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The Rise and Fall of Nikola Tesla and his Tower
Smithsonian ^ | February 4, 2013

Posted on 02/06/2013 6:44:07 PM PST by nickcarraway

By the end of his brilliant and tortured life, the Serbian physicist, engineer and inventor Nikola Tesla was penniless and living in a small New York City hotel room. He spent days in a park surrounded by the creatures that mattered most to him—pigeons—and his sleepless nights working over mathematical equations and scientific problems in his head. That habit would confound scientists and scholars for decades after he died, in 1943. His inventions were designed and perfected in his imagination.

Tesla believed his mind to be without equal, and he wasn’t above chiding his contemporaries, such as Thomas Edison, who once hired him. “If Edison had a needle to find in a haystack,” Tesla once wrote, “he would proceed at once with the diligence of the bee to examine straw after straw until he found the object of his search. I was a sorry witness of such doing that a little theory and calculation would have saved him ninety percent of his labor.”

But what his contemporaries may have been lacking in scientific talent (by Tesla’s estimation), men like Edison and George Westinghouse clearly possessed the one trait that Tesla did not—a mind for business. And in the last days of America’s Gilded Age, Nikola Tesla made a dramatic attempt to change the future of communications and power transmission around the world. He managed to convince J.P. Morgan that he was on the verge of a breakthrough, and the financier gave Tesla more than $150,000 to fund what would become a gigantic, futuristic and startling tower in the middle of Long Island, New York. In 1898, as Tesla’s plans to create a worldwide wireless transmission system became known, Wardenclyffe Tower would be Tesla’s last chance to claim the recognition and wealth that had always escaped him.

Nikola Tesla was born in modern-day Croatia in 1856; his father, Milutin, was a priest of the Serbian Orthodox Church. From an early age, he demonstrated the obsessiveness that would puzzle and amuse those around him. He could memorize entire books and store logarithmic tables in his brain. He picked up languages easily, and he could work through days and nights on only a few hours sleep.

At the age of 19, he was studying electrical engineering at the Polytechnic Institute at Graz in Austria, where he quickly established himself as a star student. He found himself in an ongoing debate with a professor over perceived design flaws in the direct-current (DC) motors that were being demonstrated in class. “In attacking the problem again I almost regretted that the struggle was soon to end,” Tesla later wrote. “I had so much energy to spare. When I undertook the task it was not with a resolve such as men often make. With me it was a sacred vow, a question of life and death. I knew that I would perish if I failed. Now I felt that the battle was won. Back in the deep recesses of the brain was the solution, but I could not yet give it outward expression.”

He would spend the next six years of his life “thinking” about electromagnetic fields and a hypothetical motor powered by alternate-current that would and should work. The thoughts obsessed him, and he was unable to focus on his schoolwork. Professors at the university warned Tesla’s father that the young scholar’s working and sleeping habits were killing him. But rather than finish his studies, Tesla became a gambling addict, lost all his tuition money, dropped out of school and suffered a nervous breakdown. It would not be his last.

In 1881, Tesla moved to Budapest, after recovering from his breakdown, and he was walking through a park with a friend, reciting poetry, when a vision came to him. There in the park, with a stick, Tesla drew a crude diagram in the dirt—a motor using the principle of rotating magnetic fields created by two or more alternating currents. While AC electrification had been employed before, there would never be a practical, working motor run on alternating current until he invented his induction motor several years later.

In June 1884, Tesla sailed for New York City and arrived with four cents in his pocket and a letter of recommendation from Charles Batchelor—a former employer—to Thomas Edison, which was purported to say, “My Dear Edison: I know two great men and you are one of them. The other is this young man!”

A meeting was arranged, and once Tesla described the engineering work he was doing, Edison, though skeptical, hired him. According to Tesla, Edison offered him $50,000 if he could improve upon the DC generation plants Edison favored. Within a few months, Tesla informed the American inventor that he had indeed improved upon Edison’s motors. Edison, Tesla noted, refused to pay up. “When you become a full-fledged American, you will appreciate an American joke,” Edison told him.

Tesla promptly quit and took a job digging ditches. But it wasn’t long before word got out that Tesla’s AC motor was worth investing in, and the Western Union Company put Tesla to work in a lab not far from Edison’s office, where he designed AC power systems that are still used around the world. “The motors I built there,” Tesla said, “were exactly as I imagined them. I made no attempt to improve the design, but merely reproduced the pictures as they appeared to my vision, and the operation was always as I expected.”

