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History (General/Chat)

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  • Ninth Circuit Considers Guam's Racially Discriminatory Plebiscite Registration Law

    08/29/2014 12:58:15 PM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 4 replies
    Powerline Blog ^ | August 28, 2014 | Paul Mirengoff
    The United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit heard oral argument yesterday in the case of Davis v. Guam. The hearing occurred in Guam, the first time the Ninth Circuit has sat there since 2002. Mr. Davis, a resident of Guam, attempted to register to vote in a plebiscite on Guam’s relationship to the United States. He was denied permission to register because he could not trace his ancestry to a native inhabitant of Guam. Guam law allows only those with correct ancestry to vote in the future status plebiscite. According to a report by Davis’ expert, nearly...
  • Senator Harlan Statue Returns to Iowa

    08/29/2014 2:51:16 AM PDT · by iowamark · 4 replies
    WHO TV ^ | 8/28/2014 | Roger Riley
    MOUNT PLEASANT, Iowa – After being in the United States Capitol since the year 1910, the statue of former Iowa senator James Harlan has returned home. The Harlan Statue had been on display at the National Statuary Hall Collection until it was replaced with a statue of the late Norman Borlaug. “Senator Harlan was a true statesman and a public servant,” said Governor Terry Branstad in a news release. Ceremonies to unveil the statue outdoors had to be hastily moved indoors after the Senator’s likeness was revealed. Rain and wind caused a change in plans. Branstad credited the Borlaug Committee...
  • Scientists Reveal the Genetic Prehistory of the New World Arctic Peoples

    08/28/2014 6:29:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, August 28, 2014 | unattributed
    Paleo-Eskimo people occupied the Arctic for more than 4,000 years, say researchers... Maanasa Raghaven of the University of Copenhagen and colleagues have tested this scenario by conducting genomic sequencing on extractions of 169 ancient human bone, teeth and hair samples from Arctic Siberia, Alaska, Canada, and Greenland. They compared them to the same from two present-day Greenlandic Inuit, two Nivkhs, one Aleutian Islander, and two Athabascans. What they found provides a new picture of the population history of the North American Arctic. Their analyses supports the model of the arrival of Paleo-Eskimos into North America as a separate migration from...
  • American Indian Oral Traditions and Ohio's Earthworks

    08/28/2014 6:21:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Ohio History Connection Archaeology Blog ^ | August 25, 2014 | Brad Lepper
    ...So, while my Journal of Ohio Archaeology paper concludes rather pessimistically that there are no documented early American Indian traditions that speak reliably to the original purpose and meaning of the ancient earthworks, there is no reason to believe that traditional stories of contemporary tribes with historic roots in the eastern Woodlands could not include themes and elements that echo, if faintly, traditions of the Hopewell culture. And if that’s conceivable, and I think it is, then it would be worthwhile to look for them... One reason why it’s important to take seriously what American Indians have had to say...
  • Utah's Great Gallery rock art younger than expected, say scientists [1K-2K]

    08/28/2014 6:13:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | August 25, 2014 | Mary-Ann Muffoletto
    "The most accepted hypotheses pointed to the age of these paintings as 2,000 to 4,000 years old or perhaps even 7,000 to 8,000 years old," says Pederson, associate professor in USU's Department of Geology and lead author on the paper. "Our findings reveal these paintings were likely made between 1,000 to 2,000 years ago." The USU-led team's findings strike a key point about the art's creators: They may have co-existed with the Fremont people, who are credited with carving distinctly different pictographs found in the same region. "Previous ideas suggested a people different from the Fremont created the paintings because...
  • Hadrian's Wall dig unearths 2,000-year-old toilet seat

    08/28/2014 6:07:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    BBC News ^ | August 27, 2014 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,000-year-old, perfectly preserved wooden toilet seat at a Roman fort on Hadrian's Wall in Northumberland. Experts at Vindolanda believe it is the only find of its kind and dates from the 2nd Century. The site, near Hexham, has previously revealed gold and silver coins and other artefacts of the Roman army. The seat was discovered in a muddy trench, which was previously filled with rubbish. Dr Andrew Birley, director of excavations at Vindolanda, said: "We know a lot about Roman toilets from previous excavations at the site and from the wider Roman world, which have included...
  • 2,800-Year-Old Zigzag Art Found in Greek Tomb

