Science (General/Chat)

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  • Workers connect final steel stretch creating the world's largest sea bridge which is a [tr]

    06/30/2016 1:45:11 PM PDT · by C19fan · 18 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | June 30, 2016 | Jennifer Newton
    This is the moment workers connected the two sides of the world's longest sea bridge - seven years after building first began. The last steel box girder was installed for the crossing on Wednesday, which spans the estuary of the Pearl River connecting Hong Kong and China. The project, called Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macao Bridge is 14 miles long and also includes an underwater tunnel. Construction of the Y-shaped bridge began in 2009 at a cost of 100 billion yuan ($15billion). And when the bridge opens to traffic, it will shorten the distance between Hong Kong, Zhuhau and Macao. It will officially...
  • The Road to Rationalia

    06/30/2016 1:11:01 PM PDT · by Heartlander · 9 replies
    National Review ^ | June 30, 2016 | Kevin D. Williamson
    The Road to Rationalia Small brains, big problems — again Being an astrophysicist, Neil deGrasse Tyson is familiar with event horizons. He needs a refresher on epistemic horizons. An event horizon (the term is generally associated with black holes) is a boundary in spacetime surrounding a massive object exerting gravitational force so great that nothing that happens within the borders of the event horizon can ever affect anything outside of it. Which is to say, the escape velocity is equal to the speed of light, meaning that you could spend an eternity staring into it and never see what’s happening...
  • Murder Charges Dropped Against Man After 23 Years in Prison

    06/30/2016 10:19:53 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 17 replies
    NBC San Diego ^ | 6/30 | Murder Charges Dropped Against Man After 23 Years in Prison
    William Richards was convicted of murdering his wife in 1993.William Richards spent 23 years locked up for a crime he says he did not commit. A man who spent 23 years in prison walked free on Tuesday after the San Bernardino District Attorney dismissed all charges against him. William Richards met students from the California Western School of Law on Wednesday to thank them for helping get him exonerated. He was convicted of murdering his wife in 1993 but he has maintained his innocence for more than 20 years. “There are no words to describe what I’ve been through,”...
  • 37,000-Year-old Skull From Borneo Reveals Surprise For Scientists

    06/30/2016 9:09:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 27, 2016 | UNSW, and PA editors
    A new study of the 37,000-year old remains of the "Deep Skull" - the oldest modern human discovered in island South-East Asia - has revealed this ancient person was not related to Indigenous Australians, as had been originally thought. The Deep Skull was also likely to have been an older woman, rather than a teenage boy. The research, led by UNSW Australia Associate Professor Darren Curnoe, represents the most detailed investigation of the ancient cranium specimen since it was found in Niah Cave in Sarawak in 1958. "Our analysis overturns long-held views about the early history of this region," says...
  • 40,000-Year-Old Grindstone Unearthed In Western Galilee Cave

    06/30/2016 9:00:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Israel Hayom ^ | Tuesday June 28, 2016 | Yori Yalon, Daniel Siryoti and Israel Hayom Staff
    Despite the often oppressive heat, summer is the main season for... excavations... Tenth-grade students volunteering on an Israel Antiquities Authority dig at a stalactite cave near Moshav Manot in the Western Galilee earlier in June discovered a 40,000-year-old grindstone... Lerer said that the grindstone was basalt, "which is created when lava erupts out of a volcano and is not indigenous to the Western Galilee area. It looks like [either] the raw material or the tool itself was brought here from the Lower Galilee by residents of the cave." The stalactite cave where the dig is underway was discovered in 2008,...
  • Face of the Greek God Pan

    06/30/2016 8:07:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | October 12, 2015 | Megan Sauter
    In November 2014, the team at Antiochia Hippos, Israel, uncovered an extraordinary artifact -- a large bronze mask of the Greek god Pan (or Faunus in the Roman pantheon)... Weighing more than 11 pounds and measuring nearly 12 inches tall, the Pan mask is made of well-cast bronze. It was discovered outside the walled city of Hippos, Israel -- in a basalt tower with 6.5-foot-wide exterior walls... The Pan mask at Hippos, Israel, is an extraordinary and unique find, but Eisenberg explains that some parallels exist in the archaeological record: Similar masks -- perhaps influenced by the style of theater...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The New World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness

    06/29/2016 11:03:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | Thursday, June 30, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: How far are you from a naturally dark night sky? In increasing steps, this world map (medium | large) shows the effect of artificial night sky brightness on the visual appearance of the night sky. The brightness was modeled using high resolution satellite data and fit to thousands of night sky brightness measurements in recent work. Color-coded levels are compared to the natural sky brightness level for your location. For example, artificial sky brightness levels in yellow alter the natural appearance of the night sky. In red they hide the Milky Way in an artificial luminous fog. The results...
  • Asteroid Day 2016 Is June 30

    06/29/2016 8:57:55 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 15 replies
    Earthsky ^ | June 29, 2016 | Eleanor Imster
    Hundreds of events – films, concerts, panels with engineers, scientists and astronauts – about asteroids and how to protect our planet from asteroid impacts.The second annual Asteroid Day happens on June 30, 2016. Asteroid Day is a global awareness campaign to help people learn about asteroids and what we can do to protect our planet from asteroid impacts. You can join the Asteroid Day discussion on Twitter and Facebook. Asteroid Day 2016 will also include hundreds of events – films, concerts, interactive workshops and panels with engineers, scientists and astronauts. Here’s the premise of Asteroid Day, in the words of...
  • The 17 equations that changed the world

    06/29/2016 8:33:17 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 63 replies
    World Economic Forum ^ | 4 Apr, 2016 | Andy Kiersz
    In 2012, Mathematician Ian Stewart came out with an excellent and deeply researched book titled "In Pursuit of the Unknown: 17 Equations That Changed the World." His book takes a look at the most pivotal equations of all time, and puts them in a human, rather than technical context. "Equations definitely can be dull, and they can seem complicated, but that’s because they are often presented in a dull and complicated way," Stewart told Business Insider. "I have an advantage over school math teachers: I'm not trying to show you how to do the sums yourself." ... Stewart continued that...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- From Alpha to Omega in Crete

    06/29/2016 7:39:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, June 29, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This beautiful telephoto composition spans light-years in a natural night skyscape from the island of Crete. Looking south, exposures both track the stars and record a fixed foreground in three merged panels that cover a 10x12 degree wide field of view. The May 15 waxing gibbous moonlight illuminates the church and mountainous terrain. A mere 18 thousand light-years away, huge globular star cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) shining above gives a good visual impression of its appearance in binoculars on that starry night. Active galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is near the top of the frame, some 11 million...
  • Doomsday looming as Sun goes blank sparking ice age fears

    06/28/2016 6:43:48 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 72 replies
    Daily Star ^ | 28th June 2016 | Joshua Nevett
    Astonishing images from NASA reveal no visible sunspots are currently visible on its surface. This has caused the star to go into "cue call" mode having entered its quietest period for more than a century, Vencore Weather claims. Decreased activity is not unusual as solar activity changes the volatile star's surface in 11-year cycles, astronomers say. But researchers are warning this current cycle could have a devastating impact on Earth's atmosphere, possibly ushering in a second ice age, similar to the one which began in 1645. Paul Dorian of Vencore Weather says the blank Sun is a sign that the...
  • Why ultra-powerful radio bursts are the most perplexing mystery in astronomy

    06/28/2016 6:06:48 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 25 replies
    Nature ^ | 28 Jun, 2016 | Elizabeth Gibney
    No astronomer had ever seen anything like it. No theorist had predicted it. Yet there it was — a 5-millisecond radio burst that had arrived on 24 August 2001 from an unknown source seemingly billions of light years away. “It was so bright, we couldn't just dismiss it,” says Duncan Lorimer, who co-discovered the signal1 in 2007 while working on archived data from the Parkes radio telescope in New South Wales, Australia. “But we didn't really know what to do with it.” Such fleeting radio bursts usually came from pulsars — furiously rotating neutron stars whose radiation sweeps by Earth...
  • Modulation of Ice Ages via Precession and Dust-Albedo Feedbacks

