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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Ebola Vaccine Is Safe and Effective, According to First Study

    11/27/2014 11:41:23 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 16 replies
    TIME ^ | 11/27/2014 | Alice Park
    Trials of a vaccine against Ebola show that it is safe and able to trigger an immune response against the virus In the first results from tests on an experimental Ebola vaccine, researchers at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) report for the first time Wednesday that the shot is safe and that it leads to an immune response among healthy volunteers. The vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and GlaxoSmithKline, was tested in 20 participants in the US at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda. “This tells us that this is kind of a...
  • 'Jurassic World' Dinosaurs Stuck in the 1980s, Experts Grumble

    11/27/2014 10:48:23 AM PST · by EveningStar · 37 replies
    National Geographic ^ | November 26, 2014 | Linda Qiu and Dan Vergano
    Who doesn't love a dinosaur flick? Well, paleontologists have a few fossil bones to pick with Jurassic World, the latest in a line of dinosaur movies that once bragged about its scientific credibility. The trailer for the new movie, a reboot of the popular 1990s Jurassic Park franchise, was released Tuesday and has already been viewed more than 14 million times on YouTube. Like the original movie, Jurassic World takes place in an island safari park, where tourists visit living dinosaurs cloned from ancient DNA—until one hybrid monster goes rogue. Despite global fervor among fans, dinosaur scientists are not thrilled...
  • Stone age axe found with wood handle

    11/27/2014 4:00:56 AM PST · by Natufian · 25 replies
    BBC ^ | 11/25/2014 | N/A
    Archaeologists in Denmark have uncovered an incredibly rare find: a stone age axe held within its wooden handle. The 5,500-year-old Neolithic axe was found during archaeological surveys ahead of a multi-billion euro tunnel project. The axe seems to have been jammed into what was once the seabed, perhaps as part of a ritual offering. The lack of oxygen in the clay ground helped preserve the wooden handle.
  • US Special Forces funds drug that can put soldiers injured on the battlefield into hibernation

    11/26/2014 8:33:25 PM PST · by TurboZamboni · 10 replies
    Mail Online ^ | 11-26-14 | Mark Prigg
    US Special Forces working with James Cook University in Australia. Drug aims to raise the heart and blood pressure into a 'survival window' low enough to reduce blood loss, but high enough to prevent brain injury. Human trials expected to begin within a year.
  • Frenchman develops pills to make flatulence smell of roses

    11/25/2014 3:24:54 PM PST · by Cry if I Wanna · 51 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | November 25, 2014 | Rory Mulholland
    A Frenchman has developed a range of pills aimed at making people’s flatulence smell sweeter - of chocolate or of roses - which he says will make the perfect Christmas present. The 65-year-old artist and inventor says his pills are aimed at easing indigestion and are made of 100 percent natural ingredients such as fennel, seaweed and blueberries.
  • Star Trek-like invisible shield found thousands of miles above Earth

    11/26/2014 5:53:20 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 69 replies
    colorado.edu ^ | November 26, 2014 | news release
    A team led by the University of Colorado Boulder has discovered an invisible shield some 7,200 miles above Earth that blocks so-called “killer electrons,” which whip around the planet at near-light speed and have been known to threaten astronauts, fry satellites and degrade space systems during intense solar storms. The barrier to the particle motion was discovered in the Van Allen radiation belts, two doughnut-shaped rings above Earth that are filled with high-energy electrons and protons, said Distinguished Professor Daniel Baker, director of CU-Boulder’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP). ... The latest mystery revolves around an “extremely sharp”...
  • Jet! Rosetta’s Comet Is Feeling The Heat As Gas and Dust Erupts From Surface

    As the European Space Agency scurries to find the final resting place of the Philae lander, Rosetta continues normal operations above the comet and will keep tracking it through 2015. Rosetta is the first orbiter to stick around near a comet, which will allow scientists an unprecedented chance to see a comet change from up close as the Sun’s heat and particles affect it. Could there be an atmosphere starting up? “At the bottom of the mosaic, the non-illuminated part of the comet stands out as a silhouette against the broader diffuse emission coming from the comet’s coma,” ESA stated....
  • Here’s The First 3-D Part Printed In Space. Where Will That Take Us Next?

