Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Fate of priceless New Orleans landmarks still being assessed
Lubbock Avalanche-Journal ^ | Sunday, September 4, 2005 | Associated Press

Posted on 09/04/2005 7:50:10 AM PDT by WestTexasWend

In New Orleans, winding streets where revelers meandered, listening to jazz in the sticky heat, are now flooded with murky water. Some businesses and landmarks are submerged or damaged; others escaped the water but were ravaged by looters.

Rescue workers are combing the waters in search of survivors, but a different kind of reckoning is also becoming clear. New Orleans is one of the most iconic cities in America, and some of the places and pieces that make it unique could be lost or looted.

A list of famous spots in the city, and how they are faring, though the full extent of the damage won't be known for some time:

• The French Quarter: This historic district is full of wrought-iron balconies and ornate colonial architecture, but was also a playground for adults who could roam the streets with cocktails in tow and listen to jazz and, during Mardi Gras, grab for beads and go wild. The area escaped much of the flooding.

• Bourbon Street: A hedonistic strip in the Quarter bursting with bars like Pat O'Brien's, Molly's on the Market, and Jean Laffite's Blacksmith Shop. The latter, a piano bar, was supposedly the in-town headquarters of pirate Jean Laffite, who owned more than 10 vessels and raided American, British and Spanish ships in the early 1800s. Located in the French Quarter, the area escaped flooding but remains closed.

• Cafe du Monde: Established in 1862, this coffee shop on Decatur Street in the French Quarter was best known for its cafe au lait, made with hearty New Orleans-style coffee, blended with chicory, and beignets - crispy, square doughnuts. Still standing.

• Galatoire's: Nearly a century old, the tiled and mirrored restaurant was famous for not taking reservations. The tuxedo-clad wait staff served Creole classics like shrimp remoulade and crab meat maison. Also located in the French Quarter. Still standing.

• Acme Oyster House: Built more than 90 years ago at the gateway to the French Quarter, the menu included raw oysters (pronounced "ersters") and traditional po' boys, or fried oyster sandwiches. On the edge of the Quarter, should have escaped much flooding.

• U.S. Mint building: The building housed Confederate soldiers during the Civil War and produced money for the federal government until 1909. It later became home to jazz and Mardi Gras exhibits and the streetcar immortalized in Tennessee Williams' play "A Streetcar Named Desire." The mint is still standing. The fate of the streetcar is unknown.

• Preservation Hall: A famed New Orleans jazz club located in an unassuming building originally built as a private residence in 1750 and was once a tavern, inn, photo studio and art gallery. Fate unknown; it is in the middle of the Quarter and should be unaffected unless looters have trashed it.

• Anne Rice's home: Tourists and fans of the "Vampire Chronicles" books would visit the Garden District home of author Anne Rice, though she no longer lives there. She also helped create several "haunted tours" of the city. The area was battered by high winds that knocked down trees.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events; US: Louisiana; US: Mississippi
KEYWORDS: frenchquarter; katrina; katrinadamage; neworleans
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-2021-4041-50 next last
Heartbreaking pic of Beauvoir, last home of Jefferson Davis, in Biloxi, MS. at link.
1 posted on 09/04/2005 7:50:11 AM PDT by WestTexasWend
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend
ping!
2 posted on 09/04/2005 7:51:09 AM PDT by mcg2000
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend

They should start pumping in billions of cubic yards of concrete.


3 posted on 09/04/2005 7:52:49 AM PDT by stockpirate (We can fight the Muslim Army in Iraq! Or we can fight them outback! Check my homepage)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend

Some areas are more than 20 feet underwater.


4 posted on 09/04/2005 7:53:19 AM PDT by stockpirate (We can fight the Muslim Army in Iraq! Or we can fight them outback! Check my homepage)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend

Paul Morphy's grave (just a few boxes away from Marie Laveaux's) is probably gone.


5 posted on 09/04/2005 7:54:07 AM PDT by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch is der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend
Cat is bringing in equipment.

The best solution bull doze the rest of the levy system and move NOLA to downtown Washing DC, weather and crime rates about the same.

