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Science (General/Chat)

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  • Supermassive black holes in 'red geyser' galaxies cause galactic warming

    05/30/2016 4:08:50 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 30 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 5/25/2016 | University of Kentucky
    An international team of scientists, including the University of Kentucky's Renbin Yan, have uncovered a new class of galaxies, called "red geysers," with supermassive black hole winds so hot and energetic that stars can't form. Over the last few billion years, a mysterious kind of "galactic warming" has caused many galaxies to change from a lively place where new stars formed every now and then to a quiet place devoid of fresh young stars. But the mechanism that produces this dramatic transformation and keeps galaxies quiet has been one of the biggest unsolved mysteries in galaxy evolution. "These galaxies have...
  • HanseYachts builds first 10-meter long 3D printed hull

    05/30/2016 10:21:49 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 23 replies
    3ders.org ^ | May 30, 2016 | by Tess
    3D printing technologies have made a big impact in a diverse range of manufacturing industries, from architecture, to healthcare, to aerospace, and to the automotive industries. Now it seems another manufacturing industry will be exploring and capitalizing on 3D printing technology, by taking it to sea. That is, German yacht and motor boat manufacturer HanseYachts AG has announced that it has integrated 3D printing technologies into its yacht design and production. The company, which was founded in 1990 and which is one of the largest manufacturers of seagoing sail yachts in the world, has decided to embrace the potentials of...
  • Vet Intern Discovers Tick on Dog’s Ear Moments Before Euthanization

    05/30/2016 7:18:12 AM PDT · by dennisw · 22 replies
    breitbart ^ | 2016/05/24/ | Jerome Hudson
    Dr. Stone was eventually able to determine that Ollie’s sickness was caused by a very rare condition called tick paralysis........... A 10-year-old dog named Ollie is alive today thanks to a Portland, Oregon-based DoveLewis Animal Hospital intern who found a tick hidden in his ear, moments before the veterinarian was to euthanise the sick dog. Ollie’s owners, Al and Joelle, decided to put the dog to sleep after noticing his rapidly failing health after returning home from a trip to the Umpqua River, according to a statement from DoveLewis Animal Hospital. “We were at a complete loss,” said Al, the...
  • A planet 1,200 light-years away is a good prospect for a habitable world

    05/29/2016 11:03:46 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    www.sciencedaily.com ^ | May 27, 2016 | Source: University of California - Los Angeles
    An artist's conception of Kepler-62f, a planet in the 'habitable zone' of a star located about 1,200 light-years from Earth. Credit: NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle ========================================================================================================================= A distant planet known as Kepler-62f could be habitable, a team of astronomers reports. The planet, which is about 1,200 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Lyra, is approximately 40 percent larger than Earth. At that size, Kepler-62f is within the range of planets that are likely to be rocky and possibly could have oceans, said Aomawa Shields, the study's lead author and a National Science Foundation astronomy and astrophysics postdoctoral fellow...
  • Cave art trove found in Spain 1,000 feet underground

    05/29/2016 10:15:47 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 27, 2016 | by Ciaran Giles
    This image released by the Diputacion Floral de Bizkaia on Friday May 27, 2016, shows a cave drawing. Spanish archaeologists say they have discovered an exceptional set of Paleolithic-era cave drawings that could rank among the best in a country that already boasts some of the world's most important cave art. Chief site archaeologist Diego Garate said Friday that an estimated 70 drawings were found on ledges 300 meters (1,000 feet) underground in the Atxurra cave, Berriatua, in the northern Basque region. He described the site as being in "the Champions' League" of cave art, among the top 10 sites...
  • Doubling down on Schrödinger's cat

    05/29/2016 10:00:37 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 23 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 26, 2016 | Provided by: Yale University
    Yale physicists have given Schrödinger's cat a second box to play in. Credit: Michael S. Helfenbein/Yale University ====================================================================================================================== Yale physicists have given Schrödinger's famous cat a second box to play in, and the result may help further the quest for reliable quantum computing. Schrödinger's cat is a well-known paradox that applies the concept of superposition in quantum physics to objects encountered in everyday life. The idea is that a cat is placed in a sealed box with a radioactive source and a poison that will be triggered if an atom of the radioactive substance decays. Quantum physics suggests that the...
  • Wrongly Convicted on Bite-Marks, Man Exonerated after 19 Years

