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Keyword: globalwarminghoax

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  • Myth of arctic meltdown: Stunning satellite images show summer ice cap is thicker and covers 1.7...

    08/30/2014 7:20:51 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 35 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | 17:05 EST, 30 August 2014 | David Rose
    To put it another way, an area the size of Alaska, America’s biggest state, was open water two years ago, but is again now covered by ice. The most widely used measurements of Arctic ice extent are the daily satellite readings issued by the US National Snow and Ice Data Center, which is co-funded by Nasa. These reveal that – while the long-term trend still shows a decline – last Monday, August 25, the area of the Arctic Ocean with at least 15 per cent ice cover was 5.62 million square kilometres. This was the highest level recorded on that...
  • Newt Gingrich says this is the single most ‘damaging thing the Bush family has done to politics’

    07/23/2014 6:56:28 AM PDT · by fredericbastiat1 · 14 replies
    TheBlaze Books ^ | 7/23/2014 | Benjamin Weingarten
    Halper believes that the Clintons’ effort to in effect keep their friends close while turning enemies into friends has been a masterful and hugely overlooked part of the rebuilding of their machine: "What has been little understood in the past decade, from 2001 to the present, is how successfully the Clintons undertook a systematic, comprehensive, and sustained effort to win over leaders in the GOP, especially figures who were once the biggest critics. In return, both Clintons were able to develop a bipartisan, statesmanlike image that had eluded them through eight years in the White House."
  • The U.N.'s upcoming grab for global tyranny

    08/27/2014 6:39:57 AM PDT · by rktman · 9 replies
    wnd.com ^ | 8/27/2014 | Lord Monckton
    The EU advisers have been telling the U.N. secretary-general that the process of annual agreements by which individual states have already signed away much of their sovereignty and independence has now gone far enough for the final stage to be achieved without anyone really fighting back. The one thing neither the EU nor the U.N. has sufficiently understood is the wisdom and prescience of your Founding Fathers. Mr. Obama may mark his “X” on the draft world-government treaty (it won’t be called that, of course, but that is what it will be). But unless two-thirds of the Senate can be...
  • Obama plans to ink climate deal without Senate approval

    08/27/2014 7:41:06 AM PDT · by rktman · 14 replies
    americanthinker.com ^ | 8/27/2014 | Rick Moran
    President Obama is planning to use some legislative trickery to write a new climate change accord and bypass the Senate's historic responsibility to approve treaties. Hey! At least he's consistent in his lawbreaking.
  • Obama reportedly plotting end-run around Congress on global climate change deal

    08/27/2014 7:42:05 AM PDT · by ColdOne · 36 replies
    foxnews.com ^ | 8/27/14 | foxnews.com
    President Obama reportedly plans to do an end-run around Congress to forge an international climate change deal, effectively bypassing the Constitution's requirement to get the Senate's approval for a treaty. The New York Times reported that the agreement is slated to be signed at a United Nations meeting next year in Paris. However, because the U.S. Senate is unlikely to ratify any international climate treaty, Obama’s negotiators reportedly are working toward an alternative agreement – a “politically binding” deal that would serve in lieu of a bona-fide treaty.
  • UN(IPCC) panel: Global warming human-caused, dangerous (MaXiMoose Barfitus Alert!!)

    08/26/2014 7:34:53 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 26 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 8/26/14 | Seth Borenstein - ap
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is here, human-caused and probably already dangerous — and it's increasingly likely that the heating trend could be irreversible, a draft of a new international science report says. The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change on Monday sent governments a final draft of its synthesis report, which combines three earlier, gigantic documents by the Nobel Prize-winning group. There is little in the report that wasn't in the other more-detailed versions, but the language is more stark and the report attempts to connect the different scientific disciplines studying problems caused by the burning of fossil...
  • Winter Is Coming: 1,097 Record Low Temperatures Broken So Far In August

    08/26/2014 2:06:05 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 22 replies
    Daily Caller ^ | 2:45 PM 08/25/2014 | Michael Bastasch
    It’s been a cool summer so far for many across the U.S. as 1,097 record low temperatures were set in August, according to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) temperature data. NOAA reports that 1,097 “low maximum” temperature records were broken between Aug. 1 and Aug. 23 at locations across the country this year. This means that these temperatures on the day they were recorded were the coolest on record. After a particularly long and frigid winter, summer for much of the U.S. has been cooler than normal, according to NOAA data. The average temperature for July was just 73.3...
  • The War on Coal: It’s Because I’m Black, Isn’t it?