    06/28/2016 5:00:32 PM PDT · by norwaypinesavage · 19 replies
    Watts Up With That ^ | June 28, 2016 | Ralph Ellis
    CO2 is only a bit-player in the drama of world climate, while the main characters are ice, dust and albedo....Ice age cycles have something to do with precession: the slow wobble of the axis of the Earth. The ancient Egyptians and Greeks knew of precession and called it the Great Year, because it gives warm and cool seasons over its approximate 23,000-year cycle. But there is a problem with invoking the Great Year as the regulator of ice ages, because we should really get an interglacial warming every 23,000 years or so. And we don’t – they only happen every...
  • Dogs Can Sniff Out Diabetes in People, Now We Know How

    06/28/2016 12:27:59 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 34 replies
    Nature World News ^ | Jun 28, 2016 | John Rosca
    Dogs have the ability to sense when a human with Type I diabetes suffers a low blood sugar episode, and scientists have discovered how they are able to do this. When a diabetic is experiencing a drop in blood sugar levels, this produces a chemical that dogs are able to smell. This can alert a dog to the onset of hypoglycemia. Many families with diabetic children have begun taking in medical alert service dogs to help monitor their children's symptoms. Speaking to the Toronto Sun, an Alliston, Ontario family discussed the benefits of having Amy, a Diabetic Alert Dog, to...
  • In Quest For Happier Chickens, Perdue Shifts How Birds Live And Die

    06/28/2016 11:01:03 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 39 replies
    NPR ^ | June 27, 2016 | staff reporter
    One of the country's leading poultry companies, Perdue Farms, announced plans Monday to make both life and death a little easier for its chickens. The changes are a break with current standard practices in the industry, and animal welfare groups are cheering.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Juno Mission Trailer

    06/28/2016 10:45:32 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | Tuesday, June 28, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What will NASA's Juno spacecraft find when it reaches Jupiter next Monday? Very little, if Juno does not survive Jupiter Orbit Insertion, a complex series of operations in an unknown environment just above Jupiter's cloud tops. If successful, as explained in the featured video, Juno will swoop around Jupiter, passing closer than any previous spacecraft. The goal is to decelerate, enter into a highly elliptical orbit, and begin two years of science operations. Juno's science mission objectives include mapping Jupiter's deep structure, determining how much water is in Jupiter's atmosphere, and exploring Jupiter's powerful magnetic field and how it...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Anticrepuscular Rays over Colorado (II)

    06/28/2016 10:40:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | Monday, June 27, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's happening over the horizon? Although the scene may appear somehow supernatural, nothing more unusual is occurring than a setting Sun and some well placed clouds. Pictured above are anticrepuscular rays. To understand them, start by picturing common crepuscular rays that are seen any time that sunlight pours though scattered clouds. Now although sunlight indeed travels along straight lines, the projections of these lines onto the spherical sky are great circles. Therefore, the crepuscular rays from a setting (or rising) sun will appear to re-converge on the other side of the sky. At the anti-solar point 180 degrees around...
  • Is Middle America Due For a Huge Earthquake?

    06/28/2016 7:56:44 AM PDT · by C19fan · 26 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | June 23, 2016 | Peter Brennan
    As I drove across the I-40 bridge into Memphis, I was reassured: chances were slim that a massive earthquake would wrest the road from its supports, and plunge me more than a hundred feet into the murky Mississippi. Thanks to a recently completed $260 million seismic retrofit, the bridge—a chokepoint for traffic in the central U.S.—is now fortified. It’s also decked out with strong-motion accelerometers and bookended by borehole seismometers to record convulsions in the earth.
  • Huge Aquifers Discovered Deep Under Drought-Stricken California

    06/28/2016 4:58:28 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 86 replies
    discover ^ | 06/27/2016 | Nathaniel Scharping
    The researchers compiled data from the California Division of Oil, Gas and Geothermal Resources, which tracks oil and gas wells around the state. Researchers determined if water had been detected while drilling, and also gathered data about depth, salinity and pressure. After looking at 360 oil and gas fields spread across eight counties, the researchers say that they’ve documented a trove of fresh water just over half the size of Lake Michigan hidden in California’s bedrock 1,000 to nearly 10,000 feet below the surface. This is almost three times more groundwater than what was indicated in previous studies, many conducted...
  • The wizard war in orbit (part 2) Black black boxes

    06/28/2016 4:14:42 AM PDT · by Purdue77 · 17 replies
    The Space Review ^ | June 27 2016 | Dwayne Day
    By fall 1959, a number of CORONA photo-reconnaissance spacecraft had already been launched under cover of the Discoverer program, but none had operated successfully. Program officials became concerned that the Agena spacecraft that carried CORONA might be vulnerable to tracking by Soviet radars, or possibly even deliberate electronic interference. They did not think this explained CORONA’s early string of failures, but it was a possibility they worried about. At the time, Harold Willis was working in the Office of ELINT located at CIA Headquarters when CORONA officials briefed him about their program and told him about their concerns. Willis also...
  • First Images of 12,000-Year-Old Mexican Mammoth Skeleton Emerge

    06/27/2016 11:45:23 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 35 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 25 JUNE 2016 | Harry Yorke
    Paleontologists are in the final stages of extracting the skeleton of a huge mammoth discovered buried two metres underneath a busy street in the Mexican city Tultepec. New images of the excavation site have revealed the sheer size of the prehistoric animal, which experts believe died between 12,000 and 14,000 years ago in what is now the city's suburb of San Antonio Xahuento. With a metre-wide skull and tusks spanning more than ten feet, the skeleton belongs to Mammuthus Columbi, a North American mammoth which expects believe grew sixteen feet high and weighed up to 10 tonnes.
  • Living tissue 3D printing: Breakthrough could lead to creation of new organs

    Researchers at the University of Bristol have developed the bio-ink, created by scientists at the University of Bristol, from stem cells. It is expected to pave the way for the production of complex tissues to replace diseased or damaged areas of the body such as knees and hips and eventually the creation of vital organs. Lead researcher Dr Adam Perriman, an expert in cellular medicine at the University of Bristol, said: “This is a very exciting development which we believe could lead to a revolution in the treatment of diseases like osteoarthritis and other causes of tissue damage. “This approach...
  • Archaeologists discover layers of Indo-Greek city in Swat

    06/26/2016 6:51:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Dawn News ^ | Sunday, June 26, 2016 | Fazal Khaliq
    Archaeologists excavate Indo-Greek and Saka-Parthian structures at Bazira, Swat. -- Dawn photo Indo-Greek coins discovered during the recent excavation at Bazira, Barikot, Swat. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat Indo-Greek coins discovered during the recent excavation at Bazira, Barikot, Swat. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat Terracotta baroque female figurine, circa 3rd-2nd BC. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat Indo-Greek coins discovered during the recent excavation at Bazira, Barikot, Swat. Courtesy Italian Archaeological Mission in Swat
  • Rare Skull From Korea's Silla Kingdom Reconstructed

    06/26/2016 6:11:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Scientists have studied a rare skeleton from the Silla culture, which ruled over part of the Korean Peninsula from 57 B.C. to A.D. 935. “The skeletons are not preserved well in the soil of Korea,” bioanthropologist Dong Hoon Shin of Seoul National University College of Medicine told Live Science. The skeleton, of a woman in her late 30s, was found in a traditional coffin that had been buried near the historic capital of the Silla Kingdom, Gyeongju. Analysis of her mitochondrial DNA suggests that she belonged to a genetic lineage that is present in East Asia today. Carbon isotopes in...
  • Monastery new discovery in underground city in Cappadocia

    06/26/2016 6:02:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | June 23, 2016 | Anadolu Agency
    A monastery hewn from the rock has been found during excavations and cleaning works in an underground city that was discovered in 2014 in the Central Anatolian province of Nevsehir... Excavation and cleaning works have been continuing on an area of 400,000 square meters that includes 11 neighborhoods around Nevsehir Castle, which is situated in the city center and has been declared a third-degree archaeological area. At the beginning of the year, a historic church was discovered in the underground city. The church features frescoes depicting the ascension of Jesus to heaven as well as other important objects for the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Jupiter's Clouds from New Horizons

    06/26/2016 10:54:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | Sunday, June 26, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The New Horizons spacecraft took some stunning images of Jupiter on its way out to Pluto. Famous for its Great Red Spot, Jupiter is also known for its regular, equatorial cloud bands, visible through even modest sized telescopes. The featured image, horizontally compressed, was taken in 2007 near Jupiter's terminator and shows the Jovian giant's wide diversity of cloud patterns. On the far left are clouds closest to Jupiter's South Pole. Here turbulent whirlpools and swirls are seen in a dark region, dubbed a belt, that rings the planet. Even light colored regions, called zones, show tremendous structure, complete...
  • Intel x86s hide another CPU that can take over your machine (you can't audit it)

    06/25/2016 9:26:23 PM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 15 replies
    Bing Bong ^ | 06/15/16 | Damien Zammit
    Recent Intel x86 processors implement a secret, powerful control mechanism that runs on a separate chip that no one is allowed to audit or examine. When these are eventually compromised, they'll expose all affected systems to nearly unkillable, undetectable rootkit attacks. I've made it my mission to open up this system and make free, open replacements, before it's too late. The Intel Management Engine (ME) is a subsystem composed of a special 32-bit ARC microprocessor that's physically located inside the chipset. It is an extra general purpose computer running a firmware blob that is sold as a management system for...
  • The Murky Ethics of Driverless Cars

    06/25/2016 7:11:06 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 31 replies
    Pacific Standard ^ | 23 Jun, 2016 | Tom Jacobs
    A new study explores a moral dilemma facing the creators of self-driving vehicles: In an accident, whose lives should they prioritize? So youÂ’re driving down a dark road late at night when suddenly a child comes darting out onto the pavement. Instinctively, you swerve, putting your own safety in jeopardy to spare her life. Very noble of you. But would you want your driverless vehicle to do the same? That question, which can be found idling at the intersection of technology and ethics, is posed in the latest issue of Science. A variation on the famous trolley dilemma, it wonÂ’t...
  • List of Possible Zika Birth Defects Grows Longer

    06/25/2016 3:58:57 PM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 15 replies
    Scientific American ^ | June 24, 2016 | Dina Fine Maron
    Even without microcephaly, seizures and developmental delays may appear in the months following birth The full scope of Zika-related birth defects may extend far beyond abnormally small heads and brain damage. Research to be presented next week at a teratology conference in San Antonio, Texas, suggests that serious joint problems, seizures, vision impairment, trouble feeding and persistent crying can be added to the list of risks from Zika exposure in the womb. The new findings confirm doctors’ concerns that even when Zika-exposed babies are born without microcephaly and appear largely normal at birth they can go on to have health...
  • Wealthy 3,600-year-old Trading Hub Found in Gaza

    06/25/2016 6:29:28 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Haaretz ^ | May 20, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The remains of a vast Bronze Age town... has been discovered in Gaza, and has now been shown to be a rich trading hub. The prosperity of its Canaanite inhabitants is evident in discoveries of elaborate gold jewelry, vast amounts of imported pottery and an unprecedented number of scarabs... trade between the seaside Canaanite town and other Mediterranean peoples, notably the ancient Cypriots. Among the clay sherds discovered were over 200 of white slip I type of pottery, a type of ware rarely found outside of Cyprus. Tell el-Ajjul, which lies right on the Gazan coast, was first explored by...
  • Ancient Canaanites Imported Animals from Egypt

    06/25/2016 5:03:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 21, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The ancient Canaanites living in Gath some 5,000 years ago weren't sacrificing their own livestock to appease the gods. They were importing animals from ancient Egypt, archaeologists have now proven. A donkey, as well as some sheep and goats whose remains were found in Early Bronze Age layers at Gath dating to 4900 years ago turn out to have been born and bred in the Nile valley.The discovery at the archaeological site of Tell el-Safi shows that animals were part of the extensive trading relations between the Old Kingdom of Egypt and Early Bronze Age Canaan (circa 2900-2500 BCE).... Until...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Strawberry to Honey Moonrise [Popsicle stick]

    06/25/2016 4:43:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | Saturday, June 25, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Near the horizon the Full Moon often seems to loom large, swollen in appearance by the famous Moon illusion. But timelapse images demonstrate that the Moon's apparent size doesn't really change as it climbs toward the zenith. Its color does, though. Recording a frame every 10 seconds, this image shows how dramatic that color change can be. The composite follows a solstice Full Moon climbing above a rugged horizon over northwestern Indiana. A shrinking line-of-sight through planet Earth's dense and dusty atmosphere shifted the moonlight from strawberry red through honey-colored and paler yellowish hues. That change seems appropriate for...
  • Campsite dating back 12,000 years unearthed by Route 8 [New Brunswick, Canada]

    06/24/2016 10:51:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    CBC News ^ | June 23, 2016 | Alan White, Shane Fowler
    Archaeologists say a campsite unearthed just metres from a new highway in Fredericton could be more than 12,000 years old. The campsite held 600 artifacts, most of which were from tool making, as well as a fire pit containing ancient charcoal... Artifacts including stone tool fragments and arrowheads that would have been attached to rods to make spears have been found at the site. No ceremonial objects were found at the site. The campsite is located just metres from the shoulder of a stretch of Route 8. Suttie estimated the site to be between 11,600 and 12,200 years old. The...
  • Skeletons and Gold Coins Found in Pompeii Shop

    06/24/2016 10:31:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, June 24, 2016 | editors
    Archaeologists excavating a shop on the outskirts of Pompeii have found four skeletons, several gold coins, and a necklace pendant, according to an Associated Press report. The skeletons belonged to young people who died in the back of the shop when nearby Mount Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79. There was an oven in the shop that the archaeologists believe may have been used to make bronze objects. There is evidence that the shop was targeted by looters seeking treasure after the eruption, but they apparently missed the gold coins and the gold-leaf-foil, flower-shaped pendant. Archaeologists have been excavating a second...
  • Ethical dilemma on four wheels: How to decide when your self-driving car should kill you

    06/24/2016 8:20:32 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 64 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 06/23/2016 | Karen Kaplan
    Self-driving cars have a lot of learning to do... And, if the situation arises, they’ll need to know whether it’s better to mow down a group of pedestrians or spare their lives by steering off the road, killing all passengers onboard. ... Once self-driving cars are logging serious miles, they’re sure to find themselves in situations where an accident is unavoidable. At that point, they’ll have to know how to pick the lesser of two evils. The answer could determine whether self-driving cars become a novelty item for the adventurous few or gain widespread acceptance among the general public. ......
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Sagittarius Sunflowers

    06/23/2016 11:09:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | Friday, June 24, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: These three bright nebulae are often featured in telescopic tours of the constellation Sagittarius and the crowded starfields of the central Milky Way. In fact, 18th century cosmic tourist Charles Messier cataloged two of them; M8, the large nebula left of center, and colorful M20 near the bottom of the frame The third, NGC 6559, is right of M8, separated from the larger nebula by dark dust lanes. All three are stellar nurseries about five thousand light-years or so distant. The expansive M8, over a hundred light-years across, is also known as the Lagoon Nebula. M20's popular moniker is...
  • Blasphemy! Godless malware preys on nearly 90 percent of Android devices

    06/23/2016 7:54:15 PM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 15 replies
    SC Magazine ^ | June 22, 2016 | Bradley Barth
    Blasphemy! Godless malware preys on nearly 90 percent of Android devices Godless, an emerging mobile malware threat capable of rooting Android phones, has started to adopt the traits of an exploit kit, in that it searches for multiple vulnerabilities through which it can automatically infect a victim. Once it successfully executes, the malware gains root access to the device, granting it full control. Christopher Budd, global threats communications manager at Trend Micro, told SCMagazine.com in an interview that Godless is ostensibly an “encyclopedia of known, good attacks against various vulnerabilities… It's loading up on attacks and using whatever will work,...
  • Archaeologist: Many thousands of years ago life flourished in the Gobi desert

    06/23/2016 11:33:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Science & Scholarship in Poland ^ | June 10, 2016 | Szymon Zdziebiowski (PAP) [szz/zan/mrt]
    Many thousands of years ago life flourished in the Mongolian Gobi desert... Archaeologists found many traces of old camps... located on the shores of lakes - now dried. Based on the findings, researchers concluded that thousands of years ago richness of species of animals lived in the study area, benefiting the ancient inhabitants of the desert. Archaeologists discovered mainly stone tools and the waste associated with their production... The oldest finds are represented by a massive stone tools made by the Middle Palaeolithic communities (200 thousand - 40 thousand years ago). Archaeologists have also discovered smaller stone products from later...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Solstice Dawn and Full Moonset

    06/23/2016 8:38:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | Thursday, June 23, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A Full Moon sets as the Solstice Sun rises in this June 20 dawn skyscape. Captured from a nearby peak in central California, planet Earth, the scene looks across the summit of Mount Hamilton and Lick Observatory domes on a calendar date that marks an astronomical change of seasons and hemispherical extremes of daylight hours. Earth's shadow stretches toward the Santa Cruz Mountains on the western horizon. Just above the atmospheric grey shadowband is a more colorful anti-twilight arch, a band of reddened, backscattered sunlight also known as the Belt of Venus. The interplay of solstice dates and lunar...
  • How Earth Moves

    06/23/2016 8:20:40 AM PDT · by fella · 23 replies
    youtube ^ | Vsauce
    How Earth Moves
  • FIVE ODD-LOOKING SATELLITES FROM NASA'S PAST

    06/22/2016 4:28:52 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 31 replies
    Vanguard 1 was the fourth satellite launched into space and the first that was solar powered. It was also, perhaps, the most successful of the early satellites. Though Vanguard 1 weighed in at a paltry 3.2 pounds, it remained operational for 2,200 days, and took readings from space which showed that the Earth is slightly pear-shaped. Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev derided Vanguard as "the grapefruit satellite" (probably out of jealousy). Vanguard 1 remains in orbit to this day, making it the oldest manmade satellite in space.
  • Humanity May Be Alone In The Universe

    06/22/2016 12:51:26 PM PDT · by Heartlander · 109 replies
    Forbes ^ | June 21, 2016 | Ethan Siegel
    There may never have been another intelligent, technologically advanced alien species in the entire history of the Universe. Last week, in the New York Times, scientist Adam Frank emphatically wrote that Yes, There Have Been Aliens, concluding that given all the potentially habitable worlds we know must be out there from our astrophysical discoveries, intelligent life must have arisen. What he fails to account for, however, is the magnitude of the unknowns that abiogenesis, evolution, long-term habitability and other factors bring into the equation. Although it’s true that there are an astronomical number of possibilities for intelligent, technologically advanced lifeforms,...
  • Farming Invented Twice In Middle East, Genomes Study Reveals

    06/22/2016 11:55:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Nature ^ | June 20, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Study of 44 ancient Middle Eastern genomes supports idea of independent farming revolutions in the Fertile Crescent. Two Middle Eastern populations independently developed farming and then spread the technology to Europe, Africa and Asia, according to the genomes of 44 people who lived thousands of years ago in present-day Armenia, Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Iran. ...the research supports archaeological evidence about the multiple origins of farming, and represents the first detailed look at the ancestry of the individuals behind one of the most important periods in human history — the Neolithic revolution. Some 11,000 years ago, humans living in the...
  • Discovery Of Roman Coins In Devon Redraws Map Of Empire

    06/22/2016 11:47:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Wednesday, June 22, 2016 | Steven Morris
    The discovery of a few muddy coins in a Devon paddock by a pair of amateur metal detector enthusiasts has led to the redrawing of the boundary of the Roman empire in south-west Britain. Previously it had been thought that Ancient Rome’s influence did not stretch beyond Exeter but the find has resulted in a major archaeological dig that has unearthed more coins, a stretch of Roman road and the remnants of vessels from France and the Mediterranean once full of wine, olive oil and garum -- fish sauce. The far south-west of Britain has long been seen as an...
  • Hundreds of genes seen sparking to life two days after death