    05/28/2016 6:06:07 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 12 replies
    Forensic Magazine ^ | Fri, 05/27/2016 | Seth Augenstein
    A California man serving a 25-to-life prison sentence for the murder of his wife based on bite-mark evidence had his conviction reversed by the state’s supreme court on Thursday. The reversal comes almost a decade after the forensic odontologist recanted his original testimony, saying he wasn’t even sure if the lesion on the victim’s hand was a human bite mark. William Richards was convicted of the 1993 murder of his wife Pamela, who was found strangled and beaten with a rock and a cinderblock. Richards was convicted at a fourth trial, after three mistrials. The 1997 conviction incorporated bite-mark evidence...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Cat's Eye Wide and Deep

    05/28/2016 4:18:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | Saturday, May 28, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The Cat's Eye Nebula (NGC 6543) is one of the best known planetary nebulae in the sky. Its more familiar outlines are seen in the brighter central region of the nebula in this impressive wide-angle view. But the composite image combines many short and long exposures to also reveal an extremely faint outer halo. At an estimated distance of 3,000 light-years, the faint outer halo is over 5 light-years across. Planetary nebulae have long been appreciated as a final phase in the life of a sun-like star. More recently, some planetary nebulae are found to have halos like this...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- The Great Carina Nebula

    05/28/2016 4:14:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    NASA ^ | Friday, May 27, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: A jewel of the southern sky, the Great Carina Nebula, also known as NGC 3372, spans over 300 light-years, one of our galaxy's largest star forming regions. Like the smaller, more northerly Great Orion Nebula, the Carina Nebula is easily visible to the unaided eye, though at a distance of 7,500 light-years it is some 5 times farther away. This gorgeous telescopic close-up reveals remarkable details of the region's central glowing filaments of interstellar gas and obscuring cosmic dust clouds. The field of view is over 50 light-years across. The Carina Nebula is home to young, extremely massive stars,...
  • Mars Set to Make Closest Approach to Earth in 11 Years

    05/28/2016 1:22:57 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 52 replies
    abc News on Yahoo ^ | 5/26/16 | Alyssa Newcomb - abc News
    If Martians exist, they'll be closer to Earth on Memorial Day than they have been in 11 years. This Monday, around 5:34 p.m. EDT, when many Americans may be enjoying a holiday barbecue, the Red Planet will be the closest it has been to Earth in more than a decade, coming within 46.8 million miles, according to NASA. The relatively close encounter with Earth comes a week after the Martian opposition, when Mars and the sun lined up on exact opposite sides of the Earth.
  • Cellphone-Cancer Link Found in Government Study

    05/28/2016 12:16:16 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 44 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | May 28, 2016 | RYAN KNUTSON
    Multiyear, peer-reviewed study found ‘low incidences’ of two types of tumors in male rats exposed to type of radio frequencies commonly emitted by cellphones A major U.S. government study on rats has found a link between cellphones and cancer, an explosive finding in the long-running debate about whether mobile phones cause health effects. The multiyear, peer-reviewed study, by the National Toxicology Program, found “low incidences” of two types of tumors in male rats that were exposed to the type of radio frequencies that are commonly emitted by cellphones. The tumors were gliomas, which are in the glial cells of...
  • Why is R-22 Refrigerant so Expensive Now?