    08/24/2014 8:44:25 AM PDT · by NOBO2012 · 11 replies
    Michelle Obama's Mirror ^ | 8-24-2014 | MOTUS
    I see that both the Farmer’s Almanac and Joe Bastardi (the other Joey B) are predicting another El Nino winter, which means a stormier and colder than normal winter, especially along the east coast. That could prove to be a bit of a problem since power companies apparently took Barry at his word that “if somebody wants to build a coal plant, they can — it’s just that it will bankrupt them.”  So they didn’t. And they’re closing the coal plants they do have: “In order to comply with the new Obama era EPA regs, American Electric Power, which supplies...
  • Repeated and Uncontrollable Failures (The unbearable sadness of climate activism)

    08/23/2014 4:28:42 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 22 replies
    Tim Blair Blog ^ | 8-16-2014 | Tim Blair
    The unbearable sadness of climate activism: Nicole Thornton remembers the exact moment her curious case of depression became too real to ignore. It was five years ago and the environmental scientist – a trained biologist and ecologist – was writing a rather dry PhD on responsible household water use. Fair enough. That would make anyone depressed. Thornton had always been easily upset by apathy towards, and denial of, environmental issues. But now she began to notice an oddly powerful personal reaction to "the small stuff" – like people littering, or neighbours chopping down an old tree. So, she's a bossy...
  • Climate Key To Sphinx's Riddle

    01/08/2007 11:27:02 AM PST · by blam · 44 replies · 1,890+ views
    Scotsman ^ | 1-7-2006 | Jeremy Watson
    Climate key to Sphinx's riddle JEREMY WATSON GLOBAL warming is one of the greatest threats to present day civilisation but work by a team of Scots scientists suggests the ancient Egyptians may have been earlier victims of climate change. The pharaohs ruled their empire for hundreds of years, spreading culture, architecture and the arts before it collapsed into economic ruin. Why that happened is one of the great mysteries of history. Now a team of scientists from Scotland and Wales believe the answer lies beneath the waters of Lake Tana, high in the Ethiopian Highlands, and the source of the...
  • Geology Picture of the Week Extra: GoogleEarth searcher finds pristine impact crater in Egypt

    07/23/2010 9:11:02 PM PDT · by cogitator · 31 replies · 2+ views
    Space.com ^ | July 22, 2010 | Clara Moskowitz
    The header link goes to the article on space.com. Basic story is that an Italian guy who sounds like a hobbyist (former curator of a science museum) found the feature while tooling around on GoogleEarth. Since it's in the remote desert, it's hardly changed since impact -- even has ejecta rays. There's a problem here; most models indicate that an object the likely size of this object should disintegrate in the atmosphere. This one obviously didn't. Abstract in Science magazine (you'd have to pay to read the whole thing) The Kamil Crater in Egypt Fresh crater in Egypt -- increases...
  • Ancient Egypt was destroyed by drought, discover Scottish experts

    08/04/2011 5:51:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies
    Scotsman, Tall and Handsome Built ^ | Tuesday, August 2, 2011 | Lyndsay Buckland
    ...the fall of the great Egyptian Old Kingdom may have been helped along by a common problem which remains with us now -- drought... a severe period of drought around 4,200 years ago may have contributed to the demise of the civilisation. Using seismic investigations with sound waves, along with carbon dating of a 100-metre section of sediment from the bed of Lake Tana in Ethiopia, the team were able to look back many thousands of years. They were able to see how water levels in the lake had varied over the past 17,000 years, with the sediment signalling lush...
  • Massive Underground Water Supply Found In Desert African Country (Supply could last 400 years)

    07/21/2012 12:25:47 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 51 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 07/21/2012 | Michael Kelley
    A newly discovered water source could supply half of Africa's driest sub-Saharan country with 400 years of water, reports Matt McGrath of BBC. The new aquifer – called Ohangwena II – flows under the border between Angola and Namibia, covering an area of about 43 miles by 25 miles on Namibia's side. The water is up to 10,000 years old and cleaner to drink than many modern sources. Project manager Martin Quinger told BBC that the stored water could last 400 years based on current rates of consumption. Currently the 800,000 people living in the northern part of the country...
  • Ice Age Survivors Found In Iceland