    06/22/2016 10:46:20 AM PDT · by Theoria · 24 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 21 June 2016 | Anna Williams
    The discovery that many genes are still working up to 48 hours after death has implications for organ transplants, forensics and our very definition of death When a doctor declares a person dead, some of their body may still be alive and kicking – at least for a day or two. New evidence in animals suggests that many genes go on working for up to 48 hours after the lights have gone out. This hustle and bustle has been seen in mice and zebrafish, but there are hints that genes are also active for some time in deceased humans. This...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Cirrus over Paris

    06/22/2016 4:45:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, June 22, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's that over Paris? Cirrus. Typically, cirrus clouds appear white or gray when reflecting sunlight, can appear dark at sunset (or sunrise) against a better lit sky. Cirrus are among the highest types of clouds and are usually thin enough to see stars through. Cirrus clouds may form from moisture released above storm clouds and so may herald the arrival of a significant change in weather. Conversely, cirrus clouds have also been seen on Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Titan, Uranus, and Neptune. The featured image was taken two days ago from a window in District 15, Paris, France, Earth. The...
  • Make It So! Sayeth Cleopatra

    06/21/2016 6:35:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Archaeology, Volume 54 Number 1 ^ | January/February 2001 | Angela M. H. Schuster
    A single Greek word, ginesthoi, or "make it so," written at the bottom of a Ptolemaic papyrus may have been written by the Egyptian queen Cleopatra VII herself, says Dutch papyrologist Peter van Minnen of the University of Groningen. Received in Alexandria on Mecheir 26 (February 23, 33 B.C.), the papyrus text, recycled for use in the construction of a cartonnage mummy case found by a German expedition at Abusir in 1904, appears to be a royal ordinance granting tax exemption to one Publius Canidius, an associate of Mark Antony's who would command his land army during the Battle of...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 6814: Grand Design Spiral Galaxy from Hubble

    06/21/2016 1:24:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | Tuesday, June 21, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In the center of this serene stellar swirl is likely a harrowing black-hole beast. The surrounding swirl sweeps around billions of stars which are highlighted by the brightest and bluest. The breadth and beauty of the display give the swirl the designation of a grand design spiral galaxy. The central beast shows evidence that it is a supermassive black hole about 10 million times the mass of our Sun. This ferocious creature devours stars and gas and is surrounded by a spinning moat of hot plasma that emits blasts of X-rays. The central violent activity gives it the designation...
  • The wizard war in orbit (part 1)

    06/21/2016 7:08:55 AM PDT · by Purdue77 · 16 replies
    The Space Review ^ | 20 June 2016 | Dwayne Day
    Tales of espionage are filled with lanky men in trenchcoats walking through cold Berlin streets at the height of the Cold War. But the most important intelligence—in terms of volume and reliability—was gathered by reconnaissance satellites far overhead. These satellites were precise, they collected vast amounts of information, and unlike spies, they did not forget, embellish, lie, or go rogue. Photographic reconnaissance satellites like CORONA, GAMBIT, HEXAGON, and KENNEN were in many ways the most prolific spooks. But they were also accompanied by other satellites, signals intelligence, or SIGINT, satellites that listened for the electronic whispers of radars and radios,...
  • First The Government Went After ExxonMobil -- Now They're Going After Me

    06/20/2016 8:01:24 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 11 replies
    Forbes ^ | 16 Jun, 2016 | Alex Epstein
    Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey is persecuting ExxonMobil XOM +0.44% and now me for having opinions on fossil FOSL +3.61% fuels she disagrees with. My company, the Center for Industrial Progress, is one of the 12 cited in the new subpoena of Exxon, meaning that Exxon is supposed to release any private or confidential correspondence any of its employees have ever had with anyone from my company. I have nothing to fear whatsoever about what such a witch-hunt would or wouldn’t reveal on my end, but I do not tolerate anyone violating my rights. So I wrote the Attorney General...