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Keyword: gauls

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  • World's oldest glue used from prehistoric times till the days of the Gauls

    11/16/2019 11:14:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Birch bark tar, the oldest glue in the world, was in use for at least 50,000 years, from the Palaeolithic Period up until the time of the Gauls. Made by heating birch bark, it served as an adhesive for hafting tools and decorating objects. Scientists mistakenly thought it had been abandoned in western Europe at the end of the Iron Age (800-25 BC) and replaced by conifer resins, around which a full-fledged industry developed during the Roman period. But by studying artefacts that date back to the first six centuries AD through the lens of chemistry, archaeology, and textual analysis,...
  • Celtics Call For Return Of Artefacts

    08/29/2002 8:07:11 AM PDT · by blam · 52 replies · 335+ views
    The New Zealand Herald ^ | 8-29-2002 | Paul Kelbie
    Celts call for return of artefacts 29.08.2002 By PAUL KELBIE in London A cultural coalition representing six "Celtic" nations are to press the British Government for the return of historically important artefacts held in some of the country's most prestigious academic collections. The Celtic League, an independent pressure group representing the indigenous people of Scotland, Wales, Ireland, Brittany, Isle of Man and Cornwall, is calling for an audit of museum collections around the UK and the return of Celtic exhibits to their "rightful" homes. Among hundreds of items are the ancient Lewis Chessmen, which were taken from Scotland to the...
  • French wine 'has Italian origins' [Etruscans]

    06/08/2013 7:40:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    BBC News ^ | Monday, June 3, 2013 | Jason Palmer
    The earliest known examples of wine-making as we know it are in the regions of modern-day Iran, Georgia, and Armenia -- and researchers believe that modern winemaking slowly spread westward from there to Europe... The Etruscans, a pre-Roman civilisation in Italy, are thought to have gained wine culture from the Phoenicians -- who spread throughout the Mediterranean from the early Iron Age onward -- because they used similarly shaped amphoras... Dr McGovern's team focused on the coastal site of Lattara, near the town of Lattes south of Montpellier, where the importation of amphoras continued up until the period 525-475 BC....
  • Dietler Discovers Statue In France That Reflects Etruscan Influence

    02/19/2004 3:22:01 PM PST · by blam · 4 replies · 359+ views
    University Of Chicago Chronicle ^ | 2-19-2004 | William Harms
    Dietler discovers statue in France that reflects an Etruscan influence By William Harms News Office This image depicts the reconstruction of the statue Michael Dietler found at Lattes in southern France. An image of the statue is positioned in the torso area of the figure of the warrior." A life-sized statue of a warrior discovered in southern France reflects a stronger cultural influence for the Etruscan civilization throughout the western Mediterranean region than previously appreciated. Michael Dietler, Associate Professor in Anthropology, and his French colleague Michel Py have published a paper in the British journal Antiquity on the Iron Age...
  • Clues about human migration to Imperial Rome uncovered in 2,000-year-old cemetery

    02/16/2016 9:47:28 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Wednesday, February 10, 2016 | PLOS
    Isotope analysis of 2000-year-old skeletons buried in Imperial Rome reveal some were migrants from the Alps or North Africa, according to a study published February 10, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kristina Killgrove from University of West Florida, USA, and Janet Montgomery from Durham University, UK. Previous work has focused on the overall human migration patterns within the Roman Empire. To understand human migration on a more granular level, the authors of this study examined 105 skeletons buried at two Roman cemeteries during the 1st through 3rd centuries AD. They analyzed the oxygen, strontium, and carbon isotope...
  • Ohio's Stonehenge

    12/12/2006 4:26:26 PM PST · by blam · 33 replies · 1,206+ views
    Ohio.com ^ | 12-12-2006 | Bob Downing
    Ohio's StonehengeFort Ancient is largest, best preserved earthwork of its kind in America. Its purpose is not known By Bob Downing Beacon Journal staff writer A sign identifies one of the prehistoric earthworks at Fort Ancient State Memorial. Ohio law forbids walking off trail or on any mound or earthwork.OREGONIA - Fort Ancient remains a mystery. The extensive earthen mounds and walls in southwest Ohio are unlikely a fortress, although they might have been used for social gatherings and religious ceremonies and astronomical viewings. The site, atop a wooded bluff 235 feet above the Little Miami River in Warren County,...
  • 'Italy's Ginger Gene Spread From Sicily'

    07/18/2014 1:53:50 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 33 replies
    Over the centuries, they’ve been scorned, persecuted and marginalized. But it was an example of modern-day disdain towards redheads that prompted an Italian photographer’s mission to safeguard their diversity, The Local has learned. Let’s face it, redheads get a tough time, especially in the early years of their life. I should know, because I am one. But more on that later. Marina Rosso, a 29-year-old fine art photographer and researcher from Udine, is not a redhead as the English translation of her surname might suggest. But after hearing in 2011 that flame-haired men were being rejected from the world’s largest...
  • Seven centuries of ploughing in Ede: Dutch Celtic fields used continuously for centuries

    03/21/2014 5:48:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    University of Groningen ^ | March 14, 2014 | Stijn Arnoldussen
    Archaeological excavations have finally answered the question regarding the age and development of the mysterious prehistoric fields enclosed by earthen ridges known as ‘Celtic fields’. Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL), a technique that dates the last exposure to light or heat sources of quartz minerals, archaeologist Stijn Arnoldussen from the University of Groningen managed to determine that these banks around the later prehistoric field plots were constructed more than 3100 years ago and remained in use for hundreds of years thereafter... The Celtic field complex targeted by the Groningen Institute of Archaeology at Lunteren measured at least 210 hectares in...
  • The Fall of a Worthy Foe-The Dying Gaul:Attalos I of Pergamon, National Gallery of Art

    01/27/2014 7:37:58 AM PST · by lbryce · 27 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | January 24 ,2014 | Catesby Leigh
    During the 230s B.C., Attalos I of Pergamon in Asia Minor decisively defeated marauding tribes of Gauls. Known for their muscular physique and the feral appearance imparted by the thick, manelike locks of hair they washed with water and lime, these Celtic warriors were at various times a terror to Greeks and Romans alike. In 387 B.C. they had plundered Rome itself. "The Dying Gaul," on loan to the National Gallery of Art, in Washington, from Rome's Capitoline Museum through March 16, is a superb antique copy of a sculptural masterpiece originally intended to commemorate the Pergamene triumph. Attalos I...
  • The fall of Phaethon: a Greco-Roman geomyth preserves the memory of a meteorite impact in Bavaria

    10/19/2010 3:53:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Antiquity ^ | v84 n324 | Rappengluck et al (seven authors, full list below)
    Arguing from a critical reading of the text, and scientific evidence on the ground, the authors show that the myth of Phaethon -- the delinquent celestial charioteer -- remembers the impact of a massive meteorite that hit the Chiemgau region in Bavaria between 2000 and 428 BC. Keywords: Bronze Age, Phaethon, Ovid, meteorite, Celts, myth Access this article (PDF File).
  • Etruscan Engineering and Agricultural Achievements: The Ancient City of Spina

    08/17/2004 9:05:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 1,553+ views
    The Mysterious Etruscans ^ | Last modified on Tue, 17-Aug-2004 15:36:27 GMT | editors
    Over the centuries the belief lingered on that here had been a great, wealthy, powerful commercial city that dominated the mouth of the Po and the shores of the Adriatic, a city of luxury and splendor, a kind of ancestor and predecessor of Venice, founded more than a thousand years later. Classical scholars also knew about Spina, for ancient literary sources indicated that there must once have existed a thriving maritime trading settlement of great economic importance, until the Celtic invasion of the Po valley destroyed it... The final key to its ultimate discovery came from aerial photography. Some...
  • Ogham alphabet

    07/27/2004 11:34:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 772+ views
    Glossemata Genealogicæ ^ | The Alphabetary Heraldic
    Ogham inscriptions : [600 bc] primitive inscriptions of the old Q-Celt (600 bc) or the newer P-Celt (400 bc) that survive in the British Isles. We have a total of approximately 375 Ogham inscriptions. Ireland has some 316 Ogham inscriptions, Wales has 40 inscriptions, and the Isle of Man has 10 inscriptions. One inscription survived at Silchester in southern England, and a few Pictish Ogham inscriptions have been found in Scotland, as far north as the Shetland Islands. Ogham script often runs upward, in a vertical manner, for it was originally written as notches on wooden staves. Oghams :...
  • The Witnesses

    02/26/2003 7:11:12 PM PST · by Commander8 · 1 replies · 275+ views
    An Understandable History of The Bible ^ | 1987 | Dr. Samuel C Gipp Th.D
    It would be extremely beneficial at this point if we could simply produce the original autographs for examination. This would greatly simplify the operation of establishing correctly the New Testament Text. But this simply cannot happen. It has long been acknowledged by scholars that we no longer have the "originals." They have long since passed from the scene. This is due to the fact that scribes were known to destroy worn out MSS after they had copied them. Apparently the church valued the WORDS of the original more than the original itself. Therefore, the readings of the originals must be...