    07/20/2007 3:39:11 PM PDT · by blam · 67 replies · 1,670+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 7-20-2007 | University Of Chicago
    Source: University of Chicago Date: July 20, 2007 Ice Age Survivors Found In Iceland Science Daily — Many scientists believe that the ice ages exterminated all life on land and in freshwater in large parts of the Northern Hemisphere, especially on ocean islands such as Iceland. Crymostygius thingvallensis, the only species in a recently described family of groundwater amphipods Crymostygidae. (Credit: photograph by Thorkell Heidarsson) Scientists at Holar University College and the University of Iceland have challenged that belief, at least when looking at groundwater animals. They have discovered two species of groundwater amphipods in Iceland that are the only...
  • Sahara dried out slowly, not abruptly: study

    05/08/2008 2:12:41 PM PDT · by suthener · 22 replies · 104+ views
    Reuters ^ | Thu May 8, 2008 2:10pm EDT | Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent
    OSLO (Reuters) - The once-green Sahara turned to desert over thousands of years rather than in an abrupt shift as previously believed, according to a study on Thursday that may help understanding of future climate changes. And there are now signs of a tiny shift back towards greener conditions in parts of the Sahara, apparently because of OSLO (Reuters) - The once-green Sahara turned to desert over thousands of years rather than in an abrupt shift as previously believed, according to a study on Thursday that may help understanding of future climate changes. And there are now signs of a...
  • Once Lush Sahara Dried Up Over Millennia, Study Says

    05/08/2008 7:08:12 PM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 178+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 5-8-2008 | James Owen
    Once Lush Sahara Dried Up Over Millennia, Study SaysJames Owen for National Geographic NewsMay 8, 2008 The grassy prehistoric Sahara turned into Earth's largest hot desert more slowly than previously thought, a new report says—and some say global warming may turn the desert green once again. The new research is based on deposits from a unique desert lake in remote northern Chad. Lake Yoa, sustained by prehistoric groundwater, has survived for millennia despite constant drought and searing heat. The body of water contains an unbroken climate record going back at least 6,000 years, said study lead author Stefan Kröpelin of...
  • The Green Sahara, A Desert In Bloom

    10/03/2008 11:55:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies · 837+ views
    Science News, ScienceDaily ^ | September 30, 2008 | Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel
    Reconstructing the climate of the past is an important tool for scientists to better understand and predict future climate changes that are the result of the present-day global warming. Although there is still little known about the Earth's tropical and subtropical regions, these regions are thought to play an important role in both the evolution of prehistoric man and global climate changes. New North African climate reconstructions reveal three 'green Sahara' episodes during which the present-day Sahara Desert was almost completely covered with extensive grasslands, lakes and ponds over the course of the last 120.000 years. The findings of Dr....
  • Space Data Unveils Evidence of Ancient Mega-lake in Northern Darfur

    03/29/2007 1:33:28 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 233+ views
    Physorg.com ^ | 3-28-2007 | Boston University
    Space Data Unveils Evidence of Ancient Mega-lake in Northern Darfur Researchers at the Boston University Center for Remote Sensing used recently acquired topographic data from satellites to reveal a now dry, ancient mega-lake in the Darfur province of northwestern Sudan. Drs. Eman Ghoneim and Farouk El-Baz made the finding while investigating Landsat images and Radarsat data. Radar waves are able to penetrate the fine-grained sand cover in the hot and dry eastern Sahara to reveal buried features. Segments of the lake’s shoreline were identified at the constant altitude of 573 ± 3 meters above sea level. Ghoneim incorporated these segments...
  • Ancient drought 'changed history'

    12/08/2005 3:58:46 AM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 42 replies · 1,607+ views
    BBC ^ | 12/07/05 | Roland Pease
    Ancient drought 'changed history' By Roland Pease BBC science unit, San Francisco The sediments are an archive of past climate conditions Scientists have identified a major climate crisis that struck Africa about 70,000 years ago and which may have changed the course of human history.The evidence comes from sediments drilled up from the beds of Lake Malawi and Tanganyika in East Africa, and from Lake Bosumtwi in Ghana. It shows equatorial Africa experienced a prolonged period of drought. It is possible, scientists say, this was the reason some of the first humans left Africa to populate the globe. Certainly,...
  • African Ice Core Analysis Reveals Catastrophic Droughts, Shrinking Ice Fields, Civilization Shifts