    05/28/2016 6:59:35 AM PDT · by central_va · 44 replies
    Pippen HVAC ^ | 5/28/16 | Pippen
    I just got charged $200.00 for two pounds of R-22. 2 pounds!!!!
  • Young Man Dies After Being Stung by 1,000 Bees While Hiking Arizona Trail: Sheriff’s Office

    05/27/2016 10:37:02 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 75 replies
    A 23-year-old man died Thursday after being swarmed by bees and stung 1,000 times while hiking in Usery Mountain Park in Arizona, authorities said. Alex Bestler and a friend were on the Merkle Trail when a large swarm of bees descended on them “without provocation or warning” shortly before 9 a.m., according to a Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office news release. The victim’s friend — identified only as Sonya — managed to escape by seeking shelter in a restroom, but Bestler was overcome by the swarm, the release stated. He was lying on the ground covered in bees when Sonya returned...
  • Massive, Violent Landslide Created Zion National Park, Study Says

    05/27/2016 6:34:33 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 42 replies
    weather.com ^ | Ada Carr
    Every year, millions of people travel to Utah to take in the beautiful and peaceful scenery in Zion National Park. According to a new study, however, the geographic stunner was formed by a massive prehistoric landslide that was far from tranquil. The study, published Thursday in the Geological Society of America, said the park’s flat valley floor owes its creation to the collapse of a wall of Navajo Sandstone that was almost 900 miles high. Weak layers in the underlying Kayenta Formation sent debris shooting across the canyon at speeds that likely reached 90 miles per second. It's believed that...
  • Schrödinger's cat lives and dies in two boxes at once

    05/27/2016 11:17:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 39 replies
    Physics World ^ | May 27, 2016 | Staff
    Schrödinger's cat now has a second box to play in, thanks to an international team of physicists that has created a two-mode "Schrödinger's cat state" for the first time. The experiment brings together two purely quantum properties, in that the "cat" (i.e. the photons) is simultaneously "alive and dead" (in a superposition of states) while also in two locations at once (the two boxes are entangled with one another).
  • Stunning cave paintings found 300 metres below Spain

    05/27/2016 1:19:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    The Local ^ | May 26, 2016 | Jessica Jones
    The cave joins that at Altamira as one of Spain’s most exciting and best-preserved set of cave paintings and for Garate, marks a career high. "Without doubt it is the most important discovery of my career," he told The Local. "I have been searching the caves of the Basque Country for ten years and have discovered lots of new caves but none as important as Atxurra. It could very well be the cave with the most animal figures in the Basque Country," he added. The Atxurra caves were originally discovered in 1929, but as the paintings are at a depth...
  • Migration back to Africa took place during the Paleolithic

    05/26/2016 11:59:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 26, 2016 | University of the Basque Country
    A piece of international research led by the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has retrieved the mitogenome of a fossil belonging to the first Homo sapiens population in Europe. The Palaeogenomics study conducted by the Human Evolutionary Biology group of the Faculty of Science and Technology, led by Concepción de la Rua, in collaboration with researchers in Sweden, the Netherlands and Romania, has made it possible to retrieve the complete sequence of the mitogenome of the Pestera Muierii woman (PM1) using two teeth. This mitochondrial genome corresponds to the now disappeared U6 basal lineage, and it is from this lineage...
  • The superbug that doctors have been dreading just reached the U.S.

    05/26/2016 12:58:23 PM PDT · by C19fan · 51 replies
    Washington Post ^ | May 26, 2016 | Lena H. Sun and Brady Dennis
    For the first time, researchers have found a person in the United States carrying bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort, an alarming development that the top U.S. public health official says could mean "the end of the road" for antibiotics. The antibiotic-resistant strain was found last month in the urine of a 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman. Defense Department researchers determined that she carried a strain of E. coli resistant to the antibiotic colistin, according to a study published Thursday in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. The authors wrote that the discovery "heralds the...
  • Man shoots male doctor for assisting his wife’s delivery in Saudi Arabia

