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Internet Sales Tax Looms - Simplified Sales Tax Initiative
PC World ^ | Rita Chang, Medill News Service

Posted on 12/10/2003 12:26:07 PM PST by Valpal1

WASHINGTON -- Online shoppers in more than 20 states may soon pay sales taxes on their purchases if Congress passes pending legislation.

Under the proposed Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Act, out-of-state merchants and online vendors must collect sales tax on goods shipped to some states. The key issue is whether buyers live in a state that has adopted the interstate sales and use tax program called the Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Agreement (see chart for status of states).

Currently, 45 states and the District of Columbia impose sales and use taxes on purchases. Of these, 35 states have signed onto the interstate tax program, which streamlines more than 7500 diverse sales tax laws in state and local jurisdictions. In 20 of these 35 states, the state legislatures have ratified the program and are ready to start taxing Internet purchases.

This measure would not be affected by a ban on taxes unique to the Internet, also being considered by Congress. That's because the taxes involved are not new fees, the bill's supporters say--they're just not being collected now.

"The bill only enforces the collection of taxes that are already due," says Bill Duncan, a legislative aide to Rep. Ernest Istook Jr. (R-Oklahoma), a House sponsor.

Temporary Respite The program is now voluntary, however, so not all merchants collect the taxes. Some, like Wal-Mart and Target, already collect sales taxes for online purchases in the 20 interstate tax program states, according to Duncan.

Enactment of the House bill would force merchants that ship goods into the 20 participating states to collect taxes on purchases.

The ten states that have not signed on are moving cautiously toward adoption, while continuing to study and analyze the issue. California, which has a complicated sales and use tax system, is participating more actively in the initiative after sitting on the sideline for months.

"To have us show up [at the meetings], participate, and engage is a big deal," says Carole Migden, chair of California's Board of Equalization, which administers the state's tax programs. Still, she says, "big revenue-generating states such as California and New York conceptually like the initiative, but aren't ready to jump in."

No one knows whether any of the ten holdout states will ratify the interstate taxing system. David Steil, representing the National Conference of State Legislatures, the lobbying arm of state legislative bodies, says he doesn't expect all of them to adopt the interstate system.

"I suspect some won't come on board," he says. "If they do nothing, they'll lose sales revenue."

Congressional aide Duncan adds, "There are political forces in every state that drive the train. Just because the tax commissioner recommends the Agreement, does not mean the legislature will follow suit."

Who'll Pay The pending bill gives states the clout to collect sales and use taxes from out-of-state merchants who have no stores, warehouses, or other physical facilities in the state where the sale occurs. In 1992, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states can't force out-of-state vendors to collect sales taxes for them, largely because the various sales and use tax systems are so complex. The court declared that it's too hard for retailers to keep track of all those tax systems.

For example, a Twinkie might be defined as nontaxable food in one state, but as taxable candy in another. Often, sales tax regulations differ even among counties or cities within a state.

Because the proposed Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Act streamlines procedure, it reduces the burden on retailers, which can then be forced to charge taxes, say those familiar with the bill.

"This bill provides a uniform definition of what is taxable," Duncan says.

To protect small businesses, the bill exempts merchants with annual sales less than $5 million from collecting sales and use taxes from their customers. "This would be an excessive burden on small retailers," says Craig Shearman, a spokesperson for the National Retail Federation.

Online mass retailer Amazon.com opposes the bill, contending that it gives smaller online retailers an unfair advantage.

"The bill creates a large loophole for small sellers," says Bill Curry, an Amazon.com spokesperson. "Clearly, anyone with $4,999,999.99 worth of out-of-state sales each year is not small," he adds. "It's a threshold that invites abuse."

Next Steps The bill, introduced in the House last Thursday, will be presented to the Senate later this week. Support is strong, says Duncan, noting that a similar measure was passed by the House in 2000 as part of the Internet Tax Moratorium, but did not come to a vote in the Senate.

Congress could vote on the bill by the end of this year or in early 2004, Duncan says.

The bill's supporters include state and local governments, which have experienced revenue shortfalls in recent years. Those jurisdictions are estimated to have lost as much as $13 billion in uncollected sales taxes from online sales in 2002, according to a study by the Business Research Center at the University of Tennessee.

Other endorsements come from retail trade groups such as the International Council of Shopping Centers and the National Retail Federation, which have long complained that online competitors enjoy a competitive advantage because they need not charge sales taxes. The bill levels the playing field for retailers, the brick-and-mortar trade groups say--and not just small, independent storefront merchants will benefit.

For example, Gateway supports the bill because it creates more equitable competition with key rival Dell. Dell does not collect taxes from its online customers. But Gateway, with stores in most states, must charge sales taxes when shipping to states that impose sales taxes.

A University of California-Los Angeles study released earlier this year found that nearly half of online buyers said they would buy fewer goods online if sales taxes were applied to their purchases.

