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Keyword: universe

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  • Cracks in the universe: the search for cosmic strings

    04/27/2018 10:23:31 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 23 replies
    Cosmos Magazine ^ | April 2018 | Cathal O'Connell
    Cracks in the universe: the search for cosmic strings Galaxy-sized filaments of raw energy may be threaded through spacetime, according to some theories. Will we ever find traces of them? Cathal O’Connell takes up the hunt. Share Tweet Tatyun / Getty Images Our universe exploded into being, expanded at a fantastic speed and cooled. Perhaps too quickly. Some physicists believe the rapid cooling might have cracked the fabric of the universe.These hairline fractures may still be threaded through space-time. Dubbed cosmic strings, mathematical models see them as invisible threads of pure energy, thinner than an atom but light-years long. The...
  • Substantial Lack Of Phosphorus In The Universe Makes Finding Alien Life Unlikely

    04/05/2018 11:49:13 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 56 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 4/5/18 | Allan Adamson
    Amid efforts to find alien life, scientists have not yet confirmed the existence of an extraterrestrial civilization. Findings of a new study suggest this has something do with the element phosphorus lacking in the cosmos. Life-Giving PhosphorusPhosphorus is the 11th most common element on Earth, and it is fundamental to all living things. Phosphorus is one of only six chemical elements on our planet that organisms depend on. "[Phosphorus] helps form the backbone of the long chains of nucleotides that create RNA and DNA; it is part of the phospholipids in cell membranes; and is a building block of the...
  • Does the Universe Care About Stephen Hawking?

    Famed scientist Stephen Hawking died earlier this week at the age of 76. He is largely regarded as one of the most important physicists in history. Of course, the tributes came pouring in. While most commemorated his genius and determination to transcend the debilitating effects of ALS, others attempted more nuanced commentary. Like USA Today which took Hawking’s death as opportunity to remind us of the physicist’s view that “Heaven is a fairy story.” Hawking, who died at 76, spoke candidly in a 2011 Guardian interview about what he believes happens when people die. He told the Guardian that while...
  • Cosmic dawn: astronomers detect signals from first stars in the universe

    03/03/2018 8:26:39 AM PST · by wastedyears · 28 replies
    The Guardian ^ | Feb 28 2018 | Hannah Devlin
    Astronomers have detected a signal from the first stars as they appeared and illuminated the universe, in observations that have been hailed as “revolutionary”.
  • Mars as never seen before: NASA's Curiosity rover reveals a stunning panorama

    02/02/2018 6:37:00 AM PST · by mairdie · 45 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 2 February 2018 | Joe Pinkstone and Tim Collins
    An incredible panoramic view sent from the surface of the red planet has been created using images taken by the Mars Curiosity rover. It reveals the landscape of one of our closest galactic neighbours, which has been home to the exploratory vehicle since it landed in Gale Crater in 2012. One of the on-board cameras captured 16 separate scenic images that show various points on its journey, as seen from the top of the Vera Rubin Ridge, which were then stitched together to form the sweeping image. Thanks to some clever visual effects that give the scene a blue hue,...
  • Scientific Theory And The Multiverse Madness (the multiverse idea is too close to fiction)

    01/23/2018 1:59:33 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 46 replies
    NPR ^ | 01/22/2018 | SABINE HOSSENFELDER
    Newton's law of gravity — remember that? The force between two massive bodies decreases with the inverse square of the distance and so on? To use it, you need a constant, "Newton's constant," also called the "gravitational constant," usually denoted G. You can determine G to reasonable accuracy with a few simple measurements. Once you have fixed the gravitational constant, you can apply Newton's law to all kinds of different situations: falling apples, orbiting planets, launching rockets, etc. All with only one constant! This ability to explain many superficially different processes is what makes natural laws so powerful. Newton's contemporaries...
  • Possible vestiges of a universe previous to the Big Bang

    11/27/2017 10:44:27 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 50 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/27/17
    Although for five decades, the Big Bang theory has been the best known and most accepted explanation for the beginning and evolution of the Universe, it is hardly a consensus among scientists. Brazilian physicist Juliano Cesar Silva Neves part of a group of researchers who dare to imagine a different origin. In a study recently published in the journal General Relativity and Gravitation, Neves suggests the elimination of a key aspect of the standard cosmological model: the need for a spacetime singularity known as the Big Bang. In raising this possibility, Neves challenges the idea that time had a beginning...
  • Scientists baffled: Universe shouldn't exist