    08/28/2014 6:00:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Wednesday, August 20, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The tomb was built sometime between 800 B.C. and 760 B.C., a time when Corinth was emerging as a major power and Greeks were colonizing the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea. The tomb itself consists of a shaft and burial pit, the pit having a limestone sarcophagus that is about 5.8 feet (1.76 meters) long, 2.8 feet (0.86 m) wide and 2.1 feet (0.63 m) high. When researchers opened the sarcophagus, they found a single individual had been buried inside, with only fragments of bones surviving. The scientists found several pottery vessels beside the sarcophagus, and the tomb also contained...
  • Ancient DNA Sheds New Light on Arctic's Earliest People

    08/28/2014 4:40:35 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 17 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 8-28-14 | Heather Pringle
    The earliest people in the North American Arctic remained isolated from others in the region for millennia before vanishing around 700 years ago, a new genetic analysis shows. The study, published online Thursday, also reveals that today's Inuit and Native Americans of the Arctic are genetically distinct from the region's first settlers. Inuit hunters in the Canadian Arctic have long told stories about a mysterious ancient people known as the Tunit, who once inhabited the far north. Tunit men, they recalled, possessed powerful magic and were strong enough to crush the neck of a walrus and singlehandedly haul the massive...
  • Phoenician Artifacts Recovered Off Coast of Malta

    08/28/2014 4:25:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology mag ^ | Monday, August 25, 2014 | unattributed
    Scientists from the French National Research Agency and Texas A&M University are part of a team that has recovered 20 Phoenician grinding stones and 50 amphorae about one mile off the coast of Malta’s Gozo Island. Timothy Gambin of the University of Malta told the Associated Press that the ship was probably traveling between Sicily and Malta when it sank ca. 700 B.C. The team will continue to look for other artifacts and parts of the vessel, which sits at a depth of almost 400 feet and is one of the oldest shipwrecks to be discovered in the central Mediterranean....
  • "Slaves' Hill" Was Home to High-Status Craftsmen

    08/28/2014 3:44:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Thursday, August 28, 2014
    New information from excavations in southern Israel’s Timna Valley by Erez Ben-Yosef and Lidar Sapir-Hen of Tel Aviv University suggests that the laborers who smelted copper at the site 3,000 years ago were skilled craftsmen of high social status. Since the 1930s, it has been thought that the Iron Age camp was inhabited by slaves because of the massive barrier that had been unearthed and the harsh conditions created by the furnaces and desert conditions. The well-preserved bones, seeds, fruits, and fabric that have been recently recovered tell a different story, however. “The copper smelters were given the better cuts...
  • Maria Von Trapp, RIP

    08/28/2014 9:17:31 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 43 replies
    Townhall ^ | 08/28/2014 | Jerry Newcombe
    Earlier this year, an event happened that did not receive wide notice. The last of the Von Trapp Family Singers, the last of the children---the real ones---died. Her name was Maria---not to be confused with the lady played by Julie Andrews, Maria Augusta Trapp, who died in 1987. Maria Von Trapp’s death in February 2014 marks the end of an era. The Sound of Music deserves its accolades as the Movie of the Year (1965) and one of the finest films ever made. Even my one-year-old granddaughter is mesmerized by the puppet scene. As a film it is an icon....
  • The Extreme Partisanship of John Roberts's Supreme Court

    08/28/2014 7:57:15 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 10 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | August 27, 2014 | Garrett Epps
    “Politics are closely divided,” John Roberts told scholar Jeffrey Rosen after his first term as chief justice. “The same with the Congress. There ought to be some sense of some stability, if the government is not going to polarize completely. It’s a high priority to keep any kind of partisan divide out of the judiciary as well.” No one who observes the chief justice would doubt he was sincere in his wish for greater unanimity, greater judicial modesty, a widely respected Supreme Court quietly calling “balls and strikes.” But human beings are capable of wishing for mutually incompatible things—commitment and...
  • The Kennewick Man Finally Freed to Share His Secrets