    05/26/2016 10:42:29 AM PDT · by wtd · 23 replies
    Gulf News ^ | May 26, 2016 | Habib Toumi, Bureau Chief
    Man shoots male doctor for assisting his wife’s delivery in Saudi Arabia Riyadh: A Saudi man was arrested after he shot a male obstetrician, arguing that he had no right to assist his wife’s delivery and that a woman gynecologist should have been around. Dr Muhannad Al Zabn, who has a Jordanian father and a Saudi mother, delivered the baby one month ago at the King Fahad Medical City in the Saudi capital Riyadh. According to media reports, the father went to the hospital and told the doctor he wanted to see him to thank him for helping his...
  • High-quality random numbers can now be computed with much less effort

    05/26/2016 10:08:32 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 26 replies
    fudzilla.com ^ | 26 May 2016 | Jon Worrel
    A big win for encryption, more efficient complex simulations Last week, computer scientist researchers at the University of Texas at Austin published a draft paper describing a new, more efficient way of generating truly random numbers that can be used everyday encryption situations like mobile banking, statistics, electronic voting and complex simulations, among other applications. At the university, computer science professor David Zuckerman and graduate student Eshan Chattopadhyay developed a method of taking two weakly random numbers and combining them into a single sequence of truly random numbers. In the past, the task of generating truly random numbers for encryption...
  • Astronomers find giant planet around very young star

    05/26/2016 10:05:19 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 12 replies
    phys.org ^ | May 26, 2016 | Provided by: Rice University
    Astronomers used the Harlan J. Smith Telescope at the University of Texas at Austin's McDonald Observatory near Fort Davis, Texas, to search for a planet around star CI Tau. Credit: Ethan Tweedie Photography ================================================================================================== In contradiction to the long-standing idea that larger planets take longer to form, U.S. astronomers today announced the discovery of a giant planet in close orbit around a star so young that it still retains a disk of circumstellar gas and dust. "For decades, conventional wisdom held that large Jupiter-mass planets take a minimum of 10 million years to form," said Christopher Johns-Krull, the lead author...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- IC 5067 in the Pelican Nebula

    05/26/2016 5:23:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    NASA ^ | Thursday, May 26, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The prominent ridge of emission featured in this sharp, colorful skyscape is cataloged as IC 5067. Part of a larger emission nebula with a distinctive shape, popularly called The Pelican Nebula, the ridge spans about 10 light-years following the curve of the cosmic pelican's head and neck. This false-color view also translates the pervasive glow of narrow emission lines from atoms in the nebula to a color palette made popular in Hubble Space Telescope images of star forming regions. Fantastic, dark shapes inhabiting the 1/2 degree wide field are clouds of cool gas and dust sculpted by the winds...
  • Space Engine. Free real-time 3D space simulator, procedural universe generator and visualiser

    05/26/2016 1:44:40 AM PDT · by Dallas59 · 18 replies
    Space Engine ^ | 5/26/2016 | Vladimir Romanyuk
    SpaceEngine - a free space simulation program that lets you explore the universe in three dimensions, from planet Earth to the most distant galaxies. Areas of the known universe are represented using actual astronomical data, while regions uncharted by astronomy are generated procedurally. Millions of galaxies, trillions of stars, countless planets - all available for exploration. You can land any planet, moon or asteroid and watch alien landscapes and celestial phenomena. You can even pilot starships and atmospheric shuttles.
  • Maybe Life in the Cosmos Is Rare After All

    05/25/2016 6:59:50 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 84 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 23 May, 2016 | Paul Davies
    When I was a student in the 1960s almost all scientists believed we are alone in the universe. The search for intelligent life beyond Earth was ridiculed; one might as well have professed an interest in looking for fairies. The focus of skepticism concerned the origin of life, which was widely assumed to have been a chemical fluke of such incredibly low probability it would never have happened twice. “The origin of life appears at the moment to be almost a miracle,” was the way Francis Crick described it, “so many are the conditions which would have had to have...
  • Leech Therapy Gaining Popularity in South Florida

    05/25/2016 6:46:35 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    NBC Miami ^ | May 24, 2016 | Laura Rodriguez
    The healing powers of a blood-sucking worm: South Florida medical practitioners are using leeches to treat patients suffering from a variety of medical conditions. Hirudotherapy, commonly referred to as Leech Therapy, is a centuries-old practice used to treat a wide range of conditions. Patricia Nardone has uterine fibroids and turned to this alternative therapy after undergoing an ineffective medical procedure. "It affects my daily life because I get tired and I'm anemic," she said. Through an online search and a couple of phone calls, she found Alicja Kolyszko, a naturopathic practitioner who travels around the United States working to heal...
  • U.N. Chief's Message to Graduates: Don't Vote for Climate-Change Deniers

    05/25/2016 5:08:14 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 15 replies
    Cybercast News Service ^ | May 25, 2016 | 11:55 AM EDT | Susan Jones
    “Now that you’re done with finals, help us meet the climate change test,” United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon told Columbia University graduates last week. […] “Don’t vote for politicians who deny the problem,” he said. “Don’t buy products that aren’t sustainable. And for heaven’s sake, turn off the lights!” …
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- NGC 5078 and Friends

    05/25/2016 3:16:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, May 25, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This sharp telescopic field of view holds two bright galaxies. Barred spiral NGC 5101 (top right) and nearly edge-on system NGC 5078 are separated on the sky by about 0.5 degrees or about the apparent width of a full moon. Found within the boundaries of the serpentine constellation Hydra, both are estimated to be around 90 million light-years away and similar in size to our own large Milky Way galaxy. In fact, if they both lie at the same distance their projected separation would be only 800,000 light-years or so. That's easily less than half the distance between the...
  • A De-Sexed Society is a De-Humanized Society

    05/25/2016 6:48:30 AM PDT · by wtd · 8 replies
    The Witherspoon Institute - Public Discourse ^ | May 25th, 2016 | Stella Morabito
    The Witherspoon Institute - Public Discourse, "A De-Sexed Society is a De-Humanized Society"The transgender movement has never been about “gender.” It’s all about sex. Sex is the real target. “Gender” is merely the politicized linguistic vehicle that facilitates a legal ban on sex distinctions. There aren’t a whole lot of dots to connect to uncover the logic of where this leads: if you abolish sex distinctions in law, you can abolish state recognition of biological family ties, and the state can regulate personal relationships and consolidate power as never before.
  • Report: NFL sought to influence government head-trauma study

    05/24/2016 9:19:08 PM PDT · by scrabblehack · 10 replies
    Yahoo Sports ^ | 5/23/2016 | Jay Busbee
    A new congressional report has found that the NFL sought to improperly influence a major government study on connections between football and brain disease, according to documents obtained by ESPN's "Outside The Lines." (Update: the NFL has rejected the conclusions of the report.) The congressional research report indicates the NFL had given the National Institutes of Health a $30 million unrestricted gift in 2012, but later sought to pull $16 million in funding from that gift away from one researcher and reroute it to researchers working on the league's own brain injury committee. When the NIH declined to redirect the...
  • Big Science vs. Humanity: The Arrogant Dream of Constructing a Human Genome in the Lab

    05/24/2016 8:23:03 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 19 replies
    The Stream ^ | May 23, 2016 | Douglas Axe
    Big Science vs. Humanity: The Arrogant Dream of Constructing a Human Genome in the Lab By Douglas Axe Published on May 23, 2016 • Scientists have recently started talking about constructing a complete human genome from scratch — out of raw chemicals. Understandably, concerns are being raised about the idea.As unsettling as the news is, though, perhaps it shouldn’t be surprising. Big science is always looking for backers of the next big project, and controversy is one sure way to get the ball rolling.Reading human genomes has become passé, it seems, so it’s predictable that something newer and bolder — like writing...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way Over the Spanish Peaks

    05/24/2016 4:28:10 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    NASA ^ | Tuesday, May 24, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: That's not lightning, and it did not strike between those mountains. The diagonal band is actually the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy, while the twin peaks are actually called the Spanish Peaks -- but located in Colorado, USA. Although each Spanish peak is composed of a slightly different type of rock, both are approximately 25 million years old. This serene yet spirited image composite was meticulously created by merging a series of images all taken from the same location on one night and early last month. In the first series of exposures, the background sky was built...
  • Parts of New Orleans Are Sinking Fast, Study Finds

