Science (General/Chat)

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  • Enigmatic plumes from Saturn’s moon caused by cosmic collision

    03/27/2017 7:43:02 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 12 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 24 Mar, 2017 | Leah Crane
    Enceladus’ south pole is wounded, bleeding heat and water. Its injury may have come from a huge rock smashing into this frigid moon of Saturn less than 100 million years ago, leaving the area riddled with leaky cracks. The region near Enceladus’ south pole marks one of the solar system’s most intriguing mysteries. It spews plumes of liquid from an interior ocean, plus an enormous amount of heat. The south pole’s heat emission is about 10 gigawatts higher than expected – equivalent to the power of 4000 wind turbines running at full capacity. The rest of the moon, though, is...
  • Astronaut who walked on the moon: ‘why I know aliens haven’t visited Earth’

    03/24/2017 7:39:42 PM PDT · by amorphous · 83 replies
    News.Com.Au ^ | 24 March 2017 | Megan Palin
    HE was an astronaut on the second manned mission to the moon and the fourth man to walk on its surface. Alan Bean, 85, is one of only 12 people to have taken “one small step for man and one giant leap for mankind” on the moon.
  • Microsoft deletes 'teen girl' AI after it became a Hitler-loving sex robot within 24 hours

    03/24/2017 11:52:20 AM PDT · by Mechanicos · 83 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 24 March 2016 | Helena Horton
    A day after Microsoft introduced an innocent Artificial Intelligence chat robot to Twitter it has had to delete it after it transformed into an evil Hitler-loving, incestual sex-promoting, 'Bush did 9/11'-proclaiming robot.
  • Solar Roadways are on FIRE (No. Really. With Pictures.)

    03/24/2017 9:17:47 AM PDT · by WombatKing · 12 replies
    pv magazine USA ^ | 3/24/2017 | WombatKing
    With its own cult following, Solar Roadways still captures the imaginations of people who live in an alternative universe where these “roads” will power the world’s future. But first, they will have to stop the infernal thing from catching on fire.
  • 2017’s Fattest Cities in America

    03/23/2017 1:28:48 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 32 replies
    WalletHub ^ | March 22, 2017 | Richie Bernardo
    Americans are the fattest people in the world. By one measure, more than 70 percent of the U.S. population aged 15 and older is overweight or obese. But such a finding should come as no surprise, considering the proliferation of fast-food establishments and increasingly cheaper grocery items that have negatively altered our diets. Unfortunately, the extra pounds have inflated the costs of obesity-related medical treatment to nearly $316 billion a year and annual productivity losses due to work absenteeism to more than $8.6 billion. But certain places are more responsible than others for tipping the scale in favor of bad...
  • What Will Happen When Betelgeuse Explodes?

    03/23/2017 5:44:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 53 replies
    Forbes ^ | March 22, 2017 | Ethan Siegel
    Every star will someday run out of fuel in its core, bringing an end to its run as natural source of nuclear fusion in the Universe. While stars like our Sun will fuse hydrogen into helium and then -- swelling into a red giant -- helium into carbon, there are other, more massive stars which can achieve hot enough temperatures to further fuse carbon into even heavier elements. Under those intense conditions, the star will swell into a red supergiant, destined for an eventual supernova after around 100,000 years or so. And the brightest red supergiant in our entire night...
  • Alien mothership? HUGE circular shadow floats past ISS in remarkable NASA footage

    The bizarre footage shows part of the space station looking out onto a black nothingness. For no apparent reason, the dark outlook begins to get lighter as some sort of circular object floats past. It continues to get lighter and lighter as the shadow is lifted. In his caption to the video, he pointed out he wasn’t for certain saying it was a “huge mothership or any sort of alien spacecraft” but that it “certainly looks unusual”. Alien enthusiast Streetcap1 posted the footage to his YouTube channel on Saturday (March 19). As he watched the mysterious shape move past, he...
  • Scientists Have Begun Testing Whether MDMA Can Cure Tinnitus

