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Keyword: tartessos

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  • Tartessian, Europe's newest and oldest Celtic language

    06/24/2019 3:21:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    History Ireland ^ | Mar/Apr 2009 | (it appears to be) John T. Koch
    One of the enduring consequences of the era of Phoenician influence -- which had by around 800 BC progressed from trading outposts to full-blown colonies in southern Spain -- was the adoption of alphabetic writing by the native population, first in the south-west. The number of known Tartessian inscriptions on stone is now about 90 and steadily rising with new discoveries. Concentrated densely in southern Portugal (the Algarve and Lower Alentejo), there is a wider scatter of fifteen over south-west Spain. The best exhibition of the inscriptions is on view in the new and innovative Museu da Escrita do Sudoeste,...
  • Origin of Mysterious 2,700-Year-Old Gold Treasure Revealed

    05/15/2018 12:11:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    National Geographic ^ | April 10, 2018 | unattributed
    ...a magnificent hoard of ancient gold objects discovered by Spanish construction workers near Seville in 1958... 2,700-year-old treasure... sparked speculation and debate about Tartessos, a civilization that thrived in southern Spain between the ninth and sixth centuries B.C... That wealth, and the fact that the Tartessians seemingly 'disappear' from history about 2,500 years ago... Another side of the debate held that the jewelry came with the Phoenicians – a Semitic, seafaring culture from the Near East which first arrived in the western Mediterranean in the eighth century B.C. and established a trading port at what is now modern-day Cadiz... The...
  • Sacred Precincts: A Tartessian Sanctuary in Ancient Spain

    12/11/2004 9:20:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 906+ views
    Archaeology Odyssey (via Web Archive) ^ | December 2003 | by Sebastián Celestino and Carolina López-Ruiz
    When the Phoenicians arrived on the Iberian peninsula, probably at the end of the ninth century B.C., they came into contact with an indigenous people called the Tartessians... The structure at Cancho Roano... was not a palace at all; it was simply a Tartessian sanctuary, which over time became influenced by Phoenician culture. Scholars have only recently begun to separate Tartessian history from myth. When the Greeks reached the Iberian peninsula a few centuries after the Phoenicians, they called the land Tartessos... According to the fifth-century B.C. historian Herodotus, Tartessian civilization was discovered accidentally by a Greek named Kolaios, who...
  • Satellite Images 'Show Atlantis'

    06/06/2004 10:00:25 AM PDT · by blam · 107 replies · 3,463+ views
    BBC ^ | 6-6-2004 | Paul Rincon
    Satellite images 'show Atlantis' By Paul Rincon BBC News Online science staff The imagery may show the former locations of major buildings and rings A scientist says he may have found remains of the lost city of Atlantis. Satellite photos of southern Spain reveal features on the ground appearing to match descriptions made by Greek scholar Plato of the fabled utopia. Dr Rainer Kuehne thinks the "island" of Atlantis simply referred to a region of the southern Spanish coast destroyed by a flood between 800 BC and 500 BC. The research has been reported as an ongoing project in the...
  • Experts trying to decipher ancient language

    02/28/2009 12:35:50 PM PST · by ApplegateRanch · 37 replies · 1,476+ views
    Ap via Excite.com ^ | Feb 28, 2009 | By BARRY HATTON
    When archaeologists on a dig in southern Portugal last year flipped over a heavy chunk of slate and saw writing not used for more than 2,500 years, they were elated. The enigmatic pattern of inscribed symbols curled symmetrically around the upper part of the rough-edged, yellowish stone tablet and coiled into the middle in a decorative style typical of an extinct Iberian language called Southwest Script. "We didn't break into applause, but almost," says Amilcar Guerra, a University of Lisbon lecturer overseeing the excavation. "It's an extraordinary thing."
  • Spaniards Search For Legendary Tartessos In A Marsh

    05/11/2007 4:02:01 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 905+ views
    M & C ^ | 5-11-2007 | Sinikka Tarvainen
    Spaniards search for legendary Tartessos in a marsh By Sinikka Tarvainen May 11, 2007, 11:28 GMT Madrid - Where was the capital of Tartessos, the legendary pre-Roman civilization which once existed on the Iberian Peninsula? The culture which flourished from around 800 to 500 BC is believed to have been located mainly around the present-day cities of Cadiz, Seville and Huelva in southern Spain, but no traces of a major urban settlement have been found. Now, however, scientists have discovered surprising clues to where a major Tartessian city may have been, the daily El Pais reported. Its ruins could lie...