Enacted/In Progress Arkansas Alabama Iowa Arizona Indiana California Kansas Connecticut Kentucky District of Columbia Minnesota Florida Nebraska Hawaii Nevada Illinois North Carolina Louisiana North Dakota Maine Ohio Maryland Oklahoma Massachusetts South Dakota Michigan Tennessee Mississippi Texas Missouri Utah New Jersey Vermont New York Washington Pennsylvania West Virginia Rhode Island Wyoming South Carolina Virginia Wisconsin

Not Participating/No Sales Tax Colorado Alaska Georgia Delaware Idaho Montana New Mexico Oregon New Hampshire


TOPICS: Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: government; internet; internettaxes; salestax; tax; taxes
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Can anybody point me to a grassroots group or website that is fighting this tax?
1 posted on 12/10/2003 12:26:07 PM PST by Valpal1
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To: Valpal1
They just can't keep their thieving hands out of our pockets.
2 posted on 12/10/2003 12:30:57 PM PST by Bikers4Bush
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To: Valpal1
the real question to ask: is the Republican Congress and Bush going to pass this law? Its is essentially the nucleaus of a national sales tax, delivered to the states.
3 posted on 12/10/2003 12:35:00 PM PST by oceanview
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To: Valpal1
www.nointernettax.org

Various resources

Google search

4 posted on 12/10/2003 12:35:32 PM PST by martin_fierro (Ohhh... ehhh... ┬┐Peeka Panish?)
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To: oceanview
it says "support is trong" in the Republican Congress? They really expect us to just keep voting for them without question I guess. If this passes and Bush signs it, I'm off the reservation.
5 posted on 12/10/2003 12:38:32 PM PST by oceanview
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To: oceanview
Sounds like businesses will be moving to the other 30 states before long.
6 posted on 12/10/2003 12:44:09 PM PST by 50sDad ("You used ALL THE GLUE on PURPOSE! It's a MAJOR AWARD!")
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To: Valpal1
Argh. My nearly tax-free life is about to go down the drain. And here in NV, they even tax the shipping and handling. This is gross.
7 posted on 12/10/2003 12:45:00 PM PST by Henrietta
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To: Valpal1
As a former business owner that had to collect and remit sales tax, I say to hell with them. We need to band together and stop being tax collectors for the federal, state, and local taxing agencies. Tell these taxing bas***ds if they want to collect a tax, go get it themselves.
8 posted on 12/10/2003 12:45:47 PM PST by whereasandsoforth (tagged for migratory purposes only)
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To: Beelzebubba
ping
9 posted on 12/10/2003 12:46:25 PM PST by Henrietta
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To: 50sDad
its not where the merchant is, its where the buyer lives.

"Enactment of the House bill would force merchants that ship goods into the 20 participating states to collect taxes on purchases."
10 posted on 12/10/2003 12:48:21 PM PST by oceanview
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To: Henrietta
Is the Republican Congress really serious about this, passing a tax increase like this in an election year? do they not even know who comprises their voting base, Republicans are heavy users of online shopping.

The Nasdaq would take a huge hit. No one will buy anything online if they have to pay sales tax and shipping, at that point it becomes cheaper to just go get the product locally and avoid the shipping charges. UPS and FedEx stocks would collapse.
11 posted on 12/10/2003 12:51:07 PM PST by oceanview
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To: Valpal1
It's not been a joyful day for conservatives.

First the SCOTUS stomps the First Amendment into the ground and now this. Sad... sad.

12 posted on 12/10/2003 12:53:40 PM PST by upchuck (Yes! I am weird. But in a dreadful, eerie, creepy, odd, horrific, warm, gentle, friendly kinda way)
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To: upchuck
the internet will no longer be a source of commerce between merchants and consumers, except for narrow specialty items that you can't buy locally. if wall street even gets a whiff that this might pass, tech stocks related to these companies and services will collapse.
13 posted on 12/10/2003 12:57:01 PM PST by oceanview
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To: Bikers4Bush
They just can't keep their thieving hands out of our pockets.

No, they can't. No matter what Americans do, the government seems to find some way to tax it.

14 posted on 12/10/2003 12:59:40 PM PST by Skooz (We keep you alive to serve this ship. Row well, and live.)
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To: Valpal1
U.S. Constitution, Section IX:

No Tax or Duty shall be laid on Articles exported from any State.

15 posted on 12/10/2003 1:01:47 PM PST by absinthe
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To: martin_fierro
Thank you,

I've joined NoInternetTax.org and email that piece of rat dung Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon and will continue to make my views known to him on a regular basis.

I'm gonna picket that sucker on his next tour throught Eastern Oregon.
16 posted on 12/10/2003 1:01:50 PM PST by Valpal1 (Impeach the 9th! Please!!)
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To: Valpal1
the problem is: the REPUBLICANS seems to be behind passing this thing!
17 posted on 12/10/2003 1:04:27 PM PST by oceanview
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To: Valpal1
Republicans show strong support for tax? And the difference between them and demonrats is...what?

I believe the first revolution was hatched with whiskey sitting on the table. Think I'll go pour myself a scotch.
18 posted on 12/10/2003 1:11:24 PM PST by sergeantdave
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To: absinthe
Some, like Wal-Mart and Target, already collect sales taxes for online purchases in the 20 interstate tax program states, according to Duncan.

The writer didn't follwup by reporting that WalMart and Target have a physical presence in those states, which is the actual basis for collecting a state sales tax.

This law is a radical departure from the physical presence test.

19 posted on 12/10/2003 1:11:57 PM PST by angkor
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To: sergeantdave
If this passes, it's time for a Tea Party!
20 posted on 12/10/2003 1:20:45 PM PST by 11B3 (Liberalism is merely another form of mental retardation.)
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