    10/18/2002 7:41:36 AM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 420+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 10-18-2002 | OSU
    African Ice Core Analysis Reveals Catastrophic Droughts, Shrinking Ice Fields, Civilization Shifts COLUMBUS, Ohio – A detailed analysis of six cores retrieved from the rapidly shrinking ice fields atop Tanzania's Mount Kilimanjaro shows that those tropical glaciers began to form about 11,700 years ago. The cores also yielded remarkable evidence of three catastrophic droughts that plagued the tropics 8,300, 5,200 and 4,000 years ago. Lastly, the analysis also supports Ohio State University researchers' prediction that these unique bodies of ice will disappear in the next two decades, the victims of global warming. These findings were published today in the journal...
  • Sahara Desert Was Once Lush and Populated

    07/20/2006 3:55:53 PM PDT · by Marius3188 · 61 replies · 1,744+ views
    LiveScience ^ | 20 July 2006 | Bjorn Carey
    At the end of the last Ice Age, the Sahara Desert was just as dry and uninviting as it is today. But sandwiched between two periods of extreme dryness were a few millennia of plentiful rainfall and lush vegetation. During these few thousand years, prehistoric humans left the congested Nile Valley and established settlements around rain pools, green valleys, and rivers. The ancient climate shift and its effects are detailed in the July 21 issue of the journal Science. When the rains came Some 12,000 years ago, the only place to live along the eastern Sahara Desert was the Nile...
  • Before they left Africa, early modern humans were 'culturally diverse'

    08/21/2014 9:55:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | August 18th, 2014 | Oxford University
    Researchers have carried out the biggest ever comparative study of stone tools dating to between 130,000 and 75,000 years ago found in the region between sub-Saharan Africa and Eurasia. They have discovered there are marked differences in the way stone tools were made, reflecting a diversity of cultural traditions. The study has also identified at least four distinct populations, each relatively isolated from each other with their own different cultural characteristics. The research paper also suggests that early populations took advantage of rivers and lakes that criss-crossed the Saharan desert. A climate model coupled with data about these ancient water...
  • Violence and climate change in prehistoric Egypt and Sudan

    07/21/2014 10:50:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    British Museum ^ | Monday, July 14, 2014 | Renée Friedman, curator
    Among the most exciting of the new acquisitions are the materials from the site of Jebel Sahaba, now in northern Sudan, which were donated to the Museum by Dr Fred Wendorf in 2002. Excavating here in 1965–66, as part of the UNESCO-funded campaign to salvage sites destined to be flooded by the construction of the Aswan High Dam, Dr Wendorf found a cemetery (site 117) containing at least 61 individuals dating back to about 13,000 years ago. This discovery was of great significance for two reasons. First, as a designated graveyard, evidently used over several generations, it is one of...
  • Mysterious Earthen Rings Predate Amazon Rainforest

    07/10/2014 12:35:30 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 43 replies
    Live Science ^ | July 07, 2014 03:37pm ET | Stephanie Pappas
    Carson and his colleagues wanted to explore the question of whether early Amazonians had a major impact on the forest. They focused on the Amazon of northeastern Bolivia, where they had sediment cores from two lakes nearby major earthworks sites. These sediment cores hold ancient pollen grains and charcoal from long-ago fires, and can hint at the climate and ecosystem that existed when the sediment was laid down as far back as 6,000 years ago. An examination of the two cores — one from the large lake, Laguna Oricore, and one from the smaller lake, Laguna Granja — revealed a...
  • Study Confirms Ancient River Systems in Sahara 100,000 Years Ago

    09/12/2013 7:21:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, September 11, 2013 | editors
    "Previous spatial analysis of the regional topography has shown there are major watersheds that are dry today but which would drain north from these [the Ahaggar and Tibesti ranges in the south] mountains towards the Mediterranean," says Coulthard, et. al. "Satellite imagery reveals traces of major river channels linked to these watersheds, now partially buried under sand dune deposits." It "provides the first strong quantitative evidence for the presence of three major river systems flowing across the Sahara during MIS 5e [Marine Isotope Stage 5e, or 130,000 years ago]".* "Whilst we cannot state for certain that humans migrated alongside these...
  • Stone Age humans crossed Sahara in the rain