    11/26/2014 4:01:24 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on November 26, 2014 | Elizabeth Howell
    There are still kinks to be worked out, however. The “part adhesion” on the tray after the piece was created had a bond that was mightier than controllers anticipated, which could mean that bonding is different in microgravity. A second calibration coupon should be created shortly as controllers make adjustments to the process. We’ll see several of these “test coupons” manufactured in the next few months and then sent back to Earth for more detailed analysis. Meanwhile, we have two more 3-D printers to look forward to in space: one created by the Italians that should arrive while their citizen,...
  • Think it’s unusually warm outside? Then you must be left-wing: Climate change beliefs affect…

    11/26/2014 12:36:43 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 21 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 10:49 EST, 26 November 2014 | Jonathan O’Callaghan
    If you don’t believe in climate change, you’re less likely to feel that the weather is getting warmer—and vice versa. That’s according to a study that analyzed how people remembered a particularly warm winter in the US in 2012. And they found those who believed in climate change remembered it being warmer, while those who didn’t thought it was colder. The research, published in Nature Climate Change, was carried out by three US sociologists—Dr. Aaron McCright of Michigan State University, Dr. Riley Dunlap of Oklahoma State, and Dr. Chenyang Xiao of American University. …
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Io and Callisto Mutual Event

    11/26/2014 5:23:54 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | November 26, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A 24 minute sequence from top to bottom, this intriguing series of telescopic frames tracks the occultation of Io by Callisto, two of Jupiter's Galilean moons, from San Pietro Polesine, Italy, planet Earth. A challenging observational project using a small telescope, the two contrasting Jovian worlds are both slightly larger than Earth's Moon. In fact, bright, volcanic Io and dark, cratered Callisto are about 3,640 and 4,820 kilometers in diameter respectively. With Earth itself now crossing near the orbital plane of Jupiter's moons, astronomers are enjoying a season of Galilean moon mutual events ranging from eclipses to occultations. The...
  • Spooky Alignment of Quasars Across Billions of Light-years — Science Release — ESO1438

    11/25/2014 10:36:03 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 32 replies
    VLT reveals alignments between supermassive black hole axes and large-scale structure New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile have revealed alignments over the largest structures ever discovered in the Universe. A European research team has found that the rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample of quasars are parallel to each other over distances of billions of light-years. The team has also found that the rotation axes of these quasars tend to be aligned with the vast structures in the cosmic web in which they reside.See Full Size Photo Quasars are galaxies with...
  • Strange but true: Seals found sexually assaulting penguins

    11/25/2014 4:37:29 PM PST · by Theoria · 88 replies
    CBS ^ | 25 Nov 2014 | Amanda Schupak
    The first time marine biologist William Haddad and his team saw a seal rape a penguin, they were shocked.By the fourth time, they were convinced this bizarre behavior was becoming a trend.For 50 years, researchers from the marine mammal program at the University of Pretoria in South Africa have been taking weekly censuses of the elephant seal population on sub-Antarctic Marion Island, more than a thousand miles south of Cape Town in the Indian Ocean. In 2006, they saw something they'd never seen before. A fur seal (not the species they were studying) mounted and appeared to mate with a...
  • Global Warming: Michael Mann defamation lawsuit against CEI, Mark Steyn, NR, argued today, 11/25/14

    11/25/2014 4:02:06 PM PST · by steelyourfaith · 14 replies
    Competitive Enterptise Institute | 11/25/14 | Sam Katzman, CEI general counsel
    Background (from Sam Katzman, Competitive Enterprise Institute general counsel) going into the hearing of 11/25/14: “Regardless of where one stands on global warming, this case is about the First Amendment. Michael Mann’s defamation lawsuit is an unfounded attempt to chill speech on a major issue of public concern. Professor Mann is a high-profile figure in the global warming debate, and he himself is responsible for much of the overheated rhetoric in that debate. His complaint about CEI’s criticism of his statistical methods belongs in the arena of public discussion and scientific inquiry, not in the courts. “This is precisely the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Creature from the Red Lagoon

