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Keyword: multiregionalism

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  • Alleged 40,000-Year-Old Human Footprints In Mexico Much, Much Older Than Thought

    11/30/2005 11:24:19 AM PST · by blam · 79 replies · 3,674+ views
    Eureka Alert/UC-Berkeley ^ | 11-30-2005 | Robert Sanders
    Contact: Robert Sanders rsanders@berkeley.edu 510-643-6998 University of California - Berkeley Alleged 40,000-year-old human footprints in Mexico much, much older than thought Berkeley -- Alleged footprints of early Americans found in volcanic rock in Mexico are either extremely old - more than 1 million years older than other evidence of human presence in the Western Hemisphere - or not footprints at all, according to a new analysis published this week in Nature. The study was conducted by geologists at the Berkeley Geochronology Center and the University of California, Berkeley, as part of an investigative team of geologists and anthropologists from the...
  • A Coronavirus Epidemic Hit 20,000 Years Ago, New Study Finds

    06/26/2021 6:26:21 PM PDT · by algore · 42 replies
    Researchers have found evidence that a coronavirus epidemic swept East Asia some 20,000 years ago and was devastating enough to leave an evolutionary imprint on the DNA of people alive today. The new study suggests that an ancient coronavirus plagued the region for many years, researchers say. The finding could have dire implications for the Covid-19 pandemic if it’s not brought under control soon through vaccination. Four other coronaviruses can also infect people, but they usually cause only mild colds. Scientists did not directly observe these coronaviruses becoming human pathogens, so they have relied on indirect clues to estimate when...
  • A coronavirus epidemic may have hit East Asia about 25,000 years ago

    04/25/2021 7:50:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Science News ^ | April 14, 2021 | Bruce Bower
    An ancient coronavirus, or a closely related pathogen, triggered an epidemic among ancestors of present-day East Asians roughly 25,000 years ago, a new study indicates.Analysis of DNA from more than 2,000 people shows that genetic changes in response to that persistent epidemic accumulated over the next 20,000 years or so, David Enard, an evolutionary geneticist at the University of Arizona in Tucson, reported April 8 at the virtual annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists. The finding raises the possibility that some East Asians today have inherited biological adaptations to coronaviruses or closely related viruses.The discovery opens the...
  • Neandertal DNA from cave mud shows two waves of migration across Eurasia

    04/21/2021 10:10:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Science News ^ | April 15, 2021 | Charles Choi
    To extract ancient human chromosomal DNA from caves, Vernot and colleagues identified regions in chromosomes rich in mutations specific to hominids to help the team filter out nonhuman DNA. This helped the researchers successfully analyze Neandertal chromosomal DNA from more than 150 samples of sediment roughly 50,000 to 200,000 years old from a cave in Spain and two caves in Siberia.After the team compared its data with DNA previously collected from Neandertal fossils of about the same age, the findings suggested that all these Neandertals were split into two genetically distinct waves that both dispersed across Eurasia. One emerged about...
  • Human Ancestor Preserved in Stone

    12/07/2007 11:02:48 PM PST · by neverdem · 23 replies · 176+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 7 December 2007 | Ann Gibbons
    Stone man. This partial skull of a 500,000-year-old human was found in a slab of travertine from a quarry like this one in Turkey.Credit: John Kappelman/University of Texas, Austin Workers at a travertine factory near Denizli, Turkey, were startled recently when they sawed a block of the limestone for tiles and discovered part of a human skull. Now, it appears they unwittingly exposed fossilized remains of a long-sought species of human that lived 500,000 years ago, researchers say. Although only four skull fragments were found, the fossil also reveals the earliest case of tuberculosis. The Middle East has long been...
  • Most Ancient Case Of Tuberculosis Found In 500,000-year-old Human; Points To Modern Health Issues

    12/07/2007 5:10:26 PM PST · by blam · 27 replies · 95+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 12-7-2007 | University of Texas at Austin.
    Most Ancient Case Of Tuberculosis Found In 500,000-year-old Human; Points To Modern Health IssuesView of the inside of a plaster cast of the skull of the newly discovered young male Homo erectus from western Turkey. The stylus points to tiny lesions 1-2 mm in size found along the rim of bone just behind the right eye orbit. The lesions were formed by a type of tuberculosis that infects the brain and, at 500,000 years in age, represents the most ancient case of TB known in humans. (Credit: Marsha Miller, the University of Texas at Austin)" ScienceDaily (Dec. 7, 2007) —...
  • Did Early Humans First Arise in Asia, Not Africa?

