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Keyword: crops

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  • Frankengrain

    12/07/2016 8:28:25 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 56 replies
    Wheat Belly Blog ^ | September 11, 2016 | Dr. William Davis
    Here’s an excerpt from the Wheat Belly Cookbook about modern high-yield, semi-dwarf wheat, what I call the “Frankengrain” because of the extensive and bizarre changes introduced into this grass by geneticists and agribusiness. (Even though a cookbook, I tried to make the Wheat Belly Cookbook a standalone book that discusses the background on why and how the Wheat Belly lifestyle yields such unexpected and extravagant health and weight loss successes. For this reason, the first 90 pages of the cookbook reiterate many of the Wheat Belly basic concepts.)From the Wheat Belly Cookbook: Wheat encapsulates a fundamental dilemma of our technological...
  • 21st Century Crop Dusting: FAA Approves Large Drone Use On Farms

    06/22/2015 6:52:54 PM PDT · by Jan_Sobieski · 39 replies
    CBS SF Bay Area ^ | 5/5/2015 | Staff
    FRESNO (CBS/AP) A drone large enough to carry tanks of fertilizers and pesticides has won rare approval from federal authorities to spray crops in the United States. Steve Markofski of Yamaha Corp. U.S.A. said Tuesday that the Federal Aviation Administrations approval is a first. He says drones are already used to take pictures to help farmers identify unhealthy patches of crops, but this is the first time theyll be able to carry a payload. Markofski says Yamahas 207-pound (94-kilogram) RMAX looks like a small helicopter and is remotely piloted. It received FAA approval Friday. Markofski says farmers in Japan...
  • Worlds Largest Indoor Farm In Japan Produces 100 Times More Food Than Other Farms [Video]

    05/21/2015 12:41:29 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    The Inquisitr News ^ | January 27, 2015 | Jan Omega
    When it comes to farming, there is no better time than now to get into the field. Thanks to technological advances ushered in by the green movement, farming has evolved from a traditional means to sustain a personal living to a science with the potential to feed millions. The Inquisitr previously reported on how technology-assisted farming has become a blessing to others. Former NFL football player, Jason Brown, watched DIY videos on Youtube to learn how to grow 46,000 pounds of sweet potatoes and 10,000 pounds of cucumbers, which he donated to pantries and kitchens. In Irvine, California, an entire...
  • Green Jackfruit: is Pulled Pork for Vegetarians the Next Big Food Craze?

    04/13/2015 9:43:31 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 29 replies
    Late last year, after 18 years of litigation, a senior government official in Kerala, south-west India was given a prison sentence after being convicted of theft. The object he stole was government property, and it was so large he had to have it cut up to get it home. A piece of art, perhaps? A precious metal? Actually, it was a 40-year-old jackfruit tree, and, once youve tasted its fruit, you begin to understand why he did it. To say the jackfruit is big is an understatement. It is the largest tree-borne fruit on the planet it isnt unusual...
  • Feds won't ban pesticides said to kill honeybees, despite 800 studies

    11/27/2014 5:42:39 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 66 replies
    The Washington Examiner ^ | November 26, 2014 | Paul Bedard
    Over 100 scientists worldwide, citing 800 studies, are demanding that the Obama administration follow Europes lead and put a moratorium on the use of a new-style pesticide blamed for the deaths of 30 percent of American honeybees every year. In a letter to the EPA and Agriculture Department, the scientists said there is overwhelming evidence from 800 studies that the pesticide family called neonicotinoids are to blame for the substantial declines in honeybees, bumblebees and butterflies, all pollinators needed to help farmers produce billions of dollars worth of food every year. The 108 signers of this letter therefore urge you...
  • Rise in Crop Production increasing levels of Carbon Dioxide in Atmosphere

    11/21/2014 7:51:17 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 48 replies
    Maine News ^ | 11/21/2014 | Betty Laseter
    Scientists have revealed that levels of carbon dioxide increase in the Northern Hemisphere during summers each year as plants absorb carbon dioxide to convert sunlight into food. The CO2 levels again rise as the plants release CO2 after the growing season. Scientists have found that corn, rice, wheat and soybean are the four leading crops that account for maximum CO2 release in the atmosphere of Northern Hemisphere. Crops act as sponge for CO2 and it could be said that the sponge effect has become bigger because of the advancements in agricultural techniques, leading to more production. There is a sharp...
  • Global warming's bad, but farming can adapt, Cargill exec says