    08/27/2014 4:29:21 PM PDT · by Para-Ord.45 · 27 replies
    http://www.smithsonianmag.com ^ | SEPTEMBER 2014 | By Douglas Preston
    Instapundit: "The Army Corps of Engineers sure didnÂ’t want this researched, and continues to interfere today. Why? " Why? It blows the native "indians" narrative of 'we were here first' out of the water. Land claims and free money is g-o-n-e gone: As work progressed, a portrait of Kennewick Man emerged. He does not belong to any living human population. Who, then, are his closest living relatives? Judging from the shape of his skull and bones, his closest living relatives appear to be the Moriori people of the Chatham Islands, a remote archipelago 420 miles southeast of New Zealand, as...
  • Introducing Antonio Gramsci

    08/27/2014 4:49:25 PM PDT · by crusher · 9 replies
    The Steve Deace Show ^ | 8/13/2014 | Steve Deace
    I have long posited that the most important political/social theorist and tactician of the past century was the Italian communist Antonio Gramsci, who singlehandedly formulated the path to the malevolent political culture that has defeated liberty and under whose heel we suffer. The lineage is clear: Marx inspired Gramsci, Gramsci inspired Alinsky, and Alinsky inspired Hillary and Soetero. It is by Gramsci's design that collectivist central planners have captured every single social institution. If you do not understand Gamsci you cannot fully understand Alinsky and the appeal of fascism to the American Ruling Class. Broadcaster Steve Deace recently presented an...
  • Civil War hero who died at Gettysburg to be awarded Medal Civil-War-officer-receive-Medal-Honor

    08/27/2014 7:10:27 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 28 replies
    Mail Online ^ | 27 Aug 2014 | OLLIE GILLMAN FOR MAILONLINE
    1st Lieutenant Alonzo Hersford Cushing to be awarded Medal of Honor Lt Cushing was killed in the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863 He stood his ground and fought on despite a bullet wound to the head Congress grant special exemption to give Lt Cushing the medal 151 years on Relatives and admirers had campaigned since 1980s for proper recognition Two Vietnam War veterans will also receive medal in ceremony next month
  • Democratic convention besieged by protesters(This Day in History 1968)

    08/26/2014 3:30:05 PM PDT · by Kid Shelleen · 9 replies
    History.com ^ | 08/26/2014 | staff
    As the Democratic National Convention gets underway in Chicago, thousands of antiwar demonstrators take to Chicago's streets to protest the Vietnam War and its support by the top Democratic presidential candidate, Vice President Hubert Humphrey. During the four-day convention, the most violent in U.S. history, police and National Guardsmen clashed with protesters outside the International Amphitheater, and hundreds of people, including innocent bystanders, were beaten by the Chicago police. The violence even spilled into the convention hall, as guards roughed up delegates and members of the press, including CBS News correspondent Mike Wallace, who was punched in the face. On...
  • Historian Claims The Louvre Museum Holds Ancient Amphipolis Tomb Treasures

    08/26/2014 10:56:38 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    greece.greekreporter.com ^ | Aug 26, 2014 | by Daphne Tsagari
    A prominent Greek historian claims that it is possible for the Louvre Museum in Paris to possess artifacts from the ancient Greek tomb currently being excavated by archaeologists in Amphipolis, Greece. The fame of the ancient Greek treasures allegedly hidden in the Amphipolis tomb has recently raised concerns whether the monument will be found intact, or if it had been looted in the past. Historian, Sarantis Kargakos, speaking to Antenna TV, said that the tomb has been looted in the past and that the monument’s interior won’t be intact. “At the spot where Ancient Amphipolis is found, a village named...
  • Why was Stonehenge built? 'Groundbreaking' discovery of 15 new monuments suggests the answer...

