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Keyword: mercury

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  • Comet Jacques Is Back! Joins Venus and Mercury at Dawn

    07/12/2014 12:21:23 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | July 12, 2014 | Bob King on
    Comet C/2014 E2 Jacques has returned! Before it disappeared in the solar glow this spring, the comet reached magnitude +6, the naked eye limit. Now it’s back at dawn, rising higher each morning as it treks toward darker skies. Just days after its July 2 perihelion, the fuzzball will be in conjunction with the planet Venus tomorrow morning July 13. With Mercury nearby, you may have the chance to see this celestial ‘Rat Pack’ tucked within a 8° circle.
  • Behind the scenes photos of Alan Shepard's space flight. (Very cool)

    05/05/2014 1:19:44 PM PDT · by RIghtwardHo · 21 replies
    io9 ^ | 5/5/2014 | RIghtwardho
    On this day in 1961, Alan B. Shepard Jr. muttered to himself, "Don't f*** up, Shepard...", huddled into the Freedom 7 Mercury capsule, and lifted off to become the first America to reach space. These are the photographs from the historic suborbital flight.
  • Love it or Hate it: Where Do You Come Down on Kale, Beets, Okra, Brussels Sprouts and Cilantro?

    04/23/2014 4:14:50 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 155 replies
    San Jose Mercury News ^ | 04/23/2014 | Martha Ross and Joan Morris
    Cilantro was described as an aphrodisiac in the Arabian Nights, but that fact fails to impress those who hate it with a passion. Cilantro was described as an aphrodisiac in "The Arabian Nights," but that fact fails to impress those who hate it with a passion. Julia Child famously told Larry King that it has a "dead taste," and she would pick it out of a dish "and throw it on the floor." The pro-cilantro crowd is just as vocal, if not as descriptive. You can find the debate anywhere you find cilantro and the people who meticulously pick it...
  • Court upholds EPA emission standards

    04/15/2014 1:17:23 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 10 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Apr. 15, 2014 4:05 PM EDT | Pete Yost
    A federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld the Environmental Protection Agency's first emission standards for mercury and other hazardous air pollutants from coal- and oil-fired power plants. In its ruling, the court rejected state and industry challenges to rules designed to clean up chromium, arsenic, acid gases, nickel, cadmium as well as mercury and other dangerous toxins. The EPA’s determination in 2000 that regulating emission standards is appropriate and necessary, and the agency’s reaffirmation of that determination in 2012, “are amply supported by EPA’s findings regarding the health effects of mercury exposure,” said the court. Congress did not specify what...
  • Moon Has Iron Core, Lunar-Rock Study Says

    12/06/2008 8:51:38 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies · 2,063+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | January 11, 2007 | Brian Handwerk
    Deep down, the moon may be more like Earth than scientists ever thought. A new moon-rock study suggests the satellite has an iron core... The moon's core could be a clue to its ancient origins, which have long puzzled astronomers. "Our moon is too big to be a moon," Taylor said. "It's huge compared to the moons we see around other planets, so it has always been suspected that there was something strange in its origin." ...Rock samples from NASA's Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 moon missions of the early 1970s have now shed more light on the moon's origins,...
  • Early NASA diapers forced astronauts to disclose the size of their manhood

    03/30/2014 7:24:24 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 55 replies
    SFGate ^ | 3-24-14 | Craig Hlavaty
    <p>When NASA astronauts were suiting up to go to space in the 1960s, they had to make a big decision before they explored the world above us: How large of a man are you?</p> <p>Getting it wrong could damage the mission.</p>
  • The Lights Stay On

    03/27/2014 5:19:29 AM PDT · by thackney · 29 replies
    Planet Gore via National Review ^ | March 25, 2014 | Henry Payne
    The Obama administration’s War on Carbon rages, but the good news is the incandescent light bulb still lives. For the third year in a row, the federal ban on the popular incandescent light bulb — the choice of most Americans — was postponed by Republican House intervention that defunded EPA enforcement of the law. “None of the funds made available in this Act may be used . . . to implement or enforce the standards with respect to incandescent reflector lamps,” reads section 322 of the $1.1 trillion budget signed by the president in January. The language was cheered by...
  • Were Mercury and Mars separated at birth?