    03/22/2017 2:13:22 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 73 replies
    thump.vice.com ^ | March 15, 2017 | Alexander Iadarola
    Photo of MDMA courtesy of Wikipedia Commons Researchers in New Zealand have started trials to see whether MDMA can treat tinnitus, a condition that causes people to hear irritating sound no one else can hear. The undertaking has taken place over the last two years, and involved a small number of participants who were given a very low dose of MDMA or a placebo and monitored over a four-hour period, reports Stuff. Many of the participants who took the MDMA reported a partial alleviation of tinnitus after three hours, but there was also a large placebo effect among the participants....
  • Electric vehicle fee proposed for Minnesota

    03/21/2017 7:31:30 PM PDT · by ButThreeLeftsDo · 21 replies
    StarTribune.com ^ | 3/21/17 | Mike Hughlett
    Electric vehicle owners in Minnesota would have to pay a $75 to $85 annual "surcharge" under proposed legislation since they do not pay the state's gasoline tax. State governments across the country are increasingly seeking to slap such fees on electric vehicles, some exceeding $150 per year. The Minnesota fee would cover vehicles that are all-electric and plug-in hybrids based on electric motors, but exclude gasoline-electric hybrids. The fee is aimed at making electric vehicle drivers pay their fair share of road maintenance costs, which are partly funded by gasoline taxes, said Rep. Pat Garofalo, R-Farmington, the author of the...
  • Cancer Cure Found In Australia 2016! EBC-46

    03/21/2017 6:07:00 PM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 31 replies
    Youtube ^ | 12/24/16
    Share this video with anyone and everyone   EBC-46 is an experimental drug candidate being studied pre-clinically by the Australian company Ecobiotics (specifically its drug discovery subsidiary Qbiotics). It was discovered through an automated screening process of natural products by selecting increasingly purified fractions of plant extracts, based on their ability to produce the desired activity profile. This is then followed by artificial synthesis of the isolated compound to confirm its chemical structure. EBC-46 is a phorbol ester which, along with other related compounds, acts as a protein kinase C regulator.   The initial lead came from observation that...
  • Confessions of a Climate Change ‘Denier’

    03/20/2017 9:38:53 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 29 replies
    The American Spectator ^ | 17 Mar, 2017 | THOMAS W. SMITH
    A few days ago I had a conversation with a very smart university professor of history and somehow the climate change subject came up. Almost instantly he responded to my thoughts by saying: “You must be one of those deniers who rejects the science consensus.” This is the new form of intellectual bullying and it’s intentionally designed is to stop the conversation not advance it. In the academies it is a technique to close off scientific inquiry. When the liberals talk of ‎consensus, what consensus are they talking about? Of whom? ....... “Perpetual repetition.” “Unqualified environmental groups.” “Sensational headlines.” This...
  • Solar system could have over 100 planets with new criteria

    03/19/2017 3:37:35 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 62 replies
    Solar system could have over 100 planets with new criteria Posted on March 19, 2017 by Kathy Fey Solar System A new classification system for what may be considered a planet would result in over 100 planets occupying our solar system. 178 SHARES ShareTweetGoogleReddit Our solar system could contain over 100 planets if a new classification system is approved. Tech Times explains that the definition of a planet was last changed by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) in 2006 when the new criteria famously demoted Pluto from the rank of a planet to dwarf planet and Kuiper Belt Object. Space...
  • How Leonardo DiCaprio Can Persuade Me on Climate Change

    03/19/2017 8:22:57 AM PDT · by conservatism_IS_compassion · 55 replies
    You probably know that actor Leonardo DiCaprio is a climate activist, and he is trying to persuade the world that climate change is both real and serious. Someone asked me on Twitter what it would take for DiCaprio (for example) to persuade a person like me. I’ll take a swing at that. For starters, you must separate the questions of real and serious. The real part refers to the climate models. The serious part refers to economic models. Those are different topics. If you want to convince me that climate change is real, the best approach is to abandon the...
  • Mini-nukes and mosquito-like robot weapons being primed for future warfare

