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Keyword: celts

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  • Treasure Hunter Finds the First Celtic Chariot Burial in Wales, Rewrites Ancient History

    04/09/2020 2:22:28 PM PDT · by Pontiac · 36 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | 11/23/18 | Ed Wheylan
    A metal detectorist in Pembrokeshire in Wales has made a discovery that could change how we understand the history of the ancient Celts. The unearthing of a Celtic chariot burial in a Welsh field astonishes experts because this find is the first of its kind in Wales. It is sure to throw light on the Welsh Iron Age and its connections with the wider Celtic world. Mike Smith, from Milford Haven, has been a metal detectorist for 30 years and is an active member of the Pembrokeshire Prospectors. Earlier this year, he was exploring a muddy field when he came...
  • Iron Age Warrior Shield Hailed as Most Important Find of the Millenium

    12/10/2019 11:05:19 AM PST · by wildbill · 25 replies
    Ancient Origens ^ | 12/5/19 | Ed Whelan
    Conservation experts have been able to restore a stunning shield that is 2,200 years old. The artifact belonged to a Celtic warrior who was buried in a chariot burial in the north of England. The warrior shield has been hailed as one of the most important and remarkable ancient finds this millennium. ... The workers had come across an Iron Age warrior’s chariot burial. The remains of the warrior were found in the chariot and two skeletons of horses were also unearthed. Paula Ware, an archaeologist with MAP, stated that “these horses were placed with their hooves on the ground...
  • Tartessian, Europe's newest and oldest Celtic language

    06/24/2019 3:21:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    History Ireland ^ | Mar/Apr 2009 | (it appears to be) John T. Koch
    One of the enduring consequences of the era of Phoenician influence -- which had by around 800 BC progressed from trading outposts to full-blown colonies in southern Spain -- was the adoption of alphabetic writing by the native population, first in the south-west. The number of known Tartessian inscriptions on stone is now about 90 and steadily rising with new discoveries. Concentrated densely in southern Portugal (the Algarve and Lower Alentejo), there is a wider scatter of fifteen over south-west Spain. The best exhibition of the inscriptions is on view in the new and innovative Museu da Escrita do Sudoeste,...
  • Ancient DNA research shines spotlight on Iberia

    03/15/2019 2:20:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | March 14, 2019 | University of Huddersfield
    The largest-ever study of ancient DNA from the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) suggests that the Iberian male lineages were almost completely replaced between 4,500 and 4,000 years ago by newcomers originating on the Russian steppe... Most striking was an influx of new people during the later Copper Age, otherwise known as the Beaker period because of the ubiquitous presence in burials of large drinking vessels, from about 4,500 years ago. By the Early Bronze Age, 500 years later, these newcomers represented about 40% of Iberia's genetic pool - but virtually 100% of their male lineages... This is an extraordinary...
  • Archaeologists found treasure of silver Celtic coins

    12/10/2018 1:02:49 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Slovak Spectator ^ | November 24, 2018 | SITA, Compiled by Spectator staff
    Archaeologists found a treasure of Celtic coins in Mosskaovce near Turãianske Teplice. The finding of 40 coins contains the most precious coins that Celts minted in this era, so-called tetradrachms. "The Celts had highly-developed coin system; tetradrachms have four times the higher value of other nominals," explains Karol Pieta, deputy of director from Archaeological Institute of Slovak Academy of Sciences (SAV) in Nitra, as quoted by the SITA newswire. Tetradrachms are about nine to ten grams in weight, as if they have four drachms inside, which were the smallest coins in that time, Pieta explains. It is highly probable that...
  • Archaeologists find oldest Greek relic in Slovak area

    06/05/2018 11:49:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Slovak Spectator ^ | May 13, 2018 | Spectator staff
    Archaeologists found a significant discovery at a Celtic sacrificial place near the village Slatina nad Bebravou. They discovered relief-decorated shoulder boards made from bronze that were part of a breastplate of a prominent Greek warrior. "It is the oldest original Greek art relic in the area of Slovakia," said deputy of director of Slovak Archaeological Institute in Nitra, Karol Pieta, as quoted by the SITA newswire. The relief was made in the Greek colony of Taranto in southern Italy in the middle of the fourth century BC. It came to Slovak territory about one hundred years later. "There is a...
  • An Icelandic Epic Predicted a Fiery End for Pagan Gods, and Then This Volcano Erupted