    01/19/2009 3:32:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 542+ views
    New Scientist ^ | Monday, January 19, 2009 | unattributed
    Line up Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars according to their distance from the sun and you'll see their size distribution is close to symmetrical, with the two largest planets between the two smallest. That would be no coincidence -- if the pattern emerged from a debris ring around the sun. Brad Hansen of the University of California, Los Angeles, built a numerical simulation to explore how a ring of rocky material in the early solar system could have evolved into the planets. He found that two larger planets typically form near the inner and outer edges of the ring, corresponding...
  • Watch the Moon Meet Venus in the Dawn this Wednesday

    02/24/2014 5:37:34 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | February 24, 2014 | David Dickinson on
    Are you ready for some lunar versus planetary occultation action? One of the best events for 2014 occurs early this Wednesday morning on February 26th, when the waning crescent Moon — sometimes referred to as a decrescent Moon — meets up with a brilliant Venus in the dawn sky. This will be a showcase event for the ongoing 2014 dawn apparition of Venus that we wrote about recently. This is one of 16 occultations of a planet by our Moon for 2014, which will hide every naked eye classical planet except Jupiter and only one of two involving Venus this...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- From the Northern to the Southern Cross

    01/27/2014 4:22:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | January 27, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: There is a road that connects the Northern to the Southern Cross but you have to be at the right place and time to see it. The road, as pictured above, is actually the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy; the right place, in this case, is dark Laguna Cejar in Salar de Atacama of Northern Chile; and the right time was in early October, just after sunset. Many sky wonders were captured then, including the bright Moon, inside the Milky Way arch; Venus, just above the Moon; Saturn and Mercury, just below the Moon; the Large and...
  • The dark secret of fairness creams: New study finds harmful metals in lightening products..

    01/16/2014 5:15:48 AM PST · by C19fan · 6 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | Januiary 15, 2014 | Neetu Chandra
    Next time you apply make-up, remember the fairness creams could contain mercury and the lipsticks may come packed with chromium, which can cause cancer. A new study by the Centre for Science and Environment's (CSE) Pollution Monitoring Lab (PML) has found mercury in 44 per cent of all the fairness creams it tested, while chromium was found in almost 50 per cent and nickel in 43 per cent of the lipstick samples tested.
  • The Obama Legacy in Planetary Exploration

    01/06/2014 9:19:21 AM PST · by Farnsworth · 28 replies
    Space.com ^ | January 04, 2014 | Mark V. Sykes
    It is frustrating, at a time when other nations are in ascendancy in space, that the administration of U.S. President Barack Obama seems committed to undermining the nation's own solar system exploration program. The Obama administration cut NASA's planetary-sciences budget by 20 percent in 2013. It has taken the National Research Council's (NRC) recommendations for prioritizing planetary investments in bad economic times and turned those recommendations upside down. The administration continues to favor large, directed projects at the expense of programs and missions that are openly competed.
  • NY law requires collecting old thermostats

    12/22/2013 5:07:31 PM PST · by ChildOfThe60s · 63 replies
    Associated Press via Fox ^ | Sunday, December 22, 2013 6:36 PM EST | Staff
    <p>ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has signed a law requiring manufacturers of thermostats with mercury to collect their old temperature controls in an effort to keep mercury out of the environment.</p> <p>The measure requires they establish collection programs and in 2015 start filing annual reports on collections.</p>
  • vanity: question on nuclear testing

    12/19/2013 8:14:59 PM PST · by Kolath · 31 replies
    Kolath | 12/19/2013 | Kolath
    Was trying to find out if there any USAF units solely dedicated to dropping nuclear test bombs in the Pacific and Nevada.
  • Protest Planned Against Last-Minute Bloomberg Push for Mandatory Flu Vaccines