Tesla patented his AC motors and power systems, which were said to be the most valuable inventions since the telephone. Soon, George Westinghouse, recognizing that Tesla’s designs might be just what he needed in his efforts to unseat Edison’s DC current, licensed his patents for $60,000 in stocks and cash and royalties based on how much electricity Westinghouse could sell. Ultimately, he won the “War of the Currents,” but at a steep cost in litigation and competition for both Westinghouse and Edison’s General Electric Company.

Wardenclyffe Tower. Photo: Wikipedia Fearing ruin, Westinghouse begged Tesla for relief from the royalties Westinghouse agreed to. “Your decision determines the fate of the Westinghouse Company,” he said. Tesla, grateful to the man who had never tried to swindle him, tore up the royalty contract, walking away from millions in royalties that he was already owed and billions that would have accrued in the future. He would have been one of the wealthiest men in the world—a titan of the Gilded Age.

His work with electricity reflected just one facet of his fertile mind. Before the turn of the 20th century, Tesla had invented a powerful coil that was capable of generating high voltages and frequencies, leading to new forms of light, such as neon and fluorescent, as well as X-rays. Tesla also discovered that these coils, soon to be called “Tesla Coils,” made it possible to send and receive radio signals. He quickly filed for American patents in 1897, beating the Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi to the punch.

Tesla continued to work on his ideas for wireless transmissions when he proposed to J.P. Morgan his idea of a wireless globe. After Morgan put up the $150,000 to build the giant transmission tower, Tesla promptly hired the noted architect Stanford White of McKim, Mead, and White in New York. White, too, was smitten with Tesla’s idea. After all, Tesla was the highly acclaimed man behind Westinghouse’s success with alternating current, and when Tesla talked, he was persuasive.

“As soon as completed, it will be possible for a business man in New York to dictate instructions, and have them instantly appear in type at his office in London or elsewhere,” Tesla said at the time. “He will be able to call up, from his desk, and talk to any telephone subscriber on the globe, without any change whatever in the existing equipment. An inexpensive instrument, not bigger than a watch, will enable its bearer to hear anywhere, on sea or land, music or song, the speech of a political leader, the address of an eminent man of science, or the sermon of an eloquent clergyman, delivered in some other place, however distant. In the same manner any picture, character, drawing or print can be transferred from one to another place. Millions of such instruments can be operated from but one plant of this kind.”

White quickly got to work designing Wardenclyffe Tower in 1901, but soon after construction began it became apparent that Tesla was going to run out of money before it was finished. An appeal to Morgan for more money proved fruitless, and in the meantime investors were rushing to throw their money behind Marconi. In December 1901, Marconi successfully sent a signal from England to Newfoundland. Tesla grumbled that the Italian was using 17 of his patents, but litigation eventually favored Marconi and the commercial damage was done. (The U.S. Supreme Court ultimately upheld Tesla’s claims, clarifying Tesla’s role in the invention of the radio—but not until 1943, after he died.) Thus the Italian inventor was credited as the inventor of radio and became rich. Wardenclyffe Tower became a 186-foot-tall relic (it would be razed in 1917), and the defeat—Tesla’s worst—led to another of his breakdowns. ”It is not a dream,” Tesla said, “it is a simple feat of scientific electrical engineering, only expensive—blind, faint-hearted, doubting world!”

Guglielmo Marconi in 1903. Photo: Library of Congress By 1912, Tesla began to withdraw from that doubting world. He was clearly showing signs of obsessive-compulsive disorder, and was potentially a high-functioning autistic. He became obsessed with cleanliness and fixated on the number three; he began shaking hands with people and washing his hands—all done in sets of three. He had to have 18 napkins on his table during meals, and would count his steps whenever he walked anywhere. He claimed to have an abnormal sensitivity to sounds, as well as an acute sense of sight, and he later wrote that he had “a violent aversion against the earrings of women,” and “the sight of a pearl would almost give me a fit.”

