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Posts by Thanatos

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • OBAMA WEB TO REPORT 'GOSSIP, SMEARS, ATTACKS' ON PRESIDENT

    09/13/2011 5:08:34 PM PDT · 17 of 273
    Thanatos to libh8er

    This is perfect.. Even though it is setup to “Report” attacks against the annoited one. EVERYONE can use it to report Attacks by the Obama administration, Democrats, and liberals against Conservatives, independants that do not agree with the liberals,, etc..

    Get enough people we can turn it around..

  • Obama's Letter to Congress about Attack in Libya

    03/22/2011 9:48:34 AM PDT · 20 of 30
    Thanatos to carton253

    Here is the whole thing.. NON Cherrypicked like your posting was:

    The War Powers Act of 1973
    Public Law 93-148
    93rd Congress, H. J. Res. 542
    November 7, 1973
    Joint Resolution
    Concerning the war powers of Congress and the President.
    Resolved by the Senate and the House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

    SHORT TITLE
    SECTION 1.
    This joint resolution may be cited as the “War Powers Resolution”.
    PURPOSE AND POLICY
    SEC. 2. (a)
    It is the purpose of this joint resolution to fulfill the intent of the framers of the Constitution of the United States and insure that the collective judgement of both the Congress and the President will apply to the introduction of United States Armed Forces into hostilities, or into situations where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicate by the circumstances, and to the continued use of such forces in hostilities or in such situations.
    SEC. 2. (b)
    Under article I, section 8, of the Constitution, it is specifically provided that the Congress shall have the power to make all laws necessary and proper for carrying into execution, not only its own powers but also all other powers vested by the Constitution in the Government of the United States, or in any department or officer thereof.
    SEC. 2. (c)
    The constitutional powers of the President as Commander-in-Chief to introduce United States Armed Forces into hostilities, or into situations where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances, are exercised only pursuant to (1) a declaration of war, (2) specific statutory authorization, or (3) a national emergency created by attack upon the United States, its territories or possessions, or its armed forces.
    CONSULTATION
    SEC. 3.
    The President in every possible instance shall consult with Congress before introducing United States Armed Forces into hostilities or into situation where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances, and after every such introduction shall consult regularly with the Congress until United States Armed Forces are no longer engaged in hostilities or have been removed from such situations.
    REPORTING
    Sec. 4. (a)
    In the absence of a declaration of war, in any case in which United States Armed Forces are introduced—
    (1)
    into hostilities or into situations where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances;
    (2)
    into the territory, airspace or waters of a foreign nation, while equipped for combat, except for deployments which relate solely to supply, replacement, repair, or training of such forces; or
    (3)
    (A)
    the circumstances necessitating the introduction of United States Armed Forces;
    (B)
    the constitutional and legislative authority under which such introduction took place; and
    (C)
    the estimated scope and duration of the hostilities or involvement.
    Sec. 4. (b)
    The President shall provide such other information as the Congress may request in the fulfillment of its constitutional responsibilities with respect to committing the Nation to war and to the use of United States Armed Forces abroad.
    Sec. 4. (c)
    Whenever United States Armed Forces are introduced into hostilities or into any situation described in subsection (a) of this section, the President shall, so long as such armed forces continue to be engaged in such hostilities or situation, report to the Congress periodically on the status of such hostilities or situation as well as on the scope and duration of such hostilities or situation, but in no event shall he report to the Congress less often than once every six months.
    CONGRESSIONAL ACTION
    SEC. 5. (a)
    Each report submitted pursuant to section 4(a)(1) shall be transmitted to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and to the President pro tempore of the Senate on the same calendar day. Each report so transmitted shall be referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate for appropriate action. If, when the report is transmitted, the Congress has adjourned sine die or has adjourned for any period in excess of three calendar days, the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President pro tempore of the Senate, if they deem it advisable (or if petitioned by at least 30 percent of the membership of their respective Houses) shall jointly request the President to convene Congress in order that it may consider the report and take appropriate action pursuant to this section.
    SEC. 5. (b)
    Within sixty calendar days after a report is submitted or is required to be submitted pursuant to section 4(a)(1), whichever is earlier, the President shall terminate any use of United States Armed Forces with respect to which such report was submitted (or required to be submitted), unless the Congress (1) has declared war or has enacted a specific authorization for such use of United States Armed Forces, (2) has extended by law such sixty-day period, or (3) is physically unable to meet as a result of an armed attack upon the United States. Such sixty-day period shall be extended for not more than an additional thirty days if the President determines and certifies to the Congress in writing that unavoidable military necessity respecting the safety of United States Armed Forces requires the continued use of such armed forces in the course of bringing about a prompt removal of such forces.
    SEC. 5. (c)
    Notwithstanding subsection (b), at any time that United States Armed Forces are engaged in hostilities outside the territory of the United States, its possessions and territories without a declaration of war or specific statutory authorization, such forces shall be removed by the President if the Congress so directs by concurrent resolution.
    CONGRESSIONAL PRIORITY PROCEDURES FOR JOINT RESOLUTION OR BILL
    SEC. 6. (a)
    Any joint resolution or bill introduced pursuant to section 5(b) at least thirty calendar days before the expiration of the sixty-day period specified in such section shall be referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives or the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, as the case may be, and such committee shall report one such joint resolution or bill, together with its recommendations, not later than twenty-four calendar days before the expiration of the sixty-day period specified in such section, unless such House shall otherwise determine by the yeas and nays.