    12/10/2013 12:05:48 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 29 replies
    Politicker.com ^ | December 9, 2013 | Colin Campbell and Jill Colvin
    Autism advocates are set to protest tomorrow against a quiet effort by Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s administration to require annual flu vaccinations for all New York City schoolchildren.On Wednesday, with just three weeks to go until he leaves office, Mr. Bloomberg’s controversial Board of Health is set to vote on new rules that would force children as young as six months old to be immunized each year before December 31 if they attend licensed day care or pre-school programs.“Young children have a high risk of developing severe complications from influenza. One-third of children under five in New York City do not...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Comet ISON from STEREO

    11/23/2013 9:37:38 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    NASA ^ | November 23, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Still intact, on November 21 Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) swept into this animated field of view (left) from the HI-1 camera on the STEREO-A spacecraft. The camera has also captured periodic Comet Encke, Mercury, and Earth, with the Sun cropped out of the frame at the right, the source of the billowing solar wind. From STEREO's perspective in interplanetary space, planet Earth is actually the most distant of the group, seen in its orbit beyond the Sun. Mercury is closest, but both planets are still so bright they create sharp vertical lines in the camera's detector. Both comets clearly...
  • Options for Reducing the Deficit: 2014 to 2023 Office: Eliminate Human Space Exploration Programs

    11/20/2013 5:41:54 AM PST · by Cincinatus' Wife · 34 replies
    Space Ref - NASA Watch ^ | November 18, 2013
    Discretionary Spending--Option 11 Eliminate Human Space Exploration Programs The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Human Exploration and Operations programs focus on developing systems and capabilities required to explore deep space while continuing operations in low- Earth orbit. The exploration programs fund research and development of the next generation of systems for deep space exploration and provide technical and financial support to the commercial space industry. Complementing those efforts, NASA's space operations programs involve operating in low-Earth orbit, most notably using the International Space Station, as well as providing space communications capabilities. This option would terminate NASA's human space exploration...
  • Compact fluorescent bulb burns PNNL staff

    11/19/2013 7:04:01 PM PST · by Rabin · 43 replies
    PNNL ^ | 18, 2013 | Staff
    A PNNL staff member removed a burned-out compact piggy tail light bulb in his home and replaced it with a new one. When he turned on the switch, only a portion of the new bulb lit up. Assuming it was defective, he turned off the switch to remove it. Grasping the bulb, he felt a pain as if he had been cut by glass, and found a small, burn. Removing the bulb, he noticed the plastic base (see pix) was blackened at the point where it connected to the mercury tube.
  • Historic Space Images From The Arecibo Observatory

    11/01/2013 2:51:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Popular Science ^ | November 01, 2013 | Francie Diep
    Happy 50th birthday to the telescope that brought us the first map of Venus, revealed ice on Mercury, and more. When Cornell University built the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico -- near the equator, so it could observe the planets without needing to move its 1,000-foot-wide reflector -- people hadn't even set foot on the moon yet. They wouldn't for another six years. Since its construction, Arecibo has contributed to generations of astronomy. Researchers first set its radar and radio instruments to discover basics, such as the speed of Mercury and Venus' rotations and the surface features of the moon...
  • Coal-Fired Power Plants Produce Insignificant Mercury (This will open your eyes)

    11/01/2013 8:59:14 AM PDT · by Titus-Maximus · 33 replies
    Objectivist | 4/9/2012 | Charles R. Anderson
    Back in December, I wrote about the absurdity of the EPA claim that coal-fired power plants produced significant mercury which necessitated drastic reductions at any cost. I was then puzzled that the EPA did not produce maps of the mercury concentrations that would show the mercury was found in higher concentrations downwind of coal-fired power plants. It turns out that maps of the concentrations of mercury do exist and can be examined. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program produces annual maps of the mercury concentrations across the USA here. Note that the mercury high concentration areas changed somewhat between 2009 and...
  • Scott Carpenter, Mercury Astronaut Who Orbited Earth, Dies at 88