    11/25/2014 8:55:15 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    NASA ^ | November 25, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What creature lurks near the red Lagoon nebula? Mars. This gorgeous color deep-sky photograph has captured the red planet passing below two notable nebulae -- cataloged by the 18th century cosmic registrar Charles Messier as M8 and M20. M20 (upper right of center), the Trifid Nebula, presents a striking contrast in red/blue colors and dark dust lanes. Just below and to the left is the expansive, alluring red glow of M8, the Lagoon Nebula. Both nebulae are a few thousand light-years distant. By comparison, temporarily situated below them both, is the dominant "local" celestial beacon Mars. Taken late last...
  • Diamonds Beneath the Popigai Crater -- Northern Russia

    11/25/2014 8:36:15 AM PST · by JimSEA · 19 replies
    Geology.com ^ | 11/25/2014 | Hobart King
    About 35 million years ago an asteroid about 5 to 8 kilometers in diameter, travelling at a speed of about 15 to 20 kilometers per second slammed into the area that is now known as the Tamyr Peninsula of northern Siberia, Russia. [1] The energy delivered by this hypervelocity impact was powerful enough to instantly melt thousands of cubic kilometers of rock and blast millions of metric tons of ejecta high into the air. Some of that ejecta landed on other continents. The explosion produced a 100 kilometer-wide impact crater with a rim of deformed rock up to 20 kilometers...
  • Dear Northeast, How’s that solar working out for ya?

    11/25/2014 6:33:07 AM PST · by rktman · 38 replies
    canadafreepress.com ^ | 11/24/2014 | Marita Noon
    A couple of months ago, effective in November, National Grid, one of Massachusetts’ two dominant utilities, announced rate increases of a “whopping” 37 percent over last year. Other utilities in the region are expected to follow suit. It’s dramatic headlines like these that make rooftop solar sound so attractive to people wanting to save money. In fact, embedded within the online version of the Boston Globe story: “Electric rates in Mass. set to spike this winter,” is a link to another article: “How to install solar power and save.” The solar story points out: “By now everyone knows that solar...
  • Climate Change Not a Cause of Bronze Age Collapse

    11/25/2014 5:49:56 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, November 17, 2014 | University of Bradford press release
    "Our evidence shows definitively that the population decline in this period cannot have been caused by climate change," says Ian Armit, Professor of Archaeology at the University of Bradford, and lead author of the study. Graeme Swindles, Associate Professor of Earth System Dynamics at the University of Leeds, added, "We found clear evidence for a rapid change in climate to much wetter conditions, which we were able to precisely pinpoint to 750BC using statistical methods." According to Professor Armit, social and economic stress is more likely to be the cause of the sudden and widespread fall in numbers. Communities producing...
  • Google Scientists Admit Renewable Energy Can't Work

    11/25/2014 5:31:15 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 23 replies
    IBD ^ | 11/25/2014
    Google is literally and figuratively pulling the plug on its investment in renewable energy because the technology doesn't work. Will its flop persuade the feds to stop dumping billions down this rat hole? Back in 2007 Google commanded star-spangled headlines with its new high-tech venture to go all in on the next big thing in technology: green renewable energy. The tech giant was saluted as a good corporate citizen for its initiative to help combat global warming. In launching the project, company executives boasted they would prove that wind and solar power were not just good for the environment, but...
  • Strange thrust: the unproven science that could propel our children into space

    11/25/2014 1:21:49 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 54 replies
    BoingBoing ^ | 11/24/14 | Charles Platt
    Strange thrust: the unproven science that could propel our children into space For many decades, a fantasy among space enthusiasts has been to invent a device that produces a net thrust in one direction, without any need for reaction mass. Of course, a reactionless space drive of this type is impossible. Or is it? By Charles Platt div#main-image {background-image:url('http://media.boingboing.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Figure-6.jpg');} Ever since I was old enough to read science fiction, I've wanted to visit Mars. Even the Moon would be better than nothing. Alas, rocket technology is unlikely to take me there within my lifetime. The problem is that rockets are a...
  • Turkish & Italian Archaeologists Dig at Karkemish