    11/12/2009 5:56:28 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 53 replies · 1,212+ views
    New Scientist ^ | November 9, 2009 | Jeff Hecht
    Wet spells in the Sahara may have opened the door for early human migration. According to new evidence, water-dependent trees and shrubs grew there between 120,000 and 45,000 years ago. This suggests that changes in the weather helped early humans cross the desert on their way out of Africa... While about 40 per cent of hydrocarbons in today's dust come from water-dependent plants, this rose to 60 per cent, first between 120,000 and 110,000 ago and again from 50,000 to 45,000 years ago. So the region seemed to be in the grip of unusually wet spells at the time. That...
  • Giant stone-age axes found in African lake basin

    09/12/2009 5:44:18 PM PDT · by decimon · 55 replies · 1,886+ views
    PhysOrg.com ^ | September 10, 2009 | Unknown
    Four giant stone hand axes were recovered from the the dry basin of Lake Makgadikgadi in the Kalahari Desert. Oxford University researchers have unearthed new evidence from the lake basin in Botswana that suggests that the region was once much drier and wetter than it is today. They have documented thousands of stone tools on the lake bed, which sheds new light on how humans in Africa adapted to several substantial climate change events during the period that coincided with the last Ice Age in Europe. Researchers from the School of Geography and the Environment at the University of Oxford...
  • The African Source Of The Amazon's Fertilizer

    11/18/2006 4:22:58 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 1,078+ views
    Science News Magazine ^ | 11-18-2006 | Sid Perkins
    The African source of the Amazon's fertilizer Sid Perkins In the winter months in the Northern Hemisphere, massive dust storms from the African Sahara waft southwest across the Atlantic to drop tons of vital minerals on the Amazon basin in South America. Now, scientists have pinpointed the source of many of those dust storms and estimated their dust content. ON THE WAY. Satellite photo shows dust (arrow), bound for the Amazon, blowing away from the Sahara's Bodélé depression. NASA The Amazonian rainforest depends on Saharan dust for many of its nutrients, including iron and phosphorus (SN: 9/29/01, p. 200: http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20010929/bob9.asp)....
  • Amazon rainforest ‘could become a desert’

    07/24/2006 4:44:22 AM PDT · by voletti · 49 replies · 1,004+ views
    daily times pakistan ^ | 7/24/06 | daily times monitor
    LAHORE: The vast Amazon rainforest is on the verge of being turned into desert, with catastrophic consequences for the world’s climate, alarming research suggests. And the process, which would be irreversible, could begin as early as next year. Geoffrey Lean and Fred Pearce, writing for The Independent on Sunday, quote studies conducted by the blue-chip Woods Hole Research Centre in Amazonia as concluding that the forest cannot withstand more than two consecutive years of drought without breaking down. “Scientists say that this would spread drought into the northern hemisphere, including Britain, and could massively accelerate global warming with incalculable consequences,...
  • Scientists Explore Lakefront Property, in the Sahara

    02/01/2004 1:36:28 PM PST · by sarcasm · 25 replies · 217+ views
    The New York Times ^ | January 27, 2004 | BRENDA FOWLER
    he paleontologists were driving across the scorched and trackless Ténéré Desert of Niger, following a low ridge of rock bearing dinosaur fossils. Suddenly, someone on the team, led by Dr. Paul Sereno of the University of Chicago, spotted something dark against the tawny dunes.Getting out of their vehicles, they stepped into sand littered with the fossilized bones of modern crocodiles, hippos, camels and birds — interesting creatures, to be sure, but not exactly the quarry of these paleontologists. "But then things got really strange," recalls Gabrielle Lyon, a member of the expedition who is Dr. Sereno's wife and the director...
  • Global warming slowdown 'could last another decade'

