Posts by The Mayor

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  • FReeper Canteen ~ Road Trip: Naval Station Mayport, Florida ~ 09 MAR 2021

    03/08/2021 8:42:16 PM PST · 22 of 29
    The Mayor to Kathy in Alaska; laurenmarlowe

    Thank you!

    I had a pretty good day, sun was out and it hit 43 degrees too.
    That can brighten up a dreary day.

  • FReeper Canteen ~ Road Trip: Naval Station Mayport, Florida ~ 09 MAR 2021

    03/08/2021 5:58:52 PM PST · 3 of 29
    The Mayor to laurenmarlowe

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    March 9

    Snow Muse

    He says to the snow, “Fall on the earth,” and to the rain shower, “Be a mighty downpour.”

    Job 37:6

    Named for a tough blue-collar neighborhood in Cincinnati, Ohio, the grassroots musical group Over the Rhine sings about a transformation that took place each year in the city. “Whenever we’d get our first real snowfall of the year, it felt like something sacred was happening,” explains band co-founder Linford Detweiler. “Like a little bit of a fresh start. The city would slow down and grow quiet.”

    If you’ve experienced a heavy snowfall, you understand how it can inspire a song. A magical quietness drapes the world as snow conceals grime and grayness. For a few moments, winter’s bleakness brightens, inviting our reflection and delight.

    Elihu, the one friend of Job who may have had a helpful view of God, noted how creation commands our attention. “God’s voice thunders in marvelous ways,” he said (Job 37:5). “He says to the snow, ‘Fall on the earth,’ and to the rain shower, ‘Be a mighty downpour.’ ” Such splendor can interrupt our lives, demanding a sacred pause. “So that everyone he has made may know his work, he stops all people from their labor,” Elihu observed (vv. 6–7).

    Nature sometimes seizes our attention in ways we don’t like. Regardless of what happens to us or what we observe around us, each moment—magnificent, menacing, or mundane—can inspire our worship. The poet’s heart within us craves the holy hush.

    Reflect & Pray

    What events or things motivate you to ponder God’s greatness and creativity? How can you experience His wonder in your ordinary moments today?

    Father, help me to see Your hand in everything today. Give me a heart to appreciate Your amazing works.

  • Amy's Place ... Poetry and Potpourri ... January, February and March 2021

    03/08/2021 7:20:05 AM PST · 620 of 626
    The Mayor to Jim Robinson; JustAmy; MEG33; jaycee; dutchess; GodBlessUSA; deadhead; LUV W; DollyCali; Gabz; ...

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    March 8

    The Reason for Writing

    But these are written that you may believe.

    John 20:31

    “The Lord is my high tower . . . . We left the camp singing.” On September 7, 1943, Etty Hillesum wrote those words on a postcard and threw it from a train. Those were the final recorded words we would hear from her. On November 30, 1943, she was murdered at Auschwitz. Later, Hillesum’s diaries of her experiences in a concentration camp were translated and published. They chronicled her perspectives on the horrors of Nazi occupation along with the beauty of God’s world. Her diaries have been translated into sixty-seven languages—a gift to all who would read and believe the good as well as the bad.

    The apostle John didn’t sidestep the harsh realities of Jesus’ life on earth; he wrote of both the good Jesus did and the challenges He faced. The final words from his gospel give insight into the purpose behind the book that bears his name. Jesus performed “many other signs . . . which are not recorded” (20:30) by John. But these, he says, were “written that you may believe” (v. 31). John’s “diary” ends on the note of triumph: “Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God.” The gift of those gospel words allows us the opportunity to believe and “have life in his name.”

    The Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, John) are diary accounts of God’s love for us. They’re words to read and believe and share, for they lead us to life. They lead us to Christ.

    Reflect & Pray

    How might it change the way you read the Gospels if you thought of them as diaries? How are you being led to the heart of Christ through them?

