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Keyword: viruses

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  • Why viruses like Herpes and Zika will need to be reclassified, and its biotech impact

    09/28/2019 6:15:48 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 09/27/2019 | San Diego State University
    In the 1950s and '60s as scientists began to obtain high resolution images of viruses, they discovered the detailed structure of the capsid—an outer protective layer composed of multiple copies of the same protein—which protects the virus' genetic material. The majority of viruses have capsids that are typically quasi-spherical and display icosahedral symmetry—like a 20-sided dice for instance. The capsid shell is what protects them, and as scientists discovered their structure, they proposed that capsids could have different sizes and hold different amounts of genome, and therefore could infect hosts differently. [M]any viruses have essentially been misclassified for 60 years,...
  • An explosion occurred in the Novosibirsk Center for Virology "Vector" [Russia]

    09/16/2019 11:25:03 PM PDT · by AzNASCARfan · 71 replies
    svoboda.org ^ | September 16, 2019 | Unknown
    An explosion occurred at the Vector State Virology Research Center near Novosibirsk . This research center has one of the most comprehensive collections of dangerous viruses in the world. According to Rospotrebnadzor, on the fifth floor of a six-story laboratory building, a gas bottle exploded during repair work, after which a fire broke out on an area of 30 square meters. The fire is eliminated. One worker suffered. With burns of the second and third degree, he was taken to the hospital. In Rospotrebnadzor emphasized that in the room where the explosion occurred, there were no biohazardous substances. At the...
  • Alarming Surge in Drug-Resistant HIV Uncovered

    07/31/2019 11:39:30 AM PDT · by C19fan · 53 replies
    Scientific America ^ | July 30, 2019 | Emiliano Rodríguez Mega
    Health authorities have uncovered an alarming surge in resistance to crucial HIV drugs. Surveys by the World Health Organization (WHO) reveal that, in the past 4 years, 12 countries in Africa, Asia and the Americas have surpassed acceptable levels of drug resistance against two drugs that constitute the backbone of HIV treatment: efavirenz and nevirapine. People living with HIV are routinely treated with a cocktail of drugs, known as antiretroviral therapy, but the virus can mutate into a resistant form.
  • There's Something About Space That's Triggering Herpes in Astronauts

    03/17/2019 7:09:26 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 88 replies
    Science Alert ^ | 18 Mar 2018 | JON CHRISTIAN
    Tests show that dormant herpes viruses reactivate in more than half the astronauts who travel on the Space Shuttle and International Space station, according to new NASA research - a phenomenon the space agency says could pose problems for deep space missions. ..."In keeping with this, we find that astronaut's immune cells - particularly those that normally suppress and eliminate viruses - become less effective during spaceflight and sometimes for up to 60 days after."
  • Dormant viruses activate during spaceflight

    03/17/2019 5:35:03 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 03/15/2019
    "NASA astronauts endure weeks or even months exposed to microgravity and cosmic radiation—not to mention the extreme G forces of take-off and re-entry," says senior author Dr. Satish K. Mehta of KBR Wyle at the Johnson Space Center. "This physical challenge is compounded by more familiar stressors like social separation, confinement and an altered sleep-wake cycle." "During spaceflight there is a rise in secretion of stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline, which are known to suppress the immune system. In keeping with this, we find that astronaut's immune cells—particularly those that normally suppress and eliminate viruses—become less effective during spaceflight...
  • More Ancient Viruses Lurk In Our DNA Than We Thought

    03/28/2016 6:19:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    University of Michigan ^ | March 22, 2016 | Kara Gavin
    One whole endogenous retrovirus genome -- and bits of 17 others -- were spotted in a study of 2,500 human genomes... Nineteen new pieces of DNA -- left by viruses that first infected our ancestors hundreds of thousands of years ago -- have just been found, lurking between our own genes. And one stretch of newfound DNA, found in about 50 of the 2,500 people studied, contains an intact, full genetic recipe for an entire virus, say the scientists who published their findings today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Whether or not it can replicate, or...
  • Test unravels history of infection