    08/26/2014 10:21:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 48 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 13:41 EST, 22 August 2014 | Sarah Griffiths
    Archaeologist Vince Gaffney, of the University of Birmingham, is involved in the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project – a four-year collaboration with the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology in Austria. The team has conducted the first detailed underground survey of the area surrounding Stonehenge, covering around four square miles (6km), journalist Ed Caesar reported for Smithsonian. They discovered evidence of 15 unknown and poorly-understood late Neolithic monuments, including other henges, barrows, pits and ditches, which could all harbour valuable information about the prehistoric site. ... Historians are not sure what purpose the Curcus served and Professor Gaffney...
  • Greek archaeologists enter large underground tomb [Amphipolis update]

    08/26/2014 10:13:43 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 13 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 08/25/2014 | Staff
    Archaeologists excavating an ancient tomb under a massive burial mound in northern Greece have entered the underground structure, which appears to have been looted in antiquity. The Culture Ministry said Monday that archaeologists have partially investigated the antechamber of the tomb at Amphipolis and uncovered a marble wall concealing one or more inner chambers. However, a hole in the decorated wall and signs of forced entry outside the huge barrel-vaulted structure indicate the tomb was plundered long ago. The excavation will continue for weeks. The tomb dates between 325 B.C.—two years after the death of ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the...
  • The Madness of 2008: The Perfect Storm That Gave Us Obama

    08/26/2014 5:47:07 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 45 replies
    National Review ^ | 08/27/2014 | Victor Davis Hanson
    <p>America is suddenly angry at the laxity, incompetence, and polarizing politics of the Obama administration, the bad optics of the president putting about in his bright golf clothes while the world burns. Certainly, no recent president has failed on so many fronts — honesty, transparency, truthfulness, the economy, foreign policy, the duties of the commander-in-chief, executive responsibilities, and spiritual leadership.</p>
  • The story of the A-10 and why the F-35 cannot replace it. (video)

    08/26/2014 4:58:24 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 46 replies
    wimp.com ^ | 8-26-2014 | wimp.com
    Pierre Sprey is one of the original designers of the A-10 Warthog during the 1970s. He provides insight into why the aircraft is so loved by ground troops in the military, and why its recent retirement from Air Force operations is so hotly debated.
  • Goodbye to Another of the "Greatest Generation"

    08/26/2014 3:58:22 AM PDT · by beachn4fun · 43 replies
    August 26, 2014 | me
    Although Jennes Christian Nelson, Jr. was not a FReeper, I hope you will join me in giving him a spiritual send off. Jennes (JC) was born in 1927 and passed into Heaven on August 20th, 2014. He was the father of my oldest brother-in-law (we grew up with him and his sisters). At 17, as soon as he graduated high school in 1944, JC enlisted in the Army Air Corps as an Air Cadet during WWII. He served with forces in the Philippines for two years, finishing with the Reserves in 1948 ( I do not know what his rank...
  • Alfred Kinsey was a pervert and a sex criminal

    08/25/2014 8:40:39 PM PDT · by Morgana · 34 replies
    LIFE SITE ^ | Jonathon van Maren
    He is known as “The Father of the Sexual Revolution,” and if you’ve ever taken a university course on 20th century history, you’ll have heard his name: Alfred Kinsey. Kinsey was not only the “father” of the Sexual Revolution, he set the stage for the massive social and cultural upheaval of the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s with his 1948 Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and his 1953 Sexual Behavior in the Human Female. These books revealed to a shocked and somewhat titillated population things they had never known about themselves: That between 30-45% of men had affairs, 85% of...
  • The Horrifying American Roots of Nazi Eugenics

    08/24/2014 2:00:49 PM PDT · by TigerClaws · 50 replies
    Hitler and his henchmen victimized an entire continent and exterminated millions in his quest for a co-called "Master Race." But the concept of a white, blond-haired, blue-eyed master Nordic race didn't originate with Hitler. The idea was created in the United States, and cultivated in California, decades before Hitler came to power. California eugenicists played an important, although little known, role in the American eugenics movement's campaign for ethnic cleansing. - See more at: http://hnn.us/article/1796#sthash.2W5ntE2W.dpuf
  • The Ghost Hotels of the Catskills

    08/25/2014 9:42:24 AM PDT · by C19fan · 49 replies
    The Daily Beast ^ | August 25, 2014 | Brandon Presser
    Phones on desks, linens on beds, catalog cards spilling out of the filing cabinets—all covered with a fine patina of dust. Neglected for years, and abandoned in seconds, it’s like a modern-day Pompeii in which the earth suddenly reclaimed its souls as they went about their daily business. But this isn’t fodder for the next Dean Koontz thriller; it’s real, and its 100 miles north of New York City. Sullivan County once boasted 538 hotels and over 50,000 bungalows, but today practically nothing remains of this illustrious, vacationing era, save crumbling towers and abandoned estates. Walking through the haunting wreckage—thirsty...
  • The End of Tanning?