6 posted on 09/04/2005 7:55:19 AM PDT by dts32041 (Shinkichi: Massuer, did you see that? Zatôichi: I don't see much)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend
The Delgado Museum, home of many priceless paintings, has not been mentioned. The D Day Museum, The Museum of the Confederacy, Jackson Barracks, Chalmette Battlefield (Battle of New Orleans), The Cabildo, Beauregards' home in the City and his nephew's home at Chalmette, The National Cemetery, and Jackson Square have not been mentioned.

Of course, there are many significant businesses in NO that are not mentioned yet...T.D. Waterhouse Money Managers and Stock Market Business, The Drug Enforcement Agency for the entire SE US is based in NO.

7 posted on 09/04/2005 7:58:12 AM PDT by vetvetdoug (Shiloh, Corinth, Iuka, Brices Crossroads, Harrisburg, Britton Lane, Holly Springs, Hatchie Bridge,)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend
Actually, I've spent some time at that home where Jeff Davis died.

It was very visible from that once beautiful highway that parreled the coast from Bay St. Louis to Mobile.

The home belonged to a Southern lady who was an admirer of the penniless Davis and took him in for free.

8 posted on 09/04/2005 7:58:28 AM PDT by battlegearboat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend

If it's going to take at least 3 months to pump it out, it's simply not worth this happening again. Let it be the New Atlantis.


9 posted on 09/04/2005 7:58:59 AM PDT by mtbopfuyn (Legality does not dictate morality... Lavin)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend

Amazing isn't it that landmarks get called priceless and human beings are what replaceable?

Sorry, sad as it is to see landmarks destroyed, I can't quite get to the priceless stage yet.


10 posted on 09/04/2005 7:58:59 AM PDT by Just mythoughts
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: battlegearboat

Visited Beauvoir a year or two after Camille spared it.
It was beautiful and the view...of the Gulf from the porch and of the house from the beach...was really magnificent,
'specially to a kid from West Texas. So sad to see this.


11 posted on 09/04/2005 8:01:11 AM PDT by WestTexasWend
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend
A lot of the beautiful old homes in the Garden District were probably hit by the winds and trees, but I understand there's not as much water damage there as in the north and west parts of the city. I saw video yesterday of the area around the D-Day Museum and it looked a little damp but none the worse for wear, so I'd think the Warehouse District came through okay. St. Louis Cathedral actually had services, so Jackson Square is high and dry.

Sounds like most of the well-known landmarks probably survived the natural disaster. But who knows what will make it through the man-made disaster that followed.

12 posted on 09/04/2005 8:01:24 AM PDT by IronJack
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend

Incomplete accounting. What about all the priceless Catholic churches?


13 posted on 09/04/2005 8:04:03 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend; Siobhan
Catholic Churches, Institutions, and Family Landmarks Destroyed by Katrina
14 posted on 09/04/2005 8:05:58 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: IronJack

Right after Katrina passed through there was a report that the statue of Christ near the cathedral lost only the thumb and forefinger of one outstreched hand, as the two giant trees on either side of it went down, taking out a lot of the wrought iron fencing.


15 posted on 09/04/2005 8:06:00 AM PDT by WestTexasWend
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

St. Louis Cathedral is high and dry.


16 posted on 09/04/2005 8:06:06 AM PDT by battlegearboat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend
Limo-Lib-update BUMP
17 posted on 09/04/2005 8:06:18 AM PDT by ChadGore (VISUALIZE 62,041,268 Bush fans.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Just mythoughts

Of course the people are more important than the buildings. But these tangental stories--college kids delaying school, museum damage, animal rescue--lend another perspective to the whole miserable situation.


18 posted on 09/04/2005 8:08:29 AM PDT by pa mom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: pa mom

I agree, but can't we wait till there is an accounting of the dead?


19 posted on 09/04/2005 8:10:49 AM PDT by Just mythoughts
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: WestTexasWend

What about Gennifer Flowers's place?


20 posted on 09/04/2005 8:11:22 AM PDT by HIDEK6
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-2021-4041-50 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson