Keyword: yurt

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  • Global Warming and the Rise of the Mongolian Empire

    03/12/2014 6:56:57 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies
    National Review ^ | 03/12/2014 | Alec Torres
    Humanity’s greatest land empire was made possible by non-human climate change. Many phenomena, real and imagined, have been attributed to global warming. From rising ocean levels to increased agricultural yields to tornadoes to polar vortices to droughts to rapes to car thefts, global warming now stands as the cause of just about anything. And because of current political dogma, man is ultimately blamed for all these evils (and occasional goods). Now a recent study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences argues that there is a correlation between increasing global temperatures and the rise of the Mongolian empire. According...
  • How Climate Change Drove the Rise of Genghis Khan

    03/10/2014 5:24:10 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 32 replies
    TIME ^ | March 10, 2014 | by Bryan Walsh
    The Mongol warlord built the world's largest land-based empire. But he couldn't have done it without a change in climate. The difference was Genghis Khan, the warlord who united the tribes and launched them on their wave of unstoppable conquest. But the Mongol Empire wasn’t solely the product of Genghis’s will. As a fascinating new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) demonstrates, the rise of the Mongols may have owed just as much to beneficial changes in the climate that made the grasslands of the Mongol steppes green and verdant, fueling the horses that were...
  • Yurts: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know But Were Afraid to Ask

    06/21/2013 9:56:58 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 28 replies
    MNN ^ | Mon, Jun 17 2013
    Here's your 101 guide on the structure that helped Genghis Khan conquer Eurasia — from how they're made to where you can stay in one or where you can buy one.A yurt is a round cylindrical dwelling capped with a conic roof that's been in use for at least the past few thousand years. Originating in Central Asia (Genghis Khan and his horde used them), the yurt was valued by its native progenitors for its portability, durability and structural soundness. Yurts are easy to put up and take down (requiring just a couple hours of work) and could be transported...
  • Genghis Khan the GREEN: Invader killed so many people that carbon levels plummeted

    04/20/2013 12:16:46 PM PDT · by plain talk · 31 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | January 25, 2011 | Daily Mail reporter
    Genghis Khan has been branded the greenest invader in history - after his murderous conquests killed so many people that huge swathes of cultivated land returned to forest. The Mongol leader, who established a vast empire between the 13th and 14th centuries, helped remove nearly 700million tons of carbon from the atmosphere, claims a new study. The deaths of 40 million people meant that large areas of cultivated land grew thick once again with trees, which absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
  • Genghis Khan the GREEN: Invader killed so many people that carbon levels plummeted

    01/15/2013 9:54:45 AM PST · by Winged Hussar · 26 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 1/25/11
    Genghis Khan has been branded the greenest invader in history - after his murderous conquests killed so many people that huge swathes of cultivated land returned to forest. The Mongol leader, who established a vast empire between the 13th and 14th centuries, helped remove nearly 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere, claims a new study.
  • The Hunt for Genghis Khan’s Tomb

    12/04/2012 11:51:09 AM PST · by Theoria · 32 replies
    The Daily Beast ^ | 03 Dec 2012 | Oliver Steeds
    For centuries historians and treasure seekers have searched for the burial site of history's most famous conqueror. New findings offer compelling evidence that it's been found. In the eight hundred years since his death, people have sought in vain for the grave of Genhis Khan, the 13th-century conqueror and imperial ruler who, at the time of his death, occupied the largest contiguous empire, stretching from the Caspian Sea to the Pacific. In capturing most of central Asia and China, his armies killed and pillaged but also forged new links between East and West. One of history’s most brilliant and ruthless...
  • Rethinking the Thundering Hordes

    05/06/2012 7:31:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Archaeology, v65 n3 ^ | May/June 2012 | Andrew Lawler
    Vast stretches of Central Asia feel eerily uninhabited. Fly at 30,000 feet over... Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan -- and there are long moments when no town or road or field is visible from your window. Wandering bands and tribes roamed this immense area for 5,000 years, herding goat, sheep, cattle, and horses across immense steppes, through narrow valleys, and over high snowy passes. They left occasional tombs that survived the ages, and on rare occasions settled down and built towns or even cities. But for the most part, these peoples left behind few physical traces of their origins, beliefs, or ways...
  • Genghis Kahn's Unintended Green Legacy

    02/23/2011 11:40:32 AM PST · by Olympiad Fisherman · 28 replies
    Mother Nature Network ^ | 1/24/2011 | Bryan Nelson
    Genghis Khan's Mongol invasion in the 13th and 14th centuries was so vast that it may have been the first instance in history of a single culture causing man-made climate change, according to new research out of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, reports Mongabay.com. Unlike modern day climate change, however, the Mongol invasion cooled the planet, effectively scrubbing around 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere. So how did Genghis Khan, one of history's cruelest conquerors, earn such a glowing environmental report card? The reality may be a bit difficult for today's environmentalists to stomach, but Khan...
  • Carnegie Institution Study: Genocide Reduces Global Warming (All hail to Genghis Khan!)

