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Keyword: phoenicians

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  • 2,600-year-old Phoenician wine 'factory' unearthed in Lebanon

    09/20/2020 9:02:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    National Geographic ^ | September 14, 2020 | Tom Metcalfe
    Excavations at Tell el-Burak, about five miles south of the Lebanese coastal city of Sidon, have revealed the well-preserved remains of a wine press used from at least the seventh century B.C. It is the earliest wine press ever found in the Phoenician homelands, which roughly corresponded to modern Lebanon. The discovery is featured in a study published Monday in the journal Antiquity. Large numbers of seeds show grapes were brought there from nearby vineyards and crushed by treading feet in a large basin of durable plaster that could hold about 1,200 gallons of raw juice... The wine press was...
  • From the Seabed, Figures of an Ancient Cult [Phoenician]

    09/06/2020 7:55:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    ASUH ^ | September 1, 2020 | Joshua Rapp Learn | New York Times
    In 1972, in one of the early finds of marine archaeology, researchers discovered a trove of clay figurines on the seabed off the coast of Israel. The figurines -- hundreds of them, accompanied by ceramic jars -- were assumed to be the remains of a Phoenician shipwreck that had rested under the Mediterranean for 2,500 years. The artifacts were never fully analyzed in a scientific study, and were filed away and mostly forgotten for decades. But a new analysis by Meir Edrey, an archaeologist at the Leon Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies at the University of Haifa in Israel, and...
  • Phoenician ship completes Atlantic voyage [crew is pretty old now]

    02/08/2020 10:08:12 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 72 replies
    Lyme Regis ^ | February 7th, 2020 | Francesca Evans
    The replica of a wooden Phoenician ship, which visited Lyme Regis last year, has completed its 6,000 mile voyage across the Atlantic. The Phoenicia visited Lyme Regis last July before setting out on its voyage from the old port of Carthage, Tunisia, in September. It called in at Cadiz (Spain), Essaouira (Morocco), Tenerife (Canary Islands) and Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic) before arriving in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, at the Coral Ridge Yacht Club on Thursday, February 4... The ship's trans-Atlantic voyage was part of the Phoenicians Before Columbus Expedition, designed, with the help of the US-based Phoenician International Research Center, to...
  • Archaeologists discover Phoenician family tomb in ancient city of Achziv

    01/12/2020 12:39:19 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | December 25, 2019 | TOI Staff
    Archaeologists have discovered the remains of an entire Phoenician family buried together in a tomb in Achziv, an ancient population center on the Mediterranean coast near the northern city Nahariya. In 2017, a joint team from Jerusalem's Hebrew Union College and France's Lyon University uncovered the bodies of a man, woman and small child in an approximately 2,800-year old cist-grave, a burial site surrounded by rocks and covered with stone slabs, the Haaretz daily reported Tuesday. The child was between three and five years old. According to the archaeological team that excavated the tomb, items found buried with the family...
  • Statue of ancient god of child sacrifice put on display in Rome

    11/11/2019 6:16:08 PM PST · by Norski · 20 replies
    LifeSiteNews ^ | Nov 6, 2019 | LifeSiteNews staff
    "ROME, November 6, 2019 (LifeSiteNews) – A reconstruction of a pagan idol who demanded child sacrifice was stationed at the entrance of Rome’s Colosseum as part of a secular historical exhibition. The statue of Moloch, worshipped by both the Canaanites and the Phoenicians, is part of an exhibit dedicated to Ancient Rome’s once-great rival, the city of Carthage. The large-scale exhibition, titled Carthago: The immortal myth, runs until March 29, 2020. . .Three ancient Greek historians all attest that it was customary in Carthage to burn children alive as offerings to the deity, whom they called Baal and Cronus or...
  • Tartessian, Europe's newest and oldest Celtic language

    06/24/2019 3:21:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    History Ireland ^ | Mar/Apr 2009 | (it appears to be) John T. Koch
    One of the enduring consequences of the era of Phoenician influence -- which had by around 800 BC progressed from trading outposts to full-blown colonies in southern Spain -- was the adoption of alphabetic writing by the native population, first in the south-west. The number of known Tartessian inscriptions on stone is now about 90 and steadily rising with new discoveries. Concentrated densely in southern Portugal (the Algarve and Lower Alentejo), there is a wider scatter of fifteen over south-west Spain. The best exhibition of the inscriptions is on view in the new and innovative Museu da Escrita do Sudoeste,...
  • A Phoenician Fortress in Oklahoma?