    08/21/2014 4:38:31 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 48 replies
    BBC News ^ | Matt McGrath
    The hiatus in the rise in global temperatures could last for another 10 years, according to new research. Scientists have struggled to explain the so-called pause that began in 1999, despite ever increasing levels of CO2 in the atmosphere. The latest theory says that a naturally occurring 30-year cycle in the Atlantic Ocean is behind the slowdown. The researchers says this slow-moving current could continue to divert heat into the deep seas for another decade. However, they caution that global temperatures are likely to increase rapidly when the cycle flips to a warmer phase. Continue reading the main story “...
  • Report: EPA Exceeds Its Authority With Proposed Rules

    08/20/2014 8:15:56 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 11 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | August 19, 2014 | Peter Fricke
    Congress should use the appropriations process to reassert its authority over the Environmental Protection Agency, according to a Heritage Foundation issue brief released Tuesday.The report, written by scholar Daren Bakst, identifies three issues on which the EPA has proposed rules and regulations that exceed its authority. In all three cases, Bakst recommends that Congress prohibit the agency from using its funding to implement the proposals. (RELATED: EPA Overrides Congress, Hands Over Town to Indian Tribes)According to the report, “the EPA is using the regulatory process to require greenhouse gas emission reductions even as Congress has been unwilling to take such...
  • ‘Little Green Men’ Believe in Global Warming

    08/19/2014 9:39:44 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 10 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 08/19/14 | Judi McLeod
    Extraterrestrials are conveniently global warming believers Only Paul Hellyer, Canada’s Defence Minister from 1963-67 under Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson who rose to Deputy Prime Minister under Pierre Elliott Trudeau, would tell you that not only do extraterrestrials exist, but they are getting ticked off with those earthlings who don’t buy into Al Gore,/Maurice Strong man-mad global warming. And only Russian Television would be the first to break the ‘scoop’. It’s not enough that earthbound worries like the far left jumping into bed with the expanding Islamic State-Caliphate; that Marxism is on the march in the U.S.A.; or that the...
  • More Harsh Winters Could Spell Disaster For The Electrical Grid

    08/18/2014 2:37:08 AM PDT · by JACKRUSSELL · 48 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | August 15, 2014 | By Michael Bastasch
    If you thought last winter was bad, get ready for a potentially worse winter in parts of the country this year. But another record-setting winter could mean more than higher heating bills and snow fights. Harsh winter weather combined with coal-fired power plant closings could spell trouble for many households across the country who will desperately need to keep the lights and heat on this winter. Joe Bastardi, chief meteorologist at WeatherBELL Analytics, told the Wall Street Journal Live that current weather patterns are “flowing along right now into the type of El Niño situation that is notorious for giving...
  • Ebola and Climate Change: Are Humans Responsible for the Severity of the Current Outbreak?

    08/12/2014 3:35:16 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 23 replies
    Newsweek ^ | August 12, 2014 | By Elijah Wolfson
    ... In a study published in 2012, researchers asked national infectious disease experts in 30 different countries whether or not they thought climate change would affect infectious disease patterns in their countries. The majority agreed. Nevertheless, it’s unclear whether these beliefs are driven by good science, or, as Malcolm Gladwank argued way back in 1995, a guilt-driven “idea of disease as a punishment for wickedness.” It’s true that West Africa, where the latest and most catastrophic Ebola outbreak is currently raging, has faced unequivocal environmental changes in recent years. The International Food Policy Research Institute published a report in 2013,...
  • Kerry Makes Case for Global Warming as Mankind's Greatest Threat

    08/15/2014 8:11:52 PM PDT · by John Semmens · 38 replies
    Semi-News/Semi-Satire ^ | 15 Aug 2014 | John Semmens
    US Secretary of State John Kerry continues to baffle observers by insisting that "global warming is, by far, the greatest threat mankind faces in the 21st century." "The reason should be obvious from the term 'global' warming," Kerry said. "This means that it affects everyone. This has to put it ahead of dangers that afflict necessarily narrower categories of victims. The beheading of innocent children by ISIS in Iraq, for example, only affects thousands of people." "The threat to wipe Israel off the map and exterminate the Jews, at worst, would entail the deaths of only a few million," Kerry...
  • PR Firms Take a Stand on Climate Change: Will No Longer Represent Firms Denying Climate Change

