HOME/ABOUT  Prayer  SCOTUS  ProLife  BangList  Aliens  StatesRights  ConventionOfStates  WOT  HomosexualAgenda  GlobalWarming  Corruption  Taxes  Congress  Fraud  MediaBias  GovtAbuse  Tyranny  Obama  ObamaCare  Elections  Polls  Debates  Trump  Carson  Cruz  Bush  OPSEC  Benghazi  InfoSec  BigBrother  IRS  Scandals  TalkRadio  TeaParty  FreeperBookClub  HTMLSandbox  FReeperEd  FReepathon  CopyrightList  Copyright/DMCA Notice 

Please keep those donations coming in, folks. Our 1st quarter FReepathon is off to a great start and we have a chance of getting 'er done early! Thank you all very much!!

Or by mail to: Free Republic, LLC - PO Box 9771 - Fresno, CA 93794
Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $41,915
47%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 47% is in!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Science (General/Chat)

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Are Electric Cars Really Green? (Video)

    02/08/2016 12:30:59 PM PST · by servo1969 · 13 replies
    Prager University ^ | 2-8-2016 | Bjorn Lomborg
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=17xh_VRrnMU Do electric cars really help the environment? President Obama thinks so. So does Leonardo DiCaprio. And many others. The argument goes like this: Regular cars run on gasoline, a fossil fuel that pumps CO2 straight out of the tailpipe and into the atmosphere. Electric cars run on electricity. They don't burn any gasoline at all. No gas; no CO2. In fact, electric cars are often advertised as creating "zero emissions." But do they really? Let's take a closer look. First, there's the energy needed to produce the car. More than a third of the lifetime carbon-dioxide emissions from an...
  • Early human ancestor didn't have the jaws of a nutcracker

    02/08/2016 9:25:11 AM PST · by JimSEA · 12 replies
    Science Daily ^ | February 8, 20 | Washington University in St. Louis
    South Africa's Australopithecus sediba, discovered in 2008 at the archaeological site of Malapa in the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, is again helping us to study and understand the origins of humans. Research published in 2012 garnered international attention by suggesting that a possible early human ancestor had lived on a diverse woodland diet including hard foods mixed in with tree bark, fruit, leaves and other plant products. But new research by an international team of researchers now shows that Australopithecus sediba didn't have the jaw and tooth structure necessary to exist on a steady diet of hard foods....
  • Scientists question Tamil Nadu government's claim that meteorite blast killed bus driver in Vellore

    02/08/2016 7:25:12 AM PST · by Red Badger · 13 replies
    timesofindia.indiatimes.com ^ | Feb 8, 2016, 08.18 PM IST | Bosco Dominique & Karthikeyan Hemalatha
    Witnesses said the blast left a crater 5ft deep and 2ft wide. =================================================================================================================================== A meteorite crashed into an engineering college in Vellore district on Saturday , causing an explosion that killed one man and injured three others, the Tamil Nadu government said on Sunday. Scientists, however, said it wasn't clear how the government concluded that a meteorite strike caused the blast. There has been no established death due to a meteorite hit in recorded history, they said. If a meteorite indeed caused the death, bus driver Kamaraj will be the first person ever to have died in a meteorite strike....
  • Was it a meteorite? Tests will determine what killed Indian man

    02/08/2016 7:22:15 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    cnn ^ | 7:27 AM ET, Mon February 8, 2016 | Roshni Majumdar and Tim Hume
    )—Indian scientists will examine remains from an object that fell from the sky Saturday, causing a large explosion which killed a man, to determine if it is a meteorite, police say. If the object is confirmed to be a meteorite - a fragment of a comet or asteroid that has fallen to Earth - the death would be the first fatality from a meteorite on record, it is believed. P. K. Senthil Kumari, the police chief in Vellore district in the southern Indian state of Tamil Nadu, told CNN that the object struck the grounds of an engineering school at...
  • Universal karma? Indian man believed first to be killed by meteorite

    02/07/2016 10:54:23 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 18 replies
    rt | reuters ^ | 2/8/16 | Steven Watt
    An Indian may be the first known human being to have been killed by a meteorite hit. Authorities said that a small celestial body struck a southern college campus, killing a bus driver and injuring three others in an incident initially reported as a bomb. The "mysterious explosion" that took place on Saturday in Vellore, a city in the south Indian state of Tamil, has been confirmed as a meteorite impact by Chief Minister J Jayalalithaa.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Light Pillars over Alaska

    02/07/2016 9:21:12 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    NASA ^ | February 08, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's happening behind those houses? Pictured here are not auroras but nearby light pillars, a nearby phenomenon that can appear as a distant one. In most places on Earth, a lucky viewer can see a Sun-pillar, a column of light appearing to extend up from the Sun caused by flat fluttering ice-crystals reflecting sunlight from the upper atmosphere. Usually these ice crystals evaporate before reaching the ground. During freezing temperatures, however, flat fluttering ice crystals may form near the ground in a form of light snow, sometimes known as a crystal fog. These ice crystals may then reflect ground...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Advanced LIGO: Gravitational Wave Detectors Upgraded

    02/07/2016 10:18:53 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    NASA ^ | February 07, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Accelerate a charge and you'll get electromagnetic radiation: light. But accelerate any mass and you'll get gravitational radiation. Light is seen all the time, but, so far, a confirmed direct detection of gravitational radiation has been elusive. When absorbed, gravitational waves create a tiny symmetric jiggle similar to squashing a rubber ball and letting go quickly. Separated detectors can be used to discern gravitational waves from everyday bumps. Powerful astronomical sources of gravitational radiation would coincidentally jiggle even detectors on opposite ends of the Earth. Pictured here are the four-kilometer-long arms of one such detector: the LIGO Hanford Observatory...
  • Europe’s shift to dark green forests stokes global warming—study

    02/07/2016 8:09:47 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 24 replies
    Reuters ^ | Thu Feb 4, 2016 2:25pm EST | Alister Doyle
    An expansion of Europe's forests towards dark green conifers has stoked global warming, according to a study on Thursday at odds with a widespread view that planting more trees helps human efforts to slow rising temperatures. Forest changes have nudged Europe's summer temperatures up by 0.12 degree Celsius (0.2 Fahrenheit) since 1750, largely because many nations have planted conifers such as pines and spruce whose dark color traps the sun's heat, the scientists said. Lighter-colored broad-leafed trees, such as oak or birch, reflect more sunlight back into space, but have lost ground to fast-growing conifers, used for everything from building...
  • Hillary: Halt all fossil fuel extraction on federal lands

    02/07/2016 5:40:33 AM PST · by rktman · 32 replies
    canadafreepress.com ^ | 2/7/2016 | Dan Calabrese
    If you enjoyed paying $1.59 a gallon for gas this past weekend, understand a few things. To the extent domestic production affects this, the oil industry is mostly gettings its resources on private lands. That's because Obama, while he's happy to take credit for the increased productivity and lower prices, is fighting new leases on federal lands wherever he can. That's how he can reassure his left-wing base he's an enemy of the oil industry while also taking credit for the low prices. But there is some oil being extracted on federal lands, and if that stopped all at once,...
  • Anodizing (Or the beauty of corrosion)

    02/06/2016 8:20:33 PM PST · by Utilizer · 26 replies
    YouTube ^ | Published on Feb 24, 2014 | Anna Berney
    Anodizing (Or the beauty of corrosion) Bill describes how metals like aluminum and titanium are made resistant to corrosion by growing an oxide layer into the metals. These is the same process used on many Apple products.
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Five Planets at Castell de Burriac

    02/06/2016 7:12:45 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    NASA ^ | February 06, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: February's five planet line-up stretches across a clear sky in this predawn scene. A hilltop Castell de Burriac looms in the foreground, overlooking the town of Cabrera de Mar near Barcelona, Spain, planet Earth. The mosaicked, panoramic image looks south. It merges three different exposure times to record a bright Last Quarter Moon, planets, seaside city lights, and dark castle ruins. Seen on February 1st the Moon was near Mars on the sky. But this week early morning risers have watched it move on, passing near Saturn and finally Venus and Mercury, sliding along near the ecliptic toward the...
  • Is This Ancient Greek 'Laptop' Proof That Time Travel Is Real? [in short, no]

    02/06/2016 2:35:49 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 105 replies
    Yahoo -- ABC News Network ^ | February 5, 2016 | some wackadoodle
    A statue showing a young girl holding up what appears to be a laptop -- complete with USB ports -- has sparked a frenzy among conspiracy theorists. The statue, 'Grave Naiskos of an Enthroned Woman with an Attendant' is in The J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, California. 'I am not saying that this is depicting an ancient laptop computer,' said YouTuber StillSpeakingOut. 'But when I look at the sculpture I can't help but think about the Oracle of Delphi, which was supposed to allow the priests to connect with the gods to retrieve advanced information and various aspects.' In...
  • Saudi Chemist Invents New Medical Technique

    02/06/2016 11:12:47 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 30 replies
    Arab News ^ | Tuesday 2 February 2016
    A Saudi woman has used her expertise in chemistry to develop a new device that can carry drugs to points of inflammation in the body. Ghada Mutlaq Al-Mutairi, 39, who currently lives in the United States and holds a doctorate in chemical engineering, works at the University of California. She received a $3 million global innovation award from HIN, the largest organization supporting scientific research in the United States. Her device, which was recognized as one of the four most important inventions by the United States Congress in 2012, provides a way to penetrate the body, detect inflammation, and provide...
  • Can slow creep along thrust faults help forecast megaquakes?

    02/06/2016 10:36:54 AM PST · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 2/4/2016 | University of California
    In Japan and areas like the Pacific Northwest where megathrust earthquakes are common, scientists may be able to better forecast large quakes based on periodic increases and decreases in the rate of slow, quiet slipping along the fault. This hope comes from a new study by Japanese and UC Berkeley seismologists, looking at the more than 1,000-kilimeter-long fault off northeast Japan where the devastating 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake originated, generating a tsunami that killed thousands. There, the Pacific Plate is trundling under the Japan plate, not only causing megaquakes like the magnitude 9 in 2011, but giving rise to a chain...
  • Could You Stomach the Horrors of 'Halftime' in Ancient Rome?

    02/06/2016 10:26:13 AM PST · by EveningStar · 61 replies
    Live Science ^ | February 4, 2016 | Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz
    The enormous arena was empty, save for the seesaws and the dozens of condemned criminals who sat naked upon them, hands tied behind their backs. Unfamiliar with the recently invented contraptions known as petaurua, the men tested the seesaws uneasily. One criminal would push off the ground and suddenly find himself 15 feet in the air while his partner on the other side of the seesaw descended swiftly to the ground. How strange. In the stands, tens of thousands of Roman citizens waited with half-bored curiosity to see what would happen next and whether it would be interesting enough to...
  • 100-Foot Asteroid to Buzz Earth Next Month

    02/06/2016 2:42:17 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 32 replies
    Discovery ^ | 2/5/16 | Mike Wall
    An asteroid as long as a basketball court will give Earth a close shave next month — though scientists aren’t sure just how close. The near-Earth asteroid 2013 TX68, which is thought to be about 100 feet (30 meters) in diameter, will zoom past our planet on March 5. The space rock could come as close as 11,000 miles (17,700 kilometers) — less than 5 percent of the distance from Earth to the moon — or stay up to 9 million miles (14.5 million km) away during the flyby, NASA officials said. “The variation in possible closest-approach distances is due...
  • Apollo 14 Mission To Fra Mauro (1971)

    02/06/2016 1:07:43 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 3 replies
    YouTube ^ | NASA/JSC
    Apollo 14 Mission To Fra Mauro (1971) [documentary] Courtesy: NASA/JSC
  • Pluto’s Mysterious, Floating Hills

    02/05/2016 7:38:13 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 22 replies
    NASA ^ | 4 Feb, 2016 | NASA
    The nitrogen ice glaciers on Pluto appear to carry an intriguing cargo: numerous, isolated hills that may be fragments of water ice from Pluto's surrounding uplands. These hills individually measure one to several miles or kilometers across, according to images and data from NASA's New Horizons mission. The hills, which are in the vast ice plain informally named Sputnik Planum within Pluto's 'heart,' are likely miniature versions of the larger, jumbled mountains on Sputnik Planum's western border. They are yet another example of Pluto's fascinating and abundant geological activity. Because water ice is less dense than nitrogen-dominated ice, scientists believe...
  • Mysterious Martian "Cauliflower" May Be the Latest Hint of Alien Life

    02/05/2016 1:23:16 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    smithsonianmag.com ^ | 02/01/2016 | Sarah Scoles
    The hunt for signs of life on Mars has been on for decades, and so far scientists have found only barren dirt and rocks. Now a pair of astronomers thinks that strangely shaped minerals inside a Martian crater could be the clue everyone has been waiting for. In 2008, scientists announced that NASA's Spirit rover had discovered deposits of a mineral called opaline silica inside Mars's Gusev crater. That on its own is not as noteworthy as the silica's shape: Its outer layers are covered in tiny nodules that look like heads of cauliflower sprouting from the red dirt. No...
  • Galactic center's gamma rays unlikely to originate from dark matter, evidence shows

    02/05/2016 1:08:03 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 15 replies
    Princeton University ^ | 4 Feb, 2016 | Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
    Bursts of gamma rays from the center of our galaxy are not likely to be signals of dark matter but rather other astrophysical phenomena such as fast-rotating stars called millisecond pulsars, according to two new studies, one from a team based at Princeton University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and another based in the Netherlands. Previous studies suggested that gamma rays coming from the dense region of space in the inner Milky Way galaxy could be caused when invisible dark matter particles collide. But using new statistical analysis methods, the two research teams independently found that the gamma ray...
  • First Macroscopic Quantum Entanglement Performed At Room Temperature

    02/05/2016 11:32:15 AM PST · by Reeses · 43 replies
    Futurism.com ^ | Feb 5 2016 | Futurism
    In a breakthrough in quantum physics, scientists were able to create the phenomenon of quantum entanglement macroscopically using large magnets at room temperature. ... scientists working at the University of Chicago and the Argonne National Laboratory revealed that they were able to create quantum entanglement at a macroscopic level at room temperature on a semiconductor chip, using atomic nuclei and the application of relatively small magnetic fields. Their breakthrough, which is published in Science Advances, is not only significant in what they accomplished but also how they accomplished it. In quantum physics, the creation of entanglement in particles larger and...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Massive Stars in NGC 6357

    02/05/2016 4:32:07 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    NASA ^ | February 05, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Massive stars lie within NGC 6357, an expansive emission nebula complex some 6,500 light-years away toward the tail of the constellation Scorpius. In fact, positioned near center in this ground-based close-up of NGC 6357, star cluster Pismis 24 includes some of the most massive stars known in the galaxy, stars with nearly 100 times the mass of the Sun. The nebula's bright central region also contains dusty pillars of molecular gas, likely hiding massive protostars from the prying eyes of optical instruments. Intricate shapes in the nebula are carved as interstellar winds and energetic radiation from the young and...
  • NASA's Mars Rover Found Mysterious Growths On Mars That Could Be The Biggest Discovery In Science

    02/05/2016 12:46:49 AM PST · by blam · 41 replies
    BI ^ | 2-5-2016
    NASA's Spirit Mars Rover Found Mysterious Growths On Mars That Could Be The Biggest Discovery In Science Jennifer Deal February 5, 2016 Four billion years ago, Mars looked a lot like Earth does today. So it's not surprising that a team of scientists believe that they may have discovered the first signs of ancient alien life on the planet.(click to the site to see the video)
  • Queen of the Philistines: Trude Dothan (1922–2016)

    02/04/2016 10:09:10 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | 02/02/2016 | editors
    Trude Dothan, the doyenne of Philistine archaeology, passed away recently at the age of 93. A pioneer in Israeli archaeology, Dothan was a world-renowned expert on the Philistines. She excavated at Athienou (Cyprus), Hazor, Ein Gedi, Tel Qasile, Tell ‘Aitun, Deir el-Balah and Tel Miqne (Biblical Ekron). The excavations at Tel Miqne, which she codirected with Seymour Gitin between 1981 and 1996, unearthed evidence that proved to be dramatically significant to our understanding of Philistine history and culture. Dothan, who had been a Professor of Archaeology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, published many studies on the Philistines, on the...
  • New 'Johnny Cash' Tarantula Uproots Spider Family Tree (14 new species found in U.S.)

    02/04/2016 8:56:25 PM PST · by dayglored · 79 replies
    National Geographic ^ | Feb 4, 2016 | Michael Greshko
    A challenging, years-long survey has uncovered 14 new species of U.S. tarantula, including one named after Johnny Cash. Some, like Aphonopelma madera, live on forested "sky islands," mountains surrounded on all sides by Arizona's deserts. Others, like the tiny Aphonopelma atomicum, nestle themselves in silk-lined burrows near Nevada's nuclear test sites. And Aphonopelma johnnycashi, named for the legendary country musician, makes its home near Folsom Prison, California. True to form, adult males are mostly black, a getup of which Cash--the Man in Black--would have no doubt been proud. (Also see "New Tarantula (Not Beetle) Named After John Lennon.") To uncover...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Dwarf Planet Ceres

    02/04/2016 3:10:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    NASA ^ | February 04, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Dwarf planet Ceres is the largest object in the Solar System's main asteroid belt, with a diameter of about 950 kilometers (590 miles). Ceres is seen here in approximately true color, based on image data from the Dawn spacecraft recorded on May 4, 2015. On that date, Dawn's orbit stood 13,642 kilometers above the surface of the small world. Two of Ceres' famous mysterious bright spots at Oxo crater and Haulani crater are near center and center right of this view. Casting a telltale shadow at the bottom is Ceres' cone-shaped, lonely mountain Ahuna Mons. Presently some 385 kilometers...
  • The Moon or Mars? NASA Must Pick 1 Goal for Astronauts, Experts Tell Congress

    02/04/2016 2:57:22 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 37 replies
    space.com ^ | 02/04/2016 | Calla Cofield,
    NASA can't afford to put humans on Mars while also pursuing missions to put astronauts back on the moon, according to a panel of experts who testified to the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Space yesterday (Feb. 3). "Today the future of NASA's human spaceflight program is far from clear," said Tom Young, former director of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. "There has been continual debate about should we go to the moon or Mars or both ... It is clear, again, that we cannot do both. And there is a need to focus our attention, capability and resources...
  • Wild new theory says Earth may actually be two different planets

    02/04/2016 10:21:30 AM PST · by Smittie · 64 replies
    BGR News ^ | 02/03/2016 | Chris Smith
    A new theory says Earth is made of two planets, rather than just one. Apparently, our planet is the result of a collision that helped map the course of both Earth as we know it and the moon. According to new research from the University of California, Earth and a hypothesized early planet called Theia collided, and the two planets fused together 4.5 billion years ago. That impact also formed our moon, Science Alert explains. The initial working theory was that the Earth and Theia only side-swiped each other, sending the moon into orbit and then flying away into space....
  • Scientists Debate Signatures of Alien Life

    02/03/2016 7:23:06 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 19 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 2/2/16 | Natalie Wolchover
    Scientists Debate Signatures of Alien Life Searching for signs of life on faraway planets, astrobiologists must decide which telltale biosignature gases to target. Photo illustration by Olena Shmahalo/Quanta Magazine February 2, 2016 Comments (5) Share this: facebooktwitterredditmail PDF Print Huddled in a coffee shop one drizzly Seattle morning six years ago, the astrobiologist Shawn Domagal-Goldman stared blankly at his laptop screen, paralyzed. He had been running a simulation of an evolving planet, when suddenly oxygen started accumulating in the virtual planet’s atmosphere. Up the concentration ticked, from 0 to 5 to 10 percent.“Is something wrong?” his wife asked.“Yeah.”The rise of...
  • Icy ebb and flow influenced by hydrothermal activity

    02/03/2016 8:26:28 AM PST · by JimSEA · 14 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 1/29/2016 | Univ of Connecticut
    Hydrothermal activity along the mid-ocean ridge system suggests that the release of molten rock, or magma, in response to changes in sea level plays a significant role in the earth's climate. The last million years of Earth's history was dominated by the cyclic advance and retreat of ice sheets over large swaths of North America. During cold glacial intervals, ice sheets reached as far south as Long Island and Indiana, while during warm interglacial periods the ice rapidly retreated to Greenland. It has long been known that ice ages occur every 40,000 years or so, but the cause of rapid...
  • Archaeologists find Bronze Age shipwreck off Turkey’s southwest

    02/03/2016 2:14:05 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | February 3, 2016 | Anadolu Agency
    Underwater excavations off the western province of Mugla's Marmaris district have unearthed a shipwreck in the Hisaronu Gulf dating back up to 4,000 years, one of the oldest shipwrecks ever found in Turkish waters... unique Bronze Age wreck 40 meters deep in the Hisaronu Gulf, crowning this season's work... "We have been carrying out the only underwater archaeological research project in the area nonstop since 2007. We have so far discovered more than 100 wrecks and their potential fields. Also, more than 20 underwater harbors and more than 400 anchors from between the Bronze Age and the Ottoman era have...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Galaxy Wars: M81 versus M82

    02/02/2016 11:27:00 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | February 03, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In the lower left corner, surrounded by blue spiral arms, is spiral galaxy M81. In the upper right corner, marked by red gas and dust clouds, is irregular galaxy M82. This stunning vista shows these two mammoth galaxies locked in gravitational combat, as they have been for the past billion years. The gravity from each galaxy dramatically affects the other during each hundred million-year pass. Last go-round, M82's gravity likely raised density waves rippling around M81, resulting in the richness of M81's spiral arms. But M81 left M82 with violent star forming regions and colliding gas clouds so energetic...
  • When Will We Reach the End of the Periodic Table?

    02/02/2016 4:29:12 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 78 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 19 Jan, 2016 | Devin Powell
    Chemistry teachers recently had to update their classroom decor, with the announcement that scientists have confirmed the discovery of four new elements on the periodic table. The as-yet unnamed elements 113, 115, 117 and 118 filled in the remaining gaps at the bottom of the famous chart-a roadmap of matter's building blocks that has successfully guided chemists for nearly a century and a half. The official confirmation, granted by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), was years in the making, as these superheavy elements are highly unstable and tough to create. But scientists had strong reason to...
  • Hidden Population of Up to 200 Lions Found in Remote Ethiopia

    02/02/2016 1:52:39 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 14 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 1 February 2016
    in the savannah of Alatash National Park, the lion sleeps tonight. This remote part of north-west Ethiopia was considered a possible habitat for lions, but it is seldom visited by people. Now an expedition by the University of Oxford’s Conservation Research Unit has discovered that lions are indeed alive and well in the park – a rare extension of their known range. “During my professional career I have had to revise the lion distribution map many times,” says Hans Bauer, who led the expedition. “I have deleted one population after the other. This is the first and probably the last...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Comet 67P from Spacecraft Rosetta

    02/02/2016 1:43:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    NASA ^ | February 02, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Spacecraft Rosetta continues to circle and map Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Crossing the inner Solar System for ten years to reach the vicinity of the comet in 2014, the robotic spacecraft continues to image the unusual double-lobed comet nucleus. The featured image, taken one year ago, shows dust and gas escaping from the comet's nucleus. Although appearing bright here, the comet's surface reflects only about four percent of impinging visible light, making it as dark as coal. Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko spans about four kilometers in length and has a surface gravity so low that an astronaut could jump off of it. With...
  • Massive Ariane 5 To Launch Giant NextGen Telescope In Dynamic Deployment To L2

    02/02/2016 11:31:13 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    universe today ^ | 02/02/2016 | Evan Gough
    The Ariane 5 rocket is a workhorse for delivering satellites and other payloads into orbit, but fitting the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) inside one is pushing the boundaries of the Ariane 5’s capabilities, and advancing our design of space observatories at the same time. The Ariane 5 is the most modern design in the ESA’s Ariane rocket series. It’s responsible for delivering things like Rosetta, the Herschel Space Observatory, and the Planck Observatory into space. The ESA is supplying an Ariane 5 to the JWST mission, and with the planned launch date for that mission less than three years...
  • Theranos Sounded Too Good to Be True—and It Is

    02/02/2016 6:40:15 AM PST · by C19fan · 7 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | February 2, 2016 | Samantha Allen
    When health care company Theranos announced that it could conduct dozens of blood tests with a finger prick, it sounded too good to be true. Once valued at a staggering $9 billion and greeted by the press with fawning magazine features, Theranos’ troubles have slowly been coming into focus since last fall. The company claimed last year that its proprietary technology can “perform hundreds of tests, from standard to year, from a pinprick and tiny sample of blood,” rather than from blood drawn through a vein in the arm. But last week, after months of heightened scrutiny, the government placed...
  • The Fermi Paradox Is Not Fermi's, and It Is Not a Paradox

    02/02/2016 1:30:21 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 81 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 1/29/16 | Robert H. Gray
    Two big ideas often come up in discussions about the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, or SETI. One is the Drake Equation, which estimates the number of civilizations in our Galaxy whose signals we might be able to detect--potentially thousands, according to plausible estimates. The other is the so-called Fermi paradox, which claims that we should see intelligent aliens here if they exist anywhere, because they would inevitably colonize the Galaxy by star travel--and since we don't see any obvious signs of aliens here, searching for their signals is pointless. The Drake Equation is perfectly genuine: it was created by astronomer...
  • Finding the Pool of Siloam: Historicity of the Gospel of John

    02/01/2016 11:25:50 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Breakpoint ^ | January 26, 2016 | Eric Metaxas
    Since at least the fifth century, Christians had identified a spot in Jerusalem as the Pool of Siloam and the site of the miracle. But it was not until a decade ago that archaeologists found what they are certain is the ancient pool of Siloam. Like so many such finds, it was almost by accident. During construction work to repair a water pipe near the Temple Mount, Israeli archaeologists Ronny Reich and Eli Shukron found "two ancient stone steps." According to Biblical Archaeology Review, "Further excavation revealed that they were part of a monumental pool from the Second Temple period,...
  • Ancient rocks of Tetons formed by continental collisions

    02/01/2016 2:13:19 PM PST · by JimSEA · 36 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 1/29/2016 | Univ. of Wyoming
    University of Wyoming scientists have found evidence of continental collisions in Wyoming's Teton Range, similar to those in the Himalayas, dating to as early as 2.68 billion years ago. The research, published Jan. 22 in the journal Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, shows that plate tectonics were operating in what is now western Wyoming long before the collisions that created the Himalayas starting 40 million years ago. In fact, the remnants of tectonic activity in old rocks exposed in the Tetons point to the world's earliest known continent-continent collision, says Professor Carol Frost of UW's Department of Geology and Geophysics, lead...
  • Robot Adjusts Stare, Makes Itself Less Creepy

    02/01/2016 12:38:33 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    Discovery.com ^ | Feb 1, 2016 07:00 AM ET // | by Glenn McDonald
    We don't incessantly stare at other people when we speak to them, and we don't expect them to stare back. Programming companion robots to understand this kind of social protocol is tricky but crucial, according to researcher Sean Andrist, a Ph.D. student at the University of Wisconsin's Department of Computer Sciences. An interesting write-up over at IEEE Spectrum details Andrist's research, which involves the "gaze mechanisms" that we humans take for granted when interacting with one another. The goal is to improve the function of both physical humanoid robots and virtual avatars by establishing rules that govern when, why and...
  • Why Does George Washington Have Two Birthdays?

    02/01/2016 10:37:29 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    The FindingDulcinea Blog ^ | February 11, 2010 | Denis Cummings
    This Monday is the federal holiday Washington's Birthday, better known as Presidents Day, celebrated on the third Monday of February. If you want to know the actual birth date of George Washington, you will find two dates: Feb. 22, 1732, and Feb. 11, 1731. Both dates are correct. What accounts for the discrepancy? When Washington was born, Britain and its colonies were using the Julian calendar. Developed in first century B.C. under Julius Caesar, it had three too many leap days per 400-year period. The Catholic Church corrected the error in the 16th century by introducing a modified calendar (the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Find the Man in the Moon

    02/01/2016 8:28:44 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    NASA ^ | February 01, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Have you ever seen the Man on the Moon? This common question plays on the ability of humans to see pareidolia -- imagining familiar icons where they don't actually exist. The textured surface of Earth's full Moon is home to numerous identifications of iconic objects, not only in modern western culture but in world folklore throughout history. Examples, typically dependent on the Moon's perceived orientation, include the Woman in the Moon and the Rabbit in the Moon. One facial outline commonly identified as the Man in the Moon starts by imagining the two dark circular areas -- lunar maria...
  • Phase of the moon affects amount of rainfall