    10/10/2013 12:59:25 PM PDT · by Borges · 58 replies
    NYT ^ | 10/10/2013 | RICHARD GOLDSTEIN
    <p>M. Scott Carpenter, whose flight into space in 1962 as the second American to orbit the Earth was marred by technical glitches and ended with the nation waiting anxiously to see if he had survived a landing far from the target site, died on Thursday in Denver. He was 88 and one of the last two surviving astronauts of America’s original space program, Project Mercury.</p>
  • ‘TransFormers’ Could Beam Light Into Permanently Shadowed Craters

    08/26/2013 2:19:52 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | August 26, 2013 | Elizabeth Howell on
    Permanently shadowed craters on the moon or Mercury are one of the most exciting locations to search for water. Because the walls of these craters protect certain spots inside from the rays of the sun, it’s quite possible for ice to lurk inside of there. We’ve found ice on so-called airless worlds because of this trick of geometry. So how about exploring them? What’s the best way to do so? The NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts office suggests using TransFormers to get inside these places. No, not the awesome robots you see in the movies, but still something that has a...
  • Lincoln Is Doing Worse Than Mercury Before Ford Killed Them

    08/19/2013 1:53:15 PM PDT · by Responsibility2nd · 53 replies
    Jalopnik ^ | 08/19/2013 | Raphael Orlove
    Ford justified killing Mercury because Mercury wasn't providing a sufficient chunk of market share in the US. Ford recently announced how much market share Lincoln has and it makes Mercury look good. Justin Berkowitz at Car and Driver made the association, citing Ford's 2010 statement explaining why they were ending the Mercury Brand. Mercury originally was created as a premium offering to Ford and was an important source of incremental sales. Of Ford Motor Company’s 16 percent market share in the U.S., Mercury accounts for 0.8 percentage points, a level that has been flat or declining for the past several...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Leaving Earth

    08/05/2013 3:59:08 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    NASA ^ | August 05, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What it would look like to leave planet Earth? Such an event was recorded visually in great detail by the MESSENGER spacecraft as it swung back past the Earth, eight years ago, on its way in toward the planet Mercury. Earth can be seen rotating in this time-lapse video, as it recedes into the distance. The sunlit half of Earth is so bright that background stars are not visible. The robotic MESSENGER spacecraft is now in orbit around Mercury and has recently concluded the first complete map of the surface. On occasion, MESSENGER has continued to peer back at...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Two Views of Earth

    07/24/2013 3:46:18 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | July 23, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: In a cross-Solar System interplanetary first, our Earth was photographed during the same day from both Mercury and Saturn. Pictured on the left, Earth is the pale blue dot just below the rings of Saturn, as captured by the robotic Cassini spacecraft now orbiting the gas giant. Pictured on the right, the Earth-Moon system is seen against a dark background, as captured by the robotic MESSENGER spacecraft now orbiting Mercury. In the MESSENGER image, the Earth (left) and Moon (right) shine brightly with reflected sunlight. MESSENGER took the overexposed image last Friday as part of a search for small...
  • Relativity behind mercury's liquidity

    06/24/2013 12:56:35 AM PDT · by neverdem · 16 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 21 June 2013 | Laura Howes
    The effects of relativity can be seen in everyday phenomena © ShutterstockWhy is mercury a liquid at room temperature? If you ask that question in a school classroom you will probably be told that relativity affects the orbitals of heavy metals, contracting them and changing how they bond. However, the first evidence that this explanation is correct has only just been published.An international team led by Peter Schwerdtfeger of Massey University Auckland in New Zealand used quantum mechanics to make calculations of the heat capacity of the metal either including or excluding relativistic effects. They showed that if they...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- All of Mercury

