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Keyword: mongolmassmurderers

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  • Mongol Hordes Gave up on Conquering Europe Due to Wet Weather

    05/28/2016 12:05:00 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 83 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 26 May 2016 | Conor Gearin
    It has mystified historians ever since. After a string of major victories, the Mongol army suddenly retreated from central Europe in 1242. Some scholars claim Mongolian politics forced the withdrawal, while others credit the strength of fortified towns in present-day Hungary and Croatia. But Europe could have been rescued by its own bad weather, an analysis of tree rings and historical documents concludes. The Mongol cavalry fed its horses on the grass of the Eurasian steppe, says Nicola Di Cosmo of Princeton University, one of the study’s authors. A warm climate in the early 1200s helped make the grasslands lush...
  • Genghis Khan's genetic legacy has competition

    01/29/2015 1:19:28 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Nature ^ | 23 January 2015 | Ewen Callaway
    In addition to Genghis Khan and his male descendants, researchers have previously identified the founders of two other highly successful Y-chromosome lineages: one that began in China with Giocangga, a Qinq Dynasty ruler who died in 15823, and another belonging to the medieval Uí Néill dynasty in Ireland. Jobling's team made a systematic search for genetic founders by analysing the Y chromosomes of more than 5,000 men from 127 populations spanning Asia... because lots of data were available and there was already evidence of such lineages. The team identified 11 Y-chromosome sequences that were each shared by more than 20...
  • Research identifies accountant as descendant of Genghis Khan

    05/31/2006 9:34:04 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies · 436+ views
    Financial Express of India ^ | Tuesday, May 30, 2006 | Associated Press
    Tom Robinson had long wondered about his family tree. He never suspected its roots might lie in the Mongolian Steppe. The Florida accountant knew that his great, great-grandfather had come to the United States from England - but beyond that his research drew a blank... Robinson thinks his forebear, whose name has long been a byword for violence and cruelty, has had a bad press. "In addition to being a conqueror, he was a great administrator," said Robinson, who has been reading up on Genghis Khan. "Their system of governance was fairly sophisticated."
  • Scientist Discover Most Fertile Irish Male

    01/17/2006 11:34:03 PM PST · by strider44 · 13 replies · 842+ views
    Reuters | 1/17/06 | Siobhan Kennedy
    By Siobhan Kennedy | January 17, 2006 DUBLIN (Reuters) - Scientists in Ireland may have found the country's most fertile male, with more than 3 million men worldwide among his offspring. Article Tools Printer friendly E-mail to a friend Science RSS feed Available RSS feeds Most e-mailed More: Globe front page | Boston.com Sign up for: Globe Headlines e-mail | Breaking News Alerts The scientists, from Trinity College Dublin, have discovered that as many as one in twelve Irish men could be descended from Niall of the Nine Hostages, a 5th-century warlord who was head of the most powerful dynasty...
  • The Hidden History Of Men (Anthropology)

    11/21/2004 3:13:58 PM PST · by blam · 37 replies · 1,875+ views
    Discover Magazine ^ | 12-2004 | Robert Kunzig
    The Hidden History of MenA research team braves Central Asia to capture a surprising genetic record of human migration and military conquest By Robert Kunzig DISCOVER Vol. 25 No. 12 | December 2004 | Anthropology One day last fall, in the home freezer of Spencer Wells, there were these things: a large leg of lamb, a few quarts of milk, and underneath, DNA samples from 2,500 people in Central Asia. Wells is an anthropological geneticist and an energetic collector of DNA, especially Y chromosomes. He lived then in an old stone house outside Geneva, but he was raised in Lubbock,...
  • Ghengis Khan a Prolific Lover, DNA Data Implies

    02/15/2003 10:02:38 AM PST · by Ranger · 8 replies · 1,003+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | February 14, 2003 | Hillary Mayell
    Ghengis Khan a Prolific Lover, DNA Data Implies  Hillary Mayell for National Geographic News February 14, 2003   Genghis Khan, the fearsome Mongolian warrior of the 13th century, may have done more than rule the largest empire in the world; according to a recently published genetic study, he may have helped populate it too. An international group of geneticists studying Y-chromosome data have found that nearly 8 percent of the men living in the region of the former Mongol empire carry y-chromosomes that are nearly identical. That translates to 0.5 percent of the male population in the world, or...
  • Who is Ghengis Khan?