    Gracious God, thank You for the gift of the Scriptures, written down by faithful hands so that I might believe and have life.

  • FReeper Canteen ~ Hall of Heroes: Famous Quotes from General Patton ~ 08 March 2021

    03/07/2021 5:01:42 PM PST · 2 of 47
    The Mayor to Kathy in Alaska

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    March 8

    The Reason for Writing

    But these are written that you may believe.

    John 20:31

    “The Lord is my high tower . . . . We left the camp singing.” On September 7, 1943, Etty Hillesum wrote those words on a postcard and threw it from a train. Those were the final recorded words we would hear from her. On November 30, 1943, she was murdered at Auschwitz. Later, Hillesum’s diaries of her experiences in a concentration camp were translated and published. They chronicled her perspectives on the horrors of Nazi occupation along with the beauty of God’s world. Her diaries have been translated into sixty-seven languages—a gift to all who would read and believe the good as well as the bad.

    The apostle John didn’t sidestep the harsh realities of Jesus’ life on earth; he wrote of both the good Jesus did and the challenges He faced. The final words from his gospel give insight into the purpose behind the book that bears his name. Jesus performed “many other signs . . . which are not recorded” (20:30) by John. But these, he says, were “written that you may believe” (v. 31). John’s “diary” ends on the note of triumph: “Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God.” The gift of those gospel words allows us the opportunity to believe and “have life in his name.”

    The Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, John) are diary accounts of God’s love for us. They’re words to read and believe and share, for they lead us to life. They lead us to Christ.

    Reflect & Pray

    How might it change the way you read the Gospels if you thought of them as diaries? How are you being led to the heart of Christ through them?

    Gracious God, thank You for the gift of the Scriptures, written down by faithful hands so that I might believe and have life.

  • Amy's Place ... Poetry and Potpourri ... January, February and March 2021

    03/07/2021 7:11:36 AM PST · 619 of 626
    The Mayor to Jim Robinson; JustAmy; MEG33; jaycee; dutchess; GodBlessUSA; deadhead; LUV W; DollyCali; Gabz; ...

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    March 7

    Pleading with God

    I, Daniel, understood from the Scriptures. . . . So I turned to the Lord God and pleaded with him in prayer and petition.

    Daniel 9:2–3

    A family’s prayer time ended with a surprising announcement one morning. As soon as Dad said, “Amen,” five-year-old Kaitlyn proclaimed, “And I prayed for Logan, because he had his eyes open during prayer.”

    I’m pretty sure praying for your ten-year-old brother’s prayer protocol isn’t what Scripture has in mind when it calls us to intercessory prayer, but at least Kaitlyn realized that we can pray for others.

    Bible teacher Oswald Chambers emphasized the importance of praying for someone else. He said that “intercession is putting yourself in God’s place; it is having His mind and perspective.” It’s praying for others in light of what we know about God and His love for us.

    We find a great example of intercessory prayer in Daniel 9. The prophet understood God’s troubling promise that the Jews would have seventy years of captivity in Babylon (Jeremiah 25:11–12). Realizing that those years were nearing their completion, Daniel went into prayer mode. He referenced God’s commands (Daniel 9:4–6), humbled himself (v. 8), honored His character (v. 9), confessed sin (v. 15), and depended on His mercy as he prayed for His people (v. 18). And he got an immediate answer from God (v. 21).

    Not all prayer ends with such a dramatic response, but be encouraged that we can go to God on behalf of others with an attitude of trust and dependence on Him.

    Reflect & Pray

    When you pray for others, how are you seeking the mind of God? How do you seek His perspective?

    Dear heavenly Father, help me to know You better so that when I pray for others, I can filter my requests through my knowledge of Your will.

  • Role of ivermectin in the prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infection among healthcare workers in India: A matched case-control study (Peer Reviewed)

    03/06/2021 8:52:21 PM PST · 29 of 38
    The Mayor to SeekAndFind

    I want some!

