Science (General/Chat)

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  • Pilot Wave Theory and Quantum Realism (PBS video)

    12/01/2016 3:16:26 PM PST · by Reeses · 11 replies
    PBS Digital Studios ^ | Nov 30, 2016 | PBS Digital Studios
    There’s one interpretation of the meaning of quantum mechanics that manages to skip a lot of the unphysical weirdness of the mainstream interpretations: it's de Broglie-Bohm pilot wave theory. There are some pretty out-there explanations for the processes at work behind the incredibly successful mathematics of quantum mechanics - things are both waves and particles at the same time, the act of observation defines reality, cats are alive and dead, or even: the universe is constantly splitting into infinite alternate realities. The weird results of quantum experiments seem to demand weird explanations of the nature of reality. In this episode,...
  • Russian Space Agency Confirms Progress Cargo Spacecraft Burns Up in Atmosphere

    12/01/2016 2:54:30 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 4 replies
    sputniknews.com ^ | 12/1/2016
    Russia's Roscosmos space corporation reported earlier on Thursday it had lost telemetry exchange with the Progress MS-04 space freighter some six minutes after the launch on board a Soyuz carrier rocket. The Roscosmos press service stressed that the loss of the cargo ship will not affect the routine operations of the ISS and the crew. A state commission currently analyzes the incident.
  • Key cause of Parkinson's disease can be treated

    12/01/2016 2:24:42 PM PST · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | December 1, 2016 | Provided by: University of New South Wales
    A new Australian study that models the early stages of Parkinson's disease has given researchers insight into its causes and a possible treatment. "We've shown how inflammation within the brain is related to the development of Parkinson's disease, and we've identified a potential mechanism that can prevent this inflammation," says lead author Dr Nic Dzamko, a NHMRC CJ Martin Fellowship holder in the Faculty of Medicine at UNSW in Sydney. "This is the result of four years' worth of work, and we're really excited by the outcomes. It offers hope and introduces a new target for therapeutic research, which we're...
  • Magnetic brain stimulation can bring back stowed memories: study [help for Hillary!]

    12/01/2016 2:19:03 PM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | Dec 01, 2016 | Provided by: University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Results by Rose et al. overturn a theory that in order for short-term memories to exist, neurons that represent that memory must be constantly active. Instead, the neural activity supporting that memory need only arise when the person trying to recall it consciously focuses his or her attention on the memory. Credit: N.S. Rose et al. =========================================================================================================================== It's clear that your working memory—which holds attention on small things of short-term importance—works, or you wouldn't be able to remember a new phone number long enough to dial it. Describing how it works, however—how the brain determines what to keep in mind,...
  • ULA unveils ‘RocketBuilder’ website

    12/01/2016 1:49:29 PM PST · by Ray76 · 5 replies
    Space Flight Now ^ | Nov 30, 2016 | William Harwood
    Rocket-builder United Launch Alliance unveiled a first-of-a-kind website Wednesday that shows potential customers exactly what it will cost to buy an Atlas 5 booster, along with expected savings based on the rocket’s demonstrated reliability, ULA’s on-time launch record and the company’s sophisticated guidance system. The new “RocketBuilder” web tool, reflecting ULA’s on-going push to streamline operations and lower prices, shows that an entry-level Atlas 5, capable of boosting a small to medium-size satellite to the high orbit used by communications stations, would cost $109 million — $75 million less than the same rocket cost just a few years ago. RocketBuilder:...
  • Apple is reportedly using drones to beat Google Maps

    12/01/2016 10:05:33 AM PST · by Enlightened1 · 16 replies
    The Verge ^ | 12/01/16 | Tom Warren
    Apple is reportedly planning to use drones to improve its Maps app and truly compete with Google Maps, following a problematic launch four years ago. Bloomberg News reports that Apple has been building a team of experts in robots and data capture to utilize drones to quickly update maps. Google and Apple both use fleets of cars and vans equipped with cameras, but drones will allow Apple to examine and monitor roads, street signs, construction areas, and more. Apple is said to have hired at least one employee from Amazon’s Air division to help run its own drone team based in Seattle. Alongside the...
  • Astronaut Buzz Aldrin Medically Evacuated From South Pole