    06/13/2013 3:29:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | June 12, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: For the first time, the entire surface of planet Mercury has been mapped. Detailed observations of the innermost planet's surprising crust have been ongoing since the robotic MESSENGER spacecraft first passed Mercury in 2008 and began orbiting in 2011. Previously, much of the Mercury's surface was unknown as it is too far for Earth-bound telescopes to see clearly, while the Mariner 10 flybys in the 1970s observed only about half. The above video is a compilation of thousands of images of Mercury rendered in exaggerated colors to better contrast different surface features. Visible on the rotating world are rays...
  • This Spot on Mercury (Almost) Never Goes Dark

    04/25/2013 6:28:41 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | April 25, 2013 | Jason Major on April 25, 2013
    Mercury, traveling in its 88-day-long orbit around the Sun with basically zero axial tilt, has many craters at its poles whose insides literally never see the light of day. These permanently-shadowed locations have been found by the MESSENGER mission to harbor considerable deposits of ice (a seemingly ironic discovery on a planet two-and-a-half times closer to the Sun than we are!*) But if there are places on Mercury where the Sun never shines (insert butt joke here) then there may also be places where it always does. That’s what researchers are looking for in illumination maps made from MESSENGER data…...
  • Green Meteorite May Be from Mercury, a First

    03/29/2013 8:27:19 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    space.com ^ | 28 March 2013 Time: 03:19 PM ET | Miriam Kramer
    The green rock found in Morocco last year may be the first known visitor from the solar system's innermost planet, according to meteorite scientist Anthony Irving, who unveiled the new findings this month at the 44th annual Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in The Woodlands, Texas. The study suggests that a space rock called NWA 7325 came from Mercury, and not an asteroid or Mars. NWA 7325 is actually a group of 35 meteorite samples discovered in 2012 in Morocco. They are ancient, with Irving and his team dating the rocks to an age of about 4.56 billion years. Irving...
  • High Fructose Corn Syrup: Some Scary Facts to Consider Before You Gulp Down Soda

    03/29/2013 7:49:44 AM PDT · by ilovesarah2012 · 72 replies
    sugarshockblog.com ^ | Connie Bennett
    Did you know that consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in the U.S. -- which can be found in a plethora of cookies, candies and fast-foods -- has increased by a a whopping 10,673 percent between 1970 and 2005? So reports the USDA Dietary Assessment of Major Trends in U.S. Food Consumption report. Are you one of millions, who, according to the USDA report, consume one-quarter of your calories from added sugars, most of which comes from high fructose corn syrup, as mercola.com pointed out? Meanwhile, have you heard about the a recent study, which reveals that a diet...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Colors of Mercury

    03/01/2013 9:20:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    NASA ^ | March 01, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: The colors of the solar system's innermost planet are enhanced in this tantalizing view, based on global image data from the Mercury-orbiting MESSENGER spacecraft. Human eyes would not discern the clear color differences but they are real none the less, indicating distinct chemical, mineralogical, and physical regions across the cratered surface. Notable at the upper right, Mercury's large, circular, tan colored feature known as the Caloris basin was created by an impacting comet or asteroid during the solar system's early years. The ancient basin was subsequently flooded with lava from volcanic activity, analogous to the formation of the lunar...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Mercury on the Horizon

    02/23/2013 9:51:02 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    NASA ^ | February 19, 2013 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Have you ever seen the planet Mercury? Because Mercury orbits so close to the Sun, it never wanders far from the Sun in Earth's sky. If trailing the Sun, Mercury will be visible low on the horizon for only a short while after sunset. If leading the Sun, Mercury will be visible only shortly before sunrise. So at certain times of the year an informed skygazer with a little determination can usually pick Mercury out from a site with an unobscured horizon. Above, a lot of determination has been combined with a little digital manipulation to show Mercury's successive...
  • Mercury shows off its colourful side

    02/17/2013 5:23:57 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 7 replies
    bbc ^ | 15 February 2013 Last updated at 19:47 ET | Jonathan Amos
    Scientists working on Nasa's Messenger probe to Mercury have shown off a stunning new colour map of the planet. It comprises thousands of images acquired by the spacecraft during its first year in orbit. This is not how we would see Mercury, which would look like a dull, brownish-grey globe to our eyes. Rather, the map represents an exaggerated view of the planet that is intended to highlight variations in the composition of its rock. "Messenger's camera has filters that go from the blue to the near-infrared of the spectrum, and we are able to use computer processing to enhance...
  • Global convention to limit mercury agreed