  • FReeper Canteen ~ Sunday Chapel ~ LET GO AND LET GOD ~ 07 March 2021

    03/06/2021 5:20:08 PM PST · 8 of 61
    The Mayor to Kathy in Alaska

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    March 7

    Pleading with God

    I, Daniel, understood from the Scriptures. . . . So I turned to the Lord God and pleaded with him in prayer and petition.

    Daniel 9:2–3

    A family’s prayer time ended with a surprising announcement one morning. As soon as Dad said, “Amen,” five-year-old Kaitlyn proclaimed, “And I prayed for Logan, because he had his eyes open during prayer.”

    I’m pretty sure praying for your ten-year-old brother’s prayer protocol isn’t what Scripture has in mind when it calls us to intercessory prayer, but at least Kaitlyn realized that we can pray for others.

    Bible teacher Oswald Chambers emphasized the importance of praying for someone else. He said that “intercession is putting yourself in God’s place; it is having His mind and perspective.” It’s praying for others in light of what we know about God and His love for us.

    We find a great example of intercessory prayer in Daniel 9. The prophet understood God’s troubling promise that the Jews would have seventy years of captivity in Babylon (Jeremiah 25:11–12). Realizing that those years were nearing their completion, Daniel went into prayer mode. He referenced God’s commands (Daniel 9:4–6), humbled himself (v. 8), honored His character (v. 9), confessed sin (v. 15), and depended on His mercy as he prayed for His people (v. 18). And he got an immediate answer from God (v. 21).

    Not all prayer ends with such a dramatic response, but be encouraged that we can go to God on behalf of others with an attitude of trust and dependence on Him.

    Reflect & Pray

    When you pray for others, how are you seeking the mind of God? How do you seek His perspective?

    Dear heavenly Father, help me to know You better so that when I pray for others, I can filter my requests through my knowledge of Your will.

  • Q ~ Trust Trump's Plan ~ 03/4/21 Vol.340, Q Day 1224

    03/06/2021 1:12:09 PM PST · 992 of 1,608
    The Mayor to 17strings; stillafreemind

    Not going to disagree. I have seen too much vulgar language lately, we never had that before.

    Disagree is one thing, debate issues don’t attack. It’s sad

  • Q ~ Trust Trump's Plan ~ 03/4/21 Vol.340, Q Day 1224

    03/06/2021 10:51:06 AM PST · 960 of 1,608
    The Mayor to stillafreemind

    I follow this but not much more. Rarely comment, it’s all educational to me.
    I watch the signs to try and figure out what’s next.

  • Q ~ Trust Trump's Plan ~ 03/4/21 Vol.340, Q Day 1224

    03/06/2021 10:36:36 AM PST · 954 of 1,608
    The Mayor to stillafreemind

    I can’t believe they think we are such a threat.
    This forum has changed a lot in over 20 years

  • Amy's Place ... Poetry and Potpourri ... January, February and March 2021

    03/06/2021 8:08:33 AM PST · 611 of 626
    The Mayor to Jim Robinson; JustAmy; MEG33; jaycee; dutchess; GodBlessUSA; deadhead; LUV W; DollyCali; Gabz; ...

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    March 6

    Minding My Own Business

    Mind your own business and work with your hands.

    1 Thessalonians 4:11

    Years ago, my son Josh and I were making our way up a mountain trail when we spied a cloud of dust rising in the air. We crept forward and discovered a badger busy making a den in a dirt bank. He had his head and shoulders in the hole and was vigorously digging with his front paws and kicking the dirt out of the hole with his hind feet. He was so invested in his work he didn’t hear us.

    I couldn’t resist and prodded him from behind with a long stick lying nearby. I didn’t hurt the badger, but he leaped straight up in the air and turned toward us. Josh and I set new world records for the hundred-yard dash.