    01/28/2011 7:10:57 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 25 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 01/28/2011 | Andrew Walden
    A study touting Genghis Khan's environmental record is being cheered by the team which produced Al Gore's movie, An Inconvenient Truth.  Genghis Khan's great accomplishment for the green cause?  Killing off 40 million humans so their un-tilled fields would be overtaken by forests.  While some may find genocide morally repugnant, environmentalists had a different concern:  Would reforestation be enough to overcome the greenhouse gases released by all those decaying bodies?  Julia Pongratz, who headed the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology research project from the Institution's Stanford University campus offices, provides the answer in a January 20 news release: We found that during the short...
  • Genghis Khan--environmentalist (Mass slaughter appears to be an environmental plus)

    01/26/2011 7:17:45 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 22 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 01/26/2011 | Ethel C. Fenig
    Environmentalists have a new role model--Genghis Khan. According to this report in England's Daily Mail , Khan was a real greenie whose actions during his long career ultimately improved the atmosphere and reforested the land. But...but...some might sputter, he was an incredibly cruel, murdering invader--not an environmentalist! Uh, well yes on all counts; that's how he improved the environment. Genghis Khan has been branded the greenest invader in history - after his murderous conquests killed so many people that huge swathes of cultivated land returned to forest.The Mongol leader, who established a vast empire between the 13th and 14th...
  • Was Genghis Khan history's greenest conqueror? (Mongol invasion scrubbed 700 million tons of carbon)

    01/25/2011 9:08:45 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    Mother Nature Network ^ | 01/25/2011 | Bryan Nelson
    Genghis Khan's Mongol invasion in the 13th and 14th centuries was so vast that it may have been the first instance in history of a single culture causing man-made climate change, according to new research out of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, reports Mongabay.com. Unlike modern day climate change, however, the Mongol invasion cooled the planet, effectively scrubbing around 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere. So how did Genghis Khan, one of history's cruelest conquerors, earn such a glowing environmental report card? The reality may be a bit difficult for today's environmentalists to stomach, but Khan...
  • Was Genghis Khan history's greenest conqueror?

    01/24/2011 3:54:27 PM PST · by Fractal Trader · 77 replies
    Mother Nature Network ^ | 24 January 2011 | Bryan Nelson
    Genghis Khan's Mongol invasion in the 13th and 14th centuries was so vast that it may have been the first instance in history of a single culture causing man-made climate change, according to new research out of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Global Ecology, reports Mongabay.com. Earn Points What's this? Comments (21) Email Facebook Twitter Stumble Digg Share Unlike modern day climate change, however, the Mongol invasion actually cooled the planet, effectively scrubbing around 700 million tons of carbon from the atmosphere. So how exactly did Genghis Khan, one of history's cruelest conquerors, earn such a glowing environmental report card?...
  • Vatican reveals Secret Archives (including letter from Genghis Khan's grandson)

    01/02/2010 4:42:07 AM PST · by NYer · 61 replies · 2,075+ views
    Telegraph ^ | January 1, 2010 | Nick Squires
    The Holy See’s archives contain scrolls, parchments and leather-bound volumes with correspondence dating back more than 1,000 years. High-quality reproductions of 105 documents, 19 of which have never been seen before in public, have now been published in a book. The Vatican Secret Archives features a papal letter to Hitler, an entreaty to Rome written on birch bark by a tribe of North American Indians, and a plea from Mary Queen of Scots. The book documents the Roman Catholic Church’s often hostile dealings with the world of science and the arts, including documents from the heresy trial against Galileo and...
  • Beneath the ruins of Genghis Khan's capital city in Central Asia, archaeologists discovered artif...

    04/10/2009 5:49:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 1,323+ views
    Smithsonian ^ | March 25, 2009 | Abigail Tucker
    Of all the wonders in The Palace of the Great Khan, the silver fountain most captivated the visiting monk. It took the shape of "a great silver tree, and at its roots are four lions of silver, each with a conduit through it, and all belching forth white milk of mares," wrote William of Rubruck, a Franciscan friar who toured the Mongol capital, Khara Khorum, in 1254. When a silver angel at the top of the tree trumpeted, still more beverages spouted out of the pipes: wine, clarified mare's milk, a honey drink, rice mead -- take your pick... in...
  • Restoring Order: Conquering Iraq in the 13th and 21st Centuries. Could Genghis Khan teach the US?