    11/24/2014 4:02:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | Monday, November 17, 2014 | unattributed
    Nicolo Marchetti of the University of Bologna is project director of the excavation at Karkemish, a 5,000-year-old city located along the Turkey-Syria border. About one-third of the site lies inside Syria and is off-limits. The site is also very close to Jarablous, a Syrian city that is now ISIS-controlled territory. “Still, we have had no problem at all.…We work in a military area. It is very well protected,” Marchetti told the Associated Press. This year his team has recovered sculptures from the palace of King Katuwa that date to 900 B.C., and a 700 B.C. mosaic floor in the palace...
  • Details of the so-called Arthur Stone Discovery at Tintagel

    11/24/2014 3:56:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Britannia.com ^ | 1990s | David Nash Ford
    A small piece of slate was discovered during excavations on Tintagel Island inscribed with the name "Artognov". Is this the first real proof of King Arthur's existence? Was he really born at Tintagel as legend insists? On 6th August 1998, English Heritage revealed that during the last week of digging on the Eastern terraces of Tintagel Island, a broken piece of Cornish slate (8" by 14") was discovered bearing the name "Artognov". It was excavated on July 4th, by Kevin Brady, an archaeologist working with a team from Glasgow University. "As the stone came out, when I saw the letters...
  • Could rare sword have belonged to Ivan the Terrible?

    11/24/2014 3:37:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | 21 November 2014 | Anna Liesowska and Derek Lambie
    Intrigue over how German-made 12th century blade, adorned in Sweden, reached Siberia... An exciting new theory has now emerged that it could have belonged to Tsar Ivan the Terrible, and came from the royal armoury as a gift at the time of the conquest of Siberia. The hypothesis, twinning an infamous Russian ruler and a revered battle hero, could turn it into one of the most interesting archaeological finds in Siberian history, though for now much remains uncertain. What Siberian experts are sure about is that the beautifully engraved weapon was originally made in central Europe, and most likely in...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Soaring over Titan

    11/24/2014 12:45:57 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | November 24, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What would it look like to fly over Titan? Radar images from NASA's robotic Cassini satellite in orbit around Saturn have been digitally compiled to simulate such a flight. Cassini has swooped past Saturn's cloudiest moon several times since it arrived at the ringed planet in 2004. The virtual flight featured here shows numerous lakes colored black and mountainous terrain colored tan. Surface regions without detailed vertical information appear more flat, while sufficiently mapped regions have their heights digitally stretched. Among the basins visualized is Kraken Mare, Titan's largest lake which spans over 1,000 kilometers long. Titan's lakes are...
  • There's a Gene for That...Or Is There?

    11/24/2014 9:56:41 AM PST · by Heartlander · 1 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | November 24, 2014 | Denyse O'Leary
    There's a Gene for That...Or Is There? Denyse O'Leary November 24, 2014 3:30 AM | Permalink A CNN headline reports, "Blame genetics for bad driving, study finds." "Genes for," however, are dangerous words in genetics. Recently, we looked at evolutionary psychology, the attempt to explain current human behavior as being governed by natural selection acting on how hominoid/hominin/human groups lived hundreds of thousands of years ago, so that the behavior is now encoded in the genes and brains of survivors. For example, we were told recently that men may have better navigation skills than women because these skills assist them...
  • Time Magazine’s Top 25 New Inventions Of 2014 Include Apple Watch, Microsoft Surface Pro 3 And More

    11/24/2014 8:21:09 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 21 replies
    International Business Times ^ | 11/24/2014 | Pavithra Rathinavel
    The yet-to-be-released Apple Watch has been making news for quite some time now. Very recently, the smartwatch has made it to the coveted Time magazine's top 25 new inventions of 2014. Based on the Time magazine list, the Apple Watch completely channels the idea of running a computer on the wrist. This is achieved by utilising a novel interface with a combination of touchscreen and physical buttons. Moreover, the Apple Watch is considered to be a fashion accessory, in addition to representing the latest technology in wearable gadgets arena, according to Time Magazine via Phone Arena. The magazine has also...
  • Israeli Firm Says It Can Recharge Your Phone In 30 Seconds