    06/02/2019 12:11:47 AM PDT · by vannrox · 20 replies
    www.anarchaeology.com/ ^ | Unspecified | David Campbell
    A Phoenician Fortress in Oklahoma? The following pages of this website are the photographic documentation of various unusual phenomena my wife, Sue, and I have found in southern Oklahoma and north Texas. What you see is what we saw and with the exception of some graphic arrows in one of the photos, no manipulation of the visual facts has been done. The original seven pages of photos began back on September 10, 2000. My wife publishes a community newspaper called TGIF, the weekend bandit. Most simply refer to it as the Bandit. It is distributed in six counties in Oklahoma...
  • 3,600-yr-old Shipwreck Uncovered Could be Oldest Ever Found in the Mediterranean [Antalya, Turkey]

    05/17/2019 10:59:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    The Vintage News ^ | April 20, 2019 | Helen Flatley
    A team of marine archaeologists has uncovered a 3,600-year-old shipwreck in the Mediterranean, just off the coast of Antalya, Turkey. The ship, believed to have been a merchant vessel sailing from Cyprus, may be the oldest ever discovered, according to Haaretz... Based on its position and the large cargo of copper ingots found inside and around the wreck, it is likely to have been a trading ship, ferrying goods from Cyprus to the Aegean region. Although the ship is in very poor condition, and the hull has been almost completely destroyed, the bulk of the ship, together with its precious...
  • Lead isotopes in silver reveal earliest Phoenician quest for metals in the west Mediterranean

    03/06/2019 11:56:51 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    PNAS ^ | February 25, 2019 | Tzilla Eshel, Yigal Erel, Naama Yahalom-Mack, Ofir Tirosh, and Ayelet Gilboa
    We offer here an answer to one of the most intriguing questions in ancient Mediterranean history: the timing/contexts and incentives of early Phoenician expansion to Mediterranean and Atlantic regions in Africa and Europe ~3,000 years ago. This was enabled by a rare opportunity to analyze a very large sample set of ancient silver items from Phoenicia. An interdisciplinary collaboration combining scientific methods with precise archaeological data revealed the Phoenicians' silver sources. We propose that Phoenicians brought silver to the Levant from southwest Sardinia ~200 years before they de facto settled there, and later, gradually, also from Iberia. We show that...
  • Sicily The Wonder of the Mediterranean 1

    01/28/2019 4:51:50 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    BBC via YouTube ^ | 2017 | Michael Scott
    [snip] I'm in Syracuse on Sicily's east coast, founded by the Greeks 27 centuries ago. In the city's ancient heart is the Duomo, the Cathedral of Syracuse. Today, this is a Christian church, but to walk through its doors is to take a trip back in time to 500 years before Christ was even born. The Duomo began life in 480 BC as the building project of a Greek tyrant, who having beaten the Carthaginians in battle, used the loot to build this. And these are the columns from that temple, soaring up into the sky. It was topped by...
  • Major Quake Likely In Middle East, Survey Finds

    07/26/2007 1:42:31 PM PDT · by blam · 47 replies · 1,129+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 7-26-2007 | Kate Ravilious
    Major Quake Likely in Middle East, Survey Finds Kate Ravilious for National Geographic News July 26, 2007 In A.D. 551, a massive earthquake devastated the coast of Phoenicia, now Lebanon. The disaster is well-documented, but scientists had struggled over the years to locate the earthquake fault. Now a new underwater survey has uncovered the fault and shown that it moves approximately every 1,500 years—which means a disaster is due any day now. "It is just a matter of time before a destructive tsunami hits this region again," said Iain Stewart, an earthquake expert at the University of Plymouth in the...
  • 3,000-year-old shipwreck shows European trade was thriving in Bronze Age

    11/26/2013 9:33:20 AM PST · by Renfield · 11 replies
    Telegraph (U.K.) ^ | 11-26-2013
    The discovery of one of the world's oldest shipwrecks shows that European trade was thriving even in the Bronze Age, according to experts. The vessel, carrying copper and tin ingots used to make weapons and jewellery, sank off the coast near Salcombe in Devon and is thought to date from 900BC. But it was only last year that the South West Maritime Archaeological Group, a team of amateur archaeologists, brought its cargo to the surface. The discovery was not announced until this month's International Shipwreck Conference, in Plymouth, Devon. It is thought that the goods - 259 copper ingots and...
  • Origin of Mysterious 2,700-Year-Old Gold Treasure Revealed

    05/15/2018 12:11:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    National Geographic ^ | April 10, 2018 | unattributed
    ...a magnificent hoard of ancient gold objects discovered by Spanish construction workers near Seville in 1958... 2,700-year-old treasure... sparked speculation and debate about Tartessos, a civilization that thrived in southern Spain between the ninth and sixth centuries B.C... That wealth, and the fact that the Tartessians seemingly 'disappear' from history about 2,500 years ago... Another side of the debate held that the jewelry came with the Phoenicians – a Semitic, seafaring culture from the Near East which first arrived in the western Mediterranean in the eighth century B.C. and established a trading port at what is now modern-day Cadiz... The...
  • Herodotus' History

