Keyword: stringtheory

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Up for Grabs: In Science, When 'Anything Goes,' Everything Goes

    12/12/2017 11:58:16 AM PST · by Heartlander · 21 replies
    Salvo Magazine ^ | December 2017 | Denyse O'Leary
    Up for Grabs In Science, When 'Anything Goes,' Everything Goesby Denyse O'Leary Family values activist Austin Ruse's new book, Fake Science: Exposing the Left's Skewed Statistics, Fuzzy Facts, and Dodgy Data (Regnery, 2017), offers a look at a world growing increasingly hostile to evidence-based reasoning. We have not discovered better reasoning methods; rather, many people seem to have decided that reasoning is not relevant to our life together, and perhaps not relevant to the life of the mind generally. Ruse begins his book with a note about polls. Opinion pollsters claim that their work is a scientific enterprise. But in...
  • Black holes' magnetism surprisingly wimpy

    12/07/2017 2:52:50 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 23 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | 12/7/17
    Black holes are famous for their muscle: an intense gravitational pull known to gobble up entire stars and launch streams of matter into space at almost the speed of light. It turns out the reality may not live up to the hype. In a paper published today in the journal Science, University of Florida scientists have discovered these tears in the fabric of the universe have significantly weaker magnetic fields than previously thought. A 40-mile-wide black hole 8,000 light years from Earth named V404 Cygni yielded the first precise measurements of the magnetic field that surrounds the deepest wells of...
  • Lightning, with a chance of antimatter

    11/29/2017 11:01:02 AM PST · by marktwain · 20 replies
    Kyoto University ^ | 27 November | Kyoto University
    Japanese netizens help scan lightning for gamma rays Japan -- A storm system approaches: the sky darkens, and the low rumble of thunder echoes from the horizon. Then without warning... Flash! Crash! -- lightning has struck. This scene, while familiar to anyone and repeated constantly across the planet, is not without a feeling of mystery. But now that mystery has deepened, with the discovery that lightning can result in matter-antimatter annihilation. In a collaborative study appearing in Nature, researchers from Japan describe how gamma rays from lightning react with the air to produce radioisotopes and even positrons -- the antimatter...
  • Excess antielectrons aren’t from nearby dead stars, study says

    11/26/2017 8:31:20 PM PST · by ETL · 28 replies
    ScienceNews.com ^ | November 16, 2017 | Emily Conover
    The finding keeps open the possibility that the particles come from dark matter New observations of the whirling cores of dead stars have deepened the mystery behind a glut of antimatter particles raining down on Earth from space. The particles are antielectrons, also known as positrons, and could be a sign of dark matter — the exotic and unidentified culprit that makes up the bulk of the universe’s mass. But more mundane explanations are also plausible: Positrons might be spewed from nearby pulsars, the spinning remnants of exploded stars, for example. But researchers with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory, or...
  • Hidden Supercluster Could Solve Milky Way Mystery

    11/23/2017 8:41:02 AM PST · by MtnClimber · 30 replies
    Qanta Magazine ^ | 21 Nov, 2017 | Liz Kruesi
    The Milky Way, just like every galaxy in the cosmos, moves. While everything in the universe is constantly moving because the universe itself is expanding, since the 1970s astronomers have known of an additional motion, called peculiar velocity. This is a different sort of flow that we seem to be caught in. The Local Group of galaxies — a collection that includes the Milky Way, Andromeda and a few dozen smaller galactic companions — moves at about 600 kilometers per second with respect to the leftover radiation from the Big Bang. Over the past few decades, astronomers have tallied up...
  • Fantasy no longer! Invisibility code cracked

    11/19/2017 2:04:10 PM PST · by Robert DeLong · 93 replies
    WND (World Net Daily) ^ | 11/19/2017 | Alicia Powe
    WASHINGTON – Top scientists in Israel are on the verge of a revolutionary breakthrough, creating a cloak that can render a person invisible. In their real-world quest for invisibility, scientists at Ben-Gurion University have developed a device that scatters light away from an object so it cannot be detected, making the object invisible to the eye. Physicists developed the method for concealing objects based on the study of “metamaterials,” which focuses on exploiting and controlling light by examining how it interacts with objects. Those arrays of minuscule components bend, scatter, transmit or otherwise shape electromagnetic radiation in ways that no...
  • Earthbound Antimatter Mystery Deepens After Scientists Rule Out Pulsar Source