    02/13/2013 2:26:46 AM PST · by neverdem · 11 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 21 January 2013 | Maria Burke
    The import or export of mercury is set to be banned © ShutterstockAfter six days of complex discussions in Geneva last week, governments from around the world agreed to a global, legally-binding treaty on Saturday to limit mercury use. This is the first new major environmental treaty in over a decade.The Minamata Convention on Mercury – named after the Japanese city where thousands of residents fell ill with mercury poisoning in the 1950s – covers a range of products and processes where mercury is used or released. Countries will be invited to ratify the treaty, which took four years to...
  • Biosynthesis of methylmercury discovered

    02/13/2013 1:45:56 AM PST · by neverdem · 6 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 12 February 2013 | Laura Howes
    While we all know mercury is poisonous it is methylmercury, the organic form, that bioaccumulates in food webs and is highly toxic. It's been acknowledged for years that methylmercury is produced by microorganisms far down the food chain, but what has not been known is how they do it. US-based researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee have now identified the genes, and hence the proteins, involved in mercury methylation and suggest that the pathway is common for all mercury methylating microorganisms.Using gene deletion, Jerry Parks' team showed that two genes are key components of bacterial mercury methylation, relating...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Northern Mercury

    12/01/2012 10:10:52 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    NASA ^ | December 01, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Innermost planet Mercurywould probably not be a good location for an interplanetary winter olympics. But new results based on data from the Mercury orbitingMESSENGER spacecraft indicate that it does have substantial water icein permanently shadowed regions within craters near its north pole. The possibility of ice on Mercury has been entertained for years, inspired by the discovery of radar bright, hence highly reflective, regions near the north pole. Highlighted in yellow in this map based on projected MESSENGER images, radar bright regions are seen to correspond with floors and walls of north polar impact craters. Farther from the pole...
  • MESSENGER Finds New Evidence for Water Ice at Mercury's Poles

    11/29/2012 12:16:16 PM PST · by Da Bilge Troll · 24 replies
    NASA ^ | 11.29.12 | NASA Press Release
    New observations by the MESSENGER spacecraft provide compelling support for the long-held hypothesis that Mercury harbors abundant water ice and other frozen volatile materials in its permanently shadowed polar craters. Three independent lines of evidence support this conclusion: the first measurements of excess hydrogen at Mercury's north pole with MESSENGER's Neutron Spectrometer, the first measurements of the reflectance of Mercury's polar deposits at near-infrared wavelengths with the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA), and the first detailed models of the surface and near-surface temperatures of Mercury's north polar regions that utilize the actual topography of Mercury's surface measured by the MLA. These...
  • Forget Wimpy Plans and NIMBYs, Let's Solve the Energy Crisis by Blowing Up Mercury

    10/15/2012 6:43:50 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 9 replies
    Motherboard ^ | 4/4/12 | Dr. Derek Mead
    Forget Wimpy Plans and NIMBYs, Let's Solve the Energy Crisis by Blowing Up Mercury Posted by Derek_Mead on Wednesday, Apr 04, 2012 Save this post NextPrev Add This With all the squabbling about oil killing us all, climate change screwing with polar bears, nuclear plants falling apart, solar panels sucking on a cloudy day, and wind turbines scything through migratory birds with a gory violence best explained by an Omega Crom song, there’s a big point that all the complainers in the energy debate are ignoring: These days, we are being huge wimps. Millennia ago us humans were building...
  • Tests of tuna sold for school lunches reveal variations in mercury levels(OMG!)