    Nanotechnology opens up the possibility to manufacture mini-nuke components so small that they are difficult to screen and detect. Furthermore, the weapon (capable of an explosion equivalent to about 100 tons of TNT) could be compact enough to fit into a pocket or purse and weigh about 5 pounds and destroy large buildings or be combined to do greater damage to an area. "When we talk about making conventional nuclear weapons, they are difficult to make," he said. "Making a mini-nuke would be difficult but in some respects not as difficult as a full-blown nuclear weapon." Del Monte explained that...
  • When Islam Was Synonymous With Knowledge and Erudition

    03/18/2017 4:23:21 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 46 replies
    The Spectator (U.K.) ^ | Andrew Lycett
    Christopher de Bellaigue stresses how, over the centuries, many Muslim leaders have been paragons of enlightenmentChristopher de Bellaigue, a journalist who has spent much of his working life in the Middle East, has grown tired of people throwing up their hands in horror at Isis, Erdogan and Islamic terror, and declaring that the region is backward and in need of a thorough western-style reformation. As he argues in this timely book, the Islamic world has been coming to terms with modernity in its own often turbulent way for more than two centuries. And we’d better understand it, because it’s an...
  • Occasional Birdy Thread (In memory of Swampsniper)

    03/18/2017 3:48:36 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 101 replies
    Photos ^ | March 18, 2017 | Self
    A few recent shots from around home. If you have bird shots, please share 'em. Mr Tricolor enjoys his breakfast. Common gallinule or marsh hen Our national bird. Love these amazing raptors Coots in the sunrise. Lake Jackson is just a block east of us. I have to look at this each morning as I leave home for work.
  • A Country Just Used a Patriot Missile to Take Down a $200 Drone

    03/18/2017 7:24:14 AM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 35 replies
    Futurism ^ | Mar. 18, 2017 | Dom Galeon and Kristin Houser
    A Country Just Used a Patriot Missile to Take Down a $200 Drone by Dom Galeon and Kristin Houser Serious Overkill In a rather unusual show of force, a U.S. ally shot down a small quadcopter drone using a Patriot missile, according to Gen. David Perkins, speaking at the Association of the United States Army’s Global Force symposium. And it wasn’t a drill. “We have a very close ally of ours that was dealing with an adversary using small quadcopter [unmanned aircraft systems],” Perkins said. “They shot it down with a Patriot missile.” A Patriot is a surface-to-air missile (SAM)...
  • Tardigrades Use Intrinsically Disordered Proteins to Survive Desiccation

    03/17/2017 1:50:15 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 43 replies
    cell ^ | 16 March 2017 | Thomas C. Boothby
    Tardigrades are microscopic animals that survive a remarkable array of stresses, including desiccation [extreme drying]. How tardigrades survive desiccation has remained a mystery for more than 250 years. Trehalose, a disaccharide essential for several organisms to survive drying, is detected at low levels or not at all in some tardigrade species, indicating that tardigrades possess potentially novel mechanisms for surviving desiccation. Here we show that tardigrade-specific intrinsically disordered proteins (TDPs) are essential for desiccation tolerance. TDP genes are constitutively expressed at high levels or induced during desiccation in multiple tardigrade species. TDPs are required for tardigrade desiccation tolerance, and these...
  • A Glimpse of a Microchip’s Delicate Architecture

    03/16/2017 8:36:24 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 8 replies
    Discover ^ | 15 Mar, 2017 | Nathaniel Scharping
    Computer chips continue to shrink ever smaller, but we still wring more processing power out of them. One of the problems that comes with taking our technology to the nanoscale, however, is that we can no longer see what’s going on with them. Computer chips, with their arrays of transistors laid out like cities, have components that measure as little as 14 nanometers across, or about 5,000 times smaller than a red blood cell. Checking out these wonders of engineering without using expensive and destructive imaging techniques is a challenge, to say the least. Viewing Technology With Technology Researchers from...
  • College student op-ed: Yes, milk is racist

