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Keyword: stringtheory

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  • First Macroscopic Quantum Entanglement Performed At Room Temperature

    02/05/2016 11:32:15 AM PST · by Reeses · 43 replies
    Futurism.com ^ | Feb 5 2016 | Futurism
    In a breakthrough in quantum physics, scientists were able to create the phenomenon of quantum entanglement macroscopically using large magnets at room temperature. ... scientists working at the University of Chicago and the Argonne National Laboratory revealed that they were able to create quantum entanglement at a macroscopic level at room temperature on a semiconductor chip, using atomic nuclei and the application of relatively small magnetic fields. Their breakthrough, which is published in Science Advances, is not only significant in what they accomplished but also how they accomplished it. In quantum physics, the creation of entanglement in particles larger and...
  • Galactic center's gamma rays unlikely to originate from dark matter, evidence shows

    02/05/2016 1:08:03 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 15 replies
    Princeton University ^ | 4 Feb, 2016 | Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
    Bursts of gamma rays from the center of our galaxy are not likely to be signals of dark matter but rather other astrophysical phenomena such as fast-rotating stars called millisecond pulsars, according to two new studies, one from a team based at Princeton University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and another based in the Netherlands. Previous studies suggested that gamma rays coming from the dense region of space in the inner Milky Way galaxy could be caused when invisible dark matter particles collide. But using new statistical analysis methods, the two research teams independently found that the gamma ray...
  • When Will We Reach the End of the Periodic Table?

    02/02/2016 4:29:12 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 78 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 19 Jan, 2016 | Devin Powell
    Chemistry teachers recently had to update their classroom decor, with the announcement that scientists have confirmed the discovery of four new elements on the periodic table. The as-yet unnamed elements 113, 115, 117 and 118 filled in the remaining gaps at the bottom of the famous chart-a roadmap of matter's building blocks that has successfully guided chemists for nearly a century and a half. The official confirmation, granted by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), was years in the making, as these superheavy elements are highly unstable and tough to create. But scientists had strong reason to...
  • {snip} Researcher reveals scheme to create and control gravitational fields using current technology

    01/09/2016 9:58:03 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    Dailymail.com ^ | 8 January 2016 | Cheyenne Macdonald For
    'The most widespread source of gravitation is the inertial mass, which produces permanent gravitational fields. 'At the opposite, electromagnetic fields could be used to generate artificial, or human-made, gravitational fields, that could be switched on or off at will, depending whether their electromagnetic progenitors are present or not.' The experiment would require major resources, but if successful, it would give humans the power to control the 'last of four fundamental forces,' not within our grips. Current research, the scientist argues, observes and aims to understand gravitational fields, but makes no attempts to change them. 'Somehow, studying gravity is a contemplative...
  • New finding may explain heat loss in fusion reactors

    01/21/2016 1:45:42 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    phys.org ^ | January 21, 2016 by | David L. Chandler
    A long-standing discrepancy between predictions and observed results in test reactors has been called "the great unsolved problem" in understanding the turbulence that leads to a loss of heat in fusion reactors. ... [I]t turns out that interactions between turbulence at the tiniest scale, that of electrons, and turbulence at a scale 60 times larger, that of ions, can account for the mysterious mismatch between theory and experimental results. ... The expectation by physicists for more than a decade had been that turbulence associated with ions (atoms with an electric charge) was so much larger than turbulence caused by electrons...that...
  • Quantum Weirdness Now a Matter of Time

    01/19/2016 5:20:28 PM PST · by Reeses · 37 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | January 19, 2016 | George Musser
    Bizarre quantum bonds connect distinct moments in time, suggesting that quantum links - not space-time - constitute the fundamental structure of the universe. ... A field is a highly entangled system. Different parts of it are mutually correlated: A random fluctuation of the field in one place will be matched by a random fluctuation in another. ("Parts" here refers both to regions of space and to spans of time.) Even a perfect vacuum, which is defined as the absence of particles, will still have quantum fields. And these fields are always vibrating. Space looks empty because the vibrations cancel each...
  • Physicists propose the first scheme to teleport the memory of an organism