Near the end of his life, Tesla became fixated on pigeons, especially a specific white female, which he claimed to love almost as one would love a human being. One night, Tesla claimed the white pigeon visited him through an open window at his hotel, and he believed the bird had come to tell him she was dying. He saw “two powerful beans of light” in the bird’s eyes, he later said. “Yes, it was a real light, a powerful, dazzling, blinding light, a light more intense than I had ever produced by the most powerful lamps in my laboratory.” The pigeon died in his arms, and the inventor claimed that in that moment, he knew that he had finished his life’s work.

Nikola Tesla would go on to make news from time to time while living on the 33rd floor of the New Yorker Hotel. In 1931 he made the cover of Time magazine, which featured his inventions on his 75th birthday. And in 1934, the New York Times reported that Tesla was working on a “Death Beam” capable of knocking 10,000 enemy airplanes out of the sky. He hoped to fund a prototypical defensive weapon in the interest of world peace, but his appeals to J.P. Morgan Jr. and British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain went nowhere. Tesla did, however, receive a $25,000 check from the Soviet Union, but the project languished. He died in 1943, in debt, although Westinghouse had been paying his room and board at the hotel for years.

Sources

Books: Nikola Tesla, My Inventions: The Autobiography of Nikola Tesla, Hart Brothers, Pub., 1982. Margaret Cheney, Tesla: Man Out of Time, Touchstone, 1981.

Articles: “The Problem of Increasing Human Energy With Special References to the Harnessing of the Sun’s Energy,” by Nikola Tesla, Century Magazine, June, 1900. “Reflections on the Mind of Nikola Tesla,” by R. (Chandra) Chandrasekhar, Centre for Intelligent Information Processing Systems, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Augst 27, 2006, http://www.ee.uwa.edu.au/~chandra/Downloads/Tesla/MindOfTesla.html”Tesla: Live and Legacy, Tower of Dreams,” PBS.org, http://www.pbs.org/tesla/ll/ll_todre.html. ”The Cult of Nikola Tesla,” by Brian Dunning, Skeptoid #345, January 15, 2003. http://skeptoid.com/episodes/4345. “Nikola Tesla, History of Technology, The Famous Inventors Worldwide,” by David S. Zondy, Worldwide Independent Inventors Association, http://www.worldwideinvention.com/articles/details/474/Nikola-Tesla-History-of-Technology-The-famous-Inventors-Worldwide.html. “The Future of Wireless Art by Nikola Tesla,” Wireless Telegraphy & Telephony, by Walter W. Massid & Charles R. Underhill, 1908. http://www.tfcbooks.com/tesla/1908-00-00.htm


TOPICS: Business/Economy; History; Science
KEYWORDS: automakers; freeenergy; godsgravesglyphs; haarp; heddylamarr; ineventors; nikolatesla; physics; science; tesla; thomasedison; wardenclyffe
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1 posted on 02/06/2013 6:44:15 PM PST by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway

/bm


2 posted on 02/06/2013 6:45:14 PM PST by bigheadfred (wogga wogga)
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To: nickcarraway

3 posted on 02/06/2013 6:45:45 PM PST by EEGator
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To: nickcarraway

This guy was so much more brilliant than Edison.
In some regards, Edison was a punk and a copycat.


4 posted on 02/06/2013 6:55:00 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: nickcarraway

***Stanford White of McKim, Mead, and White in New York.***

Ah yes, the Stanford White of THE GIRL IN THE RED VELVET SWING scandal. Shot dead by her hubby.


5 posted on 02/06/2013 6:56:02 PM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Click my name! See new paintings!)
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To: mylife
His description of Edison searching through hundreds of straws was literally accurate. Edison did just that to find a suitable filament for his light bulb. Tesla, by comparison, invented AC and WiFi decades ago.
6 posted on 02/06/2013 7:05:16 PM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: nickcarraway

The entire North East is still being powered by Tesla’s first power plant.


7 posted on 02/06/2013 7:06:10 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: nickcarraway

Morgan Jr was a short-sighted prick. We could sure use a man like Tesla today. My abdo-lute hero. Halfway through Margeret Cheney’s book for the third time. His contributions to the science of electricity have molded the way we live today!


8 posted on 02/06/2013 7:07:41 PM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: hinckley buzzard

Indeed, but Edison was a ruthless SOB when it came to business.


9 posted on 02/06/2013 7:07:53 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: hinckley buzzard

“Tesla, by comparison, invented AC and WiFi decades ago.”

And early computer guys kept running into his patents! He invented the “and” gate.