    08/25/2014 9:25:37 AM PDT · by C19fan · 34 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | August 25, 2014 | Olga Khazan
    Ryan Baker, a director of operations for Palm Beach Tan, ushers me through the narrow, pastel hallways of one of the chain's salons in Washington, D.C. It's a tiny place, squeezed into a strip mall between a Chipotle and a beauty parlor. But in a pinch, some see it as a mini-vacation—a dose of artificial sunshine when life’s too busy, or the outside world too cloudy, for the real thing. ....................................................... And that's the next big challenge for health agencies. Despite how rapidly the warnings and taxes and regulations have beat back the sunbed industry, there’s still something a little...
  • Fire Stone: First Fire-Scorched Petrified Wood Found

    08/24/2014 6:27:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    LiveScience ^ | August 12, 2014 | Becky Oskin
    After serving nearly 30 years as a doorstop for a nuclear physicist, a hunk of petrified wood from Arizona has finally been recognized as a one-of-a-kind find. The 210-million-year-old piece of wood contains the first fossilized fire scar ever discovered... Evidence for ancient forest fires predates the dinosaurs, but the clues come from charcoal, not from marks on fossilized trees. Charcoal remains of Earth's oldest fires date back more than 400 million years. No one has ever spotted a fire scar on petrified wood before, said lead study author Bruce Byers, a natural resources consultant from Falls Church, Virginia. That's...
  • VICTORIA (a pretty good read IMHO. Free to read at the site)

    08/24/2014 5:36:06 PM PDT · by dynachrome · 6 replies
    TraditionalRight.com ^ | 2014 | “Thomas Hobbes"
    Was the dissolution of the United States inevitable? Probably, once all the “diversity” and “multiculturalism” crap got started. Right up to the end the coins carried the motto, E Pluribus Unum, just as the last dreadnought of the Imperial and Royal Austro-Hungarian Navy was the Viribus Unitis. But the reality for both was Ex Uno, Plura. It’s odd how clearly the American century is marked: 1865 to 1965. As the 20th century historian Shelby Foote noted, the first Civil War made us one nation. In 1860, we wrote, “the United States are.” By the end of the war, the verb...
  • Moral Relativists In The University: They Aren’t Who You Think They Are

    08/24/2014 1:44:13 PM PDT · by ReformationFan · 28 replies
    The Aquila Report ^ | 8-24-14 | Collin Garbarino
    This year the movie God Is Not Dead preyed on every Christian parent’s fear of sending a child off to college only to have their family’s faith and values undermined by an atheist college professor espousing some form of moral relativism. The movie hinges on a certain cliché, but the cliché is a cliché because many of us took a class with “that professor.” He might not have been so over-the-top, but his prejudices were evident. The American university tends to be fairly hostile to the conservative movement. One of the core tenets of conservatism is the Judeo-Christian teaching that...
  • Before He Died, Richard III Lived Large

    08/24/2014 10:48:27 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 35 replies
    The Smithsonian ^ | 8-19-14 | Rachel Nuwer
    Bone chemistry sheds light on the monarch's shifting diet throughout his brief life Richard III was only 32 years old when he was struck down at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485. But according to new research, the King of England at least enjoyed some good eating throughout his life—especially in the few years leading up to his death. Scientists from the British Geological Survey and the University of Leicester analyzed Richard III's teeth, his femur and his ribs to see what they could reveal about the monarch's diet, Phys.org reports. They used isotope analysis to identify chemical signatures...
  • The delusions of anti-Israel conservatives