    12/01/2016 9:11:15 AM PST · by Enlightened1 · 41 replies
    NBC News ^ | 12/01/16 | ELIZABETH CHUCK
    American astronaut Buzz Aldrin has been medically evacuated from the South Pole, according to the National Science Foundation and a private tourism group. Aldrin, 86, was visiting Antarctica when "his condition deteriorated," according to White Desert, which organizes luxury tourism trips to the icy continent. The group said Aldrin was evacuated on the first available flight out of the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station to the McMurdo Station on the Antarctic coast under the care of a doctor with the U.S. Antarctic Program. He is in stable condition, White Desert said. The National Science Foundation provided the flight for Aldrin, who...
  • Record cold coming to ‘almost entire USA’ – Low temperature records set to be SHATTERED

    12/01/2016 5:58:05 AM PST · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 46 replies
    ventcore.com ^ | 11/30/16 | Paul Dorian
    Climatologist Dr. Roger Pielke Sr. announced: 'I cannot recall last time I have seen such a cold anomaly forecast across almost entire USA.' While we end November on a warm note here in the eastern US, there are changes unfolding across the Northern Hemisphere that will likely bring a widespread very cold air mass into the US next week. This cold air mass is first going to arrive in Alaska this upcoming weekend with some spots in that state plunging to 40 degrees below zero and way below normal for early December. After that, the cold air dives into the...
  • Study explains evolution phenomenon that puzzled Darwin

    11/30/2016 7:28:24 PM PST · by JimSEA · 51 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/30/2016 | Sara M. Clifton, et al
    Why do some animals have extravagant, showy ornaments -- think elk and deer antlers, peacock feathers and horns on dung beetles -- that can be a liability to survival? Charles Darwin couldn't figure it out, but now a Northwestern University research team has a possible explanation for this puzzling phenomenon of evolution. The researchers developed a mathematical model that made a surprising prediction: In animals with ornamentation, males will evolve out of the tension between natural selection and sexual selection into two distinct subspecies, one with flashy, "costly" ornaments for attracting mates and one with subdued, "low-cost" ornaments. "Ornamentation does...
  • Alternative Blockchain Uses

    11/30/2016 9:51:34 AM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 3 replies
    Nasdaq ^ | November 30, 2016
    Alternative Blockchain Uses November 30, 2016, 09:47:34 AM EDT By Due.com The system behind cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, known as blockchain, is now being explored for other potential applications. It’s so powerful that big banks like Bank of America are taking out patents on the blockchain technology to study it further to see how it can leverage its power. Now others are investigating other uses for blockchain. /snip Alternative Uses for Blockchain /snip A blog on Bytecoin noted numerous alternative uses for blockchain, starting with Namecoin’s pioneering application of distributed DNA in which its goal is to allow registering standard DNS...
  • Inside tiny tubes, water turns solid when it should be boiling

    11/29/2016 10:44:51 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 59 replies
    mit.edu ^ | 11/28/2016 | David L. Chandler
    MIT has found a completely unexpected set of changes: Inside the tiniest of spaces — in carbon nanotubes whose inner dimensions are not much bigger than a few water molecules — water can freeze solid even at high temperatures that would normally set it boiling. ... “If you confine a fluid to a nanocavity, you can actually distort its phase behavior,” Strano says, referring to how and when the substance changes between solid, liquid, and gas phases. Such effects were expected, but the enormous magnitude of the change, and its direction (raising rather than lowering the freezing point), were a...
  • Mars Ice Deposit Holds as Much Water as Lake Superior

    11/29/2016 5:56:59 PM PST · by Ray76 · 42 replies
    Jet Propulsion Lab ^ | Nov 22, 2016
    Frozen beneath a region of cracked and pitted plains on Mars lies about as much water as what's in Lake Superior, largest of the Great Lakes, researchers using NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter have determined. Scientists examined part of Mars' Utopia Planitia region, in the mid-northern latitudes, with the orbiter's ground-penetrating Shallow Radar (SHARAD) instrument. Analyses of data from more than 600 overhead passes with the onboard radar instrument reveal a deposit more extensive in area than the state of New Mexico. The deposit ranges in thickness from about 260 feet (80 meters) to about 560 feet (170 meters), with a...
  • TECH BLACKOUT: Huge solar storm which could WIPE OUT modern technology expected by 2020