    11/24/2014 7:37:55 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 26 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 11/24/2014 | ORI LEWIS AND RINAT HARASH, REUTERS
    TEL AVIV (Reuters) - An Israeli company says it has developed technology that can charge a mobile phone in a few seconds and an electric car in minutes, advances that could transform two of the world's most dynamic consumer industries. Using nano-technology to synthesize artificial molecules, Tel Aviv-based StoreDot says it has developed a battery that can store a much higher charge more quickly, in effect acting like a super-dense sponge to soak up power and retain it. While the prototype is currently far too bulky for a mobile phone, the company believes it will be ready by 2016 to...
  • Stanford archaeologist leads the first detailed study of human remains at... Deir el-Medina

    11/23/2014 3:17:22 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Stanford Report ^ | November 17, 2014 | Barbara Wilcox
    In many bodies Austin saw evidence of stress from the hard climb – today it's a thousand stone steps – from Deir el-Medina to the Valley of the Kings and back again. As Austin found, incidence of arthritis in the knees and ankles of the men at Deir el-Medina was significantly higher than for working populations from other Egyptian cemeteries. The bones also revealed clues that corroborate other scholars' findings that severely disabled Egyptians were well cared for. "I found the remains of a man who died at the age of 19 or 20 and was born without a useful...
  • Thousands of ancient artifacts uncovered at awesome Mexican temple

    11/23/2014 2:24:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    Houston Chronicle ^ | November 5, 2014 | Heather Alexander
    Mexican archaeologists exploring one of the country's most spectacular ancient temples have uncovered a stash of thousands of artifacts that are estimated to date back as far as 200 A.D. The Temple of the Feathered Serpent sits on the outskirts of Mexico City. The new Lazgo Hal Tladocan project to explore tunnels beneath it is one of the most important archaeological investigations Mexico has ever seen. Sculptures carved in stone, ornamented with pre-Columbian jewelry and elaborate jade and greenstone were found. Unique objects made of amber and thousands of wooden artifacts were also uncovered, hidden along with remains of animals,...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Solar Flare from a Sharper Sun

    11/23/2014 11:38:14 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | November 22, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Solar active region AR2192 was the largest recorded sunspot group of the last 24 years. Before rotating off the Earth-facing side of the Sun at the end of October, it produced a whopping six energetic X-class flares. Its most intense flare was captured on October 24 in this stunning view from the orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory. The scene is a color combination of images made at three different wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light; 193 angstroms shown in blue, 171 angstroms in white, and 304 angstroms in red. The emission, from highly ionized Iron and Helium atoms, traces magnetic field...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- M1: The Crab Nebula

    11/23/2014 11:14:59 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    NASA ^ | November 21, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The Crab Nebula is cataloged as M1, the first object on Charles Messier's famous 18th century list of things which are not comets. In fact, the Crab is now known to be a supernova remnant, debris from the death explosion of a massive star, witnessed by astronomers in the year 1054. This sharp, ground-based telescopic view uses narrowband data to track emission from ionized oxygen and hydrogen atoms (in blue and red) and explore the tangled filaments within the still expanding cloud. One of the most exotic objects known to modern astronomers, the Crab Pulsar, a neutron star spinning...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- LDN 988: Dark Nebula in Cygnus

    11/23/2014 11:11:15 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    NASA ^ | November 20, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Obscuring the rich starfields of northern Cygnus, dark nebula LDN 988 lies near the center of this cosmic skyscape. Composed with telescope and camera, the scene is some 2 degrees across. That corresponds to 70 light-years at the estimated 2,000 light-year distance of LDN 988. Stars are forming within LDN 988, part of a larger complex of dusty molecular clouds along the plane of our Milky Way galaxy sometimes called the Northern Coalsack. In fact, nebulosities associated with young stars abound in the region, including variable star V1331 Cygni shown in the inset. At the tip of a long...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Bright Spiral Galaxy M81

    11/23/2014 11:07:51 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    NASA ^ | November 19, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: One of the brightest galaxies in planet Earth's sky is similar in size to our Milky Way Galaxy: big, beautiful M81. This grand spiral galaxy can be found toward the northern constellation of the Great Bear (Ursa Major). This superbly detailed view reveals M81's bright yellow nucleus, blue spiral arms, and sweeping cosmic dust lanes with a scale comparable to the Milky Way. Hinting at a disorderly past, a remarkable dust lane actually runs straight through the disk, to the left of the galactic center, contrary to M81's other prominent spiral features. The errant dust lane may be the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Star Formation in the Tadpole Nebula