    09/20/2012 5:47:55 PM PDT · by mdittmar · 21 replies
    CBS News ^ | September 19, 2012 | Ryan Jaslow
    Are kids' school lunches safe? A new report from the advocacy group Mercury Policy Project finds tuna served as school lunches in some states may contain levels of mercury that the organization deems toxic. Mercury is a naturally occurring neurotoxin in the environment that can be released into the air through industrial pollution. It builds up in water and streams and turns into methylmercury, a compound which is then absorbed by fish as they feed. The report, called "Tuna Surprise" is the first to test canned tuna sold to schools, according to its authors. "Most children are already consuming only...
  • FAULTY FDEP SCIENCE DRIVES UNNECESSARY FLORIDA MERCURY SCARE

    06/16/2012 8:08:04 AM PDT · by Twotone
    Science & Public Policy Institute ^ | June 15, 2012 | Willie Soon
    Regulatory actions being debated in Florida should raise bright red flags for Sunshine State residents, other U.S. states, and even other countries.
  • EPA Official Showers Love on Anti-Fossil Fuel Activists

    06/08/2012 10:39:22 AM PDT · by jazusamo · 7 replies
    National Legal & Policy Center ^ | June 8, 2012 | Paul Chesser
    As President Obama’s Environmental Protection Agency continues to receive much-needed scrutiny as it conducts its reign of terror (“crucifying”) on fossil fuel industries, yet another renegade regional administrator has been shown in full alliance with environmental extremists in pursuit of regulations to kill oil and coal. Natural gas isn't far down the hit list. This time it’s Region 5 Administrator Susan Hedman, a veteran attorney who has litigated environmental cases as part of the University of Maryland Environmental Law Center, as counsel for the Environmental Law and Policy Center, and as senior assistant attorney general in the Illinois Attorney...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Mercury Spotting

    05/26/2012 9:48:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    NASA ^ | May 27, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Can you spot the planet? The diminutive disk of Mercury, the solar system's innermost planet, spent about five hours crossing in front of the enormous solar disk in 2003, as viewed from the general vicinity of planet Earth. The Sun was above the horizon during the entire transit for observers in Europe, Africa, Asia, or Australia, and the horizon was certainly no problem for the sun-staring SOHO spacecraft. Seen as a dark spot, Mercury progresses from left to right (top panel to bottom) in these four images from SOHO's extreme ultraviolet camera. The panels' false-colors correspond to different wavelengths...
  • 93-year-old Florida woman retires her ’64 Mercury after 576,000 miles on the road

    04/04/2012 9:51:06 PM PDT · by Impala64ssa · 40 replies
    Yahoo news ^ | 4/5/12 | Eric Pfeiffer
    These days, most people consider themselves lucky if a new car lasts 5 to 10 years. Make it to 100,000 miles in your vehicle, and the car company might make a commercial about you. That makes 93-year-old Rachel Veitch a notable exception. Veitch is retiring her 1964 Mercury Comet Caliente after more than 576,000 miles on the road. "I am legally blind, so I can no longer drive my lovely Chariot," Veitch told FoxNews.com. "They don't have to take it away, I would not dream of driving that car again." The car itself is fine, but Veitch has macular degeneration...
  • Florida woman, 93, reaches end of the road after 576,000 miles in her 1964 Mercury

    04/02/2012 12:10:23 PM PDT · by rawhide · 31 replies
    foxnews.com ^ | 4-2-12
    After 576,000 miles--or more than a trip to the moon and back--in the same 1964 Mercury Comet Caliente, the 93-year-old Orlando grandmother is stepping on the brakes due to age-related macular degeneration in both eyes. She realized her vision had completely failed her in early March after running a "bald-faced red light," Veitch told FoxNews.com. "I am legally blind, so I can no longer drive my lovely Chariot," she said by phone. "They don’t have to take it away, I would not dream of driving that car again." Veitch,a retired nurse who told FoxNews.com in July 2009 that the car...
  • American Hero John Glenn: THERE'S a Guy Who Knows What Love Is...