    11/29/2016 1:16:44 PM PST · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 144 replies
    express.co.uk ^ | 11/29/16 | Sean Martin
    THERE is a one in eight chance that the Earth will be hit by a huge solar storm by 2020 which could potentially leave the world without Internet, phone service and many more services that modern-day humans rely on. Researchers have warned that there is roughly a 12 per cent chance that a solar storm could smash into Earth by the end of the decade.(emphasis mine) The powerful event would likely be as huge as the Carrington Event, which occurred on 1859. The solar storm which hit 150 years ago was so powerful that its southern auroras could be seen...
  • 'Diamond-age' of power generation as nuclear batteries developed

    11/28/2016 4:22:30 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 24 replies
    phys.org ^ | 11/27/2016
    New technology has been developed that uses nuclear waste to generate electricity in a nuclear-powered battery. A team of physicists and chemists from the University of Bristol have grown a man-made diamond that, when placed in a radioactive field, is able to generate a small electrical current. ... The team have demonstrated a prototype 'diamond battery' using Nickel-63 as the radiation source. However, they are now working to significantly improve efficiency by utilising carbon-14, a radioactive version of carbon, which is generated in graphite blocks used to moderate the reaction in nuclear power plants. Research by academics at Bristol has...
  • Variable, Not Constant: Speed Of Light Theory Challenging Einstein’s Physics Can Now Be Tested

    11/27/2016 11:30:21 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 56 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 27 November 2016, 1:16 am EST | Dianne Depra
    Researchers suggesting that the speed of light varies have come up with a numerical prediction that will allow their theory to be tested. Many theories in physics are built upon the idea that the speed of light is at a constant rate, but Joăo Magueijo and Niayesh Afshordi think otherwise. In a paper published in the journal Physical Review D, they detailed the creation of an exact figure on the spectral index, a model that can be used to determine if their theory is valid or not. All structures in the universe today were created when fluctuations occurred in the...
  • Why quantum mechanics might need an overhaul

    11/26/2016 6:19:48 PM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 61 replies
    Science News ^ | November 4, 2016 | Tom Siegfried
    Why quantum mechanics might need an overhaul by Tom Siegfried 3:37pm, November 4, 2016 Nobel laureate Steven Weinberg says current debates suggest need for new approach to comprehend reality SAN ANTONIO ? Quantum mechanics is science’s equivalent of political polarization. Voters either take sides and argue with each other endlessly, or stay home and accept politics as it is. Physicists either just accept quantum mechanics and do their calculations, or take sides in the never-ending debate over what quantum mechanics is actually saying about reality. Steven Weinberg used to be happy with quantum mechanics as it is and didn’t worry...
  • Environmentally-friendly graphene textiles could enable wearable electronics

    11/26/2016 8:36:43 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 3 replies
    phys.org ^ | 11/25/2016
    Cotton fabric is among the most widespread for use in clothing and textiles, as it is breathable and comfortable to wear, as well as being durable to washing. These properties also make it an excellent choice for textile electronics. A new process, developed by Dr Felice Torrisi at the CGC, and his collaborators, is a low-cost, sustainable and environmentally-friendly method for making conductive cotton textiles by impregnating them with a graphene-based conductive ink. Based on Dr Torrisi's work on the formulation of printable graphene inks for flexible electronics, the team created inks of chemically modified graphene flakes that are more...
  • Solving a Mystery Behind the Deadly ‘Tsunami of Molasses’ of 1919

    11/26/2016 8:17:37 AM PST · by sparklite2 · 43 replies
    NYT ^ | NOV. 26, 2016 | ERIN McCANN
    “A dull muffled roar gave but an instant’s warning before the top of the tank was blown into the air,” The New York Times wrote in 1919. “Two million gallons of molasses rushed over the streets and converted into a sticky mass the wreckage of several small buildings which had been smashed by the force of the explosion.”
  • ...Living cells are coaxed into using silicon to make material for TV and computer screens