    03/26/2009 1:11:16 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 13 replies · 1,024+ views
    Japan Focus ^ | ‎Mar 20, 2009‎ | Jack Weatherford
    In his final televised speech to the Iraqi people in 2003, Saddam Hussein denounced the invading Americans as "the Mongols of this age," a reference to the last time infidels had conquered his country, in 1258. But the comparison isn't very apt — unlike the Mongols, the Americans don't have the organizational genius of Genghis Khan. In the 13th century, Temujin — better known by his title, Genghis Khan ("world leader") — headed a tribal nation smaller than the workforce of Wal-Mart, yet he conquered and ruled more people than anyone in history. After Genghis Khan's death, his grandson, Hulegu,...
  • Recently Uncovered Skeleton Offers Clues on Chinggis Khaan Era

    12/15/2008 7:22:12 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies · 850+ views
    Mongolian News ^ | Thursday, December 11, 2008 | William Kennedy
    An ancient female skeleton discovered along the Tuul River, some 55 kilometers outside Ulaanbaatar, may be more remarkable for when she lived rather than who she was. After examining earrings and rings discovered amongst the remains, Kh. Lkhagvasuren, an archaeologist who heads the Mongolian Historical and Cultural Heritage Center, said this week that the woman was likely a contemporary of Chinggis Khaan... While an examination of the skeleton -- specifically the skull and waist -- revealed that it belonged to a teenage female, not much else is known about the young woman's life. The body was buried in a wooden...
  • Mongolian conqueror Genghis Khan banned gay sex, experts say

    09/01/2007 5:21:19 PM PDT · by GeorgeKant · 43 replies · 1,365+ views
    AP ^ | 2007-08-30
    BEIJING, Aug 30 (AP) -- Gay sex was punishable by death under Genghis Khan's rule. That was among the findings of Chinese researchers who spent more than a year compiling the legendary Mongolian conqueror's code of laws, the official Xinhua News Agency said Thursday. His early 13th century empire stretched across Asia all the way to central Europe. Article 48 of the code said men who "committed sodomy shall be put to death," according to experts at a research institute in the Chinese region of Inner Mongolia. The experts at the Research Institute of Ancient Mongolian Laws and Sociology said...
  • China claims Genghis Khan as its own

    12/29/2006 4:04:22 PM PST · by maui_hawaii · 49 replies · 3,762+ views
    From outcast nomad to tribal warlord and finally founder of the world's greatest land empire, Genghis Khan went through a lot of changes in a tumultuous life spanning the end of the 12th century and the beginning of the 13th. But perhaps the strangest transformation ever undergone by the Mongolian military genius has come in modern times: his reinvention as a Chinese hero. “Genghis Khan was certainly Chinese,” says Guo Wurong, general manager of the Genghis Khan Mausoleum Tourist District in China's Inner Mongolia region. “We currently define him as a hero of the Mongolian nationality, a great man of...
  • Gengis Khan Basecamp Found In China

    12/28/2006 5:22:34 PM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 855+ views
    Physorg/Xinhua ^ | 12-26-2006
    Gengis Khan basecamp found in China Chinese scholars have found a series of ancient wells they believe provided water for Genghis Khan's legendary hordes during their campaign in Western Xia. The find led them to conclude Genghis Khan did indeed march through the city of Ordos on his expedition into Western Xia. China's Xinhua news service said Monday more than 80 wells spaced 10 meters (33 feet) apart that were apparently used by the expedition's thousands of soldiers and horses. The wells are believed to be part of the "100 Wells" cited in the ancient classic history, "The Untold Story...
  • Mural Of Genghis Khan's Funeral Found

    12/27/2006 5:27:07 PM PST · by blam · 67 replies · 2,621+ views
    Washington Times ^ | 12-26-2006
    Mural of Genghis Khan's funeral found Dec. 26, 2006 at 12:09PM A painting of a Mongolian funeral ceremony in the Arjai caves in North China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region might depict Genghis Khan's funeral. The mural in one of the caves at the Arjai Grotto is about 20 inches long and 14 inches wide, the Xinhua News Agency reported Tuesday. The painting depicts a Mongolian funeral where a man is held above a funeral pit by white cranes, said Pan Zhaodong, a researcher from the Social Science Academy of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. One well-dressed onlooker could very well...