    11/23/2014 10:51:40 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | November 18, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Dusty emission in the Tadpole nebula, IC 410, lies about 12,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Auriga. The cloud of glowing gas is over 100 light-years across, sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from embedded open star cluster NGC 1893. Formed in the interstellar cloud a mere 4 million years ago, bright cluster stars are seen all around the star-forming nebula. Notable near the image center are two relatively dense streamers of material trailing away from the nebula's central regions. Potentially sites of ongoing star formation in IC 410, these cosmic tadpole shapes are about 10 light-years long....
  • What is "Sin"? (Vanity)

    11/23/2014 5:12:09 AM PST · by BwanaNdege · 100 replies
    Self | 11/23/2014 | BwanaNdege
    Hello Freepers! I need help with research for a paper. Your ideas are needed and welcomed. I especially would appreciate comments from Libertarians and any lurking Liberals/Progressives and Atheists/"Brights".
  • How Players at MIT Engineered a Football Team

    11/22/2014 11:23:48 AM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 15 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 11-21-14 | Ben Cohen
    This Season, the Engineers Are Going to Playoffs, but They Once Competed in Hand-Me-Downs CAMBRIDGE, Mass.—In the 1970s, on this campus known for scientific innovation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology students engineered a rather unlikely experiment: a football team. MIT had no intercollegiate football squad at the time. The student body in 1901 voted 119-117 to discontinue it. So one day in 1978, a group of MIT students huddled and created a team that would play its first game that fall. No one else at the school had any clue. There were times when fielding a football team at MIT seemed...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Double Dust Disks of HD 95086

    11/22/2014 11:08:37 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | November 17, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What do other star systems look like? To help find out, astronomers are carrying out detailed observations of nearby stars in infrared light to see which have dust disks that might be forming planets. Observations by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and ESA's Herschel Space Observatory have found that planetary system HD 95086 has two dust disks: a hot one near the parent star and a cooler one farther out. An artist's illustration of how the system might appear is featured here, including hypothetical planets with large rings that orbit between the disks. The planets may have created the large...
  • The Whichness of the Why — Another asteroid has been detected sporting a long tail.

    11/22/2014 12:31:05 AM PST · by Swordmaker · 6 replies
    Thunderbolts.info ^ | November 21, 2014 | by Stephen Smith
    Asteroid 62412. Credit: Scott Sheppard Comets are often called “dirty snowballs” by astronomers. However, various investigative missions, such as Giotto and Deep Impact, revealed them to be blackened, cratered, and fractured. No ice fields, reflective crust, or watery clouds were observed. Indeed, the latest pictures from the Rosetta mission of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko indicate that it is a mountain of rock in space. According to a recent press release, the Gemini Observatory’s image of asteroid 62412, located between Mars and Jupiter, is the first time that one of the Hygiea family of asteroids has exhibited a tail, and is only the...
  • Throwback Thursday: Seeing through our galaxy

    11/21/2014 10:58:31 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 7 replies
    Medium ^ | 11/20/14 | Ethan Siegel
    When we look out at the Universe, our view is pretty consistently dominated by the stars within our own galaxy. Although we know that many interesting things lie beyond — globular clusters, individual galaxies, and rich clusters and superclusters of galaxies — being in the Milky Way makes it very hard to see a great many of them. This is because our own galaxy, from our vantage point within it, dominates a huge fraction of the sky overhead. Image credit: Richard Payne, of Arizona Astrophotography.The plane of the Milky Way itself obscures about a total of 20% of our night sky. What appears...
  • Have an HDTV? Use this neat trick to unlock better picture quality

    11/21/2014 4:56:48 PM PST · by EveningStar · 69 replies
    Komando.com ^ | November 19, 2014 | Kim Komando
    ... Calibrating your HDTV doesn't have to cost as much as the TV itself. A calibration disc is a thrifty way to get professional-grade results for less. What's a calibration disc? It's a disc that holds information for tweaking your HDTV's color and brightness levels. You don't have to buy a calibration disc, though - you can make your own with a free download from AVS. Not only is it free, it comes with a support staff in AVS's knowledgeable forum ...
  • James Bond-inspired LASER WATCH will burn through objects from a distance

