals: Ancient ring-like structures from 176,000 years ago

    05/25/2016 7:10:46 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    l a times ^ | 05/25/2016 | Deborah Netburn
    Deep in a dark cave in southwestern France lie half a dozen mysterious structures that scientists believe were built by Neanderthals 176,000 years ago -- about 140,000 years before the first modern humans arrived in Europe. The structures, described Wednesday in the journal Nature, are located in what is known as the Bruniquel Cave. They are made of roughly 400 pieces of stalagmites, all roughly, almost eerily, the same size. Archaeologists say these mineral formations were probably broken off the cave floor by ancient hands and then deliberately arranged into two large rings and a series of four round piles...
  • Mao's Cultural Revolution Offers Lessons for Obama's America

    05/25/2016 3:14:48 PM PDT · by Benny Huang · 16 replies
    Freedom Daily ^ | May 25, 2016 | Benny Huang
    I was pleasantly surprised to see the media pause for a moment last week to recall China's Cultural Revolution on the 50th anniversary of its regrettable birth. Unlike a lot of the media's silly anniversaries this one is actually worth remembering. If you aren't familiar with the Cultural Revolution just think of Stephen King's "Children of the Corn" being played out in China rather than rural Nebraska. The movement began in 1966 and lasted about ten years. Children rose up against their elders and seized for themselves the reins of power, humiliating their parents and teachers and sometimes even murdering...
  • The Army Is Bringing Back a 70-Year-Old Gun for New Fights [Karl Gustav]

    05/25/2016 6:04:35 AM PDT · by C19fan · 33 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | May 23, 2016 | Kyle Mizokami
    The United States Army will soon begin distributing a weapon system introduced in 1946. The M3 Carl Gustav rocket launcher will bolster the firepower of rifle platoons, giving them a much-needed edge. Developed by Bofors (now Saab), the Carl Gustav is a lightweight, man-portable recoilless rifle. Recoilless rifles are like a cross between an artillery gun and a bazooka: While they have propellant at the base of the projectile like a rocket, the propellant doesn't burn beyond the barrel, meaning the projectile flies unpowered like a bullet or artillery shell. Unlike artillery, propellant gasses are directed backwards, counteracting the weapon's...
  • Bell of battlecruiser sunk 75 years ago in Royal Navy's biggest ever disaster retrieved from [tr]

    05/25/2016 5:47:32 AM PDT · by C19fan · 28 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 24, 2016 | Sam Tonkin
    The bell from HMS Hood has been unveiled by the Princess Royal to mark the 75th anniversary of the Royal Navy's largest loss of life from a single vessel. Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen - who funded the expedition to retrieve the bell from the seabed of the Denmark Strait between Iceland and Greenland - attended the event at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard where the bell has gone on display. Anne struck eight bells at midday during the ceremony, held with HMS Victory as a backdrop, watched by descendants of some of the 1,415 sailors who died when the battleship was hit...
  • Trump: suicide of Bill Clinton's counsel Vince Foster 'very fishy' – as it happened

    05/23/2016 6:59:40 PM PDT · by Helicondelta · 428 replies
    theguardian.com ^ | May 23, 2016
    Moments before his on-air interview with Bill O’Reilly, a Washington Post interview with presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump indicated that the real estate tycoon is tentatively exploring one of the most infamous conspiracy theories about Bill Clinton’s presidency as he readies his general election battle plan against Hillary Clinton. In the interview, Trump called theories that the Clintons were behind the 1993 death of deputy White House counsel Vince Foster “very serious,” calling the circumstances of his suicide “very fishy.” “He had intimate knowledge of what was going on,” Trump said. “He knew everything that was going on and...
  • Review of Ed Cline's "Sparrowhawk" which dramatizes events leading up to the American Revolution.

    05/25/2016 12:02:32 AM PDT · by Hugh Kenrick · 40 replies
    The Objectivist Standard ^ | Spring 2010 | Dina Schein Federman
    "The founding of the United States was among the most dramatic and glorious events in history. For the first time, a nation was founded on the principle of individual rights. Those interested in learning about America’s founding and its cause may turn to history texts. But history texts, even when their content is accurate, tend to be dry accounts of events. They lack the excitement of an adventure novel. Yet most novels set in the Revolutionary period are not good sources of information: Being works of fiction, they may take liberties with historical fact; and they often employ the American...
  • 5,000-Year-Old Beer Recipe Had Secret Ingredient

    05/24/2016 7:14:00 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    discovery.com ^ | May 24, 2016 09:42 AM ET | Tom Metcalfe, Live Science
    Scientists conducted tests on ancient pottery jars and funnels found at the Mijiaya archaeological site in China’s Shaanxi province. The analyses revealed traces of oxalate — a beer-making byproduct that forms a scale called “beerstone” in brewing equipment — as well as residues from a variety of ancient grains and plants. These grains included broomcorn millets, an Asian wild grain known as “Job’s tears,” tubers from plant roots, and barley. Barley is used to make beer because it has high levels of amylase enzymes that promote the conversion of starches into sugars during the fermenting process. It was first cultivated...
  • New Orleans delays bid process for Confederate monument removal