    11/25/2016 2:31:45 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    dailymail.co.uk/ ^ | 11/25/2016 | Ryan O'Hare
    Engineers have exploited the tenacious nature of life by persuading it to build with silicon – the stuff of microchips. In a breakthrough study, researchers have tweaked a bacterial protein to knit together carbon and silicon, producing the basis for compounds used in everything from drugs to TV screens. The team claims that their enzyme is far more efficient than man-made catalysts and could reduce the cost of making the compounds and avoid using toxic material. As silicon-carbon bonds are not known to occur naturally, they are made in the lab by chemists. But in a first, the CalTech team...
  • Atlanta Astronaut Eats Thanksgiving Dinner in Space

    11/24/2016 12:37:28 PM PST · by Cecily · 13 replies
    Atlanta Journal Constitution ^ | November 24, 2016 | Nicole D. Smith
    Like many Atlantans, astronaut Shane Kimbrough plans to gather around the table and eat a traditional Thanksgiving meal. But this traditional meal certainly isn't typical. Kimbrough—along with five other space crew members—are aboard the International Space Station (ISS), orbiting many miles away in space on Thanksgiving Day. Kimbrough is one of two Americans on board, but all of the astronauts—who are from the U.S., France and Russia—will dig into a space-friendly version of a quintessential, American Thanksgiving meal: packets of turkey, green beans, candied yams and mashed potatoes. In order to eat dinner, the orbiting men and women just add...
  • Blood from human teens rejuvenates body and brains of old mice

    11/24/2016 10:51:35 AM PST · by moose07 · 52 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 15 November 2016 | Jessica Hamzelou
    Blood plasma from young people has been found to rejuvenate old mice, improving their memory, cognition, and physical activity. The method has the potential to be developed into a treatment for people, says Sakura Minami of Alkahest, the company behind the work. Previous research has found that stitching old and young mice together has an interesting effect. While sharing a blood system works out well for the older mouse, the younger one isn’t so lucky. The young animals started to show signs of brain ageing, while the brains of the older mice started to look younger. “We see a rejuvenation...
  • The Real War on Science

    11/23/2016 7:38:54 PM PST · by tbw2 · 19 replies
    City Journal ^ | Autumn, 2016 | John Tierney
    The Real War on Science: The Left has done far more than the Right to set back progress.
  • Why Do So Many Big Earthquakes Strike Japan?

    11/23/2016 11:45:55 AM PST · by JimSEA · 41 replies
    Live Science ^ | 11/22/2016 | Denise Chow
    A magnitude-6.9 earthquake struck yesterday off the coast of Fukushima, Japan, likely along the same fault that ruptured in 2011, unleashing a massive 9.0-magnitude temblor that triggered deadly tsunamis and caused widespread destruction. Over the course of its history, Japan has seen its share of shaking, but what makes this part of the world so susceptible to big earthquakes? The answer has to do with Japan's location. The island nation lies along the so-called Pacific Ring of Fire, an imaginary horseshoe-shaped zone that follows the rim of the Pacific Ocean, where many of the world's earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur....
  • Thanksgiving Movie Recommendation - Event Horizon

    11/23/2016 10:17:38 AM PST · by Scythian_Reborn · 58 replies
    If you're looking to chill out and watch a movie that will "stick with you" for months then I recommend "Even Horizon". This movie is by far one of the best Sci-Fi movies of it's time, though overlooked. I am posting the preview but if you're like me you should stop after the first 15 seconds so you go into the film not knowing anything about it. One thing I will tell however is that this film is deeply unsettling with a palpable sense of doom, and it's scary because of what it doesn't show you. Event Horizon Trailer ......
  • Archaeological excavation unearths evidence of turkey domestication 1,500 years ago