    05/23/2016 8:20:30 PM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 39 replies
    NBCnews ^ | 5/22/2016 | Tim Stelloh
    New Orleans is sinking fast — with one neighborhood losing as much as an inch per year, a new study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research found. The study, which was conducted between 2009 and 2012 and published last week, used GPS and radar, including one device that captured images from seven miles above ground. The most threatened section of the already-below-sea level city is Michoud, a neighborhood that sits between Lake Ponchartrain and Lake Borguen, and is being swallowed up at a rate of half an inch to just over one inch per year, the researchers found.
  • Astronomers just discovered a rare dwarf galaxy that's loaded with precious elements

    05/23/2016 5:24:39 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 37 replies
    Science Alert ^ | 5/23/16 | BEC CREW
    Scientists have been searching for the origin of some of the most precious metals on Earth - including gold, silver, and platinum - for almost six decades. And now we might finally have the answer. Heavy, and often valuable elements like these are called r-process elements, and they require an incredible amount of energy to produce. So far, no one's been able to explain how they came to exist in the Universe. But the discovery that an ancient dwarf galaxy called Reticulum II - about 98,000 light-years from Earth - has stars that contain a "whopping" amount of these metals...
  • Discovery could open the door to cellphone and car batteries that last five times longer

    05/23/2016 10:51:48 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 40 replies
    phys.org ^ | 23 MAY 2016 | Provided by: University of Texas at Dallas
    A University of Texas at Dallas researcher has made a discovery that could open the door to cellphone and car batteries that last five times longer than current ones. Dr. Kyeongjae Cho, professor of materials science and engineering in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science, has discovered new catalyst materials for lithium-air batteries that jumpstart efforts at expanding battery capacity. The research was published in Nature Energy. "There's huge promise in lithium-air batteries. However, despite the aggressive research being done by groups all over the world, those promises are not being delivered in real life," Cho said....
  • India's Mini-Shuttle Blasts Into Elon Musk's Race For Space

    05/23/2016 6:14:59 AM PDT · by Republic_Venom · 21 replies
    www.ndtv.com ^ | May 23, 2016 | Anurag Kotoky, Ganesh Nagarajan, Bloomberg
    India successfully launched a scale model of a reusable spacecraft on Monday, a project that in time could pit the nation against billionaires Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk in the race to make access to space cheaper and easier. The winged vessel -- one-fifth of full size -- blasted off on a rocket from Sriharikota base on the southeastern coast, the Indian Space Research Organisation said. The spacecraft reached an altitude of 65 kilometers (40 miles) and glided back at supersonic speeds for a splashdown in the Bay of Bengal. The test took about 13 minutes.
  • The Sinister, Secret History Of A Food That Everybody Loves [the Curse of the Potato]

    05/23/2016 4:55:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 75 replies
    Washington Post 'blogs ^ | April 25, 2016 | Jeff Guo
    "The Spaniards were much impressed with the productivity of manioc in Arawak agriculture in the Greater Antilles," historian Jonathan Sauer recounts in his history of crop plants. "[A Spanish historian] calculated that 20 persons working 6 hours a day for a month could plant enough yuca to provide cassava bread for a village of 300 persons for 2 years." By all accounts, the Taíno were prosperous -- "a well-nourished population of over a million people," according to Sauer. And yet... lacked the monumental architecture of the Maya or the mathematical knowledge of the Aztec. And most importantly, they were not organized in...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Inside a Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector

    05/22/2016 9:30:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | Monday, May 23, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why is there more matter than antimatter in the Universe? To better understand this facet of basic physics, energy departments in China and the USA led in the creation of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. Located under thick rock about 50 kilometers northeast of Hong Kong, China, eight Daya Bay detectors monitor antineutrinos emitted by six nearby nuclear reactors. Featured here, a camera looks along one of the Daya Bay detectors, imaging photon sensors that pick up faint light emitted by antineutrinos interacting with fluids in the detector. Early results indicate an unexpectedly high rate of one type...
  • 'Stone Age Art' In Upper Franconian Cave Not An Archaeological Sensation After All