    01/31/2016 3:46:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    phys.org ^ | January 29, 2016 by | Hannah Hickey
    When the moon is high in the sky, it creates bulges in the planet's atmosphere that creates imperceptible changes in the amount of rain that falls below. New University of Washington research to be published in Geophysical Research Letters shows that the lunar forces affect the amount of rain - though very slightly. ... Kohyama was studying atmospheric waves when he noticed a slight oscillation in the air pressure. He and co-author John (Michael) Wallace, a UW professor of atmospheric sciences, spent two years tracking down the phenomenon. Air pressure changes linked to the phases of the moon were first...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- MWC 922: The Red Square Nebula

    01/31/2016 8:52:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    NASA ^ | January 31, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What could cause a nebula to appear square? No one is quite sure. The hot star system known as MWC 922, however, appears to be embedded in a nebula with just such a shape. The featured image combines infrared exposures from the Hale Telescope on Mt. Palomar in California, and the Keck-2 Telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. A leading progenitor hypothesis for the square nebula is that the central star or stars somehow expelled cones of gas during a late developmental stage. For MWC 922, these cones happen to incorporate nearly right angles and be visible from the...
  • Proof your cat loves you FIVE times less than your dog

    01/31/2016 7:33:29 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 88 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 01/31/2016 | By Lorraine Fisher
    Are you a dog or cat person? Does a dog's eager friendliness make him superior to an elegantly aloof feline, or vice versa? It's a debate that has divided animal lovers for generations. Now a new BBC documentary is seeking to resolve the question by discovering definitively which species has the edge: Britain's eight million cats, or its nine million canines. In Cats Vs Dogs, animal experts Chris Packham and Liz Bonnin team up with scientists and vets to put our two favourite pets to the test in a host of different categories. Think you know which one will win?...
  • Is this the hand of God? Incredible cloud formation above Portugal looks like a fist from Heaven

    01/31/2016 5:43:26 AM PST · by a fool in paradise · 39 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 27 January 2016 | Jennifer Newton for MailOnline
    An incredible cloud formation which appeared over the skies of Portugal has been dubbed the 'hand of God'. The cloud took the form of a fist from Heaven with a hand holding a fireball as it dominated the skyline across the island of Madeira on Monday. And weather blogger Rogerio Pacheco, 32, could not believe his luck when he looked up at the clouds while commuters made their way to work in the morning rush hour...
  • Carbon and Carbonate (Ocean acidification )

    01/30/2016 8:51:19 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 17 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | January 30, 2016 | Willis Eschenbach
    Guest Post by Willis EschenbachI’ve spent a good chunk of my life around, on, and under the ocean. I worked seasonally for many years as a commercial fisherman off of the western coast of the US. I’ve frozen off my begonias setting nets in driving sleet up in the Bering Sea. I’m also a blue-water sailor with a Pacific crossing under my belt, and a surfer, and both a sport and a commercial diver.Plus I’m eternally curious, so I have read about and studied the ocean all my life.Based on both my experience and my knowledge, I have written...
  • European Space Agency launches new laser communications hub

    01/30/2016 7:01:50 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 3 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jan 30, 2016 7:55 AM EST
    The European Space Agency says a new laser terminal has been launched into orbit as part of wider efforts to develop Europe's first optical communications network, a system able to monitor natural disasters and other catastrophes. The European Data Relay System terminal, launched Friday from Kazakhstan, was released from its host satellite Saturday morning. ...
  • Gene-Hacked Mosquitoes to Fight Zika Virus

    01/30/2016 10:26:03 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Jan 29, 2016 09:45 AM ET | Tracy Staedter
    Transmitted through the sting of an infected mosquito, the virus can cause a birth defect called microcephaly in newborn babies. The rare condition shrinks the brains of unborn babies and could affect as many as 4 million people before a vaccine is developed. But scientists at the biotech firm Oxitec, based in the U.K., have an alternative plan. They want to unleash armies of gene-hacked mosquitoes into Brazilian jungles to seek and destroy the disease-carrying insects. The genetically modified mosquitoes wouldn't fight the Zika carriers in probiscus-to-probiscus combat. In fact, these mosquitoes make love, not war. That's because the mosquitoes,...