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Keyword: amphorae

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  • Ancient Cemetery for Infants Found on Greek Island

    05/03/2021 1:13:44 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 12 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | May 3, 2021 | Philip Chrysopoulos
    An ancient cemetery for infants in Astypalea. Credit: Dodecanese Ephorate of Antiquities The study of the largest ancient cemetery for infants found on Astypalea island in Greece continues, shedding light on the worship of the goddess of childbirth and the Earth mother. The Dodecanese Ephorate of Antiquities that is carrying out the study has found that almost all the infants buried there were newborns or, at most, a few months old. There are also a few toddlers that were up to two years of age. The bodies of the babies were placed in ceramic containers, mainly amphorae or hydrias, whichwere...
  • 'Undisturbed' Roman-era shipwreck discovered off Cyprus

    06/28/2019 2:33:26 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    FOX News ^ | By James Rogers
    Archaeologists have discovered the wreck of a Roman-era ship off the east coast of Cyprus. In a statement, Cyprus’ Department of Antiquities explained that the wreck is the first undisturbed Roman shipwreck found in the Mediterranean island nation’s waters. The ship is loaded with amphorae, or large ancient jars, which are likely from Syria and ancient Cilicia on modern-day Turkey's southeastern coast. Analysis of the shipwreck will shed new light on seaborne trade between Cyprus and the rest of the Roman provinces of the eastern Mediterranean, officials explained in the statement. The wreck was found near the resort town of...
  • 4th century BC Mazotos shipwreck yields Chian amphorae and rich finds about shipbuilding history

    12/28/2018 2:47:06 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    TornosNews.gr ^ | December 12, 2018 | unattributed
    A total of seventy (70) partly or fully preserved Chian amphorae were recovered, which raised the number of amphorae stowed under the foredeck of the ship’s hold to ninety nine (99). Most of these amphorae were most probably carrying wine but at least one was full of olive pits, possibly for consumption by the crew. Also, two fishing weights were found, which offer us a glimpse of the life onboard the merchantmen of the period. Underneath the cargo, the wooden hull was poorly preserved, most probably (as a result of the wrecking episode and (the subsequent natural site formation processes...
  • Sunken haul of Roman fish sauce found off Italy

    12/12/2015 4:36:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    The Local (Italy) ^ | Decenber 11, 2015 | unattributed
    In spite of the mystery that usually surrounds ancient shipwrecks, it is almost certain that the ship was sailing a route between Italy, Spain and Portugal in order to transport a precious cargo of Roman garum. The clue lies in the shape of the clay jars, as the sauce itself has all since seeped into the sea. "After we filmed the wreck and analyzed an amphora [clay jar] and some fragments that a robotic craft brought back to the surface, we realized the ship was carrying a huge quantity of fish sauce when it sank," said Trigona. "The amphora are...
  • How a Ship Full of Fish Helped Recreate an Ancient Fish Sauce

    03/06/2012 10:18:22 AM PST · by Renfield · 20 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 3-1-2012 | Peter Smith
    If you’re like me, the last post on the convoluted origins of our favorite fermented condiment—ketchup—probably left you wondering: What is the difference between Roman garum than modern Thai fish sauce? What little I know comes from an experiment performed by Sally Grainger, author of Cooking Apicus, recounted in the book Cured, Fermented and Smoked Foods. Grainger is a British chef and an experimental archeologist. She looked at studies on fish sauce amphorae (ceramic vessels) from archeological sites in Spain and North Africa. One of her more fascinating sources comes from a 2,000-year-old shipwreck discovered off the coast of Grado,...
  • The Lowly Amphora (and ancient contact across the oceans)

    06/01/2015 10:43:47 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    The Mathisen Corollary ^ | Monday, February 6, 2012 | David Warner Mathisen
    Professor Elizabeth Lyding Will (1924 - 2009...) was one of the world's leading authorities on amphoras, an ancient two-handled container that her research demonstrated to be vitally important for tracing ancient trade patterns and for opening windows on tremendous amounts of information about ancient life and commerce. In a 2000 article entitled "The Roman Amphora: learning from storage jars," she discusses the diverse uses of "the lowly Roman amphora -- a two-handled clay jar used by the Canaanites, Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans to ship goods," describing both its main usage for the transportation of liquids including wine, olive oil, and...
  • An ancient wreck tells the tale of Romans in France