    11/23/2016 10:15:55 AM PST · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 21, 2016 | Provided by: Field Museum
    Turkey eggshells and bones from an offering 1,500 years ago in Oaxaca, Mexico. Credit: © Linda Nicholas, The Field Museum. ================================================================================================================================ The turkeys we'll be sitting down to eat on Thursday have a history that goes way back. Archaeologists have unearthed a clutch of domesticated turkey eggs used as a ritual offering 1,500 years ago in Oaxaca, Mexico—some of the earliest evidence of turkey domestication. "Our research tells us that turkeys had been domesticated by 400-500 AD," explains Field Museum archaeologist Gary Feinman, one of the paper's authors. "People have made guesses about turkey domestication based on the presence or...
  • Female monkeys manipulate males into fighting by shunning those who don't get involved [tr]

    11/23/2016 7:02:04 AM PST · by C19fan · 26 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | November 23, 2016 | Ryan O'Hare
    When it comes to warring monkeys, females wield the real power. A study has found that female vervet monkeys manipulate males into fighting battles by lavishing attention on brave soldiers while giving other males the cold shoulder. After scraps with rival gangs, usually over food, females would groom males that had fought hardest, while snapping at those that abstained.
  • Chelsea Clinton gets hate for liking RT’s Space 360 video (LOL, mean tweets)

    11/23/2016 5:20:29 AM PST · by simpson96 · 5 replies
    RT.com ^ | 11/22/2016 | Staff
    Among those impressed by RT’s special project ‘Space 360’ was the daughter of this year’s Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Chelsea Clinton’s kind words were met with mockery by some on social media, however. The Space 360 project showcases the never-before-seen panoramic view from the International Space Station’s cupola viewport, letting the viewers on Earth experience their planet and space through the eyes of the cosmonauts. Chelsea Clinton, last seen two weeks ago campaigning for her mother, posted a link on Monday to a Mashable article about the project, calling it “very cool.” The article clearly identified ‘Space 360’ as...
  • Microsoft wants to turn quantum computing research into real products

    11/22/2016 4:21:17 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | 11/21/16 | Mark Coppock
    Many companies and researchers are investigating quantum computing as one of the next major steps in the evolution of computers. The “spooky” effects of quantum physics, it is hoped, will enable the creation of computers that operate on certain tasks at unprecedented levels of performance. Microsoft is one of those companies, and it has been looking at quantum computing for some time now. Today, however, the company is taking the next step of actively investing in the creation of a real, scaleable quantum computer that can be used to tackle real-world problems, as the company outlines on the official Microsoft...
  • No matter what you do a whale is gonna die

    11/21/2016 3:31:57 PM PST · by hugorand · 6 replies
    youtube
    Great video that illustrates that no matter what you do (paper or plastic) a whale is gonna die.
  • TSUNAMI WARNING ISSUED AFTER QUAKE OFF FUKUSHIMA IN JAPAN

    11/21/2016 2:17:24 PM PST · by Enlightened1 · 11 replies
    AP ^ | 11/21/16
    TOKYO (AP) -- An earthquake with preliminary magnitude of 7.3 has struck off the coast of Fukushima prefecture in Japan. A tsunami warning for waves of up to three meters (10 feet) has been issued. The Japan Meteorological Agency says the quake struck around 6 a.m at a depth of 10 kilometers (6 miles). Fukushima prefecture is north of Tokyo and home to the nuclear power plant that was destroyed by a huge tsunami following an offshore earthquake in 2011.
  • Working Earthquake Prediction Model?

    11/21/2016 2:00:26 PM PST · by pa_dweller · 2 replies
    http://www.koat.com/article/video-earthquake-researcher-uses-sun-to-make-predictions/8299193
  • Elon Musk’s SpaceX to launch 4,000 satellites for global Internet coverage

    11/21/2016 2:45:10 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 39 replies
    Washington Journal ^ | 11/17/16 | Daniel Navas
    Elon Musk has announced an ambitious plan to put more than 4,000 satellites in space to create a global high-speed internet network. Musk first turned his attention to internet satellites in 2014, and his plan soon received the backing of Google, which chucked $1bn at Space Exploration Technologies Corp, aka SpaceX. Musk said in January 2015 that the plan would cost at least $10bn. The original number of satellites was pinned at 700, but documents filed with the US Federal Communications Commission show that SpaceX wants to deploy 4,425 satellites, plus “in-orbit spares”, to provide high-speed, global internet coverage. Earth...
  • Revolutionary NASA/NOAA GOES-R Geostationary Weather Satellite Awesome Night Launch