    06/26/2014 6:21:11 AM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 14 replies
    Pioneer Press ^ | 6-24-14 | Tom Webb
    Climate change may shrink the ice caps and devastate the coasts, but here in the farmlands of Minnesota and the Dakotas, a milder climate may bring some benefits, a new report suggests. That was one twist in a report issued Tuesday by a group of top corporate and political officials, including Greg Page, executive chairman of Wayzata-based agribusiness giant Cargill. While the group's other notables warned Tuesday about possible devastation ahead, Page delivered a conflicted -- even hopeful -- view of how food production would adjust to a changing climate. For instance, a warming climate is expected to shift the...
  • Monarch butterfly decline linked to spread of GM crops

    06/09/2014 5:05:10 AM PDT · by NowApproachingMidnight · 62 replies
    CBC ^ | 6/4/2014 | Emily Chung
    The main cause of the monarch butterfly's decline is the loss of milkweed its food in its U.S. breeding grounds, a new study has found. That all but confirms that the spread of genetically modified crops is indirectly killing the monarch.
  • California: Before And After The Drought, And Why It's Only Going To Get Worse

    02/04/2014 6:01:28 AM PST · by blam · 21 replies
    Zero Hedge ^ | 2-4-2014 | Tyler Durden
    California: Before And After The Drought, And Why It's Only Going To Get WorseZero Hedge Tyler Durden on 02/03/2014While the Northeast is blanketed by another winter storm, California has its own, quite inverse, climatic problems in the form of a historic drought which as Bloomberg reports, is forcing farmers in the fertile central valley region to fallow thousands of acres of fields and has left 17 rural towns so low on drinking water that the state may need to start trucking in supplies. It is so bad that water reservoirs are at about 60 percent of average, according to state...
  • Unapproved genetically modified wheat from Monsanto found in Oregon field

    05/30/2013 8:00:45 PM PDT · by Ron C. · 404 replies
    Washington Post ^ | May 30, 2013 | Steven Mufson
    Japan, the largest market for U.S. wheat exports, suspended imports from the United States and canceled a major purchase of white wheat on Thursday after the recent discovery of unapproved genetically modified wheat in an 80-acre field in Oregon. How the altered crop made its way to the Oregon field remains a mystery. The strain was developed by Monsanto to make wheat resistant to the companys own industry-leading weed killer. Monsanto tested the type of altered seed in more than a dozen states, including Oregon, between 1994 and 2005, but it was never approved for commercial use. Yet the Agriculture...
  • 'Beemageddon' Threatens US With Food Disaster

    05/07/2013 8:16:38 PM PDT · by Veggie Todd · 50 replies
    Russia Today ^ | May 7, 2013 | Unknown
    US honey bees have been dying by the tens of millions, with annual death rates of about 30 percent. With fewer bees to pollinate fruits and vegetables each year, 'beemageddon' may soon cause the collapse of the agriculture industry.
  • Why does America regulate the trade in raisins?

    04/15/2013 7:27:33 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 20 replies
    The Economist ^ | April 14, 2013 | The Economist Explains
    THE Supreme Court has frequently handed down judgments that have shaken America to its core. Now, it has turned its attention to the raisin.A group of farmers has brought a complaint about the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, under which the government confiscates part of the annual national raisin crop. The Court is considering whether the arrangement is constitutional. But why is a country that generally celebrates red-blooded capitalism regulating the raisin trade in the first place?Since the 1940s a government agency called the Raisin Administrative Committeehas confiscated a portion of the annual raisin crop: 47% in 2003 and...
  • Raisin farmers in SCOTUS case face $650K charge if they dont give half their crop to the feds

    01/31/2013 6:54:33 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 25 replies
    Hotair ^ | 01/31/2013 | MARY KATHARINE HAM
    47 percent of their crop, to be precise. It’s J.J. Abrams’ world. We’re all just living in it.Luckily, the Supreme Court decided to take the case of the Horne family, so they may end up retaining the right to freely sell the raisin crop they’ve duly produced, but how is it that they must appeal to the highest court in the land for that right? Well, it all started in 1937, as so many good things do, when the federal government began requiring raising farmers to lay aside a tribute portion of their crops in order to control supply and...
  • Scientists discover genetic key to efficient crops