    05/24/2016 3:13:23 PM PDT · by BBell · 21 replies
    NEW ORLEANS (WWL-TV) – The city of New Orleans has cancelled the start of the monument relocation bid process that was scheduled Monday as the matter continues to be stayed by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals. The decision to remove four monuments that celebrate Confederate era figures or events and the bid process to have them removed has been marked by controversy and court hearings. The city council voted late last year to have the Robert E. Lee statue at Lee Circle, The P.G.T. Beauregard statue near City Park, the Jefferson Davis Memorial on Jefferson Davis Parkway and the...
  • [2 hrs 44 minutes Video] President Ronald Reagan Assassination Attempt CNN Coverage 3-30-1981

    05/23/2016 9:04:19 PM PDT · by fkabuckeyesrule · 16 replies
    JFK1963NEWSVIDEOS YouTube ^ | Published on March 13, 2016 | CNN
    From Monday March 30th, 1981 CNN Live Coverage of the Assassination attempt of the 40th President of The United States Ronald Reagan. Coverage starts at 2:00 P.M E.T with President Reagan speaking to the AFL-CIO at the Washington Hilton Hotel. Reagan was shot by John Hinkley Jr. at 2:27 P.M E.T and Reagan was rushed to George Washington University Hospital
  • Christianity: An Antidote to Tyranny

    05/23/2016 9:42:10 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 7 replies
    Crisis Magazine ^ | May 23, 2016 | Clifford Staples
    Christianity: An Antidote to TyrannyClifford Staples Like all modern tyrants, Karl Marx hated religion, Christianity in particular, because he understood that it was going to be very difficult if not impossible to get men to follow him so long as they continued to follow Jesus Christ, and so the first thing an aspiring tyrant in the middle of Christian Europe needed to do was to uproot and destroy Christianity. With Christ dwelling in the hearts of men there was no room for the atheist humanism that Marx and others were proposing as an alternative. But without God men could be...
  • The Sinister, Secret History Of A Food That Everybody Loves [the Curse of the Potato]

    05/23/2016 4:55:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 75 replies
    Washington Post 'blogs ^ | April 25, 2016 | Jeff Guo
    "The Spaniards were much impressed with the productivity of manioc in Arawak agriculture in the Greater Antilles," historian Jonathan Sauer recounts in his history of crop plants. "[A Spanish historian] calculated that 20 persons working 6 hours a day for a month could plant enough yuca to provide cassava bread for a village of 300 persons for 2 years." By all accounts, the Taíno were prosperous -- "a well-nourished population of over a million people," according to Sauer. And yet... lacked the monumental architecture of the Maya or the mathematical knowledge of the Aztec. And most importantly, they were not organized in...
  • 'Stone Age Art' In Upper Franconian Cave Not An Archaeological Sensation After All

    05/22/2016 9:03:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    FAU News ^ | April 27, 2016 | Julia Blumenrother
    The Mäanderhöhle cave near Bamberg was previously regarded as an archaeological sensation. It was thought to contain some of the oldest cave art in Germany. However, Julia Blumenröther, a former student at FAU's Institute of Prehistory and Early History, has demonstrated in her Master's thesis that the markings discovered inside the cave in 2005 are not fertility symbols carved by humans as previously thought. In fact, these lines occurred as a result of natural processes, the archaeologist says. One of the caverns in the 75-metre long cave is full of spherical deposits of minerals known as cave clouds that form...
  • People you don't mess with, Leroy Brown, Jim Thompson,Jack Bauer,DJT

    05/22/2016 3:43:23 PM PDT · by eastforker · 159 replies
    eastforker ^ | 05/22/16 | eastforker
    Would like to hear who you think not to mess with.
  • Tax Havens: A Legitimate Defense against Greedy Politicos

    05/22/2016 8:10:45 AM PDT · by fella · 5 replies
    Panam Post ^ | 21 May 2016 | Luis Guillermo Vélez
    Officials, Intellectuals, Workers Hypocritically Denounce Strategies They Practice Themselves; Why can’t tax evasion be a legitimate form of self defense? In some countries and circumstances, it is. Despite what politicians want us to believe, tax havens exist because some countries have been turned into tax hellholes by officials bent on “social justice” and “income redistribution.” Sometimes, those same politicians top the list of “offshore” account holders trying to evade taxes. “The Wealth of Nations” by Adam Smith had something to say about this kind of government revenue, namely that taxes are a lesser evil overall than other forms of paying...
  • Huge Roman Villa Found Under Amalfi Church Set To Open

    05/21/2016 5:39:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    The Local ^ | 16 May 2016 | unattributed
    A fresco-covered Roman villa, found underneath a church on Italy's sun-kissed Amalfi coast, is set to open to the public for the first time in July.... Italy's Culture Undersecretary, Antimo Cesaro... told Ansa the ruin was "a perfectly preserved archaeological treasure of enormous artistic value". The enormous villa dates back to the second century BC and was first unearthed eight metres below the church of Santa Maria dell'Assunta in central Positano, Campania, in 2004. Prior to its discovery, the impressive abode had lain hidden since AD 79 when an eruption of Vesuvius buried it under volcanic stone and ash. The...
  • Rome Mulls 'Metro Museum' After New Line Unearths Ruin

    05/21/2016 5:27:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    The Local ^ | 17 May 2016 | Patrick Browne
    Rome authorities are set to build the world's first 'archaeological underground station' around an ancient Roman barracks which came to light during works to build a new underground station. The remains of a second century imperial barracks were found nine metres below street level in November, when construction began on Amba Aradam-Ipponio station on the city's new metro Line C. The 1,753 square-metre ruin contains some 39 rooms, many of which contain original mosaics and frescoes. Lying so deep under the city, it was impossible for modern survey equipment to detect the ruin before work began. But work on the...
  • Elizabeth I dress: Altar cloth may be Queen's gown

    05/21/2016 4:37:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    BBC ^ | May 16, 2016 | unattributed
    The fabric at St Faith's Church in Bacton has been identified by experts as a piece of a 16th Century dress. An examination by Historic Royal Palaces curators has strengthened a theory it formed part of a court dress. The Queen is depicted in the Rainbow Portrait wearing a similar fabric, but no documentary evidence has been found to suggest the dress was worn by her. Historians believe the monarch could have gifted the garment to one of her servants, Blanche Parry. Dating back to the last decades of the 16th Century, the altar cloth that hung in a glass...
  • Venezuela: Food and Medicine Shortages are a Government Policy

    05/21/2016 6:39:30 AM PDT · by fella · 16 replies
    panampost.com ^ | 20 May 2016 | Luis H. Ball
    President Maduro Deliberately Causes Shortages to Cow Venezuelan Citizens into Submission Even with the collapse of the price of oil, Venezuela’s total export revenue this year will yield a similar amount to Peru’s total exports. Peru and Venezuela have the same population, and the world knows there are no food lines in Peru and no one is dying for lack of medicines in that country. Unfortunately, most reporting by the international press on Venezuela’s current crisis, while mentioning the Chavista regime’s mismanagement and corruption, also places the blame on the economic crisis that befell the country after oil prices collapsed...
  • Did the Battle of Jutland Really Matter?

    05/21/2016 6:33:24 AM PDT · by C19fan · 100 replies
    National Interest ^ | May 20, 2016 | Robert Farley
    A century ago, the two greatest fleets of the industrial age fought an inconclusive battle in the North Sea. The British Grand Fleet and the German High Seas Fleet fielded a total of fifty-eight dreadnought battleships and battle cruisers, ships over the twice the size of most modern surface combatants. Including smaller ships, the battle included 250 vessels in total.
  • 101-Year-Old Lady Checks Riding Camel Off Bucket List

    05/20/2016 3:13:00 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    For her upcoming 102nd birthday, Helen Estes had the idea to celebrate by riding a camel. Estes has already checked off a number of items from her bucket list like riding a motorcycle, hot air ballooning, and attending Mardis Gras. "When I was in junior high we were studying the Arabian Knights and I guess I must have been bug eyed or something, because I wanted to experience what they did," said Estes. When she told her community living place what she wanted to do for her 102nd birthday, Polo Park Estates did not hesitate to make it happen. It...
  • Teen uses satellite imagery to discover possible ancient Mayan ruins

    05/20/2016 10:31:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 11 replies
    phys.org ^ | May 11, 2016 | by Bob Yirka
    Credit: Canadian Space Agency, via TheTelegraph ====================================================================================================================== William Gadoury, a 15 year old Mayan history enthusiast who lives in Saint-Jean-de-Matha in Lanaudière, Quebec, has, according to Le Journal de Montréal, used satellite imagery to make associations between ancient Mayan city locations and constellations, and in so doing, may have actually discovered a site that has not been previously known. According to the news report, Gadoury, who claims to have been long interested in the Mayan culture, gained access to satellite imagery—after applying the Geographic Information System he found a correlation between 22 constellations and 117 Mayan cities. But, in so...
  • Why they hate Christianity.

    05/20/2016 10:14:54 AM PDT · by LouAvul · 10 replies
    This is an excerpt from Francis Schaeffer's How Should We Then Live? Published in 1976, Schaeffer draws parallels between ancient Rome's hatred of Christianity and what we're seeing in modern times. No totalitarian authority nor authoritarian state can tolerate those who have an absolute by which to judge that state and its actions. The Christians had that absolute in God's revelation. Because the Christians had an absolute, universal standard by which to judge not only personal morals but the state, they were counted as enemies of totalitarian Rome and were thrown to the beasts. Amazing the number of similarities between...