    08/15/2014 6:44:19 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 21 replies
    Triple Pundit ^ | 08/14/2014 | RP Seigel
    Public relations (PR) is a powerful but unseen force in our society. Companies hire PR firms to make them look as good as possible. When the companies do something they are proud of, they do everything they can to make sure everyone hears about it (including, sometimes contacting reporters like us). When the companies do things that are not so great, they “spin” the news to make it sound harmless. PR firms make their money from fees paid by their clients and have typically been value-neutral, meaning that they promote whatever their clients want them to promote. So it’s a...
  • It's an Unsettling Climate for skeptical scientists like Murry Salby

    08/14/2014 12:11:13 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 7 replies
    joannenova.com.au ^ | August 13th, 2014 | Joanne
    Rupert Darwall is the author of Age of Global Warming (and earning excellent reviews). Darwall has a gift for converting tricky scientific concepts into a story. This month in the City Journal, he beautifully summarizes and updates the story of Murry Salby. He’s interviewed Richard Lindzen and others, and discusses Salby’s work in the context of the way heretics are marginalized. I helped Rupert with some of the background. It’s controversial science, a complex situation, with irrelevant baggage to boot. But that’s exactly the place where science communicators — or in the case of Rupert, excellent historians — are most...
  • Be afraid! Trapped atmospheric waves on the rise. Extreme heatwaves to come.

    08/14/2014 10:28:41 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 37 replies
    joannenova.com.au ^ | August 14th, 2014 | Joanne
    There are waves piling on waves in the weather.A new press release tells us that there have been an “exceptional” number of weather extremes in summer. Weather extremes in the summer — such as the record heat wave in the United States that hit corn farmers and worsened wildfires in 2012 — have reached an exceptional number in the last ten years. Human-made global warming can explain a gradual increase in periods of severe heat, but the observed change in the magnitude and duration of some events is not so easily explained. Heatwaves lend themselves to headlines. Not only are...
  • Groups rally around think tank, publication being sued for global warming views

    08/14/2014 9:13:19 AM PDT · by jazusamo · 24 replies
    Fox News ^ | August 14, 2014 | Barnini Chakraborty
    WASHINGTON – News outlets, advocacy groups and fellow think tanks are jumping to the defense of a conservative-leaning D.C. policy center and publication being sued for libel by a scientist who didn't like what they had to say about his work on global warming. Michael Mann, a prominent professor of meteorology at Pennsylvania State University, has long been a target of climate change skeptics for his work claiming temperatures have risen dramatically in recent decades, and has sued before when groups tried to debunk his data. But this time, Mann is being accused of going too far with his case...
  • Kellogg Wants Suppliers To Report Carbon Emissions

    08/13/2014 8:16:15 AM PDT · by palmer · 28 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Wed, 08/13/2014 - 7:29am | John Flesher - AP Environmental Writer - Associated Press
    Kellogg said Wednesday it will step up efforts to reduce planet-warming emissions in its supply chain as part of a broader initiative designed to be more environmentally friendly. Under the plan, the Battle Creek-based food products manufacturer will require key suppliers such as farms and mills to measure and publicly disclose their greenhouse gas outputs and targets for reducing them...
  • Carter: 'Nutcases' are stopping climate action (funny)

    08/13/2014 9:08:45 AM PDT · by jazusamo · 61 replies
    The Hill ^ | August 13, 2014 | Laura Barron-Lopez
    Former President Carter says climate skeptics are the "biggest handicap" for the U.S. when it comes to acting on global warming. “I would say the biggest handicap we have right now is some nutcases in our country that don’t believe in global warming,” Carter said Tuesday during the American Renewable Energy Day summit in Aspen, Colo. “I think they are going to change their position because of pressure from individuals, because the evidence of the ravages of global warming is already there," he added. The 39th president expressed frustration with the administration and Congress on their lack of efforts to...
  • PG poll: Scientific consensus on climate change has not permeated the public [lefty whining]

    08/13/2014 8:36:13 AM PDT · by GulliverSwift · 40 replies
    Pitsburgh Post-Gazette ^ | James P. O'Toole
    Despite the scientific consensus that global warming is occurring and caused by human activity, a new survey conducted for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette demonstrates that many Americans remain uncertain about the impact of climate change and the need for government action to address it. This is contrary to some polls suggesting wide support for steps to counter the phenomenon. David W. Moore, director of the iMediaEthics survey, said the results suggest that, because of flaws in methodology or wording, some other surveys have overstated the degree of public knowledge on the issue, and the intensity of support for measures to curb...
  • Kerry visits Solomon Islands, sees WWII memorials (and talks “climate change”)