Edison was a creep! He paid boys to grab peoples cats and dogs and then “Westinghoused” them using AC power, trying to scare people away from AC.


10 posted on 02/06/2013 7:13:39 PM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: nickcarraway

The Wardenclyffe Tower.

11 posted on 02/06/2013 7:16:50 PM PST by jaz.357 (Welcome to hell. Here's your accordion.)
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To: nickcarraway

Thank God he convinced Morgan that AC was the way to go for powering the home. But such a shame that he died broke.


12 posted on 02/06/2013 7:26:47 PM PST by deweyfrank
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To: hinckley buzzard

Wifi is actually based upon frequency hopping spread spectrum technology and the inventor of that has a story that bests even Tesla. She (yes, she) was widely regarded as the most beautiful woman in the world. She used her range of acting talent and God-given beauty to set the standard by which all other Hollywood starlets were measured. Her incredible beauty and intellect(specifically mathematics) made her a force of nature, capturing the attention of heads of state and movie fans alike. She married and arms merchant named Friedrich Mandl, the third richest man in Europe when she was 19. He used her for arm candy when hosting the likes of Hitler and Mussolini in order to sell munitions. She left him and escaped to continue pursuing her acting career in America. She worked and married a composer named George Antheil. Together they devised a secret wireless communication system based on the 88 keys of a piano, driven in large part to help the US military in WWII.
Lamarr’s and Antheil’s frequency-hopping idea serves as a basis for modern spread-spectrum communication technology, such as Bluetooth, COFDM used in Wi-Fi network connections, and CDMA used in some cordless and wireless telephones.[25] Blackwell, Martin, and Vernam’s 1920 patent Secrecy Communication System seems to lay the communications groundwork for Kiesler and Antheil’s patent, which employed the techniques in the autonomous control of torpedoes. In other words, Hedy Lamarr is likely the most influential woman in history and most people don’t know her story. Not just another pretty face!


13 posted on 02/06/2013 7:34:06 PM PST by Madhattan
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To: mylife

“The entire North East is still being powered by Tesla’s first power plant.”

That statement contains a bit of truth, an oversimplification and no small amount of exaggeration. All rolled into one.


14 posted on 02/06/2013 7:47:27 PM PST by Nik Naym (It's not my fault... I have compulsive smartass disorder.)
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To: Madhattan
yup, and a damn fine actress...
15 posted on 02/06/2013 8:04:36 PM PST by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: Madhattan

“which employed the techniques in the autonomous control of torpedoes.”

Wasn’t that a Tesla invention? Around 1894?
Can you recommend a bio of Lamarr?


16 posted on 02/06/2013 8:08:20 PM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: nickcarraway

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks nickcarraway.

Just adding to the catalog, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


17 posted on 02/06/2013 8:16:01 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra

Perhaps you’re thinking of Tesla’s radio controlled submersibles, first demonstrated at the 1893 Columbian Exposition (it was in 1893 because they were a year late in the planning etc), giving him priority over Marconi (Tesla sued over Marconi’s unlicensed use of his radio patents).


18 posted on 02/06/2013 8:21:09 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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http://www.tfcbooks.com/mall/more/431pir.htm


19 posted on 02/06/2013 8:22:35 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: deweyfrank

The thing is, AC is actually now becoming a liability...

.. not knocking Tesla, AC was the best tech at the time. But most appliances (including washers and dryers) convert AC over to DC — sometimes just to convert it back to 3-phase AC for precise induction motor control (one of Tesla’s inventions that will never die, more than likely).

Also, the power companies lose tons of money due to capacitance in everything from the big lines (up to million volts or more), and small systems (your block).

With the advent of power electronics that can work on the power levels involved now, you will see more and more DC systems going on line, at least to the substation. They have a dramatic drop in line loss due to capacitance and inductance in the system. At the termination point, you have a monster inverter to convert it back to pure sine wave AC current, 3-phase.


20 posted on 02/06/2013 8:23:51 PM PST by Aqua225 (Realist)
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To: hinckley buzzard

“His description of Edison searching through hundreds of straws was literally accurate. Edison did just that to find a suitable filament for his light bulb. Tesla, by comparison, invented AC and WiFi decades ago.”

Exactamondo!