    SEC. 6. (b)
    Any joint resolution or bill so reported shall become the pending business of the House in question (in the case of the Senate the time for debate shall be equally divided between the proponents and the opponents), and shall be voted on within three calendar days thereafter, unless such House shall otherwise determine by yeas and nays.
    SEC. 6. (c)
    Such a joint resolution or bill passed by one House shall be referred to the committee of the other House named in subsection (a) and shall be reported out not later than fourteen calendar days before the expiration of the sixty-day period specified in section 5(b). The joint resolution or bill so reported shall become the pending business of the House in question and shall be voted on within three calendar days after it has been reported, unless such House shall otherwise determine by yeas and nays.
    SEC 6. (d)
    In the case of any disagreement between the two Houses of Congress with respect to a joint resolution or bill passed by both Houses, conferees shall be promptly appointed and the committee of conference shall make and file a report with respect to such resolution or bill not later than four calendar days before the expiration of the sixty-day period specified in section 5(b). In the event the conferees are unable to agree within 48 hours, they shall report back to their respective Houses in disagreement. Notwithstanding any rule in either House concerning the printing of conference reports in the Record or concerning any delay in the consideration of such reports, such report shall be acted on by both Houses not later than the expiration of such sixty-day period.
    CONGRESSIONAL PRIORITY PROCEDURES FOR CONCURRENT RESOLUTION
    SEC. 7. (a)
    Any concurrent resolution introduced pursuant to section 5(b) at least thirty calendar days before the expiration of the sixty-day period specified in such section shall be referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives or the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, as the case may be, and one such concurrent resolution shall be reported out by such committee together with its recommendations within fifteen calendar days, unless such House shall otherwise determine by the yeas and nays.
    SEC. 7. (b)
    Any concurrent resolution so reported shall become the pending business of the House in question (in the case of the Senate the time for debate shall be equally divided between the proponents and the opponents), and shall be voted on within three calendar days thereafter, unless such House shall otherwise determine by yeas and nays.
    SEC. 7. (c)
    Such a concurrent resolution passed by one House shall be referred to the committee of the other House named in subsection (a) and shall be reported out by such committee together with its recommendations within fifteen calendar days and shall thereupon become the pending business of such House and shall be voted on within three calendar days after it has been reported, unless such House shall otherwise determine by yeas and nays.
    SEC. 7. (d)
    In the case of any disagreement between the two Houses of Congress with respect to a concurrent resolution passed by both Houses, conferees shall be promptly appointed and the committee of conference shall make and file a report with respect to such concurrent resolution within six calendar days after the legislation is referred to the committee of conference. Notwithstanding any rule in either House concerning the printing of conference reports in the Record or concerning any delay in the consideration of such reports, such report shall be acted on by both Houses not later than six calendar days after the conference report is filed. In the event the conferees are unable to agree within 48 hours, they shall report back to their respective Houses in disagreement.
    INTERPRETATION OF JOINT RESOLUTION
    SEC. 8. (a)
    Authority to introduce United States Armed Forces into hostilities or into situations wherein involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances shall not be inferred—
    (1)
    from any provision of law (whether or not in effect before the date of the enactment of this joint resolution), including any provision contained in any appropriation Act, unless such provision specifically authorizes the introduction of United States Armed Forces into hostilities or into such situations and stating that it is intended to constitute specific statutory authorization within the meaning of this joint resolution; or
    (2)
    from any treaty heretofore or hereafter ratified unless such treaty is implemented by legislation specifically authorizing the introduction of United States Armed Forces into hostilities or into such situations and stating that it is intended to constitute specific statutory authorization within the meaning of this joint resolution.
    SEC. 8. (b)
    Nothing in this joint resolution shall be construed to require any further specific statutory authorization to permit members of United States Armed Forces to participate jointly with members of the armed forces of one or more foreign countries in the headquarters operations of high-level military commands which were established prior to the date of enactment of this joint resolution and pursuant to the United Nations Charter or any treaty ratified by the United States prior to such date.
    SEC 8. (c)
    For purposes of this joint resolution, the term “introduction of United States Armed Forces” includes the assignment of member of such armed forces to command, coordinate, participate in the movement of, or accompany the regular or irregular military forces of any foreign country or government when such military forces are engaged, or there exists an imminent threat that such forces will become engaged, in hostilities.
    SEC. 8. (d)
    Nothing in this joint resolution—
    (1)
    is intended to alter the constitutional authority of the Congress or of the President, or the provision of existing treaties; or
    (2)
    shall be construed as granting any authority to the President with respect to the introduction of United States Armed Forces into hostilities or into situations wherein involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances which authority he would not have had in the absence of this joint resolution.
    SEPARABILITY CLAUSE
    SEC. 9. If any provision of this joint resolution or the application thereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the joint resolution and the application of such provision to any other person or circumstance shall not be affected thereby.
    EFFECTIVE DATE
    SEC. 10. This joint resolution shall take effect on the date of its enactment.
    CARL ALBERT