    03/16/2017 7:07:52 AM PDT · by Hube · 42 replies
    The College Fix ^ | 03/16/2017 | Dave Huber
    In an op-ed featured in the California State University-Long Beach student paper Daily 49er, Samantha Diaz follows up on stories about the silly usurpation of milk by white supremacists by arguing that yes, the dairy beverage really is racist. All of us have been “so accustomed to hearing the benefits of milk,” Diaz writes, “that you probably didn’t even realize the subtle racism hidden in our health facts.” But … aren’t our dietary guidelines science? And aren’t progressives all about science, especially in this Age of Trump? Apparently not when “there is a deep-rooted [American] tradition to suppress an entire...
  • The race to save footage of America's nuclear tests: Declassified clips of blasts [tr]

    03/16/2017 6:36:38 AM PDT · by C19fan · 32 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 16, 2017 | Cheyenne Macdonald
    Between 1945 and 1962, the United States conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests over remote sites in New Mexico, Nevada, and both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. With several cameras to capture each detonation, the tests yielded roughly 10,000 recordings which have since been left to be slowly decay in high-security vaults. Now, researchers are working to scan the decomposing films so the footage can be reanalysed and declassified before it’s too late. So far, they’ve scanned about 4,200 recordings – and the effort has revealed that much of the original published data on the tests are wrong.
  • Why are climate-change models so flawed? Because climate science is so incomplete

    03/15/2017 7:37:49 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 54 replies
    Boston Globe ^ | 14nMar, 2017 | Jeff Jacoby
    ‘DO YOU believe,” CNBC’s Joe Kernen asked Scott Pruitt, the Environmental Protection Agency’s new director, in an interview last Thursday, “that it’s been proven that CO2 is the primary control knob for climate?” Replied Pruitt: “No. I think that measuring with precision human activity on the climate is something very challenging to do, and there’s tremendous disagreement about the degree of impact. So no — I would not agree that it’s a primary contributor to the global warming that we see. But we don’t know that yet. We need to continue the debate and continue the review and the analysis.”...
  • Goodyear deflates blimp, but keeps familiar form in flight

    03/15/2017 5:10:00 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 42 replies
    AP ^ | March 14, 2017 | John Rogers
    Goodyear has let the helium out of the last of its fabled fleet of blimps, but the company's flight program will continue. About two dozen employees were on hand early Tuesday to witness the deflation of California-based Spirit of Innovation. But shed no tears, blimp fans, you'll still see a familiar blue-and-gold form floating over your favorite sports event or awards show. Although the blimp's replacement, Wingfoot Two, will look about the same when it arrives at Goodyear's airship base in Carson later this year, it will be a semi-rigid dirigible.
  • APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble

    03/15/2017 8:19:34 AM PDT · by Purdue77 · 4 replies
    Astronomy Picture of the Day ^ | 15 March 2017 | Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA
    Explanation: Stars are forming in the gigantic dust pillar called the Cone Nebula. Cones, pillars, and majestic flowing shapes abound in stellar nurseries where natal clouds of gas and dust are buffeted by energetic winds from newborn stars. The Cone Nebula, a well-known example, lies within the bright galactic star-forming region NGC 2264. The Cone was captured in unprecedented detail in this close-up composite of several observations from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. While the Cone Nebula, about 2,500 light-years away in Monoceros, is around 7 light-years long, the region pictured here surrounding the cone's blunted head is a mere...
  • What is the science behind free markets and capitalism?

    03/14/2017 12:29:38 PM PDT · by John Conlin · 17 replies
    The American Thinker ^ | 3/14/17 | John Conlin
    The economic system called capitalism has been described in many ways but at its core it is quite simply free people freely interacting with other free people. Capitalism has transformed the world by producing more wealth than any other economic system in the history of civilization. But why does it produce such wealth? Some have said freedom is the magic potion; that left to their own devices free people will outperform any other economic system. That is true but the ultimate reason is deeper and firmly based in science and fact. In the past few decades a great deal of...
  • Space Sex Is Serious Business

    03/14/2017 11:56:14 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 49 replies
    FiveThirtyEight ^ | 14 Mar 2017 | Maggie Koerth-Baker
    ...And so, in September 1992, Lee and Davis became the first (and, after the unwritten rule became a written one, possibly last) married couple in space. NASA says no humans have had sex in space. There’s nothing other than speculation to suggest otherwise. NASA has acknowledged the gaps in what we know about the impacts of long-duration spaceflight. In 2014, for instance, it commissioned a team studded with health experts and retired astronauts to write a National Academies report advising the agency on how best to ethically approach long-duration spaceflight situations where the very nature of the mission would mean...
  • Last Gasp Of The Global Warming Scam: Treating You Like An Idiot

    03/14/2017 8:23:48 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 41 replies
    Manhattan Contrarian ^ | 11 Mar, 2017 | Francis Menton
    On Thursday, new EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt appeared on CNBC's "Squawk Box," and made a statement that has gotten a lot of attention. The statement was: "I think that measuring with precision human activity on the climate is something very challenging to do and there's tremendous disagreement about the degree of impact, so, no, I would not agree that it's a primary contributor to the global warming that we see." I would have said that that statement was just a rather obvious truism. I mean, we have an enormously complex climate system, affected by literally dozens of factors, many of...
  • A strength test for the strong force

    03/12/2017 6:55:15 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 7 replies
    Symmetry Magazine ^ | 10 Mar, 2017 | Sarah Charley
    A joint Fermilab/SLAC publication New research could tell us about particle interactions in the early universe and even hint at new physics. Much of the matter in the universe is made up of tiny particles called quarks. Normally it’s impossible to see a quark on its own because they are always bound tightly together in groups. Quarks only separate in extreme conditions, such as immediately after the Big Bang or in the center of stars or during high-energy particle collisions generated in particle colliders. Scientists at Louisiana Tech University are working on a study of quarks and the force that...
  • Ugh (Euro Snowfall Forecast for upcoming East Coast Snowstorm)

    03/12/2017 2:25:08 PM PDT · by dirtboy · 71 replies
    Both the Euro and GFS are showing stonger storms in closer to the coast, so this could well become reality.
  • Scientists create ‘designer yeast’ in major step toward synthetic life

    03/12/2017 12:05:19 PM PDT · by C19fan · 15 replies
    Washington Post ^ | March 9, 2017 | Sarah Kaplan
    In a significant advance toward creating the first “designer” complex cell, scientists say they are one-third of the way to synthesizing the complete genome of baker's yeast. In seven studies published Thursday in the journal Science, the researchers describe how they built six of the 16 chromosomes required for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, altering the genetic material to edit out some genes and write in new characteristics.
  • Pack of Seven Gray Wolves Missing in Northern California

    03/12/2017 12:03:51 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 40 replies
    Wildlife advocates say they are searching Northing California for seven gray wolves that haven't been spotted in months. The first wolf pack to make the state home in nearly a century hasn't been seen since May 2016, the San Francisco Chronicle reports Saturday. The family, known as the Shasta Pack, disappeared from southeastern Siskiyou County.
  • The Search for MH370 Revealed Secrets of the Deep Ocean

    03/12/2017 9:24:01 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 19 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | 10 Mar, 2017 | SARAH ZHANG
    A remote part of the Indian Ocean has become, by chance, one of the best-mapped parts of the underwater world. The ocean is vast, deep, and unexplored. When Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared three years ago this week, the search brought the ocean’s vastness into sharp relief. This is how deep and dark it is three miles down. This is how unlikely you are to spot a downed airliner in 120,000 square nautical miles of open ocean. This is how much we know about the ocean floor—less than we know about the surface of Mars. As the search dragged on...
  • Fun Experiment: Astronaut Wrings out Washcloth in Space, Watch What Happens

    03/10/2017 4:42:24 PM PST · by Daffynition · 59 replies
    HNGN ^ | Apr 18, 2013 | HNGN Staff Reporter
    Two high school students posed the question "what would happen if you wring out a wet waschcloth in space" and an astronaut aboard the International Space Station conducted the experiment which resulted in a rather beautiful moment in space. The experiment, called "Wring It Out" was designed by two 10th-graders in Nova Scotia. Kendra Lamke and Meredith Hatfield won a contest sponsored by the Canada Space Agency to come up with an experiment for an astronaut to perform in micro-gravity. According to the two students, they hypothesized that water from a wrung-out washcloth would not drip off but rather would...
  • Cosmic uncertainty: Is the speed of light really constant?