    06/04/2015 5:28:40 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    The British Broadcasting Corporation ^ | June 4, 2015 | Jonathan Ball
    US researchers claim to have developed a single test that is able to identify past exposure to every known human virus infection, using a drop of blood.The technique decodes the infection history imprinted in our immune response. The scientists hope that the test will eventually provide important insight into how viruses contribute to development of a range of diseases. The work was published in the journal Science. During a virus infection, your immune system generates antibodies designed to fight the virus. Each antibody recognises a tiny fragment of the virus and their interaction is very specific - they fit like...
  • Plan For Lethal-Virus Laboratories Leaves Smalltown USA In Uproar

    06/28/2003 3:37:39 PM PDT · by blam · 2 replies · 193+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 6-29-2003 | Andrew Gumbel
    Plan for lethal-virus laboratories leaves Smalltown USA in uproar By Andrew Gumbel in Los Angeles 29 June 2003 A network of high-security laboratories for storing and investigating some of the most lethal viruses known to mankind is being built across the US, leaving communities in uproar. They not only fear the risk of the viruses escaping, but also contend that the programme, part of the $6bn (£3.5bn) Project BioShield, is a stunning case of overkill. For none of the germs to be studied is related to bioweaponry. In the tiny town of Hamilton, Montana, campaigners worry that they will become...
  • Scientists Map 5,000 New Ocean Viruses

    05/21/2015 4:48:16 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 7 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 5/21/15 | Carl Zimmer
    Scientists Map 5,000 New Ocean Viruses In the few decades since viruses were first found in the oceans, scientists have only been able to identify a handful of species. A new survey has uncovered nearly all the rest. Photographs by Jennifer Brum, Tucson Marine Phage LabA few of the more than 5,000 viruses discovered during the Tara Oceans Expedition. By: Carl ZimmerMay 21, 2015 In March 2011, the Tara, a 36-meter schooner, sailed from Chile to Easter Island — a three-week leg of a five-year global scientific expedition. All but one of the seven scientists aboard the ship spent much...
  • New DNA Tech: Creating Unicorns and Curing Cancer for Real?

    04/05/2015 11:12:38 AM PDT · by E. Pluribus Unum · 12 replies
    The Daily Beast ^ | 04/04/2015 | David Ewing Duncan
    We have the earth-shattering technology in our hands—but even its inventors worry about its awesome power to alter our genetic future. “We have within our grasp the technology to change evolution. This could change the course of biological life.” — Paul Berg, Nobel Laureate and a pioneer of genetic engineeringIn 2012, scientists in the U.S. and Sweden invented a technology as potentially life-altering as splitting the atom. One that you haven’t heard of—yet—called “CRISPR-Cas9”. This innovation with the cumbrous name allows biologists to edit DNA almost as easily as cutting and pasting words and letters on a laptop.Scientists say...
  • Malwarebytes Programs

    04/02/2015 10:43:19 AM PDT · by hsmomx3 · 21 replies
    Is Malwarebytes and Malwarebytes Anti-Exploits two separate programs? If so, is it advised to have both programs on my computer? I am currently using Malwarebytes Anti-malware on my Windows 8.1 system.
  • Hackers abuse another Adobe Flash zero-day to attack thousands of web users with redirects

    02/03/2015 12:12:35 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 24 replies
    MacDailyNews ^ | Monday, February 2, 2015
    “Adobe is scurrying to patch the third Flash zero-day of the year, with criminal hackers already using a previously unknown and unpatched vulnerability to launch attacks against thousands of web denizens, security researchers warned today,” Thomas Fox-Brewster reports for Forbes. “Those attacks hit visitors to popular video sharing site Dailymotion, with other sites thought to be affected as the infections were launched via advertisements that will likely be resident on many other web pages.” “Visitors to any affected site would have been redirected to an attacker-controlled page where an exploit kit would attempt to compromise the target system by targeting...
  • Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Linked To Physiological Viral Shifts

    01/24/2015 10:30:04 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    diabetesinsider.com ^ | Jan 24 2015 - 1:02pm | Shelly Fraley
    Washington University School of Medicine researchers have found that those patients who suffer from inflammatory bowel diseases also had a greater variety of viruses contained within their digestive systems than they found in the bowels of health volunteers. This, they believe, suggests that viruses somehow play a role in the development of this condition. ... “This is the tip of the iceberg. A significant portion of the viral DNA we identified in these patients is unfamiliar to us—it comes from newly identified viruses we don’t know much about,” explains senior study author Herbert W. Virgin. “We have a great deal...
  • Ebola, Marburg viruses edit genetic material during infection