    Speaker of the House of Representatives.

    JAMES O. EASTLAND

    President of the Senate pro tempore.

    IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, U.S.,
    November 7, 1973.
    The House of Representatives having proceeded to reconsider the resolution (H. J. Res 542) entitled “Joint resolution concerning the war powers of Congress and the President”, returned by the President of the United States with his objections, to the House of Representatives, in which it originated, it was
    Resolved, That the said resolution pass, two-thirds of the House of Representatives agreeing to pass the same.

    Attest:

    W. PAT JENNINGS

    Clerk.

    I certify that this Joint Resolution originated in the House of Representatives.

    W. PAT JENNINGS

    Clerk.

    IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES
    November 7, 1973
    The Senate having proceeded to reconsider the joint resolution (H. J. Res. 542) entitled “Joint resolution concerning the war powers of Congress and the President”, returned by the President of the United States with his objections to the House of Representatives, in which it originate, it was
    Resolved, That the said joint resolution pass, two-thirds of the Senators present having voted in the affirmative.

    Attest:

    FRANCIS R. VALEO

    Secretary.

  • Obama's Letter to Congress about Attack in Libya

    03/22/2011 9:47:10 AM PDT · 19 of 30
    Thanatos to Hoodat
    Hoodat wrote: "This ‘letter’ which doesn’t even have Obama’s signature on it, is missing a time stamp. When was it issued?"

    The Letter is dated March 21, 2011.. You can click on the link at the top of the post to be taken to the whitehouse website and you can ask obama himself on what time he wrote it..
  • Obama's Letter to Congress about Attack in Libya

    03/22/2011 9:43:32 AM PDT · 17 of 30
    Thanatos to carton253
    carton253 Wrote "According to the War Resolution Act of 1973, the president has 48 hours to notify the Congress after committing troops to military action. If Congress doesn’t authorize the military action, then the president can keep the military force in the area of action for 90 days. (60 days for action, 30 days to withdraw)"

    The part of the War Resolution Act of 1973 you quote does not apply or go into affect unless this section is complied with:

    SEC. 2. (c)

    The constitutional powers of the President as Commander-in-Chief to introduce United States Armed Forces into hostilities, or into situations where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances, are exercised only pursuant to (1) a declaration of war, (2) specific statutory authorization, or (3) a national emergency created by attack upon the United States, its territories or possessions, or its armed forces.


    Oh, almost forgot.. Here is Section 3 of the War Resolution Act of 1973

    SEC. 3. The President in every possible instance shall consult with Congress before introducing United States Armed Forces into hostilities or into situation where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances, and after every such introduction shall consult regularly with the Congress until United States Armed Forces are no longer engaged in hostilities or have been removed from such situations.


    See that part where it says "SHALL"
  • Obama's Letter to Congress about Attack in Libya

    03/22/2011 9:41:44 AM PDT · 16 of 30
    Thanatos to carton253
    carton253 Wrote "According to the War Resolution Act of 1973, the president has 48 hours to notify the Congress after committing troops to military action. If Congress doesn’t authorize the military action, then the president can keep the military force in the area of action for 90 days. (60 days for action, 30 days to withdraw)"

    The part of the War Resolution Act of 1973 you quote does not apply or go into affect unless this section is complied with:

    SEC. 2. (c)

    The constitutional powers of the President as Commander-in-Chief to introduce United States Armed Forces into hostilities, or into situations where imminent involvement in hostilities is clearly indicated by the circumstances, are exercised only pursuant to (1) a declaration of war, (2) specific statutory authorization, or (3) a national emergency created by attack upon the United States, its territories or possessions, or its armed forces.
  • Favorite News Apps? Is Free Republic developing an app?