    I learned something from my brashness: Sometimes it’s best not to poke around in other people’s business. That’s especially true in relationships with fellow believers in Jesus. The apostle Paul encouraged the Thessalonians to “make it your ambition to lead a quiet life: You should mind your own business and work with your hands” (1 Thessalonians 4:11). We’re to pray for others and seek by God’s grace to share the Scriptures, and occasionally we may be called to offer a gentle word of correction. But learning to live a quiet life and not meddling into others’ lives is important. It becomes an example to those who are now outside God’s family (v. 12). Our calling is to “love each other” (v. 9).

    Reflect & Pray

    What happens when you meddle in other people’s business? What’s the first thing you should do instead for others?

    God, teach me to know what it means to love others better.

  • FReeper Canteen ~ Tunes For Our Troops: Music From Washington ~ 06 March 2021

    03/05/2021 6:15:27 PM PST · 10 of 159
    The Mayor to Kathy in Alaska

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    March 6

    Minding My Own Business

    Mind your own business and work with your hands.

    1 Thessalonians 4:11

    Years ago, my son Josh and I were making our way up a mountain trail when we spied a cloud of dust rising in the air. We crept forward and discovered a badger busy making a den in a dirt bank. He had his head and shoulders in the hole and was vigorously digging with his front paws and kicking the dirt out of the hole with his hind feet. He was so invested in his work he didn’t hear us.

    I couldn’t resist and prodded him from behind with a long stick lying nearby. I didn’t hurt the badger, but he leaped straight up in the air and turned toward us. Josh and I set new world records for the hundred-yard dash.

    I learned something from my brashness: Sometimes it’s best not to poke around in other people’s business. That’s especially true in relationships with fellow believers in Jesus. The apostle Paul encouraged the Thessalonians to “make it your ambition to lead a quiet life: You should mind your own business and work with your hands” (1 Thessalonians 4:11). We’re to pray for others and seek by God’s grace to share the Scriptures, and occasionally we may be called to offer a gentle word of correction. But learning to live a quiet life and not meddling into others’ lives is important. It becomes an example to those who are now outside God’s family (v. 12). Our calling is to “love each other” (v. 9).

    Reflect & Pray

    What happens when you meddle in other people’s business? What’s the first thing you should do instead for others?

    God, teach me to know what it means to love others better.

  • Amy's Place ... Poetry and Potpourri ... January, February and March 2021

    03/05/2021 6:39:41 AM PST · 603 of 626
    The Mayor to Jim Robinson; JustAmy; MEG33; jaycee; dutchess; GodBlessUSA; deadhead; LUV W; DollyCali; Gabz; ...

    Freep mail me to be on or off the Daily Bread ping list


    March 5

    Who Knows?

    When times are good, be happy; but when times are bad, consider this: God has made the one as well as the other.

    Ecclesiastes 7:14

    According to Chinese legend, when Sai Weng lost one of his prized horses, his neighbor expressed sorrow for his loss. But Sai Weng was unconcerned. He said, “Who knows if it may be a good thing for me?” Surprisingly, the lost horse returned home with another horse. As the neighbor congratulated him, Sai Weng said, “Who knows if it may be a bad thing for me?” As it turned out, his son broke his leg when he rode on the new horse. This seemed like a misfortune, until the army arrived at the village to recruit all able-bodied men to fight in the war. Because of the son’s injury, he wasn’t recruited, which ultimately could have spared him from death.

    This is the story behind the Chinese proverb which teaches that a difficulty can be a blessing in disguise and vice versa. This ancient wisdom has a close parallel in Ecclesiastes 6:12, where the author observes: “Who knows what is good for a person in life?” Indeed, none of us know what the future holds. An adversity might have positive benefits, and prosperity might have ill effects.

    Each day offers new opportunities, joys, struggles, and suffering. As God’s beloved children, we can rest in His sovereignty and trust Him through the good and bad times alike. God has “made the one as well as the other” (7:14). He’s with us in all the events in our lives and promises His loving care.