21 posted on 02/06/2013 8:25:35 PM PST by logitech (Who's here so vile, that will not love his country? If any speak, for him I have offended)
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To: mylife

Yes, as a boy he saw a drawing of Niagara Falls in a book of the natural wonders of the world, and he had the vision of converting that falling water to power with turbine tunnels. And he built it. That area of NY was the first part of the planet to be fully electrified, and it spread out from Tesla’s first plant.


22 posted on 02/06/2013 8:26:51 PM PST by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: Nik Naym

But the truth nonetheless.


23 posted on 02/06/2013 8:27:47 PM PST by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra

I don’t think Tesla attempted to apply his work to guided weapons systems though I could be wrong and will look into that. As far as bio’s, “Hedy’s Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World”. Very cool read. She was given the National Medal of Technology by Clinton as I recall.


24 posted on 02/06/2013 8:28:44 PM PST by Madhattan
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To: nickcarraway
Westinghouse had been paying his room and board at the hotel for years

This was nice.

I am looking for this

25 posted on 02/06/2013 8:32:08 PM PST by FoxPro
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To: Travis McGee

The man was a true visionary.


26 posted on 02/06/2013 8:35:17 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: Travis McGee

“But the truth nonetheless.”

Claiming the entire North East is powered by a single power plant is just silly.


27 posted on 02/06/2013 8:40:12 PM PST by Nik Naym (It's not my fault... I have compulsive smartass disorder.)
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To: Madhattan

Thanks! Can’t wait to read it!

Tesla was working with remotely guided boats and torpedoes in 1898. There’s a lot covered in the Cheney book, which I heartily recommend! There are so many quotes from that book,,,,,
“His first two radio-controlled devices were boats, and one was submersible.”
“Tesla was not transmitting messages in any known language. Nevertheless, he was employing his own coded pulses via Hertzian waves to directly control this pioneer unmanned craft.”
“What his patents included,(snip) were specifications for a torpedo boat without a crew,” Freakin’ 1898!


28 posted on 02/06/2013 8:45:59 PM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: nickcarraway
One of the most eccentric geniuses to ever live.

I don't know why, but all the far out mega-conspiracy nuts seem obsessed with Tesla. Some anti-Semitic organizations sell copies of his notes in both English and the original Serbo-Croatian. No, I'm not saying Tesla was an anti-Semite. Anti-Semites do seem fascinated with him, however.

Another eccentric character (not as important as Tesla, but fifty times nuttier) was Edward Leedskalnin, the subject of my favorite In Search Of . . . episode (available on YouTube!).

29 posted on 02/06/2013 8:47:23 PM PST by Zionist Conspirator (Ki-hagoy vehamamlakhah 'asher lo'-ya`avdukh yove'du; vehagoyim charov yecheravu!)
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To: mylife

30 years ago, I had an interim job as the maintenance guy for a sheet metal/machine shop. I had to pull a huge motor off an ancient press brake one day. On it’s spec plate, it listed Tesla’s patents!
In 7th grade Science class, I built a 250,000 volt Van de Graff generator. Got an A. But then I hooked it to the classroom’s doorknob, and sent a foot long bolt of lightning to anyone trying to get in! Got a week’s detention for that prank! The next year, I wanted to build a Tesla Coil. My Dad said, in retrospect, quite wisely, “No Tesla Coil!” I still wanna build one though! Built a Cloud Chamber instead for that year’s project.


30 posted on 02/06/2013 8:57:56 PM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: Madhattan

That’s Hedley.


31 posted on 02/06/2013 9:00:40 PM PST by eartrumpet
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra

We all built Van de Graff generators! LOL

Your Father was indeed wise.


32 posted on 02/06/2013 9:06:57 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: Zionist Conspirator

He did make some anti-semitic remarks. But,,,, I think they were the result of his troubles getting financing.

“Tesla’s anti-Semitism appeared sporadic and was unusual among gentiles of his time. Once he called one of his secretaries to him and hissed as if it were a revealed truth, “Miss! Never trust a Jew!””

But again, I think it had to do with his frustration over trying to get financing.


33 posted on 02/06/2013 9:08:58 PM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra

I build an ion propelled engine.
I think it moved an 1/8th of an inch while dangling from the vertical on a wire.

Now NASA is using that propulsion for deep space exploration.