    12/28/2005 4:01:34 PM PST · by SuzyQue · 51 replies · 1,568+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | December 27, 2005 | Nicholas Bakalar
    Did Early Humans First Arise in Asia, Not Africa? Nicholas Bakalar for National Geographic News   December 27, 2005 -----snip------They believe that early-human fossil discoveries over the past ten years suggest very different conclusions about where humans, or humanlike beings, first walked the Earth. New Asian finds are significant, they say, especially the 1.75 million-year-old small-brained early-human fossils found in Dmanisi, Georgia, and the 18,000-year-old "hobbit" fossils (Homo floresiensis) discovered on the island of Flores in Indonesia. -----snip------"What seems reasonably clear now," Dennell said, "is that the earliest hominins in Asia did not need large brains or bodies." These attributes...
  • Evidence for the Orangutan Relationship

    04/03/2005 9:23:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 1,929+ views
    Buffalo Museum of Science ^ | circa 2003 | Dr. Jeffrey Schwartz (et al)
    Evidence for the orangutan being the closest living relative of modern humans is based on at least 35 known characters that appear to be either exclusive to humans and orangutans or largely absent in outgroups.
  • Infectious Evolution: Ancient Virus Hit Apes, Not Our Ancestors, In The Genes

    04/02/2005 11:48:39 AM PST · by blam · 41 replies · 1,551+ views
    Science News ^ | 3-5-2005 (issue) | Bruce Bower
    Infectious Evolution: Ancient virus hit apes, not our ancestors, in the genesMarch 5 Bruce Bower A vicious virus infected ancestral chimpanzees and gorillas in Africa between 4 million and 3 million years ago. Not only did it kill a great many of these primates, but it also infiltrated the surviving animals' genomes, altering the course of evolution. That's the picture emerging from a new analysis of modern-primate DNA. Around 1.5 million years ago, this virus of the class called retroviruses also infected ancestors of modern baboons and macaques, two African monkeys, reports geneticist Evan E. Eichler of the University of...
  • Four ancient skulls unearthed in Mexico suggest that North America was a melting pot ….

    01/29/2020 5:29:32 PM PST · by blueplum · 44 replies
    The Daily Mail UK ^ | 29 Jan 2020 | Jonathan Chadwick
    Full title: Four ancient skulls unearthed in Mexico suggest that North America was a melting pot of different peoples and cultures 10,000 years ago The first humans to settle in North America were more diverse than previously believed, according to a new study of skeletal fragments. US scientists analysed four skulls recovered from caves in Mexico that belonged to humans that lived sometime between 9,000 to 13,000 years ago. The researchers were surprised to find a high level of diversity, with the skulls ranging in similarity to that of Europeans, Asian and ...
  • Humans migrated from Europe to the Levant 40,000 years ago

    11/10/2019 5:43:46 AM PST · by Openurmind · 54 replies
    Science Daily ^ | November 5, 2019 | Tel Aviv University
    Who exactly were the Aurignacians, who lived in the Levant 40,000 years ago? Researchers from Tel Aviv University, the Israel Antiquities Authority, and Ben-Gurion University now report that these culturally sophisticated yet mysterious humans migrated from Europe to the Levant some 40,000 years ago, shedding light on a significant era in the region's history. The Aurignacian culture first appeared in Europe some 43,000 years ago and is known for having produced bone tools, artifacts, jewelry, musical instruments, and cave paintings. For years, researchers believed that modern man's entry into Europe led to the rapid decline of the Neanderthals, either through...
  • Neanderthal extinction linked to human diseases

    11/10/2019 5:39:36 AM PST · by Openurmind · 32 replies
    Science Daily ^ | Nov 7, 2019 | Stanford University
    In a new study published in the journal Nature Communications, Greenbaum and his colleagues propose that complex disease transmission patterns can explain not only how modern humans were able to wipe out Neanderthals in Europe and Asia in just a few thousand years but also, perhaps more puzzling, why the end didn't come sooner. "Our research suggests that diseases may have played a more important role in the extinction of the Neanderthals than previously thought. They may even be the main reason why modern humans are now the only human group left on the planet," said Greenbaum, who is the...
  • New insights on the wooden weapons from the Paleolithic site of Schoningen

    10/25/2015 6:07:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Friday, October 23, 2015 | editors
    The Paleolithic site of Schöningen in north-central Germany is famous for the earliest known, completely preserved wooden weapons or artifacts uncovered there by archaeologists under the direction of Dr. Hartmut Thieme between 1994 and 1998 at an open-cast lignite mine. Deposited in organic sediments at a former lakeshore, they were found in combination with the remains of about 16,000 animal bones, including 20 wild horses, whose bones featured numerous butchery marks, including one pelvis that still had a spear protruding from it. The finds are considered evidence that early humans were active hunters with specialized tool kits as early as...
  • 400,000 year old spears found in an German coal mine!

    10/11/2010 6:38:35 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 82 replies
    reinep.wordpress.com ^ | 07-04-2010 | Staff
    Researchers in Germany have unearthed 400,000 year old wooden spears from what appears to be an ancient lake shore hunting ground stunning evidence that human ancestors systematically hunted big game much earlier than believed. The three spears, each carved from the trunk of a spruce tree, are 6 feet to more than 7 feet long. They were found with more than 10,000 animal bones, mostly from horses, including many obviously butchered. That indicates the ancient hunters were organized enough to trap horses and strong enough to kill them by throwing spears, perhaps ambushing herds that showed up for water. “There’s...
  • Evidence of New Human Species Found in Philippines

    04/10/2019 12:39:58 PM PDT · by Candor7 · 65 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | April 10, 2019 1:00 p.m. ET | Robert Lee Hotz
    In a handful of fossilized teeth and bones, scientists say they’ve found evidence of a previously unknown human species that lived in what is now the Philippines about 50,000 years ago. The discovery deepens the mystery of an era when the world was a melting pot of many different human kinds on the move. Small-jawed with dainty teeth, able to walk upright but with feet still shaped to climb, these island creatures were a mix-and-match patchwork of primitive and advanced features in a unique variation of the human form, the scientists reported Wednesday in the journal Nature.(Snip)
  • Researchers shed new light on the origins of modern humans

    03/24/2019 10:18:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | March 20, 2019 | University of Huddersfield
    The migration signal makes good sense in terms of climate. For most of the last few hundred years, different parts of Africa have been out of step with each other in terms of the aridity of the climate. Only for a brief period at 60,000-70,000 years ago was there a window during which the continent as a whole experienced sufficient moisture to open up a corridor between the south and the east. And intriguingly, it was around 65,000 years ago that some of the signs of symbolism and technological complexity seen earlier in South Africa start to appear in the...
  • The New Story of Humanity's Origins in Africa

    07/15/2018 3:22:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | July 11, 2018 | Ed Yong
    Consider the ancient human fossils from a Moroccan cave called Jebel Irhoud, which were described just last year. These 315,000-year-old bones are the oldest known fossils of Homo sapiens. They not only pushed back the proposed dawn of our species, but they added northwest Africa to the list of possible origin sites. They also had an odd combination of features, combining the flat faces of modern humans with the elongated skulls of ancient species like Homo erectus. From the front, they could have passed for us; from the side, they would have stood out. Fossils from all over Africa have...
  • Indiana Legend Says Welsh Settlers Arrived in the 12th Century

    05/01/2018 12:23:08 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 67 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | September 3, 1989 | Jodi Perras
    On a rugged bluff overlooking the Ohio River, known locally as "Devil's Backbone," centuries of overgrowth obscures a secret of history... In 1799, early settlers found six skeletons clad in breastplates bearing a Welsh coat of arms. Indian legends told of "yellow-haired giants" who settled in Kentucky, southern Indiana, southern Ohio and Tennessee -- a region they called "the Dark and Forbidden Land." Archeologists debunk the legend. They say that evidence indicates that the natives of the region once conducted a vigorous trading network nearby and buried their dead on the bluff... Upstream about 14 miles from Louisville, Ky., the...
  • Out of Africa: 90,000-Year-Old Human Finger Points to Much Earlier Migration

    04/23/2018 1:03:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 102 replies
    Researchers have directly dated the earliest-ever fossil from an anatomically modern human found outside of Africa and the Levant. This 90,000-year-old fossilized finger rewrites traditional theories of early migration, beating expectations by some 25,000 years. Homo sapiens, the team thinks, were exploring what was once the wet grassland of Saudi Arabia far earlier than previously thought. Humans may not have left Africa in one big wave, but in a series of trickles... Extensive testing at institutions around the world revealed not only was this the finger bone of a modern human, but it was also the oldest directly dated Homo...
  • Stone tools in India suggest earlier human exit from Africa

    02/01/2018 8:17:08 AM PST · by C19fan · 31 replies
    Phys Org ^ | January 31, 2018 | Malcolm Ritter
    Just a week after scientists reported evidence that our species left Africa earlier than we thought, another discovery is suggesting the date might be pushed back further. omo sapiens arose in Africa at least 300,000 years ago and left to colonize the globe. Scientists think there were several dispersals from Africa, not all equally successful. Last week's report of a human jaw showed some members of our species had reached Israel by 177,000 to 194,000 years ago. Now comes a discovery in India of stone tools, showing a style that has been associated elsewhere with our species. They were fashioned...