    Reflect & Pray

    Can you think of an example where a misfortune turned out to be a blessing? How can you keep your focus on God in good times as well as in bad times?

    Sovereign God, thank You for ordering my life. Help me to praise You in both good and bad times, believing that You work all things for the ultimate good of those who love You.

  • FReeper Canteen ~ Just Hangin' Cafe ~ 5 March 2021

    03/04/2021 6:53:00 PM PST · 38 of 69
    The Mayor to beachn4fun

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    March 5

    Who Knows?

    When times are good, be happy; but when times are bad, consider this: God has made the one as well as the other.

    Ecclesiastes 7:14

    According to Chinese legend, when Sai Weng lost one of his prized horses, his neighbor expressed sorrow for his loss. But Sai Weng was unconcerned. He said, “Who knows if it may be a good thing for me?” Surprisingly, the lost horse returned home with another horse. As the neighbor congratulated him, Sai Weng said, “Who knows if it may be a bad thing for me?” As it turned out, his son broke his leg when he rode on the new horse. This seemed like a misfortune, until the army arrived at the village to recruit all able-bodied men to fight in the war. Because of the son’s injury, he wasn’t recruited, which ultimately could have spared him from death.

    This is the story behind the Chinese proverb which teaches that a difficulty can be a blessing in disguise and vice versa. This ancient wisdom has a close parallel in Ecclesiastes 6:12, where the author observes: “Who knows what is good for a person in life?” Indeed, none of us know what the future holds. An adversity might have positive benefits, and prosperity might have ill effects.

    Each day offers new opportunities, joys, struggles, and suffering. As God’s beloved children, we can rest in His sovereignty and trust Him through the good and bad times alike. God has “made the one as well as the other” (7:14). He’s with us in all the events in our lives and promises His loving care.

    Reflect & Pray

    Can you think of an example where a misfortune turned out to be a blessing? How can you keep your focus on God in good times as well as in bad times?

    Sovereign God, thank You for ordering my life. Help me to praise You in both good and bad times, believing that You work all things for the ultimate good of those who love You.

  • Q ~ Trust Trump's Plan ~ 03/4/21 Vol.340, Q Day 1224

    03/04/2021 9:31:18 AM PST · 45 of 1,608
    The Mayor to ransomnote

    Thanks!

  • Amy's Place ... Poetry and Potpourri ... January, February and March 2021

    03/04/2021 6:42:35 AM PST · 587 of 626
    The Mayor to Jim Robinson; JustAmy; MEG33; jaycee; dutchess; GodBlessUSA; deadhead; LUV W; DollyCali; Gabz; ...

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    March 4

    Knowing the Father

    Jesus answered: “Don’t you know me, Philip, even after I have been among you such a long time? Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father.”

    John 14:9 According to legend, British conductor Sir Thomas Beecham once saw a distinguished-looking woman in a hotel foyer. Believing he knew her but unable to remember her name, he paused to talk with her. As the two chatted, he vaguely recollected that she had a brother. Hoping for a clue, he asked how her brother was doing and whether he was still working at the same job. “Oh, he’s very well,” she said, “And still king.”

    A case of mistaken identity can be embarrassing, as it was for Sir Beecham. But at other times it may be more serious, as it was for Jesus’ disciple Philip. The disciple knew Christ, of course, but he hadn’t fully appreciated who He was. He wanted Jesus to “show [them] the Father,” and Jesus responded, “Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father” (John 14:8–9). As God’s unique Son, Christ reveals the Father so perfectly that to know one is to know the other (vv. 10–11).

    If we ever wonder what God is like in His character, personality, or concern for others, we only need to look to Jesus to find out. Christ’s character, kindness, love, and mercy reveal God’s character. And although our amazing, awesome God is beyond our complete comprehension and understanding, we have a tremendous gift in what He’s revealed of Himself in Jesus.

    Reflect & Pray

    How well do you know God’s character? How does it match your perception of who Jesus is?