    01/15/2016 3:07:48 PM PST · by presidio9 · 51 replies
    Phys.org ^ | January 14, 2016
    In "Star Trek," a transporter can teleport a person from one location to a remote location without actually making the journey along the way. Such a transporter has fascinated many people. Quantum teleportation shares several features of the transporter and is one of the most important protocols in quantum information. In a recent study, Prof. Tongcang Li at Purdue University and Dr. Zhang-qi Yin at Tsinghua University proposed the first scheme to use electromechanical oscillators and superconducting circuits to teleport the internal quantum state (memory) and center-of-mass motion state of a microorganism. They also proposed a scheme to create a...
  • Gravitational wave rumors ripple through science world

    01/12/2016 9:00:15 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 87 replies
    spacedaily.com ^ | 01/12/2016
    There has been no announcement, no peer review or publication of the findings - all typically important steps in the process of releasing reliable and verifiable scientific research. Instead, a message on Twitter from an Arizona State University cosmologist, Lawrence Krauss, has sparked a firestorm of speculation and excitement. Krauss does not work with the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory, or LIGO, which is searching for ripples in the fabric of space and time. But he tweeted on Monday about the apparent shoring up of rumor he'd heard some months ago, that LIGO scientists were writing up a paper...
  • The mystery of the naked black hole

    01/06/2016 6:59:33 PM PST · by Utilizer · 38 replies
    AAAS Science ^ | 5 January 2016 2:45 pm | Daniel Clery
    KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA--Most, if not all, galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centers surrounded by dense clouds of stars. Now, researchers have found one that seems to have lost almost its entire entourage. The team, which reported its find here today at the annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society, says it doesn't know what stripped the stars away. But it has put forward a tantalizing possibility: The object could be an extremely rare medium-sized black hole, which theorists have predicted but observers have never seen. The unusual black hole sits about 1 billion light-years from Earth in SDSS J1126+2944,...
  • Black hole caught 'burping' galactic gas supply

    01/06/2016 2:18:17 PM PST · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    BBC ^ | 5 January 2016 | By Jonathan Webb
    NASA/CXC/Univ of Texas/E Schlegel et al Image caption The two waves of hot, X-ray emitting gas were seen in this image from Chandra ================================================================================================================ Astronomers have spotted two huge waves of gas being "burped" by the black hole at the heart of a nearby galaxy. The swathes of hot gas, detected in X-ray images from Nasa's Chandra space telescope, appear to be sweeping cooler hydrogen gas ahead of them. This vast, rippling belch is taking place in NGC 5195 - a small, neglected sibling of the "Whirlpool Galaxy", 26 million light years away. That makes it one of the closest...
  • ‘God Does Not Play Dice’ (Or does He? possible discovery of a new particle has Physics buzzing)

    01/04/2016 1:35:55 PM PST · by presidio9 · 40 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | Dec. 27, 2015 | Robbert Dijkgraaf
    <p>It was the perfect holiday surprise. On Dec. 15 the latest results from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland were announced, after early rumors had physicists buzzing. A signal in the data suggests a discovery that no one predicted: a possible new particle several times heavier than the Higgs boson.</p>
  • Gaza ENT Doctor Challenges Einstein's Relativity Theory, States: People in Gaza Have the...

    12/30/2015 4:42:15 PM PST · by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis · 44 replies
    MEMRI TV ^ | 11/17/15
    In a recent interview, Gaza ENT doctor Muhammad Yahya Barzaq said that he had written a book refuting Einstein's Theory of Special Relativity. "Had Einstein deigned to read the discoveries of Christian Doppler, we would never have had something called the Einstein Theory," he said. Barzaq further said that he had come up with his invention of what he called a "cartridge plane" after replacing a cassette at the exact moment when an airplane was flying overhead. On the issue of Gaza he said that people there "deserve to live because they have the benefit and interest of humanity at...
  • Could teleportation become a reality?