    05/22/2016 9:03:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    FAU News ^ | April 27, 2016 | Julia Blumenrother
    The Mäanderhöhle cave near Bamberg was previously regarded as an archaeological sensation. It was thought to contain some of the oldest cave art in Germany. However, Julia Blumenröther, a former student at FAU's Institute of Prehistory and Early History, has demonstrated in her Master's thesis that the markings discovered inside the cave in 2005 are not fertility symbols carved by humans as previously thought. In fact, these lines occurred as a result of natural processes, the archaeologist says. One of the caverns in the 75-metre long cave is full of spherical deposits of minerals known as cave clouds that form...
  • Why men are best at guessing endings of TV crime dramas

    05/22/2016 1:49:48 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 39 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 5-20-16 | REHEMA FIGUEIREDO and JEMMA BUCKLEY
    Men are more likely to guess the endings of complex TV crime dramas because women are distracted by the emotion of the story, claims a leading psychologist. Dr David Lewis has said that men remain detached while watching detective dramas such as ITV’s The Secret and BBC1’s Undercover and pick up on hints about the ending that women miss. Dr Lewis said: ‘A man is much more likely to look at that and say “ah ha!” A woman, because she is focused on the emotions, is less likely to spot these things designed to give you a hint. ‘Women tend...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- LL Orionis: When Cosmic Winds Collide

    05/22/2016 5:31:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | Sunday, May 22, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What created this great arc in space? This arcing, graceful structure is actually a bow shock about half a light-year across, created as the wind from young star LL Orionis collides with the Orion Nebula flow. Adrift in Orion's stellar nursery and still in its formative years, variable star LL Orionis produces a wind more energetic than the wind from our own middle-aged sun. As the fast stellar wind runs into slow moving gas a shock front is formed, analogous to the bow wave of a boat moving through water or a plane traveling at supersonic speed. The slower...
  • Huge Roman Villa Found Under Amalfi Church Set To Open

    05/21/2016 5:39:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    The Local ^ | 16 May 2016 | unattributed
    A fresco-covered Roman villa, found underneath a church on Italy's sun-kissed Amalfi coast, is set to open to the public for the first time in July.... Italy's Culture Undersecretary, Antimo Cesaro... told Ansa the ruin was "a perfectly preserved archaeological treasure of enormous artistic value". The enormous villa dates back to the second century BC and was first unearthed eight metres below the church of Santa Maria dell'Assunta in central Positano, Campania, in 2004. Prior to its discovery, the impressive abode had lain hidden since AD 79 when an eruption of Vesuvius buried it under volcanic stone and ash. The...
  • Rome Mulls 'Metro Museum' After New Line Unearths Ruin

    05/21/2016 5:27:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    The Local ^ | 17 May 2016 | Patrick Browne
    Rome authorities are set to build the world's first 'archaeological underground station' around an ancient Roman barracks which came to light during works to build a new underground station. The remains of a second century imperial barracks were found nine metres below street level in November, when construction began on Amba Aradam-Ipponio station on the city's new metro Line C. The 1,753 square-metre ruin contains some 39 rooms, many of which contain original mosaics and frescoes. Lying so deep under the city, it was impossible for modern survey equipment to detect the ruin before work began. But work on the...
  • Elizabeth I dress: Altar cloth may be Queen's gown

    05/21/2016 4:37:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    BBC ^ | May 16, 2016 | unattributed
    The fabric at St Faith's Church in Bacton has been identified by experts as a piece of a 16th Century dress. An examination by Historic Royal Palaces curators has strengthened a theory it formed part of a court dress. The Queen is depicted in the Rainbow Portrait wearing a similar fabric, but no documentary evidence has been found to suggest the dress was worn by her. Historians believe the monarch could have gifted the garment to one of her servants, Blanche Parry. Dating back to the last decades of the 16th Century, the altar cloth that hung in a glass...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Milky Way and Planets Near Opposition