34 posted on 02/06/2013 9:10:38 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: mylife
This guy was so much more brilliant than Edison.

In some regards, Edison was a punk and a copycat.


But a better salesman and businessman. Tesla was a genius - but the world we live in was mostly built by mediocre minds filled with drive and focus, not by troubled geniuses.
35 posted on 02/06/2013 9:12:20 PM PST by AnotherUnixGeek
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To: AnotherUnixGeek

True enough.


36 posted on 02/06/2013 9:14:51 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: AnotherUnixGeek

The Story Of My Life.(Pere Ubu)

I was born in Miami, Florida, in 1953.
First thing I did was crack the back of my head on the floor.
I stepped on a bee when I was four.
I slammed the door of a `57 Chevy on my hand when I was six.
Little did I know that darker clouds were gathering on the horizon of my life.
That’s the story.
That’s the story.
That’s the story of my life.

Later on.
Messing around in the backyard. I was nine.
I stumbled onto the secret of Anti-Gravity.
It’s such a simple trick, I said to myself, I hope I can remember.
Instinctively I knew that trouble was bound to come.
That’s the story.
That’s the story.
That’s the story of my life.

Still later I met a girl named Sue. Only daughter of the football coach.
I liked her.
I think she liked me.
Her family moved to Toronto.
Naively I said to myself, Why that’s the story of my life.
That’s the story of my life.


37 posted on 02/06/2013 9:18:00 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: nickcarraway
Is there any known case of an Albanian or an "albanian kosovar(TM)" contributing anything to mankind or society?

I mean, it wouldn't have to be anything as overwhelming as AC electricity, an improved lollipop stick would suffice....

38 posted on 02/06/2013 9:24:45 PM PST by varmintman
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To: Aqua225

Back then, you would have had to have a DC power station about every three blocks. It just doesn’t “travel well.”


39 posted on 02/06/2013 9:30:42 PM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: mylife
We used to play with the HV of an old color TV during lunch time at tech school way back when.
The instructor would just shake his head and walk away, LOL.
40 posted on 02/06/2013 9:36:00 PM PST by The Cajun (Sarah Palin, Mark Levin......Nuff said.)
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To: The Cajun

I know a guy that had the cathode on a TV arc on his nose LOL


41 posted on 02/06/2013 9:42:00 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: mylife
Worst with me was the anode of an old thyratron tube that fired our sonic tools at work.
2000V at 50 amps for fraction of a second, flash bulbs going off inside your eyeballs :)
42 posted on 02/06/2013 10:00:02 PM PST by The Cajun (Sarah Palin, Mark Levin......Nuff said.)
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To: The Cajun

That’s bound to leave an impression.


43 posted on 02/06/2013 10:03:47 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of The Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: EEGator
By 1912, Tesla began to withdraw from that doubting world. He was clearly showing signs of obsessive-compulsive disorder, and was potentially a high-functioning autistic. He became obsessed with cleanliness and fixated on the number three; he began shaking hands with people and washing his hands—all done in sets of three. He had to have 18 napkins on his table during meals, and would count his steps whenever he walked anywhere.


44 posted on 02/06/2013 10:21:42 PM PST by Lancey Howard
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To: Lancey Howard

Tesla but who is the other guy?


45 posted on 02/06/2013 11:04:41 PM PST by Lurkina.n.Learnin (Superciliousness is the essence of Obama)
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To: Lurkina.n.Learnin

Is it Sarkozee?


46 posted on 02/06/2013 11:07:15 PM PST by Lurkina.n.Learnin (Superciliousness is the essence of Obama)
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To: nickcarraway

Mark Twain in Tesla's lab

47 posted on 02/06/2013 11:17:41 PM PST by P.O.E. (Pray for America)
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To: mylife

Tesla was the true Mad Scientist of fiction.


48 posted on 02/07/2013 12:10:57 AM PST by Forward the Light Brigade (Into the Jaws of H*ll)
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra
... “Westinghoused”...

"We sting,you use!" (This has been around for a century, about)

49 posted on 02/07/2013 12:17:24 AM PST by imardmd1
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To: FoxPro
Westinghouse had been paying his room and board at the hotel for years

This was nice.

Nice? Westinghouse deprived him of millions by cheating his good will, and then paid his room and board?

Yeah, real nice.

50 posted on 02/07/2013 12:19:18 AM PST by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
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