    03/20/2014 3:03:49 PM PDT · by NYer · 11 replies
    National Geographic ^ | March 20, 2014 | Robert Kunzig
    Published: April 2014Roman Boat Romans in France An ancient wreck tells the tale of Romans in France. By Robert Kunzig Photograph by Rémi Bénali The Romans had a serious trash problem, though by our standards it was good-looking trash. Their problem was amphorae. They needed millions of the curvy clay jars to ship wine, olive oil, and fish sauce around the empire, and often they didn’t recycle their empties. Sometimes they didn’t even bother to pop the cork—it was quicker to saber the neck or the pointy base, drain the thing, then chuck it. In Rome there’s a five-acre,...
  • Roman Shipwreck Discovered Near Aeolian Islands

    07/02/2010 5:59:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    ANSAmed ^ | July 2010 | unattributed
    The wreck of a Roman ship from the first century AD which is still whole and has over 500 wide-mouthed amphorae onboard has been discovered to the south of the island of Panarea... [announced] by the Regional Councillor for Cultural Heritage, Gaetano Armao, and by the Superintendent, Sebastiano Tusa. ''From the first surveys,'' said Tusa, ''we can establish that it is a merchant shipping measuring around 25 metres, in perfect condition, which transported fruit and vegetables from Sicily to the markets in the north. The style of the amphorae is in fact typical of the 'workshops' of the island and...
  • Trash Talk [ Monte Testaccio, imperial Roman landfill ]

    05/05/2012 8:34:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Archaeology, Volume 62 Number 2 ^ | March/April 2009 | Jarrett A. Lobell
    In the middle of Rome's trendiest neighborhood, surrounded by sushi restaurants and nightclubs with names like Rodeo Steakhouse and Love Story, sits the ancient world's biggest garbage dump--a 150-foot-tall mountain of discarded Roman amphorae, the shipping drums of the ancient world. It takes about 20 minutes to walk around Monte Testaccio, from the Latin testa and Italian cocci, both meaning "potsherd." But despite its size--almost a mile in circumference--it's easy to walk by and not really notice unless you are headed for some excellent pizza at Velavevodetto, a restaurant literally stuck into the mountain's side. Most local residents don't know...
  • Ancient Greek Ships Carried More Than Just Wine

    10/16/2011 7:46:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Nature ^ | Friday, October 14, 2011 | Jo Marchant
    A DNA analysis of ancient storage jars suggests that Greek sailors traded a wide range of foods -- not just wine, as many historians have assumed. The study, in press at the Journal of Archaeological Science1, finds evidence in nine jars taken from Mediterranean shipwrecks of vegetables, herbs and nuts. The researchers say DNA testing of underwater artefacts from different time periods could help to reveal how such complex markets developed across the Mediterranean. Archaeologist Brendan Foley of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in Massachusetts and geneticist Maria Hansson of Lund University, Sweden, retrieved DNA from nine amphorae -- the...
  • Archaeologists find signs of ancient advertisements from Sassanid era

    08/21/2004 2:34:39 AM PDT · by BlackVeil · 28 replies · 1,269+ views
    Tehran Times ^ | August 21 2004 | Anon
    TEHRAN (MNA) -- During the latest season of excavations of the northern gate of Takht-e Suleiman, an ancient Zoroastrian fire temple located in northwestern Iran, the stamps of two seals were discovered which indicate that objects entered Takht-e Suleiman from other regions with special tags attached to them which seem to be advertisements. They signify that an early form of advertising was being practiced during the Sassanid era (224-642 C.E.), Yusef Moradi, the head of the excavation team, said on Friday. “The team began its excavations in early August and found the stamps of two seals at the upper levels...
  • Ancient Persian fleet surrenders it's mysteries

    08/21/2004 1:17:11 AM PDT · by freedom44 · 16 replies · 2,133+ views
    New Zealand News ^ | 8/21/04 | SIMON COLLINS
    Secrets of an ancient Persian armada sunk off the coast of Greece 2500 years ago are being dredged up by modern archaeologists. A team from Greece, Canada and the United States has just completed a second expedition to retrieve artefacts from 300 ships of the Persian King Darius that were wrecked in a storm off the Mt Athos Peninsula, northern Greece, in 492BC or 493BC. Aucklanders will be among the first to hear the results today when three of the expedition leaders present their findings in a free public lecture at Auckland University. In two trips so far, last October...