    05/21/2016 12:47:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | Saturday, May 21, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In this early May night skyscape, a mountain road near Bursa, Turkey seems to lead toward bright planets Mars and Saturn and the center of our Milky Way Galaxy, a direction nearly opposite the Sun in planet Earth's sky. The brightest celestial beacon on the scene, Mars, reaches its opposition tonight and Saturn in early June. Both will remain nearly opposite the Sun, up all night and close to Earth for the coming weeks, so the time is right for good telescopic viewing. Mars and Saturn form the tight celestial triangle with red giant star Antares just right of...
  • This is the Netflix hack the world has been waiting for (Smartflix)

    05/21/2016 11:49:44 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 13 replies
    BGR ^ | May 21, 2016 | Yoni Heisler
    Because Netflix doesn’t own the global licensing rights to all of the movies and TV shows it carries, a good deal of its programming remains completely unavailable to subscribers outside of certain geographic regions. Indeed, one of the reasons why Netflix is so intent on developing its own original programming is precisely because they don’t have to deal with thorny licensing issues. Now if you find yourself in the frustrating position of wanting to watch something on Netflix that is otherwise geographically restricted, there’s a new desktop app that can help turn that dream into a reality.
  • Looking for a geologist.

    05/20/2016 7:32:16 PM PDT · by M.K. Borders · 22 replies
    Request for info | 20 May 216 | Myself
    Looking for a geologist with knowledge of Oklahoma in general and specifically the area surrounding Fort Sill.
  • Do We Need to Revise General Relativity?

    05/20/2016 11:56:18 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 39 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | Ross Pomeroy
    The idea that our Universe is filled with dark matter has been around for nearly a century. When astronomers noticed that orbital speeds towards the edges of spiral galaxies remain the same or even increase slightly, rather than decrease, they surmised that either there must be some huge unseen mass driving the rotation, or that the laws of gravity given by Einstein's General Relativity need to be changed. They elected the first option. Over that time, cosmologists have accumulated boatloads of evidence in favor of the notion that this invisible, "dark" matter -- which neither interacts with nor emits light...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- 3D Mercury Transit

    05/20/2016 10:54:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | Friday, May 20, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: On May 9, innermost planet Mercury crossed IN FRONT of the Sun. Though pictures project the event in only two dimensions, a remarkable three dimensional perspective on the transit is possible by free viewing this stereo pair. The images were made 23 minutes apart and rotated so that Mercury's position shifts horizontally between the two. As a result, Mercury's orbital motion produced an exaggerated parallax simulating binocular vision. Between the two exposures, the appropriately named planet's speedy 47.4 kilometer per second orbital velocity actually carried it over 65,000 kilometers. Taken first, the left image is intended for the right...
  • Killer Nile crocodiles in Florida? Experts say it's possible

    05/19/2016 7:09:04 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 39 replies
    AP ^ | May 19, 2016 | Terry Spencer
    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Step aside, Burmese python — you may no longer be Florida's scariest invasive species. Researchers have confirmed that three Nile crocodiles were captured near Miami, and they say it's possible more of the man-eating reptiles are still out there, although no one can say for sure. The big question now: How did they get to Florida? "They didn't swim from Africa," University of Florida herpetologist Kenneth Krysko said. "But we really don't know how they got into the wild."
  • How Does Light Travel?

    05/19/2016 1:06:30 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 82 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | 19 May , 2016 by | Matt Williams
    Ever since Democritus... argued that all of existence was made up of tiny indivisible atoms, scientists have been speculating as to the true nature of light. Whereas scientists ventured back and forth between the notion that light was a particle or a wave until the modern, the 20th century led to breakthroughs that showed that it behaves as both. These included the discovery of the electron, the development of quantum theory, and Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. However, there remains many fascinating and unanswered questions when it comes to light, many of which arise from its dual nature. For instance, how...