    09/09/2004 10:31:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 704+ views
    The History: Thalia, the Internet Classics Archive ^ | 440 B.C. | Herodotus, tr by George Rawlinson
    There is a great river in Arabia, called the Corys, which empties itself into the Erythraean sea. The Arabian king, they say, made a pipe of the skins of oxen and other beasts, reaching from this river all the way to the desert, and so brought the water to certain cisterns which he had dug in the desert to receive it. It is a twelve days' journey from the river to this desert tract. And the water, they say, was brought through three different pipes to three separate places.
  • THE HISTORY OF HERODOTUS

    09/22/2003 12:29:49 PM PDT · by restornu · 10 replies · 195+ views
    Ancient History Page ^ | 440 BC | by Herodotus trans. by George Rawlinson
    The First Book, Entitled CLIO THESE are the researches of Herodotus of Halicarnassus, which he publishes, in the hope of thereby preserving from decay the remembrance of what men have done, and of preventing the great and wonderful actions of the Greeks and the Barbarians from losing their due meed of glory; and withal to put on record what were their grounds of feuds. According to the Persians best informed in history, the Phoenicians began to quarrel. This people, who had formerly dwelt on the shores of the Erythraean Sea, having migrated to the Mediterranean and settled in the parts...
  • Who Invented the Alphabet: The Semites or the Greeks?

    01/17/2011 6:27:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    Archaeolgy Odyssey ^ | Winter 1998 | Barry B. Powell
    I would make the startling suggestion that the alphabet was invented by a single human being, who created this remarkable technology to record the Greek hexameters of the poet we call Homer. Certainly everyone agrees that the invention of the alphabet made possible the development of philosophy, science and democracy, some of the finest achievements in the history of human culture. But who invented the alphabet? Was it really the Semitic-speaking Phoenicians, as many of us learned in grammar school? Or was it actually the Greeks, to whom the Phoenicians supposedly passed it? I don't believe the Phoenicians actually had...
  • Ancient Phoenician DNA from Sardinia, Lebanon reflects settlement, integration, mobility

    01/18/2018 5:56:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, January 10, 2018 | from PLOS
    E. Matisoo-Smith from the University of Otago, New Zealand and Pierre Zalloua from the Lebanese American University, Beirut, and colleagues... looked at mitochondrial genomes... to investigate how Phoenicians integrated with the Sardinian communities they settled. The researchers found 14 new ancient mitogenome sequences from pre-Phoenician (~1800 BCE) and Phoenician (~700-400 BCE) samples from Lebanon and Sardinia and then compared these with 87 new complete mitogenomes from modern Lebanese and 21 recently published pre-Phoenician ancient mitogenomes from Sardinia. The researchers found evidence of continuity of some lineages of indigenous Sardinians after Phoenician settlement, which suggests that there was integration between Sardinians...
  • 'Indiana Joan', 95, is accused of looting $1MILLION in ancient artefacts from Egypt and the ME

    11/25/2017 6:10:05 AM PST · by mairdie · 48 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 25 November 2017 | Brooke Rolfe
    ...Ms Howard, otherwise known as 'Indiana Joan', volunteered on archeological digs for around 11 years with British and American archaeologists in Syria, Egypt, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine and Israel from around 1967... Her collection includes neolithic axe heads more than 40,000 years old, pottery and weapons from the Phoenicians and the Romans, coins and seals and jewellery from the time of the pharaohs, and a precious funerary mask from Egypt. She said a favourite was a Roman dagger she found buried with the skeletal remains of its owner. Another was the wrappings of a mummy's remains and a cat claw wound...
  • ANCIENT PHONICIAN-HEBREW VOWELS

    11/25/2003 8:54:56 AM PST · by Hermann the Cherusker · 12 replies · 398+ views
    Web ^ | Unknown | Unknown
    ANCIENT PHONICIAN-HEBREW VOWELSThe following ancient witnesses show that the Jewish writing didn't used the actual system of points for indicating the vowels, but specific characters: the character sounded as ah, the character sounded as eh, the letter had two sounds Y/J and ee, as in yearly/January; the character sounded as oh, the character sound as Uh and as V   THE (click to enlarge image) STELE OF KILAMU THE SILOE INSCRIPTION Certainly, the use of points in the Stele of Kilamu and in the Siloe inscription is to separate the words. The Vowels were there all the time In all these writings, from...
  • DNA Captured From 2,500-Year-Old Phoenician

    05/28/2016 10:34:05 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 40 replies
    This is the first ancient DNA to be obtained from Phoenician remains. Known as “Ariche,” the young man came from Byrsa, a walled citadel above the harbor of ancient Carthage. Byrsa was attacked by the Roman general Scipio Aemilianus “Africanus” in the Third Punic War. It was destroyed by Rome in 146 B.C. Analysis of the skeleton revealed the man died between the age of 19 and 24, had a rather robust physique and was 1.7 meters (5’6″) tall. He may have belonged to the Carthaginian elite, as he was buried with gems, scarabs, amulets and other artifacts. Now genetic...