    09/02/2004 1:08:33 PM PDT · by OESY · 74 replies · 11,109+ views
    Footprints + ^ | September 2, 2004 | MIne, Mine
    Despite some recent FReeper posts, one question that has not been satisfactorily answered is, What did Kerry mean when he testified before Congress that our troops in Vietnam "razed villages in a fashion reminiscent of Ghengis Khan"? Who is Ghengis Khan? * * * Genghis Kahn, or Ghengis Khan (interpreted as either "precious warrior" or "spirit of light") as he is more widely known, was born about the year 1162. On a hunting trip when young, he was ambushed by an enemy tribe and taken prisoner. While prisoner he killed his guard and escaped. The enemy searched, but excellent survival...
  • Free meal promotion for relatives of Genghis Khan

    07/05/2004 4:44:37 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 23 replies · 586+ views
    Ananova ^ | July, 2004 | Ananova
    A London restaurant chain is offering customers free DNA testing to see if they're descended from Genghis Khan. Restaurant Shish has promised free meals for any found to be related to the notorious Mongol leader. The unusual promotion is to mark the Mongolian government's decision to allow citizens to have surnames for the first time since they were banned by the communists in the 1920s. Some 50,000 Mongolians now proudly claim direct descent from and bear the name of Genghis Khan. Shish has teamed up with DNA-based research company Oxford Ancestors to offer descendants food from their ancestral homelands. From...
  • Genghis Khan, Law Giver, Free Trader And Diplomat, Is Back With A New Image

    07/10/2006 6:44:22 PM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 686+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 7-11-2006 | Richard Spencer - Ulan Bator
    Genghis Khan, law giver, free trader and diplomat, is back with a new image By Richard Spencer in Ulan Bator (Filed: 11/07/2006) The Mongolian capital has been swamped with images of its former potentate, Genghis Khan, in honour of the anniversary of his unification of the nation in 1206. At the climax of celebrations in Ulan Bator yesterday, soldiers in traditional uniform and bearing yaks' tail standards heralded the unveiling of an enormous statue of the Great Khan in the main Sukhbaatar Square. The monument in which it is set contains earth and stones from the holy and historic places...
  • The Last Great Mystery: The Hunt for Genghis Khan

    05/28/2003 10:40:05 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 3 replies · 338+ views
    BBC ^ | May 27, 2003 | Michael Kohn
    After years of suppression by Mongolia's former communist rulers, the great Mongol warlord Ghengis Khan is back at the top of the national agenda, almost 800 years after his death. His wizened image appears on everything from vodka bottles to money. Much of Genghis Khan's life remains a mystery Scientists too are rediscovering Ghengis' history. The American-funded Ghengis Khan Geo-Historical expedition has spent three years exploring sites associated with the kahn's life. Yet one mystery remains, the site of his burial. John Woods of the University of Chicago is the expedition's team leader, and he thinks it might be at...
  • History rehabilitates the tyrants of old in Central Asia

    10/26/2003 1:22:46 PM PST · by nwrep · 26 replies · 327+ views
    Boston.com ^ | October 24, 2003 | H.D.S. Greenway
    By H.D.S. Greenway, 10/24/2003 UNTIL THE TYRANTS of the 20th century came along, they were the most efficient, cold-blooded, feared, and destructive conquerors the world had ever known. They were the Mongol horsemen from the steppes of Central Asia, whose hordes under the leadership of Genghis Khan built a 13th-century empire by mass slaughter -- burning cities and terrifying half a dozen civilizations from Russia to the East China Sea. Genghis Khan's grandson, Hulagu, leveled Baghdad, and Iraqis have invoked his name ever since to brand their enemies, including the Americans. It is said that you could smell their stench...
  • Archeologists Unearth Remains of Genghis Khan's Palace on Mongolian Steppe

    10/06/2004 6:04:21 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 55 replies · 2,104+ views
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 6, 2004 | Audrey McAvoy
    TOKYO (AP) - Archaeologists have unearthed the site of Genghis Khan's palace and believe the long-sought grave of the 13th century Mongolian warrior is somewhere nearby, the head of the excavation team said Wednesday. A Japanese and Mongolian research team found the complex on a grassy steppe 150 miles east of the Mongolian capital of Ulan Bator, said Shinpei Kato, professor emeritus at Tokyo's Kokugakuin University. Genghis Khan (c. 1162-1227) united warring tribes to become leader of the Mongols in 1206. After his death, his descendants expanded his empire until it stretched from China to Hungary. Genghis Khan built the...
  • Has Genghis' Tomb Been Found?