    12/29/2015 2:39:13 PM PST · by DFG · 49 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 12/29/2015 | Richard Gray
    It might seem like more of a magic trick than real science, but physicists have successfully made a 'cloud' of atoms exist in two separate places at the same time. The laws of standard physics dictate an object can't be in two places at once, but the researchers have exploited a quirk of tiny particles that exist in the quantum world, and applied this to atoms. Their breakthrough raises the prospect of being able to send not just information but perhaps even 'recreate' physical objects over large distances in a form of teleportation.
  • Carbon doped with nitrogen dramatically improves storage capacity of supercapacitors

    12/29/2015 9:55:30 AM PST · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    phys.org ^ | December 28, 2015 | by Bob Yirka
    Fabrication schematic of ordered mesoporous fewlayer carbon (OMFLC). Credit: Science (2015). DOI: 10.1126/science.aab3798 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ (Phys.org) - A team of researchers working in China has found a way to dramatically improve the energy storage capacity of supercapacitors - by doping carbon tubes with nitrogen. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their process and how well the newly developed supercapacitors worked, and their goal of one day helping supercapacitors compete with batteries. Like a battery, a capacitor is able to hold a charge, unlike a battery, however, it is able to be charged and discharged very quickly...
  • Why String Theory Is Not Science

    12/24/2015 6:40:17 AM PST · by C19fan · 43 replies
    Forbes ^ | December 23, 2015 | Ethan Siegel
    There are a lot of different ways to define science, but perhaps one that everyone can agree on is that it’s a process by which: 1.knowledge about the natural world or a particular phenomenon is gathered, 2.a testable hypothesis is put forth concerning a natural, physical explanation for that phenomenon, 3.that hypothesis is then tested and either validated or falsified, 4.and an overarching framework — or scientific theory — is constructed to explain the hypothesis and that makes predictions about other phenomena, 5.which is then tested further, and either validated, in which case new phenomena to test are sought (back...
  • Physicists figure out how to retrieve information from a black hole

    12/23/2015 1:17:47 PM PST · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    sciencemag.org ^ | 23 December 2015 3:15 pm | By Adrian Cho
    Black holes earn their name because their gravity is so strong not even light can escape from them. Oddly, though, physicists have come up with a bit of theoretical sleight of hand to retrieve a speck of information that's been dropped into a black hole. The calculation touches on one of the biggest mysteries in physics: how all of the information trapped in a black hole leaks out as the black hole "evaporates." Many theorists think that must happen, but they don't know how. Unfortunately for them, the new scheme may do more to underscore the difficulty of the larger...
  • Intelligence genes discovered by scientists

    12/22/2015 4:43:59 AM PST · by SkyPilot · 93 replies
    Photo: AP The Telegraph ^ | 21 Dec 15 | Sarah Knapton
    Imperial College London has found that two networks of genes determine whether people are intelligent or not so bright. Genes which make people intelligent have been discovered and scientists believe they could be manipulated to boost brain power. Researchers have believed for some time that intellect is inherited with studies suggesting that up to 75 per cent of IQ is genetic, and the rest down to environmental factors such as schooling and friendship groups. But until now, nobody has been able to pin-point exactly which genes are responsible for better memory, attention, processing speed or reasoning skills. Now Imperial College...
  • Black holes can grow to 50 billion times the mass of the Sun... and then stop

    12/21/2015 1:15:25 PM PST · by Red Badger · 32 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | December 21, 2015 12:30 GMT | By Matt Atherton
    Black holes can only grow if they have a gas disc to feed on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr ======================================================================================================== Black holes can only grow to 50 billion times the mass of the Sun, before they lose their only source of 'food' and stop growing. Scientists discovered that black holes have a size limit, as when it gets so big, the gas which feeds the great void loses its energy, and falls into the unknown. A researcher from the University of Leicester analysed the disc of gas which surrounds supermassive black holes at the centre of galaxies. He found that...
  • What Are Quantum Gravity's Alternatives To String Theory?