    11/20/2016 6:45:40 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 25 replies
    universe today ^ | 20 Nov , 2016
    “It’s a dramatic leap in capability – like moving from black and white TV to HDTV,” explained Greg Mandt, the NOAA GOES-R program manager during a prelaunch media briefing in the cleanroom processing facility at Astrotech. “This is a very exciting time,” explained Greg Mandt, the NOAA GOES-R program manager during the Astrotech cleanroom briefing. “This is the culmination of about 15 years of intense work for the great team of NOAA and NASA and our contractors Lockheed Martin and Harris.” “We are bringing the nation a new capability. The GOES program has been around for about 40 years and...
  • 'Dog Noses Can Save Lives': Alabama Women Will Train Dogs to Smell Cancer

    11/19/2016 8:52:20 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 22 replies
    ABC3340 ^ | MELANIE YUILL
    We've heard countless stories of how dogs have sniffed out danger and saved lives. Now two Alabama women will train dogs to sniff out cancer. The two women, Cindy Roberts and Dr. Laurie Malone, recently spent time in California learning the necessary science and training methods. Roberts has a background in dog training and Dr. Malone in research. They believe their combined experience will be perfect for training dogs and adding to the evidence and research for the cancer detection field. ABC33/40 caught up with the women at the Barking at the Moon Festival in Fultondale Sunday. Dozens of dogs...
  • Doctor: Treatment Using Maggots Saves Lives, Limbs and Money

    11/19/2016 8:13:24 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 48 replies
    KHOU ^ | November 11, 2016 | Shern-Min Chow,
    Sometimes ancient remedies are the best, even if they make you a little squeamish. Maggots are being used again but in a new way: to save lives, limbs and money. Some doctors think the larvae could revolutionize wound care, which costs $10 to 15 billion a year in the U.S. It’s a problem that will grow, with our growing diabetes population. On the Ca-Hil farm out in the small town of Wild Peach in Brazoria County, it is another day. Owner Randy Harang is prepping the fields to bale hay, but for the 59-year-old, it is not just business as...
  • How Leeches Made Their Comeback

    11/19/2016 8:09:44 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 15 replies
    New York Magazine ^ | Steven Poole | November 11, 2016
    It’s nice to think of modern medicine, like modern war, as high-tech, almost impersonal. Our medications are engineered on a molecular level. Keyhole surgery, computerized imaging, and robotics promise magical, almost noninvasive modes of health maintenance. So why are doctors using leeches again? The medicinal leech has three jaws and a hundred teeth. With them it saws into the skin and injects anesthetics to avoid disturbing its meal, chemicals that dilate the blood vessels to get a better flow of the good stuff, and anticoagulants to stop the blood from clotting and impeding its feast. Then it starts to suck....
  • New York City ATMs Are As Disgusting As You Thought

    11/19/2016 6:42:42 PM PST · by jcon40 · 23 replies
    Heat street.com ^ | Nov. 16, 16 | Drake Bear
    Probably the best reason to wash your hands regularly is that the world is covered in feces. New York City is particularly gross, and some of the most shared surfaces of this spend-friendly city are automated teller machines. Quite appropriately, the good scientists at New York University tested them for microbes. The study, published in the journal mSphere, included a hundredsome samples from eight neighborhoods across Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens, ranging from midtown to Flushing to Inwood to Ozone Park. “ATM surfaces, potentially retaining microbial signatures of human inhabitants … are interesting from both a biodiversity perspective and a public...
  • A look at carbon nanotubes and opto-electronics in chip design

    11/19/2016 10:41:00 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 13 replies
    Fudzilla ^ | 18 November 2016 | Jon Worrel
    Process node scaling is becoming very expensive Carbon nanotubes have long been proposed as a significant substrate replacement to transform the chip design industry as we know it. They can operate using substantially less electrical charge and are six to ten times faster than silicon, yet due to their incredibly small size they have proven difficult to work with. The search for silicon alternativesOver the past 62 years since the first working silicon transistor was made at Bell Labs, companies have used different doping concentrations to influence electron mobility on circuit designs. But over the past half-decade, the industry...
  • Polar bear killed sled dog where cute viral video was shot