    11/21/2014 10:42:47 AM PST · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    Mirror (UK) ^ | Nov 21, 2014 12:21 | By Andy Dawson
    Hobbyist Patrick Priebe has created a terrifyingly awesome laser watch that will burn through objects from afar The Apple Watch is already obsolete and it isn't even in the shops yet. The reason is simple – it doesn't contain a laser that can actually burn stuff. If that's what you're looking for in a smartwatch, forget about Apple and look towards the work of hobbyist Patrick Priebe. He's knocked together what he describes as the "Bond-inspired laser watch" and it might well consign the Apple Watch to the bin of history. That's because this isn't just some laser pointer that...
  • 141 year old cold weather record falls in Jacksonville ( Florida )

    11/21/2014 6:34:48 AM PST · by george76 · 18 replies
    WJXT ^ | Nov 20 2014 | Blake Mathews
    24 degrees breaks old record of 30 set in 1873. Thursday morning not only broke an "ancient" record from 1873, but we also dropped to the second coldest temperature ever recorded in the month of November in Jacksonville. According to the National Weather Service, for the second morning in a row, Jacksonville set a new cold weather record. Thursday mornings temperature dropped to a bone chilling 24 degrees breaking the old record of 30 degrees set in 1873. If that wasn't cold enough for you, Thursday's 24 degrees also marks the second lowest temperature ever recorded in the month of...
  • Anything Goes — Science advances through irrational methods.

    11/21/2014 1:16:47 AM PST · by Swordmaker · 66 replies
    Thunderbolts.info ^ | Nov 18, 2014 | Stephen Smith
    “I was bold in the pursuit of knowledge, never fearing to follow truth and reason to whatever results they led, and bearding every authority which stood in their way.” — Thomas Jefferson “Dissention” by Cory Ench It is a common perception that “we stand on the shoulders of giants”: that is, new ideas are based on those inherited from older investigations. If that is the case, then there is a serious hinderance inherent in the approach. The title of this article is borrowed from Paul Feyerabend, a self-described “epistemological anarchist”, who promulgated an irreverent view of science. It is necessary,...
  • Archaeologists Unearth Three Ancient Greek Mosaics in the Ongoing Excavation in Zeugma, Turkey

    11/20/2014 11:15:08 PM PST · by ApplegateRanch · 18 replies
    Laughing Squid ^ | November 18, 2014 | Rebecca Escamilla
    The Zeugma excavation project conducted by Oxford Archaeology and supported by Packhard Humanities Institute and the Ministry of Culture of Turkey has recently unearthed three ancient Greek mosaics in the Turkish city of Zeugma. Zeugma had received some press and support in 2000 after flooding caused by construction began to bury and damage artifacts in the region. The mosaics, created in the 2nd century BC, are constructed of boldly colored glass and are being covered for protection until excavation is complete. The head of the project, Professor Kutalmis Görkay, recently gave the Hurriyet Daily News more details about the plan...
  • BICEP2 All Over Again? Researchers Place Higgs Boson Discovery in Doubt

    11/20/2014 2:26:16 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on November 20, 2014 | Tim Reyes
    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe, faster is better. Faster means more powerful particle collisions and looking deeper into the makeup of matter. However, other researchers are proclaiming not so fast. LHC may not have discovered the Higgs Boson, the boson that imparts mass to everything, the god particle as some have called it. While the Higgs Boson discovery in 2012 culminated with the awarding in December 2013 of the Nobel Prize to Peter Higgs and François Englert, a team of researchers has raised these doubts about the Higgs Boson in their paper published in the journal Physical...
  • Quicky Mid-November 2014 ENSO Update--AUSTRALIA’S BOM UPGRADES ENSO TRACKER STATUS TO EL NIŃO ALERT