    03/28/2012 5:26:32 AM PDT · by Reaganite Republican · 55 replies
    Reaganite Republican ^ | March 28, 2012 | Reaganite Republican
    An interesting story surrounds last month's  50th anniversary celebration of the  Mercury-Atlas 6 manned space flight... John and Annie Glenn with VP Johnson, 1962 John Glenn's own true heroFor half a century now the world has applauded John Glenn as a heart-stirring American hero. He lifted the nation's spirits when, as one of the original Mercury astronauts, he was blasted alone into orbit around the Earth; the enduring affection for him is so powerful that even now people find themselves misting up at the sight of his face or the sound of his voice. But for all these years, Glenn has...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Unusual Hollows Discovered on Planet Mercury

    03/27/2012 4:33:25 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    NASA ^ | March 27, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What are those unusual features on planet Mercury? The slightly bluish tinge of features dubbed hollows has been exaggerated on the above image by the robotic MESSENGER spacecraft currently orbiting Mercury. The rounded depressions appear different than impact craters and nothing like them has been noted on Earth's Moon or anywhere else in the Solar System. The above image is a section of the floor of Raditladi impact basin about 40 kilometers wide that includes the mountains of the central peak. One progenitor hypothesis is that the hollows formed from the sublimation of material exposed and heated during the...
  • Memo: Shield Steve Schmidt from John McCain blame (plans to destroy Palin to save Schmidt)

    03/15/2012 7:32:44 PM PDT · by roses of sharon · 44 replies
    Politico ^ | 3/15/12
    Ten days before the 2008 presidential election, as blame was beginning to be laid out for John McCain’s “likely defeat,” a top communications adviser to the campaign wrote a detailed strategy memo focused on how to preserve the reputation of another key adviser, Steve Schmidt, POLITICO has learned. *** The protective maneuver sheds more light on the final days of the 2008 campaign, a period of low morale marked by tensions between the Palin and McCain camps and the expectation of defeat. *** “Thankfully, and rightfully so, some members of the political punditry are already coming his defense (Rove, McKinnon,...
  • Agenda-Driven "Science" at EPA

    02/01/2012 3:23:16 PM PST · by I got the rope · 4 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | 1 Feb 12 | Willie Soon
    In December 2011, the Environmental Protection Agency released new Clean Air Act “National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.” Once again, EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson touted the supposedly huge benefits of controlling emissions of mercury (Hg) and other air toxics from U.S. coal- and oil-fired power plants (or electric generating units, EGUs). The people of Idaho may welcome this new rule, since EPA’s miraculous modeling machine has promised to prevent “six premature deaths” and create “up to $54 million” in health benefits by 2016 – even though not one coal-fired EGU in Idaho fits the EPA’s final rules. Even the...
  • Many consumers in the dark about dangers of CFL bulbs

    01/15/2012 5:16:15 AM PST · by Rocky · 51 replies
    The is the first in a multi-part series of articles exposing the lies and misinformation behind legislation mandating the replacement of incandescent light bulbs with potentially unsafe compact florescent light (CFL) bulbs. ------- According to provisions of legislation passed by congress in 2007, the 100-watt incandescent bulb was to be off the shelves this January, followed by a phase-out of the 75-watt version in January 2013 and the 60- and 40-watt versions in January 2014. But last month congress granted consumers a reprieve by including in its spending bill a measure delaying enforcement of the ban until the end of...
  • CFL bulbs: Shedding Light on Misleading Performance Claims (EPA's claims about CFL's are bogus)

    01/14/2012 8:08:34 PM PST · by Robert A. Cook, PE · 185 replies · 1+ views
    By Kirk Myers, Seminole County Environmental News Examiner This article, the second in a series, focuses on the misleading performance claims surrounding the “more energy efficient” compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs now replacing traditional incandescent bulbs. These potentially harmful mercury-filled lamps (see my previous column describing the dangers) are being forced on consumers by the U.S. congress with support from the Green Lobby and light-bulb manufacturers like GE, Sylvania and Phillips. These and other manufacturers stand to make huge profits selling the more expensive CFLs (more on that issue in my next column). There is a growing body of evidence...