    04/15/2018 8:46:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Livescience ^ | March 20, 2018 | Laura Geggel
    A series of Earth-shattering volcanic eruptions in Iceland during the Middle Ages may have spurred the people living there to turn away from their pagan gods and convert to Christianity, a new study finds. The discovery came about thanks to precise dating of the volcanic eruptions, which spewed lava about two generations before the Icelandic people changed religions. But why would volcanic eruptions turn people toward monotheism? The answer has to do with the "Voluspa," a prominent medieval poem that predicted a fiery eruption would help lead to the downfall of the pagan gods, the researchers said. Historians have long...
  • A Lost European Culture, Pulled From Obscurity

    11/30/2009 8:48:53 PM PST · by Borges · 46 replies · 1,681+ views
    NY Times ^ | 11/30/09 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    Before the glory that was Greece and Rome, even before the first cities of Mesopotamia or temples along the Nile, there lived in the Lower Danube Valley and the Balkan foothills people who were ahead of their time in art, technology and long-distance trade. For 1,500 years, starting earlier than 5000 B.C., they farmed and built sizable towns, a few with as many as 2,000 dwellings. They mastered large-scale copper smelting, the new technology of the age. Their graves held an impressive array of exquisite headdresses and necklaces and, in one cemetery, the earliest major assemblage of gold artifacts to...
  • Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India

    05/15/2016 1:15:34 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 10 replies
    business-standard.com ^ | May 15, 2016 Last Updated at 11:57 IST | Press Trust of India
    Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India Press Trust of India | Melbourne May 15, 2016 Last Updated at 11:57 IST Ancient Irish musical traditions, thought to be long dead, are alive and well in south India, according to a new study of musical horns from iron-age Ireland. The realisation that modern Indian horns are almost identical to many iron-age European artifacts shows a rich cultural link between the two regions 2,000 years ago, said PhD student Billy O Foghlu, from The Australian National University (ANU). "I was astonished to find what I thought to be dead soundscapes alive...
  • Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India

    05/14/2016 12:23:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 13, 2016 | Australian National University
    An archaeologist studying musical horns from iron-age Ireland has found musical traditions, thought to be long dead, are alive and well in south India. The realisation that modern Indian horns are almost identical to many iron-age European artefacts reveals a rich cultural link between the two regions 2,000 years ago, said PhD student Billy O Foghlu, from The Australian National University (ANU). "Archaeology is usually silent. I was astonished to find what I thought to be dead soundscapes alive and living in Kerala today," said the ANU College of Asia-Pacific student... The findings help show that Europe and India had...
  • A man’s discovery of bones under his pub could forever change what we know about the Irish

    03/21/2016 8:45:16 AM PDT · by Theoria · 46 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | 17 March 2016 | Peter Whoriskey
    Ten years ago, an Irish pub owner was clearing land for a driveway when his digging exposed an unusually large flat stone. The stone obscured a dark gap underneath. He grabbed a flashlight to peer in. "I shot the torch in and saw the gentleman, well, his skull and bones," Bertie Currie, the pub owner, said this week. The remains of three humans, in fact, were found behind McCuaig’s Bar in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. And though police were called, it was not, as it turned out, a crime scene. Instead, what Currie had stumbled over was an ancient burial...
  • Clues about human migration to Imperial Rome uncovered in 2,000-year-old cemetery

    02/16/2016 9:47:28 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Wednesday, February 10, 2016 | PLOS
    Isotope analysis of 2000-year-old skeletons buried in Imperial Rome reveal some were migrants from the Alps or North Africa, according to a study published February 10, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kristina Killgrove from University of West Florida, USA, and Janet Montgomery from Durham University, UK. Previous work has focused on the overall human migration patterns within the Roman Empire. To understand human migration on a more granular level, the authors of this study examined 105 skeletons buried at two Roman cemeteries during the 1st through 3rd centuries AD. They analyzed the oxygen, strontium, and carbon isotope...
  • English DNA one third Anglo-Saxon

    01/20/2016 7:49:52 AM PST · by ek_hornbeck · 54 replies
    BBC ^ | 1/20/15 | Paul Rincon
    The present-day English owe about a third of their ancestry to the Anglo-Saxons, according to a new study. Scientists sequenced genomes from 10 skeletons unearthed in eastern England and dating from the Iron Age through to the Anglo-Saxon period. Many of the Anglo-Saxon samples appeared closer to modern Dutch and Danish people than the Iron Age Britons did. The results appear in Nature Communications journal. According to historical accounts and archaeology, the Anglo-Saxons migrated to Britain from continental Europe from the 5th Century AD. They brought with them a new culture, social structure and language. Genetic studies have tackled the...
  • William Tell, Tax Rebel