    08/12/2014 9:55:11 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 14 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Aug 13, 12:39 AM EDT | Matthew Lee
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry paid a visit Wednesday to the Solomon Islands in the South Pacific, where he met the tiny nation’s leaders and commemorated the ferocious World War II battles fought on Guadalcanal. Kerry met with Solomon’s Prime Minister Gordon Lilo and Governor General Frank Kabui to discuss sustainable development, ocean preservation and how the islands’ 600,000 residents are coping with the effects of climate change. …
  • At Martha's Vineyard, Obama complains about Cold Ocean

    08/11/2014 7:58:45 PM PDT · by logi_cal869 · 45 replies
    Breitbart ^ | 8/11/2014 | Charlie Spiering
    "I found, as somebody from Hawaii, the water is still a little cold."
  • British scientists stranded in freezing Antarctic research station

    08/10/2014 11:37:26 AM PDT · by citizen · 77 replies
    Mail Online ^ | 8 August 2014 | Dan Bloom
    British scientists are stranded after their Antarctic base lost power in the depths of winter as temperatures plummeted to a record low of minus 55C. There is no way of rescuing the 13 researchers from the Halley VI Research Station - which has been hit by a 19-hour blackout - for months until the hostile winter subsides. The British Antarctic Survey admitted it was a 'serious incident' and has suspended all experiments as the workers heat up emergency accommodation which has not been used for months. Some of the fallout from the power cut, which happened a week ago but...
  • Global Warming Pause Puts 'Crisis' In Perspective

    08/07/2014 2:36:36 PM PDT · by iowamark · 23 replies
    Forbes ^ | 8/7/2014 | James Taylor
    Much has been written and argued, from all sides in the global warming debate, about the meaning of the asserted 17-year pause in global warming. Is a 17-year pause significant? Is a pause even occurring? Does the pause signal a longer-term halt to global warming or even a long-term cooling trend? Would a resumption of global warming to pre-pause rates end the global warming debate? A look at recent temperatures and their appropriate context provides helpful meaning to the much-discussed global warming pause. Satellite instruments began uniformly measuring temperatures throughout the Earth’s lower atmosphere in 1979. Climate scientists overseeing these...
  • Peter Goldmark - Thel Man Behind the Global Warming Scheme

    08/04/2014 6:51:50 PM PDT · by mgist · 30 replies
    Politco ^ | not sure | The Arena
    Arena Profile: Peter Goldmark Peter Goldmark currently directs the Climate and Air program for Environmental Defense Fund. Prior to joining Environmental Defense, he was Chairman and CEO of the International Herald Tribune. Peter has had exceptional careers in both the public and private sectors. His public service was highlighted by his tenure as Budget Director for the State of New York during the 1970s city- and state-wide fiscal crisis where he was an architect of its rescue; and as Executive Director of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey through to 1983. He served as president of the...
  • A Dozen States File Suit Against New Coal Rules

    08/02/2014 7:55:44 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 19 replies
    New York Times ^ | August 1, 2014 | By CORAL DAVENPORT
    Twelve states filed a lawsuit against the Obama administration on Friday seeking to block an Environmental Protection Agency proposal to regulate coal-fired power plants in an effort to stem climate change. The plaintiffs are led by West Virginia and include states that are home to some of the largest producers of coal and consumers of coal-fired electricity. The suit was filed in the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. The other plaintiffs are Alabama, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota and Wyoming. The E.P.A. rule, announced by President Obama on June...
  • Need Proof Communists Are Behind Global Warming Hype? Here It Is…

    08/01/2014 5:20:49 PM PDT · by Up Yours Marxists · 14 replies
    Western Journalism ^ | August 1, 2014 21:05 GMT | Christopher Agee
    Details emerging from a meeting held last month in Venezuela provide some rare insight into the actual mission of numerous groups that purportedly exist to stop the ostensible dangers of global warming. According to reports, the United Nations sponsored the four-day event, which was attended by representatives from 130 environmentalist groups. While the end result was a lengthy report providing an overview of the alliance’s proposals, the basic message can be summed up in two words: end capitalism. Fellowship of the Minds provided its analysis of the Spanish language document published after the meeting ended July 18. According to the...