    03/22/2011 8:55:23 AM PDT · 2 of 18
    Thanatos to dmam2011

    would love to see one for the Ipad/Iphone

  • Obama's Letter to Congress about Attack in Libya

    03/22/2011 8:53:35 AM PDT · 1 of 30
    Thanatos
    Where in this letter does Obama provide the authorization to attack a sovereign nation in direct violation of the US Constitution and the War Powers Act??
  • Federal Judge in Florida Rules Individual Mandate is Unconstitutional

    01/31/2011 1:08:19 PM PST · 203 of 395
    Thanatos to Marty62
    You can read the Court's Opinion here:

    UnConstitutional Law Passed by the Democratic Party, Obama Care

    Download and read on your computer, it is 78 pages long.
  • Breaking News: Florida Judge Rules Individual Mandate in Health Care Law Is Unconstitutional

    01/31/2011 1:07:48 PM PST · 24 of 33
    Thanatos to sheikdetailfeather
    You can read the Court's Opinion here:

    UnConstitutional Law Passed by the Democratic Party, Obama Care

    Download and read on your computer, it is 78 pages long.
  • FEDERAL JUDGE RULES INDIVIDUAL MANDATE IN OBAMA HEALTH CARE LAW...

    01/31/2011 1:07:36 PM PST · 41 of 50
    Thanatos to Outlaw Woman
    You can read the Court's Opinion here:

    UnConstitutional Law Passed by the Democratic Party, Obama Care

    Download and read on your computer, it is 78 pages long.
  • Video: BREAKING: Florida Judge Rules Health Care Law Unconstitutional

    01/31/2011 1:05:38 PM PST · 39 of 50
    Thanatos to blog.Eyeblast.tv
    You can read the Court's Opinion here:

    UnConstitutional Law Passed by the Democratic Party, Obama Care

    Download and read on your computer, it is 78 pages long.
  • FL Judge Rules Against Obamacare, Injunction Denied As Unnecessary Since Entire Law Unconstitutional

    01/31/2011 1:00:04 PM PST · 18 of 47
    Thanatos to 2ndDivisionVet
    You can read the Court's Opinion here:

    UnConstitutional Law Passed by the Democratic Party, Obama Care

    Download and read on your computer, it is 78 pages long.
  • Judge Declares Pro-Abortion ObamaCare Unconstitutional

    01/31/2011 12:56:59 PM PST · 12 of 37
    Thanatos to julieee
    If anyone wants to read the court's decision: Click Here. UnConstitutional Law Passed by the Democratic Party, Obama Care Download and read on your computer, it is 78 pages long
  • Can Tea Party Organisations sue the NAACP for Slander and/or Libel?

    07/15/2010 10:26:14 AM PDT · 1 of 26
    Thanatos
  • Freeper in Colorado needs online poll help for her child

    06/04/2010 1:00:16 PM PDT · 38 of 38
    Thanatos to Trillian
    It's over. I want to thank EVERYONE for voting! It was most appreciated and the boy was happy that he got lots of votes!

    Freepers never seize to amaze me..

    Thank YOU!

  • Freeper in Colorado needs online poll help for her child

    05/10/2010 6:39:02 PM PDT · 34 of 38
    Thanatos to Trillian

    up to 253

    Whoo Hoo!

    Thank you to everyone who’s voting!

  • Freeper in Colorado needs online poll help for her child

    05/06/2010 12:40:26 PM PDT · 26 of 38
    Thanatos to Krankor
    Not sure how much clearer it can be, but here goes:


    CLICK HERE-->Kroger Contest<--CLICK HERE


    If for some reason the system does not take you to the bag itself, it is bag # 45424
  • Freeper in Colorado needs online poll help for her child

    05/06/2010 10:45:47 AM PDT · 10 of 38
    Thanatos to Thanatos

    Thanks all! Keep it up.. the leader is at over 3000 votes.. :-)

  • Freeper in Colorado needs online poll help for her child

    05/06/2010 10:29:34 AM PDT · 1 of 38
    Thanatos
  • Health "Reform" lawsuits and Injunction

    12/23/2009 3:02:21 PM PST · 4 of 10
    Thanatos to Thanatos
    This is from the Washingtime Times:

    Wash Times via Newsmax

    "With their procedural options in the Senate exhausted, Republicans are looking to the Constitution for a way to fight the Democrats' health care reform bill.

    South Carolina's attorney general said Tuesday his office was exploring whether the horse-trading used to secure the last few Democratic votes for the bill violates the Constitution; now a separate challenge is headed for a vote on the Senate floor on Wednesday.

    Sen. John Ensign, Nevada Republican, has raised a constitutional point of order, arguing that the founding document does not give Congress the right to insist that Americans buy health insurance, nor to punish them with a tax if they don't."