    11/20/2014 1:54:32 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 2 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | November 19, 2014 | Bob Tisdale
    Guest Post by Bob TisdaleAUSTRALIA’S BOM UPGRADES ENSO TRACKER STATUS TO EL NIŃO ALERTOn November 18, Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) upgraded the conditions in the tropical Pacific from El Nińo “watch” to “alert” levels, “indicating at least a 70% chance of El Nińo occurring”.  See the rest of their update here.NOAA’S WEEKLY NINO3.4 DATA The sea surface temperature anomalies of the NINO3.4 region of the equatorial Pacific are a commonly used ENSO index. NOAA’s Oceanic NINO Index is a form of the data of that region. According to NOAA’s weekly sea surface temperature data for the NINO3.4 region, as of...
  • Germany gives up on emissions target. Japan emits more CO2 than ever

    11/20/2014 1:42:05 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 9 replies
    joannenova.com.au ^ | November 18th, 2014 | | Breitbart- London
    So much for momentum on climate change. Reality bites. Without nuclear power, Japans emissions have hit a new record high. At the same time, even with 17% of its energy from Nuclear power, and with 23,000 wind turbines, Germany stands no chance of reaching its emissions targets. The rich, technologically advanced nation that has spent more than any other on green energy admits they’ve failed. Those who want to stop producing CO2 have billions of dollars to spend on advertising and pointless windmills, but in the end, chemistry and physics can’t be bought. If renewables could provide cheap reliable power,...
  • Remembering Arthur Balfour, Friend of Science and Friendly Opponent to Atheist Bertrand Russell

    11/20/2014 12:31:46 PM PST · by Heartlander · 1 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | November 20, 2014 | Mike Keas
    Remembering Arthur Balfour, Friend of Science and Friendly Opponent to Atheist Bertrand Russell Mike Keas November 20, 2014 11:28 AM | Permalink This year marks the hundredth anniversary of the start of World War I -- and this past week provided a terrible reminder that conflicts stirred by the war remain with us. In Israel, a pair of Palestinian Muslims turned a Jerusalem synagogue at morning prayers into a bloodbath, a reminder to Israelis (as if one were needed) of their vulnerability to terrorists fanatically opposed to the existence of the state. Observers with a long memory may have recalled...
  • Researchers, Ahoy! Should Futurist Science Move… Offshore?

    11/20/2014 11:06:48 AM PST · by Mellonkronos · 13 replies
    Transhumanity.net ^ | November 9, 2014 | Nikki Olson
    Interesting here to see transhumanists again talking about moving offshore—literally!—to avoid government regulations. -- Mellonkronos “Researchers, Ahoy! Should Futurist Science Move… Offshore?" By Nikki Olson November 9, 2014 http://transhumanity.net/researchers-ahoy-should-futurist-science-move-offshore/ What is the likelihood of seeing research vessels devoted to scientific research outside the bounds of national jurisdiction? The idea of relocating for the sake of circumventing law, in particular the notion of establishing new nations in international waters, is an idea typically initiated with liberty in mind. The Principality of Sealand, for instance, established in 1967, was founded with the intention of creating a space free from “oppressive laws and...
  • More details of Apple’s GT Advanced sapphire deal make it crystal clear how things fell apart

    11/20/2014 2:47:17 AM PST · by Swordmaker · 19 replies
    9to5Mac ^ | November 19, 2014 | MIKE BEASLEY
    The Wall Street Journal has revealed key details of the failed deal between Apple and sapphire supplier GT Advanced Technologies that show why the agreement collapsed and how GT managed to run itself into bankruptcy while trying to meet Apple’s standards. A previous report from the Journal revealed that GTAT had been unable to provide the iPhone 6 displays it had promised Apple, but now we have even more information on why that demand was so hard to meet. Originally Apple intended to buy the massive new sapphire furnaces GTAT had designed, but eventually Apple decided to simply ask GTAT...
  • What is the Difference Between Asteroids and Comets?

    11/19/2014 1:44:17 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 32 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on November 19, 2014 | Nancy Atkinson
    Asteroids and comets have a few things in common. They are both celestial bodies orbiting our Sun, and they both can have unusual orbits, sometimes straying close to Earth or the other planets. They are both “leftovers” — made from materials from the formation of our Solar System 4.5 billion years ago. But there are a few notable differences between these two objects, as well. The biggest difference between comets and asteroids, however, is what they are made of. While asteroids consist of metals and rocky material, comets are made up of ice, dust, rocky materials and organic compounds. When...