    11/18/2016 10:41:05 PM PST · by Daffynition · 55 replies
    EdmontonSun ^ | November 17, 2016 | staff reporter
    If it's too cute to be true, it probably is. The owner of a Manitoba dog sanctuary, whose dog was the subject of a heartwarming viral video with a polar bear, told CBC News that a bear has killed and eaten one of his dogs. The viral clip, which was posted online over the weekend, showed an enormous polar bear stroking a lounging dog on the head for several fascinating and adorable moments. While many were awed by the unlikely friendship, conservation officers were called to remove three polar bears from Mile 5 Dog Sanctuary in Churchill, Man., last week,...
  • Asteroid strike made 'instant Himalayas'

    11/18/2016 9:20:25 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 29 replies
    BBC ^ | 18 Nov, 2916 | Jonathan Amos BBC Science Correspondent
    Scientists say they can now describe in detail how the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs produced its huge crater. The reconstruction of the event 66 million years ago was made possible by drilling into the remnant bowl and analysing its rocks. These show how the space impactor made the hard surface of the planet slosh back and forth like a fluid. At one stage, a mountain higher than Everest was thrown up before collapsing back into a smaller range of peaks. "And this all happens on the scale of minutes, which is quite amazing," Prof Joanna Morgan from Imperial...
  • New Zealand's earthquake was so powerful the sea floor lifted TWO METRES (trunc)

    11/18/2016 1:10:52 PM PST · by Twotone · 32 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | Nov. 17, 2016 | Kate Darvall
    These incredible photographs show how New Zealand's 7.8 magnitude earthquake lifted the seabed two metres - and exploded through the sand. Dramatic aerial pictures reveal the scale of the devastation caused on the coastline north of Kaikoura, on the country's South Island. Scientists say the seabed lifted an estimated two metres on the foreshore and admit they have never seen anything like it. It comes as rain and strong winds battered central New Zealand on Thursday, threatening further damage - just days after the quake killed two people and sparked with huge landslides. More than 1,000 tourists and residents have...
  • Mumps outbreak spreading at University of Missouri amid national surge (trunc)

    11/18/2016 5:42:44 AM PST · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 29 replies
    dailymail ^ | 11/17/16 | AP & Mia DeGraaf
    Escalating numbers of mumps infections being reported nationwide There are now 31 cases at University of Missouri, 27 more being tested Last week, State University of New York reported outbreak from swimteam Numerous Arkansas towns reported 427 mumps infections this summer Harvard University also battling an outbreak Mumps is an infection of the salivary gland, preventable by MMR vaccine The highly infectious virus is spread by saliva on cups, cutlery, plates Many do not experience symptoms but mumps can be devastating (copywrite restriction pervents further information; more information avaiable at source website)
  • World's Largest Pyramid Was Mistaken as a Mountain

    11/17/2016 11:37:21 AM PST · by sparklite2 · 63 replies
    newser ^ | Aug 20, 2016 | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore
    (Newser) – When Hernan Cortez and his Spanish army marched into Cholula in present-day Mexico nearly 500 years ago, they were greeted by a peaceful people prone to building pyramids instead of stockpiles of weapons. Those people and their pyramids fell, and fast, with 10% of the local population murdered in a day as their pyramids were torched into oblivion. But as legend has it, one mud-brick pyramid was hidden, perhaps accidentally by vegetation, and was for centuries mistaken for a mountain, until locals began to construct an insane asylum in 1910. That's when they discovered the largest monument ever...
  • Tasmanian Devil Milk Kills Several Deadly Superbugs That Are Resistant to Existing Drugs