    11/26/2004 12:11:59 PM PST · by blam · 57 replies · 2,640+ views
    China.Org ^ | 11-26-2004 | Shao Da
    Has Genghis' Tomb Been Found? After four years' work, a joint team of Japanese and Mongolian archaeologists announced on October 4 that they had found what they believe to be the true mausoleum of Genghis Khan (1162-1227). The ruins, dated to between the 13th and 15th century, were found at Avraga, around 250 kilometers east of Ulan Bator, the capital of the People's Republic of Mongolia. Team members said that they expect the discovery to provide clues to the whereabouts of the khan's actual burial site, which they believe may be within 12 kilometers of the mausoleum. There is a...
  • How I am related to Genghis Khan

    05/29/2006 3:32:15 PM PDT · by MadIvan · 45 replies · 3,342+ views
    The Times ^ | May 30, 2006 | Mark Henderson
    A US accountant has proof that he is descended from the Mongol warlordTHEY seem the unlikeliest of relatives. One was a fearsome warlord whose name became a byword for savagery. The other is a mild-mannered accountancy academic from Florida. Yet Tom Robinson, 48, has become the first man outside Asia to trace his ancestry directly to Genghis Khan, the 13th-century Mongol leader whose empire stretched from the South China Sea to the Persian Gulf. And, since his paternal great-great-grandfather emigrated to the United States from Windermere, Cumbria, many more descendants are probably scattered across the Lake District. Genetic tests have...
  • China says Genghis Khan catalyst for Renaissance

    07/22/2006 12:51:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 463+ views
    Turkish Daily News ^ | Saturday, July 22, 2006 | Reuters
    "Genghis Khan introduced papermaking and printing technologies to Europe and pioneered cultural exchanges between Asia and Europe," it quoted Zhu Yaoting, a specialist on Mongolian history at Beijing Union University, as saying. "He brought cultural progress that helped liberate the Europeans from the bondage of theology -- in this sense, his expeditions served as a catalyst for the Renaissance," he said. Genghis Khan's expeditions to Europe also reopened the Silk Road and laid the path for Marco Polo's historic trip to China. "The expedition revived the ancient trade link and made economic and cultural exchanges possible again between the isolated...
  • Genghis misunderstood

    10/03/2006 11:15:52 AM PDT · by JZelle · 90 replies · 1,532+ views
    Washington Times ^ | 10-3-06 | Matthew Barakat
    He's one of the most famous names of the last millennium, and he's the father of his country, which turns 800 years old this year. That's why the D.C. region's Mongolian community would like to see a statue erected of Genghis Khan, the George Washington of Mongolia.
  • Mural Of Genghis Khan's Funeral Found

    12/27/2006 5:27:07 PM PST · by blam · 67 replies · 2,621+ views
    Washington Times ^ | 12-26-2006
    Mural of Genghis Khan's funeral found Dec. 26, 2006 at 12:09PM A painting of a Mongolian funeral ceremony in the Arjai caves in North China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region might depict Genghis Khan's funeral. The mural in one of the caves at the Arjai Grotto is about 20 inches long and 14 inches wide, the Xinhua News Agency reported Tuesday. The painting depicts a Mongolian funeral where a man is held above a funeral pit by white cranes, said Pan Zhaodong, a researcher from the Social Science Academy of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region. One well-dressed onlooker could very well...
  • China claims Genghis Khan as its own

    12/29/2006 4:04:22 PM PST · by maui_hawaii · 49 replies · 3,762+ views
    From outcast nomad to tribal warlord and finally founder of the world's greatest land empire, Genghis Khan went through a lot of changes in a tumultuous life spanning the end of the 12th century and the beginning of the 13th. But perhaps the strangest transformation ever undergone by the Mongolian military genius has come in modern times: his reinvention as a Chinese hero. “Genghis Khan was certainly Chinese,” says Guo Wurong, general manager of the Genghis Khan Mausoleum Tourist District in China's Inner Mongolia region. “We currently define him as a hero of the Mongolian nationality, a great man of...
  • Celebrating Genghis Khan's Big Year

    10/13/2006 3:52:54 PM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 1,765+ views
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | 9-29-2006 | Eric Powell
    Celebrating Genghis Khan's Big Year September 29, 2006 by Eric Powell Eight centuries on, the Mongolian conqueror continues to influence culture worldwide. Mongolians love their Khan. Before I traveled to Mongolia last year to report a story on Bronze Age nomads, I'd read about the country's devotion to a man known throughout the rest of the world as the most ruthless and bloodthirsty conqueror in the planet's history. But I was still surprised by the ubiquity of his presence in the capital city Ulaanbaatar (sometimes spelled Ulan Bator, or "Red Hero" in Mongolian). Not only is his visage (sometimes benevolent,...
  • Beneath the ruins of Genghis Khan's capital city in Central Asia, archaeologists discovered artif...

    04/10/2009 5:49:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 1,323+ views
    Smithsonian ^ | March 25, 2009 | Abigail Tucker
    Of all the wonders in The Palace of the Great Khan, the silver fountain most captivated the visiting monk. It took the shape of "a great silver tree, and at its roots are four lions of silver, each with a conduit through it, and all belching forth white milk of mares," wrote William of Rubruck, a Franciscan friar who toured the Mongol capital, Khara Khorum, in 1254. When a silver angel at the top of the tree trumpeted, still more beverages spouted out of the pipes: wine, clarified mare's milk, a honey drink, rice mead -- take your pick... in...