    04/03/2004 11:53:24 AM PST · by -=[_Super_Secret_Agent_]=- · 15 replies · 182+ views
    Ludwig von Mises Institute ^ | march 30, 2004 | Adam Young
    The legend of William Tell, the Swiss legendary hero who symbolizes the struggle for individual and political freedom, has its origins in medieval Switzerland, in the tax rebellions that launched the Everlasting League and the defeat of an empire. Settled first by the Tene, then the Celts and then the Romans, after the empire fell Switzerland fell under the sway of the Ostrogoths, the Franks and finally Charlemagne's empire and its heirs. In the 11th century, Switzerland was divided by the conflict between the Emperor and the Papacy. The dukes and counts, abbots and bishops benefited the most from this...
  • The subterranean wonder of the Celtic Hypogeum [Italy]

    12/20/2015 1:05:09 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | November 27, 2014 | M R Reese
    ...Northern Italy's Friuli-Venezia Giulia... is located in the Eastern Alps, near Slovenia, and used to be an important regional power. Today, it is a quaint town, and many tourists are attracted to it as a medieval center. Julius Caesar founded Cividale in 50 B.C. The area had already been settled by the Veneti and Celts, but it was after the destruction of Aquileia and Iulium Carnicum that the town became known as Cividale and became the principal town of Friuli. Within Cividale del Friuli is the Celtic Hypogeum -- a subterranean structure created for an unknown purpose. The Celtic Hypogeum...
  • Ohio's Stonehenge

    12/12/2006 4:26:26 PM PST · by blam · 33 replies · 1,206+ views
    Ohio.com ^ | 12-12-2006 | Bob Downing
    Ohio's StonehengeFort Ancient is largest, best preserved earthwork of its kind in America. Its purpose is not known By Bob Downing Beacon Journal staff writer A sign identifies one of the prehistoric earthworks at Fort Ancient State Memorial. Ohio law forbids walking off trail or on any mound or earthwork.OREGONIA - Fort Ancient remains a mystery. The extensive earthen mounds and walls in southwest Ohio are unlikely a fortress, although they might have been used for social gatherings and religious ceremonies and astronomical viewings. The site, atop a wooded bluff 235 feet above the Little Miami River in Warren County,...
  • Does Celtic art have links with Asia?

    10/15/2015 11:26:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | October 15, 2015 | editors
    An Oxford University-led... research team... will be looking at a group of artefacts in excavations and museum collections that are traditionally described as ‘Celtic’ because of their use of spirals, circles, interlaced designs, or swirling representations of plants or animals. One main line of enquiry is the relationship between the central European Celts and their nomadic Eurasian neighbours (often referred to as Scythians or Sarmatians), who inhabited the European end of a grassland (steppe) corridor that stretched east towards Central Asia and China... Iron Age tombs frozen in the mountains of Siberia, Mongolia, and Kazakhstan have yielded Roman glass, Chinese...
  • London - Red hair may be the genetic legacy of Neanderthals...

    01/16/2005 12:47:07 PM PST · by IGBT · 372 replies · 26,595+ views
    Planet Save.com ^ | 1/14/05 | Planet Save.com
    London - Red hair may be the genetic legacy of Neanderthals, according to a new study by British scientists. Researchers at the John Radcliffe Institute of Molecular Medicine in Oxford were quoted by The Times as saying the so-called "ginger gene" which gives people red hair, fair skin and freckles could be up to 100 000 years old. They claim that their discovery points to the gene having originated in Neanderthal man who lived in Europe for 200 000 years before Homo sapien settlers, the ancestors of modern man, arrived from Africa about 40 000 years ago. Rosalind Harding, the...
  • DNA Traces Roots Back To Stone Age

    03/25/2002 5:34:27 PM PST · by blam · 24 replies · 369+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 3-24-2002 | Paul Lashmar
    26 March 2002 01:46 GMT DNA traces roots back to Stone Age By Paul Lashmar 24 March 2002 Are you a Viking, Saxon, Pict, Celt, or descendant of an ancient African tribe? New DNA testing methods will enable us to trace our family tree right back to the Stone Age. Until recently, researching your ancestry meant hours of painstaking digging through fusty old files in public record offices or asking older relatives about their family memories. When the 1901 census was released online, demand was so great that the system crashed. The new scientific technique for tracing relatives allows individuals...
  • DNA shows Irish people have more complex origins than previously thought

    01/11/2014 6:13:55 AM PST · by NYer · 71 replies
    scott.net ^ | July 5, 2013 | Marie McKeown
    The blood in Irish veins is Celtic, right? Well, not exactly. Although the history many Irish people were taught at school is the history of the Irish as a Celtic race, the truth is much more complicated, and much more interesting than that ... Research done into the DNA of Irish males has shown that the old Anthropological attempts to define 'Irish' have been misguided. As late as the 1950s researchers were busy collecting data among Irish people such as hair colour and height, in order to categorise them as a 'race' and define them as different to the British....