    11/04/2014 7:31:05 AM PST · by wtd · 15 replies
    Medical Press ^ | November 4, 2014
    Ebola, Marburg viruses edit genetic material during infectionFiloviruses like Ebola "edit" genetic material as they invade their hosts, according to a study published this week in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The work, by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the Galveston National Laboratory, and the J. Craig Venter Institute, could lead to a better understanding of these viruses, paving the way for new treatments down the road. Using a laboratory technique called deep sequencing, investigators set out to investigate filovirus replication and transcription, processes involved in the virus...
  • Ebola Spread to Guinea's Capital Raises Fears

    03/29/2014 1:19:43 PM PDT · by CorporateStepsister · 18 replies
    MSN News ^ | March 29, 2014 | MSN News
    CONAKRY, Guinea — Ebola, one of the world's most deadly viruses, has spread from a remote forested corner of southern Guinea to the country's seaside capital, raising fears that the disease, which causes severe bleeding and almost always death, could spread far beyond this tiny West African nation's borders.
  • Newly identified natural protein blocks HIV, other deadly viruses

    02/12/2013 2:27:08 PM PST · by neverdem · 3 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | February 11, 2013 | NA
    A team of UCLA-led researchers has identified a protein with broad virus-fighting properties that potentially could be used as a weapon against deadly human pathogenic viruses such as HIV, Ebola, Rift Valley Fever, Nipah and others designated "priority pathogens" for national biosecurity purposes by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease. In a study published in the January issue of the journal Immunity, the researchers describe the novel antiviral property of the protein, cholesterol-25-hydroxylase (CH25H), an enzyme that converts cholesterol to an oxysterol called 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC), which can permeate a cell's wall and block a virus from getting in....
  • 'Tinba' Bank Trojan Burrows into Browsers to Steal Logins

    06/04/2012 8:25:11 AM PDT · by Perseverando · 17 replies
    PC World ^ | June 3, 2012 | John E. Dunn
    Researchers have spotted a new banking Trojan subbed 'Tinba' that appears to have hit on a simple tactic for evading security - be as small as possible. An astonishing 20KB in size, Tinba ('Tiny Banker') retains enough sophistication to match almost anything that can be done by much larger malware types. Its main purpose is to burrow into browsers in order to steal logins, but it can also use 'obfuscated' (i.e disguised) web injection and man-in-the-browser to attempt to finesse two-factor web authentication systems. A particularly interesting feature is the way it tries to evade resident security, injecting itself into...
  • Avira Criticized for Recommending Controversial Product

    06/30/2011 10:31:29 AM PDT · by catnipman · 1 replies
    Softpedia ^ | 6/14/2011 | Lucian Constantin
    Avira has stirred up some controversy among users after deciding to display ads for a third-party registry cleaner within the free version of its antivirus product. Avira AntiVir Personal, the free solution offered by the German security vendor, is one of the most popular anti-malware products on the market today and has over 100 million users. It seems that Avira recently partnered up with Uniblue, the owners of ProcessLibrary.com, a database of information about Windows processes, and creators of several software products. The partnership between the two companies requires Avira to display ads for Uniblue RegistryBooster within AntiVir Personal. These...
  • 'Virus-eater' discovered in Antarctic lake

    03/29/2011 3:23:02 PM PDT · by neverdem · 52 replies · 1+ views
    Nature News ^ | 28 March 2011 | Virginia Gewin
    First of the parasitic parasites to be discovered in a natural environment points to hidden diversity. A genomic survey of the microbial life in an Antarctic lake has revealed a new virophage — a virus that attacks viruses. The discovery suggests that these life forms are more common, and have a larger role in the environment, than was once thought. An Australian research team found the virophage while surveying the extremely salty Organic Lake in eastern Antarctica. While sequencing the collective genome of microbes living in the surface waters, they discovered the virus, which they dubbed the Organic Lake Virophage...
  • Best Courses To Take To Get a Degree In Virology and Tutoring

    03/02/2011 11:01:36 AM PST · by Niuhuru · 5 replies
    Mind of Niuhuru | March 2 2011 | Niuhuru
    I would like to get information on the best possible courses to take. I also wanted to know if I indeed needed to take Medical Terminology to get a degree in Virology. If there are any virologists who would like to tutor me, that would be good too