    03/10/2017 3:40:14 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 60 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 03/01/2017 | Stuart Clark
    The speed of light in a vacuum is the ultimate cosmic speed limit. Just getting close to it causes problems: the weird distortions of Einstein’s relativity kick in, so time slows down, lengths go up, masses balloon and everything you thought was fixed changes. Only things that have no mass in the first place can reach light speed – photons of light being the classic example. Absolutely nothing can exceed this cosmic max.We have known about the special nature of light speed since an experiment by US physicists Albert Michelson and Edward Morley in the 1880s. They set two beams...
  • The curious case of Earth's leaking atmosphere

    03/10/2017 9:26:53 AM PST · by Lorianne · 29 replies
    Pys Org ^ | 08 July 2016
    Earth's atmosphere is leaking. Every day, around 90 tonnes of material escapes from our planet's upper atmosphere and streams out into space. Although missions such as ESA's Cluster fleet have long been investigating this leakage, there are still many open questions. How and why is Earth losing its atmosphere – and how is this relevant in our hunt for life elsewhere in the Universe? Given the expanse of our atmosphere, 90 tonnes per day amounts to a small leak. Earth's atmosphere weighs in at around five quadrillion (5 × 1015) tonnes, so we are in no danger of running out...
  • It's a ravioli! It's a UFO! It's ... a moon

    03/10/2017 7:52:46 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    NASA on Thursday released pictures of Pan, one of Saturn's many moons, and its distinctive shape is drawing comparisons to flying saucers and stuffed pasta. The images of the moon come courtesy of NASA's Cassini spacecraft, and reveal the UFO-like form of the tiny satellite, which has an average radius of just 8.8 miles. Cassini's Twitter account tweeted a gif showing the raw images. ... According to NASA's website, Pan's strange shape comes from what is called an equatorial ridge, a characteristic it shares with one of its sister moons, Atlas. The ridge has formed over the course of Pan's...
  • India's Chandrayaan-1 lost since 2009 found orbiting moon [NASA JPL New Technique]

    03/10/2017 6:31:13 AM PST · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    03-10-2017 | Staff
    Considered lost since 2009 when radio contact with it was lost, India's Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft has been found orbiting the moon. The spacecraft has been found by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. Earlier, JPL's calculations indicated that Chandrayaan-1 was circling some 200 kilometres above the lunar surface, but it was generally considered "lost." Chandrayaan-1 was India's first mission to the moon, was launched successfully on October 22, 2008 from Sriharikota. ISRO says the "satellite made more than 3400 orbits around the moon and the mission was concluded when the communication with the spacecraft was lost on August 29,...
  • Short men are more likely to lose their hair: Four genes that cause teenagers [tr]

    03/10/2017 3:43:17 AM PST · by C19fan · 18 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | March 8, 2017 | Victoria Allen
    Short men are in greater danger of losing their hair early, because both are in their genes. Men who feel they have lost the genetic lottery by being short may be unhappy to hear the same genes could cause their hair to fall out. But the testosterone which can cause boys to stop growing early, by closing the plates at the end of their bones during their teenage years, is also thought to cause baldness.
  • Here's Our Best Look Yet at Saturn's 'UFO' Moon (Moon's name: Pan)