    11/17/2017 9:19:32 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 29 replies
    Space.com ^ | November 16, 2017 | Harrison Tasoff,
    The recent finding, detailed in the journal Science today (Nov. 17), concerns positrons, the antimatter complements of electrons. High-energy particles, usually protons, traveling across the galaxy can create pairs of positrons and electrons when they interact with dust and gas in space, study co-author Hao Zhou, at Los Alamos National Lab, told Space.com. In 2008, the space-based PAMELA detector measured unexpectedly high numbers of earthbound positrons. This was about 10 times what they were expecting to see, according to Zhou. ... Zhou's team made detailed measurements of the gamma-rays coming from the direction of two nearby pulsars — Geminga and its companion...
  • Quantum computers take a step forward with a 50-qubit prototype

    11/13/2017 10:11:56 PM PST · by ETL · 33 replies
    ScienceNews.com ^ | November 10, 2017 | Emily Conover
    Bit by qubit, scientists are edging closer to the realm where quantum computers will reign supreme.IBM is now testing a prototype quantum processor with 50 quantum bits, or qubits, the company announced November 10. That’s around the number needed to meet a sought-after milestone: demonstrating that quantum computers can perform specific tasks that are beyond the reach of traditional computers. Unlike standard bits, which represent either 0 or 1, qubits can indicate a combination of the two, using what’s called a quantum superposition. This property allows quantum computers to perform certain kinds of calculations more quickly. But because quantum bits...
  • Visionary Mathematician Vladimir Voevodsky Dies at 51

    11/12/2017 8:55:36 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 20 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 10/11/17 | Kevin Hartnett
    Voevodsky’s friends remember him as constitutionally unable to compromise on the truth — a quality that led him to produce some of the most important mathematics of the 20th century. Vladimir Voevodsky at the Institute for Advanced Study in 2016. In math as in life, Vladimir Voevodsky played by his own rules. Voevodsky, a Russian-born mathematical prodigy, produced a string of daring insights in the 1990s that revolutionized one of the central fields of mathematics and established him at the pinnacle of his profession. His work continues to reverberate today. On Sept. 30, Voevodsky died in Princeton, New Jersey, at...
  • Bizarre 3-Year-Long Supernova Defies Our Understanding of How Stars Die

    11/08/2017 2:21:07 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    Space.com ^ | November 8, 2017 01:00pm ET | Harrison Tasoff,
    Supernova iPTF14hls was unremarkable when first detected by a partner telescope in San Diego on Sept. 22, 2014. The light spectrum was a textbook example of a Type II-P supernova, the most common type astronomers... The observatory was in the middle of a 7.5-year collaborative survey, so Arcavi focused on more-promising objects. But in February, 2015... a student working for Arcavi that winter, noticed the object had become brighter over the past five months. "He showed me the data," Arcavi said, "and he [asked], 'Is this normal?' and I said, 'Absolutely not. That is very strange. Supernovae don't do that,'"...
  • Rookie UC Santa Cruz Astronomer David Coulter Hits Paydirt

    11/08/2017 9:35:05 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 5 replies
    Santa Cruz Sentinel ^ | 11/03/17 | Jondi Gumz
    David Coulter was in Copenhagen when he got an email that catapulted him into the stars. Coulter, 36, is a self-taught programmer. He spent 10 years in industry jobs, then left for graduate studies in astronomy and astrophysics at UC Santa Cruz, which operates Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton. “I just wanted to learn about outer space,” he said. He picked the right place. The second-year grad student found himself on a team that was the first to take images of neutron stars merging, beating a group from Harvard, perhaps explaining the origin of metals such as gold and uranium....
  • Groundbreaking 'quarksplosion' discovery can make ten times as much energy as nuclear fusion

    11/07/2017 7:05:11 PM PST · by sparklite2 · 96 replies
    DAILYMAIL.COM ^ | 7 November 2017 | CHEYENNE MACDONALD
    Study found elementary particles called quarks release energy when fused Certain types can produce eight times more energy than hydrogen fusion It's so powerful that the researchers at first hesitated to publish the work
  • The Oracle of Arithmetic

    07/04/2016 4:38:42 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 33 replies
    Quanta ^ | 28 Jun, 2016 | Erica Klarreich
    At 28, Peter Scholze is uncovering deep connections between number theory and geometry. In 2010, a startling rumor filtered through the number theory community and reached Jared Weinstein. Apparently, some graduate student at the University of Bonn in Germany had written a paper that redid “Harris-Taylor” — a 288-page book dedicated to a single impenetrable proof in number theory — in only 37 pages. The 22-year-old student, Peter Scholze, had found a way to sidestep one of the most complicated parts of the proof, which deals with a sweeping connection between number theory and geometry. “It was just so stunning...
  • Einstein Proved Right on Gravity—Again