    01/27/2013 7:02:13 PM PST · by Sir Napsalot · 9 replies
    Cornell Univ Chronicles Online ^ | 1-23-2013 | Krishna Ramanujan
    With projections of 9.5 billion people by 2050, humankind faces the challenge of feeding modern diets to additional mouths while using the same amounts of water, fertilizer and arable land as today. Cornell researchers have taken a leap toward meeting those needs by discovering a gene that could lead to new varieties of staple crops with 50 percent higher yields. The gene, called Scarecrow, is the first discovered to control a special leaf structure, known as Kranz anatomy, which leads to more efficient photosynthesis. Plants photosynthesize using one of two methods: C3, a less efficient, ancient method found in most...
  • First, the Bad News

    01/16/2013 3:34:02 AM PST · by Kaslin · 8 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | January 16, 2013 | John Stossel
    We in the media rarely lie to you. But that leaves plenty of room to take things wildly out of context. That's where most big scare stories come from, like recent headlines about GM foods. GM means "genetically modified," which means scientists add genes, altering the plant's DNA, in this case to make the crop resistant to pests. Last week, Poland joined seven other European countries in banning cultivation of GM foods. The politicians acted because headlines screamed about how GM foods caused huge tumors in rats. The pictures of the rats are scary. Some have tumors the size of...
  • Monsanto's GM Corn And Cancer In Rats: Real Scientists Deeply Unimpressed.

    09/21/2012 5:47:59 AM PDT · by Aussiebabe · 9 replies
    Forbes ^ | 9/20/2012 | Tim Worstall
    Experts not involved in the study were skeptical, with one accusing the French scientists of going on a "statistical fishing trip" and others describing its methods as well below standard. The animals on the genetically modified (GM) diet suffered mammary tumors, as well as severe liver and kidney damage, according to the peer-reviewed study which was published in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology and presented at a news conference in London. The researchers said 50 percent of male and 70 percent of female rats died prematurely, compared with only 30 percent and 20 percent in the control group.
  • World braced for new food crisis

    07/20/2012 7:24:27 AM PDT · by Perseverando · 20 replies
    Financial Times ^ | July 19, 2012 | Jack Farchy and Gregory Meyer
    The world is facing a new food crisis as the worst US drought in more than 50 years pushes agricultural commodity prices to record highs. Corn and soyabean prices surged to record highs on Thursday, surpassing the peaks of the 2007-08 crisis that sparked food riots in more than 30 countries. Wheat prices are not yet at record levels but have rallied more than 50 per cent in five weeks, exceeding prices reached in the wake of Russias 2010 export ban. The drought in the US, which supplies nearly half the worlds exports of corn and much of its soyabeans...
  • The case for mandatory GMO labeling

    06/18/2012 3:53:02 PM PDT · by southern rock · 26 replies
    Natural News ^ | 06/18/2012 | Mike Adams
    The case for mandatory GMO labeling - even if you believe in limited government and the free market (NaturalNews) Now that the GMO labeling ballot measure has been officially accepted onto the California ballot, Monsanto is gearing up its propaganda campaign that aims to convince people you don't need to know what you're eating! Trust us, we're the food companies! We never lie, do we? For the record, I'm an opponent of most government mandates against individuals. When the government says you have to give your children vaccine shots, that's a violation of your liberty. When Mayor Bloomberg says you...
  • A New Stragedy to Feed the World

    12/24/2011 10:47:13 PM PST · by count-your-change · 33 replies · 1+ views
    Enter Stage Right ^ | 12/19 2011 | Dennis T. Avery
    "Can we successfully grow more plants per acre as a future strategy for increasing our crop yields and food production? Sixty thousand corn plants per acre -- twice Iowa's current average -- could be one route to higher productivity. The world will need twice as much food in 2050, and we'll need to triple the crop yields on the best land. Doubling would be a very good start."
  • Alabama: Inmates can replace Hispanic farmhands

    10/09/2011 1:24:37 AM PDT · by Cincinatus' Wife · 97 replies
    Politico ^ | October 8, 2011 | MACKENZIE WEINGER
    Alabama farmers frantically looking for workers to replace those that have fled the state in the wake of its tough new immigration law should just stop by their local prison, according to the head of Alabamas agriculture department. John McMillan, commissioner of the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries, told the Montgomery Advertiser on Thursday that inmate labor through the states work-release program offers a short-term solution to the sudden labor shortage that has hit Alabama since enforcement of its illegal immigration law kicked in. Some farmers have said the states new law has driven away Hispanic migrant farm workers...