    03/10/2017 1:05:37 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 12 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 3/9/17 | Nadia Drake
    Here's Our Best Look Yet at Saturn's 'UFO' Moon Adorned with a thin band of icy ring particles, the small moon Pan inspires comparisons to alien spacecraft, walnuts, and even ravioli. View Images One of Cassini's new views of Saturn's moon Pan. Photograph by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute By Nadia Drake PUBLISHED March 9, 2017 There’s a tiny “flying saucer” orbiting deep within Saturn’s rings, and a NASA probe has just gotten its most impressive look yet at the strange object. The saucer is actually a little moon called Pan, and NASA’s Cassini spacecraft captured its distinctive shape on March 7...
  • Breast Cancer Vaccine Personalized

    03/09/2017 8:26:07 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 30 replies
    NBC DFW ^ | Mar 3, 2017 | Briana Castro
    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in American women. More than 300,000 women will be diagnosed this year. Researchers are working on a vaccine that could lead to prevention. “Your general practitioner who normally says 'everything is fine' goes pale,” said Barbara Popoli, while speaking in front of lawmakers to push for more funding for cancer research. This is what happened when Popoli found out she had inflammatory breast cancer. “Sixty to 80 percent chance I was going to die from this,” Popoli said. After chemotherapy, radiation and surgery, with her husband by her side, she enrolled in...
  • Gluten-free diets could lead to deficiencies and cause illness

    03/09/2017 11:49:34 AM PST · by Gamecock · 32 replies
    The Australian ^ | JOHN ROSS | March 10, 2017
    As a gastroenterologist, Jason Tye-Din sees ­patients who only eat potatoes and sometimes a bit of rice. “They’re too scared to eat anything else,” he says, “because they get some sort of reaction. Sometimes it’s a real reaction but in most cases it’s because they’ve ­developed such a fear of food. They’re confused about their symptoms and their relationship to food.” Tye-Din says some patients arrive at his clinic in tears. “They come in saying, ‘I don’t know what to eat.’ They’ve got to the point where they’ve pulled so many things from their diet that it is not ­nutritious...
  • In an Unexplained Case, Brain Activity Has Been Recorded as Much as 10 Minutes After Death

    03/09/2017 6:33:20 AM PST · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    www.sciencealert.com ^ | 8 MAR 2017 | BEC CREW
    Doctors in a Canadian intensive care unit have stumbled on a very strange case - when life support was turned off for four terminal patients, one of them showed persistent brain activity even after they were declared clinically dead. For more than 10 minutes after doctors confirmed death through a range of observations, including the absence of a pulse and unreactive pupils, the patient appeared to experience the same kind of brain waves (delta wave bursts) we get during deep sleep. And it's an entirely different phenomenon to the sudden 'death wave' that's been observed in rats following decapitation. "In...
  • Stephen Hawking: People must control aggression or face humanity's demise [suggests world govt]

    03/08/2017 10:25:37 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 48 replies
    KRMG ^ | March 8, 2017 5:18 PM | Theresa Seiger
    While physicist Stephen Hawking is optimistic about the future, he warned in an interview published Tuesday that, with the pace of technological advancement, humans must gain control over their aggressive instincts in order to survive. The famed English scientist told The Times that the issue lies in the instincts humanity has honed to survive so far. “Since civilization began, aggression has been useful inasmuch as it has definite survival advantages,” he told the British newspaper. “It is hard-wired into our genes by Darwinian evolution. Now, however, technology has advanced at such a pace that this aggression may destroy us all...
  • Aboriginal hair shows 50,000 year connection to Australia

    03/08/2017 8:35:31 PM PST · by JimSEA · 15 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 3/8/2014 | Ray Tobler et al
    Modern Aboriginal Australians are the descendants of a single founding population that arrived in Australia 50,000 years ago, while Australia was still connected to New Guinea. Populations then spread rapidly -- within 1500-2000 years -- around the east and west coasts of Australia, meeting somewhere in South Australia. DNA in hair samples collected from Aboriginal people across Australia in the early to mid-1900s has revealed that populations have been continuously present in the same regions for up to 50,000 years -- soon after the peopling of Australia. Published in the journal Nature, the findings reinforce Aboriginal communities' strong connection to...
  • Indicators show potatoes can grow on Mars

    03/08/2017 4:06:46 PM PST · by Gamecock · 55 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 34/8/2017
    The International Potato Center (CIP) launched a series of experiments to discover if potatoes can grow under Mars atmospheric conditions and thereby prove they are also able to grow in extreme climates on Earth. This Phase Two effort of CIP's proof of concept experiment to grow potatoes in simulated Martian conditions began on February 14, 2016 when a tuber was planted in a specially constructed CubeSat contained environment built by engineers from University of Engineering and Technology (UTEC) in Lima based upon designs and advice provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Ames Research Center (NASA ARC), California....
  • Caffeine boosts enzyme that could protect against dementia

    03/07/2017 2:15:49 PM PST · by JimSEA · 30 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 3/7/2017 | Indiana University
    A study by Indiana University researchers has identified 24 compounds -- including caffeine -- with the potential to boost an enzyme in the brain shown to protect against dementia. The protective effect of the enzyme, called NMNAT2, was discovered last year through research conducted at IU Bloomington. The new study appears today in the journal Scientific Reports. "This work could help advance efforts to develop drugs that increase levels of this enzyme in the brain, creating a chemical 'blockade' against the debilitating effects of neurodegenerative disorders," said Hui-Chen Lu, who led the study. Lu is a Gill Professor in the...
  • Why We Need to Redefine the “Cure” for Cancer

    03/07/2017 2:06:10 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 46 replies
    Vox ^ | Ravi Parikh
    The war on cancer has created more treatments, but could do more on prevention.In his final State of the Union address one year ago, President Obama announced a “moonshot” initiative to “cure cancer once and for all.” Though the moonshot will be one of Obama’s few health programs to continue under President Donald Trump — its $1.8 billion budget is secure — today, on World Cancer Day, it remains more difficult than ever to imagine a real cure. Take the 50-year-old man diagnosed with prostate cancer in my clinic at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. He received a novel...
  • A section of the San Andreas fault just above L.A. is long overdue for a major earthquake

    03/07/2017 8:23:10 AM PST · by TermLimitsforAll · 35 replies
    LA Times ^ | 03/07/2017 | Rong-Gong Lin II
    Southern California could be overdue for a major earthquake along the Grapevine north of Los Angeles, according to a sobering new study by the U.S. Geological Survey. The research found earthquakes happen there on average every 100 years. The last major temblor occurred 160 years ago, a catastrophic geological event that ruptured an astonishing 185 miles of the San Andreas fault. The land on either side of the fault has been pushing against the other at a rate of more than 1 inch a year since 1857, the researchers said, accumulating energy that will be suddenly released in a major...
  • Why Georges Lemaître Should Be as Famous as Einstein

    03/07/2017 6:01:33 AM PST · by C19fan · 11 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | March 7, 2017 | Ross Pomeroy
    YOUNG STUDENTS lucky enough to benefit from a science education will likely recognize Albert Einstein, Isaac Newton, Galileo Galilei, Charles Darwin, Marie Curie, or Gregor Mendel. But ask them about Georges Lemaître and they'd probably be stumped. Indeed, the man who first proposed that the universe is expanding and formulated the theory of the Big Bang is scarcely recognized by Google. Search for "famous scientists" and scroll through the horizontal list that pops up. Lemaître is nowhere to be seen.
  • Study Links Soy Consumption to Breast Cancer Survival

    03/06/2017 2:50:40 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 5 replies
    UPI ^ | March 6, 2017 | Amy Wallace
    New study links prolonged survival of certain breast cancers to the consumption of foods containing soy.New research from Tufts University debunks the myth that soy consumption increases estrogen levels and could lead to breast cancer in women. In the past, there has been some controversy over the consumption of soy because of concern its estrogen-like properties could increase the risk of the most common form of breast cancer, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. "Isoflavones -- the component of soy that has estrogen-like properties -- have been shown to slow the growth of breast cancer cells in laboratory studies, and epidemiological analyses...