    04/25/2013 1:10:04 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 43 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | 04/25/2013 | Gautam Naik
    Scientists have subjected Albert Einstein's famous theory of gravity to its toughest real-world test so far—and it has prevailed. Einstein's general theory of relativity states that objects with mass cause a curvature in space-time, which we perceive as gravity. Space-time, according to Einstein's theories of relativity, is a four-dimensional fabric woven together by space and time. For example, a bowling ball causes a dent in a mattress, and that dent changes the otherwise straight motion of a nearby marble on the same mattress. Similarly, the mass of the sun distorts the space-time around it. A body with less mass, like...
  • Uranium Seawater Extraction Makes Nuclear Power Completely Renewable

    07/01/2016 4:39:49 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 39 replies
    Forbes ^ | July 1, 2016 | James Conca
    America, Japan and China are racing to be the first nation to make nuclear energy completely renewable. The hurdle is making it economic to extract uranium from seawater, because the amount of uranium in seawater is truly inexhaustible. And it seems America is in the lead. New technological breakthroughs from DOE’s Pacific Northwest (PNNL) and Oak Ridge (ORNL) national laboratories have made removing uranium from seawater within economic reach and the only question is – when will the source of uranium for our nuclear power plants change from mined ore to seawater extraction? Nuclear fuel made with uranium extracted from...
  • Scientist eyes 39-day voyage to Mars

    02/26/2010 2:39:44 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 40 replies · 989+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 2/26/10 | Jean-Louis Santini
    WASHINGTON (AFP) – A journey from Earth to Mars could eventually take just 39 days -- cutting current travel time nearly six times -- according to a rocket scientist who has the ear of the US space agency. Franklin Chang-Diaz, a former astronaut and a physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), says reaching the Red Planet could be dramatically quicker using his high-tech VASIMR rocket, .. The Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket -- to give its full name -- is quick becoming a centerpiece of NASA's future strategy as it looks to private firms to help meet the...
  • The 17 equations that changed the world

    06/29/2016 8:33:17 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 65 replies
    World Economic Forum ^ | 4 Apr, 2016 | Andy Kiersz
    In 2012, Mathematician Ian Stewart came out with an excellent and deeply researched book titled "In Pursuit of the Unknown: 17 Equations That Changed the World." His book takes a look at the most pivotal equations of all time, and puts them in a human, rather than technical context. "Equations definitely can be dull, and they can seem complicated, but that’s because they are often presented in a dull and complicated way," Stewart told Business Insider. "I have an advantage over school math teachers: I'm not trying to show you how to do the sums yourself." ... Stewart continued that...
  • Why ultra-powerful radio bursts are the most perplexing mystery in astronomy

    06/28/2016 6:06:48 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 25 replies
    Nature ^ | 28 Jun, 2016 | Elizabeth Gibney
    No astronomer had ever seen anything like it. No theorist had predicted it. Yet there it was — a 5-millisecond radio burst that had arrived on 24 August 2001 from an unknown source seemingly billions of light years away. “It was so bright, we couldn't just dismiss it,” says Duncan Lorimer, who co-discovered the signal1 in 2007 while working on archived data from the Parkes radio telescope in New South Wales, Australia. “But we didn't really know what to do with it.” Such fleeting radio bursts usually came from pulsars — furiously rotating neutron stars whose radiation sweeps by Earth...
  • Sleeping Black Hole Wakes To Devour Passing Star

    06/26/2016 6:48:55 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 30 replies
    It happened about 3.9 billion light years from Earth in the direction of the Draco constellation, and was spotted using high-energy X-ray data from NASA's public archives. The black hole, with a mass a few million times larger than the sun, gorged on the star at a rate 100 times greater than a theoretical maximum known as the Eddington limit. The majority of supermassive black holes are dormant, meaning they are not actively consuming matter. But occasionally a star drifts too close to a dormant black hole and a 'tidal disruption event' begins. Authors of the new research say their...
  • String Theory Co-Founder: Sub-Atomic Particles Are Evidence the Universe Was Created

    06/20/2016 6:11:57 AM PDT · by xzins · 170 replies
    CNS ^ | June 17, 2016 | Barbara Hollingsworth
    Dr. Michio Kaku, a theoretical physicist at the City College of New York (CUNY) and co-founder of String Field Theory, says theoretical particles known as “primitive semi-radius tachyons” are physical evidence that the universe was created by a higher intelligence. After analyzing the behavior of these sub-atomic particles - which can move faster than the speed of light and have the ability to “unstick” space and matter – using technology created in 2005, Kaku concluded that the universe is a “Matrix” governed by laws and principles that could only have been designed by an intelligent being. “I have concluded that...