    12/19/2015 7:19:11 AM PST · by C19fan · 19 replies
    Fortune ^ | December 17, 2015 | Ethan Slegel
    The Universe we know and love — with Einstein’s General Relativity as our theory of gravity and quantum field theories of the other three forces — has a problem that we don’t often talk about: it’s incomplete, and we know it. Einstein’s theory on its own is just fine, describing how matter-and-energy relate to the curvature of space-and-time. Quantum field theories on their own are fine as well, describing how particles interact and experience forces. Normally, the quantum field theory calculations are done in flat space, where spacetime isn’t curved. We can do them in the curved space described by...
  • A Fight for the Soul of Science (physicists, philosophers debate boundaries of science)

    12/17/2015 10:01:58 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 28 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 12/16/15 | Natalie Wolchover
    A Fight for the Soul of Science String theory, the multiverse and other ideas of modern physics are potentially untestable. At a historic meeting in Munich, scientists and philosophers asked: should we trust them anyway? Laetitia Vancon for Quanta MagazinePhysicists George Ellis (center) and Joe Silk (right) at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich on Dec. 7. By: Natalie WolchoverDecember 16, 2015 Comments (17) Share this: facebooktwitterredditmail PDF Print Physicists typically think they “need philosophers and historians of science like birds need ornithologists,” the Nobel laureate David Gross told a roomful of philosophers, historians and physicists last week in Munich, Germany,...
  • Dark matter and the dinosaur: New theory challenges notions on origins of human life

    12/12/2015 1:32:59 AM PST · by Squawk 8888 · 22 replies
    National Post ^ | December 12, 2015 | Joseph Brean
    TORONTO — Dark matter inspires many strange theories, but until now few have involved giant lizards and the origins of humanity. If physicist Lisa Randall’s theory is correct, however, there is a clear link between dark matter, the great unknown majority of universal stuff and the extinction of the dinosaurs, which cleared the path for the rise of mammals, including that special species, homo sapiens. Roughly, her idea is that the rotation of a vast disc of dark matter through our solar system dislodged an asteroid from a weak and distant orbit, and sent it hurtling toward Earth, where it...
  • German scientists make big stride towards fusion

    12/11/2015 8:39:05 PM PST · by Olog-hai · 24 replies
    TheLocal.de ^ | 11 Dec 2015 12:15 GMT+01:00 | (AFP)
    Scientists in Germany said Thursday they had reached a milestone in a quest to derive energy from nuclear fusion, billed as a potentially limitless, safe and cheap source. [...] After spending a billion euros and nine years' construction work, physicists working on a German project called the "stellarator" said they had briefly generated a superheated helium plasma inside a vessel -- a key point in the experimental process. [...] The German experiment, using a machine called Wendelstein 7-X, was aimed at seeing whether it was possible to heat helium atoms with a microwave laser and to briefly contain the plasma...
  • Black holes have a size limit of 50 billion suns

    12/10/2015 8:44:24 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 27 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 10 Dec, 2015 | Joshua Sokol,
    Even gluttons can't eat forever. When black holes at the hearts of galaxies swell to 50 billion times the mass of our sun, they may lose the discs of gas they use as cosmic feedlots. Most galaxies host a supermassive black hole at their centre. Around this is a region of space where gas settles into an orbiting disc. The gas can lose energy and fall inwards, feeding the black hole. But these discs are known to be unstable and prone to crumbling into stars. Theoretically, a black hole could grow so big that it swallows up the stable part...
  • Rare Merger of Neutron Stars --"The Origin of Heavy Elements in the Universe"

    12/08/2015 11:01:44 AM PST · by sparklite2 · 14 replies
    Daily Galaxy ^ | December 8, 2015
    [This article is much more interesting than its headline] Several years ago it was discovered that the early Solar system contained a significant amount of plutonium-244. Considering its short-lived cycle, plutonium-244 that existed over four billion years ago when Earth formed has long since decayed but its daughter elements have been detected. Plutonium is a radioactive element. Its longest-lived isotope is plutonium-244 with a lifetime of 120 million years. Detection of plutonium-244 in nature would imply that the element was synthesized in astrophysical phenomena not so long ago (at least in Galactic time scales) and hence its origin cannot be...
  • Scientists see the light on microsupercapacitors: Laser-induced graphene makes ... storage possible

    12/03/2015 12:56:53 PM PST · by Red Badger · 12 replies
    phys.org ^ | December 3, 2015 | Provided by: Rice University
    Rice University scientists are making small, flexible microsupercapacitors in a room-temperature process they claim shows promise for manufacturing in bulk. The technique is based on their method to burn patterns of spongy graphene into plastic sheets with a commercial laser. Credit: Tour Group/Rice University ====================================================================================================================================== Rice University researchers who pioneered the development of laser-induced graphene have configured their discovery into flexible, solid-state microsupercapacitors that rival the best available for energy storage and delivery. The devices developed in the lab of Rice chemist James Tour are geared toward electronics and apparel. They are the subject of a new paper in the...
  • NASA Says Indian Scientist's Theory Is Correct, Black Holes Don't Really Exist