    08/24/2014 6:10:19 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 38 replies
    American Thinker ^ | August 24, 2014 | Ben Cohen
    In 1948, the argument for the creation of Israel was a moral argument; the argument against the creation of Israel was based on an assessment of America’s national interest. Almost seventy years later Israel is an economic and military powerhouse, with a rapidly growing population, while her traditional enemies are weaker than ever. At the present time, most of those who argue against the continued existence of Israel attempt to base their arguments on moral grounds. Still, a small and noisy group of conservatives contend that our support for Israel undermines our standing in the region, and threatens our national...
  • KIDS REACT TO ROTARY PHONES (video)

    08/24/2014 12:11:18 AM PDT · by Impala64ssa · 46 replies
    You Tube ^ | TheFineBros
    Kids reacting to technology of the past, this time around, it's rotary phones. Amazing how technology changes so quickly.
  • The Space Shuttle On Rails

    08/23/2014 4:25:33 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 11 replies
    Txchnologist ^ | July 14th, 2014 | Txchnologist staff
    On a clear July day in 1966, New York Central Railroad engineer Don Wetzel and his team boarded a specially modified Buddliner railcar. Bolted to the roof above them were two GE J47-19 jet engines. Wetzel throttled the engines up and tore down a length of track from Butler, Indiana, to Stryker, Ohio, at almost 184 mph, piloting the experimental vehicle into the record books as the world’s fastest jet-powered train.
  • China seizes huge cache of illegal weapons including 10,500 guns and 120,000 knives and SWORDS

    08/22/2014 11:01:41 PM PDT · by skinkinthegrass · 19 replies
    Daily Mail.Co. UK ^ | 14 April 2014 (update:15 April 2014 ) | Matt Blake
    China seizes huge cache of illegal weapons including 10,500 guns and 120,000 knives and SWORDS Follows 4-month probe leading agents deep into China's criminal underworld Haul includes sniper rifles, machine guns, crossbows and samurai swords 15 people were arrested on suspicion of making and distributing arms Official says it was a family-run firm that 'gave business cards all over China'
  • Oldest Yet Known Metal Object Discovered in the Middle East

    08/22/2014 8:00:53 PM PDT · by fatez · 70 replies
    Live Scient ^ | August 22, 2104 | Charles Q. Choi
    A copper awl is the oldest metal object unearthed to date in the Middle East. The discovery reveals that metals were exchanged across hundreds of miles in this region more than 6,000 years ago, centuries earlier than previously thought, researchers say.
  • Fergus/Croche parody

    08/22/2014 11:30:18 AM PDT · by 2harddrive · 2 replies
    Vanity | Vanity
    Bad, Bad Michael Brown Well the north side of St Louie’ Is the baddest part of town And if you go down there You better just beware Of a man name of Michael Brown Now Michael more than trouble You see he stand ‘bout six foot four All those downtown ladies call him "Treetop Lover" All the men just call him "Sir" And he's bad, bad Michael Brown The baddest man in the whole damn town Badder than old King Kong And meaner than a junkyard dog Now Michael he a gambler And he like his fancy clothes And he...
  • Before they left Africa, early modern humans were 'culturally diverse'

    08/21/2014 9:55:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | August 18th, 2014 | Oxford University
    Researchers have carried out the biggest ever comparative study of stone tools dating to between 130,000 and 75,000 years ago found in the region between sub-Saharan Africa and Eurasia. They have discovered there are marked differences in the way stone tools were made, reflecting a diversity of cultural traditions. The study has also identified at least four distinct populations, each relatively isolated from each other with their own different cultural characteristics. The research paper also suggests that early populations took advantage of rivers and lakes that criss-crossed the Saharan desert. A climate model coupled with data about these ancient water...
  • (Those Were The Days!) PHOTO: Late 1960s: Economy Class Seating on a Pan-Am 747

    08/21/2014 7:19:24 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 106 replies
    Retronaut ^ | Circa 1960's | Retronaut
    Late 1960s: Economy Class Seating on a Pan-Am 747 The 1960's were barely done when Pan Am again set a standard the rest of the world was forced to follow. Pan American's Boeing B-747 Jumbo Jets brought down the cost of long distance air travel once again. Source: Pan Am Historical Foundation
  • Clouded Judgment

    08/21/2014 2:34:21 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 1 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | August 21, 2014 | Marvin Olasky
    What caused the terrible world war that began 100 years ago this month? The answer is complicated. Economic trends and social oozes certainly had a big role. Man-centered pride rather than God-centered humility ran rampant among both leaders and followers, with some church hierarchs looking to “progress” rather than Christ for salvation. But many of us were struck in the late 1990s by the irresponsibility of Bill Clinton and Newt Gingrich in putting their personal urges ahead of the national interest, and a parallel problem emerged a century ago. Yes, early versions of Monica Lewinsky occupied the minds of many...
  • Sea Lions And Seals Likely Spread Tuberculosis To Ancient Peruvians

    08/21/2014 1:43:29 PM PDT · by Theoria · 13 replies
    NPR ^ | 21 Aug 2014 | Michaeleen Doucleff
    When Europeans came to the Americas, they brought some nasty diseases — smallpox, cholera and typhus, to name a few.But one pathogen was already there. And it likely traveled to the shores of South America in a surprising vessel.By analyzing DNA from 1,000-year-old mummies, scientists have found evidence that sea lions and seals were the first to bring tuberculosis to the New World. The sea animals likely infected people living along the coast of Peru and northern Chile, a team from the University of Tubingen in Germany reported Wednesday in the journal Nature."We weren't expecting to find a connection to...
  • Ferguson and Eric Holder's Violent Past

    08/21/2014 10:41:24 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 12 replies
    American Thinker ^ | August 21, 2014 | Jason Kissner
    Attorney General Eric Holder has at least one redeeming quality: he fights for what he believes in, and he doesn’t hesitate to express sentiments he knows many people will disagree with vociferously. As long as it’s done within the bounds of the law, that sort of thing should be considered a virtue no matter what one’s political orientation is. It must also be added that those who think Holder is pushing socialist views on race only because he now has the power to do so are wrong; he’s been doing so since his university days at Columbia. And there’s the...
  • Neanderthals Died Out 10,000 Years Earlier Than Thought, With Help From Modern Humans

    08/21/2014 10:35:33 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 50 replies
    Nationalgeographic.com ^ | 08-20-2014 | Dan Vergano
    New fossil dates show our ancient cousins disappeared 40,000 years ago. The Neanderthals died out about 10,000 years earlier than previously thought, new fossil dating suggests, adding to evidence that the arrival of modern humans in Europe pushed our ancient Stone Age cousins into extinction. (Read "Last of the Neanderthals" in National Geographic magazine.) Neanderthals' mysterious disappearance from the fossil record has long puzzled scholars who wondered whether the species went extinct on its own or was helped on its way out by Europe's first modern human migrants. "When did the Neanderthals disappear, and why?" says Tom Higham of the...
  • The Allies Invade Southern France: Seaports and a Race up the Rhone

    08/21/2014 8:52:22 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 8 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | August 21, 2014 | Austin Bay
    Winston Churchill disparaged Operation Anvil-Dragoon, the Aug. 15, 1944 Allied "second D-Day" invasion of Southern France. Churchill joked that he was "dragooned" into an unnecessary invasion. D-Day, June 6th, had breached Fortress Europe. A French Riviera "pincer" was folly. However, the Allied senior commanders who dragooned the Prime Minister obeyed an old military axiom: Amateurs talk strategy. Professionals study logistics. The Germans destroyed Normandy's Port Cherbourg and blocked Antwerp. Supplies over beaches barely met daily needs. The George Patton-led U.S. 3rd Army's August 1944 armored dash stretched supply capacities. Patton's high tempo strike at the Reich required more gas...
  • James Foley Went Looking to Support Terrorists in Syria, Instead They Cut Off His Head

    08/20/2014 3:50:14 PM PDT · by wtd · 124 replies
    FrontPageMag ^ | August 19, 2014 | Daniel Greenfield
    James Foley was one of a new breed of activists calling themselves journalists. He didn’t travel to report on a story, but to promote an agenda. And the agenda was obvious from his Twitter feed. [snip] Foley came to Syria to support the Sunni Islamist rebels against the Syrian government. He cheered on the Sunni Muslim terrorists fighting to ethnically cleanse the Christians of Aleppo. In the conflict between Israel and Hamas, his tweets and retweets were chock full of pro-terrorist propaganda. link
  • Winchester Model 70 Radio Rifle

    08/20/2014 3:04:59 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 32 replies
    NRA.org ^ | unknown | NRA Museum
    In the 1950s, with the airwaves filling with the sounds of rock 'n' roll, America was changing into a "transistor" nation. Deciding to capitalize on the popularity of radio, Winchester designated a prototype .308 Model 70 with a built-in radio in 1955. A speaker was set into the right side of the stock with a series of holes — carved in the trademark "W" outline — allowing the sound to be heard. Presented as a glittering show gun, the new Winchester soon proved a hard sell.
  • Modern Humans Arrived in Europe Earlier Than Previously Thought, Study Finds

    08/20/2014 2:50:07 PM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 55 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 20 August 2014 | GAUTAM NAIK
    A new study concludes that modern humans arrived in Europe much earlier than previously believed, and clarifies more specifically the long time period they overlapped with Neanderthals. The significant overlap bolsters a theory that the two species met, bred and possibly exchanged or copied vital toolmaking techniques. It represents another twist in an enduring puzzle about human origins: why we triumphed while the better adapted and similarly intelligent Neanderthals died out. The study was published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Neanderthals are our closest known extinct relatives, with about 99.5% of DNA in common with humans. They had a brain...
  • Republicans throw a conniption over the teaching of U.S. history (barf alert)

    08/19/2014 5:53:35 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 24 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | August 19, 2014 11:17 AM | Michael Hiltzik
    As students prepare to return to school in the next few weeks, there's no better time for a conservative freakout over education. The issue of the moment is a new outline, or “framework,” issued by the College Board for advanced placement classes in US history. The framework is here. According to a resolution passed at the recent summer meeting of the Republican National Committee meeting in Chicago, it “reflects a radically revisionist view of American history that emphasizes negative aspects.” The RNC calls the framework, which is to be implemented for some 500,000 AP history students this fall, “biased and...
  • Wreck Of World War II-Era U.S. Ship Dubbed 'Galloping Ghost' Is Found

    08/19/2014 3:21:06 PM PDT · by Theoria · 16 replies
    NPR ^ | 19 Aug 2014 | Krishnadev Calamur
    The USS Houston sank during World War II after being hit by the Japanese, killing 700 sailors and Marines. Now, more than 70 years later, U.S. and Indonesian divers have confirmed that a sunken vessel in the Java Sea was the wreck of the ship dubbed "The Galloping Ghost of the Java Coast."The Houston was carrying 1,068 crewmen when it was hit on Feb. 28, 1942, during the Battle of Sunda Strait. Only 291 sailors and Marines survived the sinking and their later use as slave labor by the Japanese. The vessel's commanding officer, Capt. Albert H. Rooks, was posthumously...
  • The diaries: Quisling sealed Denmark's WWII fate

    08/19/2014 12:27:49 PM PDT · by Utah Binger · 8 replies
    Politiken ^ | Peter Wivel, Europe Correspondent, Brussels
    The decision to occupy Denmark was taken at a meeting in Berlin on December 17, 1939 – three and a half months after World War II broke out and almost four months before German troops invaded the country on April 9, 1940. A series of personal meetings between Norway’s Fascist politician Vidkun Quisling and Adolf Hitler led to the decision. Quisling was adamant that Hitler should deny Britain access to the northern Norwegian town of Narvik, and thus be able to control a Norway rich in raw materials. Quisling himself planned to lead a political coup and open Norway up...
  • Sir Robert Peel’s Nine Principles of Policing

    08/19/2014 7:20:32 AM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 11 replies
    NY Times ^ | 4-15-14 | NY TIMES
    Police Commissioner William J. Bratton lists the following guidelines on his blog. There is some doubt among scholars that Sir Robert Peel actually enunciated any of his nine principles himself — some researchers say they were formulated in 1829 by the two first commissioners of London’s Metropolitan Police Department.