    Dear God, help me to grow in my knowledge and appreciation of who You are.

  • FReeper Canteen ~ The Star Spangled Banner ~ 04 March 2021

    03/03/2021 10:11:04 PM PST · 47 of 66
    The Mayor to Kathy in Alaska

    It was my pleasure Kathy! Thank you

  • FReeper Canteen ~ The Star Spangled Banner ~ 04 March 2021

    03/03/2021 6:35:43 PM PST · 12 of 66
    The Mayor to Kathy in Alaska

    On this day I swore an oath to this country and started serving in the US Army
    04 March 1976

  • FReeper Canteen ~ The Star Spangled Banner ~ 04 March 2021

    03/03/2021 6:34:13 PM PST · 10 of 66
    The Mayor to Kathy in Alaska

    Freep mail me to be on or off the Daily Bread ping list


    March 4

    Knowing the Father

    Jesus answered: “Don’t you know me, Philip, even after I have been among you such a long time? Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father.”

    John 14:9 According to legend, British conductor Sir Thomas Beecham once saw a distinguished-looking woman in a hotel foyer. Believing he knew her but unable to remember her name, he paused to talk with her. As the two chatted, he vaguely recollected that she had a brother. Hoping for a clue, he asked how her brother was doing and whether he was still working at the same job. “Oh, he’s very well,” she said, “And still king.”

    A case of mistaken identity can be embarrassing, as it was for Sir Beecham. But at other times it may be more serious, as it was for Jesus’ disciple Philip. The disciple knew Christ, of course, but he hadn’t fully appreciated who He was. He wanted Jesus to “show [them] the Father,” and Jesus responded, “Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father” (John 14:8–9). As God’s unique Son, Christ reveals the Father so perfectly that to know one is to know the other (vv. 10–11).

    If we ever wonder what God is like in His character, personality, or concern for others, we only need to look to Jesus to find out. Christ’s character, kindness, love, and mercy reveal God’s character. And although our amazing, awesome God is beyond our complete comprehension and understanding, we have a tremendous gift in what He’s revealed of Himself in Jesus.

    Reflect & Pray

    How well do you know God’s character? How does it match your perception of who Jesus is?

    Dear God, help me to grow in my knowledge and appreciation of who You are.

  • Amy's Place ... Poetry and Potpourri ... January, February and March 2021

    03/03/2021 5:52:24 AM PST · 571 of 626
    The Mayor to Jim Robinson; JustAmy; MEG33; jaycee; dutchess; GodBlessUSA; deadhead; LUV W; DollyCali; Gabz; ...

    Freep mail me to be on or off the Daily Bread ping list


    March 3

    Preserved

    The Lord himself goes before you.

    Deuteronomy 31:8

    While I was clearing out the garden in preparation for spring planting, I pulled up a large clump of winter weeds . . . and leapt into the air! A venomous copperhead snake lay hidden in the undergrowth just below my hand—an inch lower and I would have grabbed it by mistake. I saw its colorful markings as soon as I lifted the clump; the rest of it was coiled in the weeds between my feet.

    When my feet hit the ground a few feet away, I thanked God I hadn’t been bitten. And I wondered how many other times He had kept me from dangers I never knew were there.

    God watches over His people. Moses told the Israelites as they prepared to enter the promised land, “The Lord himself goes before you and will be with you; he will never leave you nor forsake you. Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged” (Deuteronomy 31:8). They couldn’t see God, but He was with them nonetheless.

    Sometimes difficult things happen that we may not understand, but we can also reflect on the number of times God has preserved us without our ever being aware!

    Scripture reminds us that His perfect, providential care remains over His people every day. He’s always with us (Matthew 28:20).

    Reflect & Pray

    How does the biblical truth that God watches over His people comfort you? Who can you tell about His faithfulness today?

    Faithful Father, thank You for watching over me every day. Please give me grace to walk closely with You in everything I do today.