    10/26/2017 10:45:49 AM PDT · by ForYourChildren · 116 replies
    WND ^ | 10/25/2017 | na
    New measurements confirm cosmos should have self-destructed if Big Bang true! Despite the organization’s $1.24 billion annual budget for 2017, the physicists at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, are being forced to admit failure in their latest effort to explain why any of us are here. Indeed, why there’s even a “here” here at all. “The universe should not actually exist,” said Christian Smorra, a physicist at CERN’s Baryon–Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) collaboration. CERN, founded in 1954, features a circular tunnel some 17 miles around that houses a particle accelerator, which uses peak energy of 14 trillion electron...
  • Is The Inflationary Universe A Scientific Theory? Not Anymore

    09/29/2017 5:45:11 AM PDT · by C19fan · 20 replies
    Forbes ^ | September 28, 2017 | Sabine Hossenfelder
    We are made from stretched quantum fluctuations. At least that’s cosmologists’ currently most popular explanation. According to their theory, the history of our existence began billions of years ago with a – now absent – field that propelled the universe into a phase of rapid expansion called “inflation.” When inflation ended, the field decayed and its energy was converted into radiation and particles which are still around today.
  • What Caused the Universe to Come into Existence?

    09/17/2017 6:49:17 AM PDT · by Raymond Pamintuan · 129 replies
    PJ Media ^ | September 16, 2017 | Edward Watson
    We know, to the best of our senses and instruments, that the universe exists. How did it come into reality 13.8 billion years ago? In other words, what caused the Big Bang? Roughly speaking, there are two possibilities: “nothing” caused the universe to come into being or “something” triggered it into existence.
  • There have probably been trillions of alien civilizations, and yet we may still never see one

    06/27/2017 6:56:54 PM PDT · by plain talk · 146 replies
    Quartz Media ^ | June 11, 2016 | Gordon Lichfield
    Sorry, everybody. We’re just not that special. In more than five decades of scanning the heavens, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) has found no sign of alien life. Yet now two American astronomers, in the scientific equivalent of a back-of-the-envelope calculation, are estimating that over the course of its history the universe has seen at least half a trillion technologically advanced species. Remember, 420 billion intelligent civilizations is the “pessimistic” estimate. But sadly—or happily, depending on your view of aliens—it doesn’t make us any less alone.
  • The idea of creating a new universe in the lab is no joke

    06/25/2017 9:53:55 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 33 replies
    Aeon ^ | 6/14/17 | Zeeya Merali
    Zeeya Merali is a freelance science writer and author of A Big Bang in a Little Room: The Quest to Create New Universes. Her work has appeared in Nature, Scientific American, Discover, Science, New Scientist, and on the BBC. She has also published two textbooks with National Geographic and has worked on NOVA's television series The Fabric of the Cosmos. She has a PhD in theoretical cosmology and lives in London. Artwork illustrating the concept of an alternate ‘bubble’ universe in which our universe (left) is not the only one. Some scientists think that bubble universes may pop into existence...
  • The (not-so) observable universe

    04/01/2017 9:38:29 AM PDT · by boycott · 18 replies
    AL.com ^ | April 01, 2017 | Steven Austad
    In case you haven't been paying attention, it has been a pretty exciting last few years for what astronomers call the "observable universe." It's been a particularly rewarding stretch for Albert Einstein too, even though he died in 1955. For instance, last year astrophysicists made the first observations of gravitational waves, which Einstein, exactly 100 years ago, predicted should exist. These waves, which I won't even try to explain, were observed when two black holes crashed into one another and merged. A black hole is formed from matter so dense, and with gravity so strong, that anything near it -...
  • APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble

    03/15/2017 8:19:34 AM PDT · by Purdue77 · 4 replies
    Astronomy Picture of the Day ^ | 15 March 2017 | Hubble Legacy Archive, NASA, ESA
    Explanation: Stars are forming in the gigantic dust pillar called the Cone Nebula. Cones, pillars, and majestic flowing shapes abound in stellar nurseries where natal clouds of gas and dust are buffeted by energetic winds from newborn stars. The Cone Nebula, a well-known example, lies within the bright galactic star-forming region NGC 2264. The Cone was captured in unprecedented detail in this close-up composite of several observations from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. While the Cone Nebula, about 2,500 light-years away in Monoceros, is around 7 light-years long, the region pictured here surrounding the cone's blunted head is a mere...
  • Atheist cosmologist warns “deeply religious” people not to put their faith in “apparent” fine-tuning

    02/25/2017 6:54:04 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 36 replies
    Uncommon Descent ^ | 02/24/2017
    In “Physics: A cosmos in the lab,” a review of A Big Bang in a Little Room: The Quest to Create New Universes by Zeeya Merali, cosmologist Andreas Albrecht writes at Nature, The question of cosmic origins, and the possibility that humans might create new universes, can connect with religious concerns. These form a substantial thread through A Big Bang in a Little Room that significantly reduced the book’s appeal to me. I am an atheist. I respect that many people are deeply religious (some are very close to me) and that religion can have a positive, even beautiful,...
  • The Most Persuasive Scientific Reason to Believe?

    What scientific argument for the truth of Christianity do you find the most persuasive? As I contemplated this question, my answer was big bang cosmology. Here’s why. All big bang models include three essential features: (1) constant laws of physics throughout the universe; (2) a dynamic universe, one either expanding or contracting; and (3) a beginning to the universe. Remarkably, the biblical description matches these essential features. Constant Laws of Physics The scientific enterprise depends on a universe governed by constant laws of physics. If measurements today have no bearing on what happened yesterday or will happen tomorrow, no scientific...
  • Stargazers' delight: Lunar eclipse, comet, and 'Snow Moon' in one incredible night

    02/10/2017 6:00:38 PM PST · by Mozilla · 13 replies
    Fox News ^ | 2/10/17 | Fox News staff
    Stargazers are in for a triple treat: Friday night will feature a type of lunar eclipse, the Full Snow Moon, and even a comet. You’ve likely heard of a “supermoon,” when the full moon appears brighter than usual because it’s closer to Earth. Friday night, something different will happen, in effect. The full moon will be darker. That’s because the Earth’s natural satellite will experience something called a penumbral eclipse. A full lunar eclipse happens when the Earth is right in between the sun and the moon, casting its shadow onto the moon. In a penumbral eclipse, it’s just the...
  • We Still Don't Know How Fast The Universe Is Expanding

    01/13/2017 6:13:38 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 53 replies
    Forbes ^ | 12 Jan, 2017 | Ethan Siegel
    Once we discovered that the Universe was expanding, the next scientific step was to determine what the rate of expansion was. Despite the fact that it's been more than 80 years, we still don't have agreement on how fast that rate actually is. By looking at the largest cosmic scales and the oldest signals -- the leftover radiation from the Big Bang and the largest-scale galaxy correlations -- we get one number for the rate: 67 km/s/Mpc. But if we look at individual stars, galaxies, supernovae and other direct indicators, we get another number: 74 km/s/Mpc. The uncertainties are very...
  • Thou Art My Son...Psalm 1 and 2 pt 9

    …I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou art my Son; this day have I begotten thee. Ask of me, and I shall give thee the heathen for thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for thy possession.Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter’s vessel.(Psalm 2:7-9)In its original context Psalm 2 is a coronation psalm. Israel is the Son of God, therefore the King of Israel, who is the embodiment of Israel, is a Son of God. God has appointed the King, and...
  • Five Independent Signs Of New Physics In The Universe

    11/06/2016 8:17:45 AM PST · by MtnClimber · 23 replies
    Forbes ^ | 4 Nov, 2016 | Ethan Siegel
    Since the Large Hadron Collider at CERN turned on, it’s brought with it an incredible slew of results. Large numbers of rare, exotic and unstable particles have been created, and their decays have been measured to unprecedented precision. The Higgs boson has been created and observed to have a mass of 126 GeV/c2, branching and decaying in exactly the ratios the Standard Model predicts. As it now stands, we’ve detected every particle and antiparticle predicted by the most successful particle physics theory of all time. Unless we get hit by a big physics surprise, the LHC will become renowned for...