    11/16/2016 9:53:18 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 43 replies
    A whole new way to fight antibiotic resistance.Scientists have discovered that Tasmanian devil milk contains an arsenal of antimicrobial compounds that can kill some of the most deadly bacterial and fungal infections known to science - including golden staph. Tasmanian devils were found to produce six different types of these antimicrobial compounds - humans produce just one - and scientists were able to successfully synthesise them in the lab to test their effectiveness against a number of drug-resistant bacterial and fungal pathogens. When tested against 25 different bacterial and six fungal strains, the six varieties of antimicrobial compounds were found...
  • First meeting of the After School Satan Club in the U.S. brings protesters to Portland

    11/16/2016 8:39:49 PM PST · by Be Careful · 18 replies
    The first official meeting of the After School Satan Club in the United States took place Wednesday at Sacramento Elementary School in Portland, drawing national members of the Satanic Temple and Catholic protesters from a group based out of Pennsylvania. "The club is here to contrast the presence of the evangelical Good News Clubs, which are here specifically to proselytize to children," said Lucien Greaves, the Satanic Temple's national co-founder, who was on hand for the first official meeting of the club, an open house for parents, students and staff. Members of the press were not allowed to attend. The...
  • Earliest known stone version of Ten Commandments up for auction

    11/16/2016 10:34:17 AM PST · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    CNN ^ | Updated 9:36 PM ET, Tue November 15, 2016 | By Georgia McCafferty
    The earliest known stone inscription of the Ten Commandments is being auctioned in Beverly Hills on November 16, with an opening bid of $250,000 -- and a stipulation that any owner must put the tablet on public display. Described as a "national treasure" of Israel, the stone was first uncovered in 1913 during excavations for a railroad station near Yavneh in Israel and is the only intact tablet version of the Commandments thought to exist.
  • A Brief History of the Drug That "Cured" Jimmy Carter’s Cancer

    11/16/2016 9:15:11 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 37 replies
    Inverse ^ | 03/07/2016 | Yasmin Tayag
    Former president Jimmy Carter announced Sunday that he’s stopping treatment for his brain cancer at the ripe age of 91. Inspiring as his story is, it’s hard not to wonder: how’d he do it? Turns out Carter was being treated with Keytruda, a new and highly promising immunotherapy drug that was approved not long after Carter was diagnosed. In August 2015, Carter announced that his aggressive melanoma — a deadly form of skin cancer — had spread to his brain, and it seemed pretty clear that he had only a few weeks left to live. Still, he underwent treatment at...
  • Rip in crust drives undersea volcanism

    11/16/2016 8:01:44 AM PST · by JimSEA · 26 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/14/2016 | Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
    Scientists analyzing a volcanic eruption at a mid-ocean ridge under the Pacific have come up with a somewhat contrarian explanation for what initiated it. Many scientists say undersea volcanism is triggered mainly by upwelling magma that reaches a critical pressure and forces its way up. The new study says the dominant force, at least in this case, was the seafloor itself -- basically that it ripped itself open, allowing the lava to spill out. The eruption took place on the East Pacific Rise, some 700 miles off Mexico. "Mid-ocean ridges are commonly viewed as seafloor volcanoes, operating like volcanoes on...
  • Climate Change rebut book suggestions for high schooler

    11/14/2016 7:04:38 PM PST · by Phillyred · 45 replies
    My son is a high school freshman and has a leftist teacher for environmental "science". He is pushing man made climate change and ozone depletion. Any recent book recommendations for his age? Web sites? Also, any suggestions on how to take his tests and answer the way he is "supposed to" but making it clear he doesn't agree? Thanks!
  • Google Doodle For Sir Frederick Banting: Why Chemistry Is Part Of Insulin's Story

    11/14/2016 1:17:23 PM PST · by posterchild · 5 replies
    Forbes ^ | Nov 14, 2016 | Carmen Drahl
    Today’s Google Doodle honors the 125th birthday of Sir Frederick Banting, the first person to use insulin to treat people with diabetes. That achievement garnered Banting a share of the 1923 Nobel Prize in Medicine. Most folks know that insulin is a lifesaving treatment, but fewer know how it works. I wouldn’t be writing about it if chemistry weren’t involved in the story, of course. So let’s dive in. Insulin is a natural protein that regulates energy consumption and blood sugar levels in the body. When a person develops Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas no longer produces enough insulin. Nowadays...