    11/29/2015 4:24:52 PM PST · by Jyotishi · 49 replies
    India Times ^ | November 27, 2015 | Bobins Abraham
    American space agency, the NASA had recently observed flares of X-rays from a black hole, which goes against the conventional notion that they are compact particles with such huge gravity that even light can't escape. Last month NASA announced that two of its space telescopes caught a huge burst of X-ray spewing out of a super massive black hole. These flairs appeared to be be triggered by the eruption of a charged particle from the black hole, which according to conventional belief doesn't let anything out. The latest findings are in accordance with the theory of Indian astrophysicist Abhas Mitra...
  • 'Material universe' yields surprising new particle

    11/25/2015 12:22:07 PM PST · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 25, 2015 | Provided by: Princeton University
    These tungsten ditelluride crystals behave as insulators for current applied in some directions and as conductors for current applied in other directions. The researchers found that this behavior is due to a newly theorized particle, the type-II Weyl fermion. Credit: Wudi Wang and N. Phuan Ong, Princeton University --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- An international team of researchers has predicted the existence of a new type of particle called the type-II Weyl fermion in metallic materials. When subjected to a magnetic field, the materials containing the particle act as insulators for current applied in some directions and as conductors for current applied in other...
  • Is Earth Growing a Hairy Dark Matter 'Beard'?

    11/23/2015 4:24:17 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 37 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Nov 23, 2015 03:48 PM ET // by | Ian O'Neill
    Gary Prezeau of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., describes the results of his theoretical model that goes some way to explain how streams of dark matter particles may interact with our planet's gravitational field. "A (dark matter) stream can be much larger than the solar system itself, and there are many different streams crisscrossing our galactic neighborhood," said Prézeau in a JPL press release. "When gravity interacts with the cold dark matter gas during galaxy formation, all particles within a stream continue traveling at the same velocity." As these streams begin to interact with a planet, according to...
  • The Most Mind-Bending Fact I Learned in Physics

    11/19/2015 10:56:52 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 64 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | 11/2015 | Tom Hartsfield
    Physics is built out of philosophically fascinating ideas. Or, at least, ideas that fascinate us as physicists. We are often moved to reverentially proclaim the beauty of various concepts and theories. Sometimes this beauty makes sense to other people (we're made of star stuff) and other times it's opaque (Frobenius manifolds in psuedo-Euclidean spaces). I have my own personal favorite idea. It arises from the philosophically fantastic (but mathematically moderate) workings of Einstein's relativity theory. The theory of special relativity holds that time and space are not separate entities, each operating on its own; rather they are intimately and inextricably...
  • Researchers have written quantum code on a silicon chip for the first time

    11/17/2015 6:53:19 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 28 replies
    Science alert ^ | 11/17/15 | FIONA MACDONALD
    Researchers have written quantum code on a silicon chip for the first time And so it begins... FIONA MACDONALD 17 NOV 2015 For the first time, Australian engineers have demonstratedthat they can write and manipulate the quantum version of computer code on a silicon microchip. This was done by entangling two quantum bits with the highest accuracy ever recorded, and it means that we can now start to program for the super-powerful quantum computers of the future.Engineers code regular computers using traditional bits, which can be in one of two states: 1 or 0. Together, two bits...
  • Image: A supermassive black hole in action

    11/17/2015 10:55:45 AM PST · by Red Badger · 48 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 17, 2015 | Provided by: European Space Agency
    Credit: NASA, ESA, S. Baum & C. O’Dea (RIT), R. Perley & W. Cotton (NRAO/AUI/NSF), and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) =============================================================================================================== Scientists often use the combined power of multiple telescopes to reveal the secrets of the Universe – and this image is a prime example of when this technique is strikingly effective. The yellow-hued object at the centre of the frame is an elliptical galaxy known as Hercules A, seen by the Earth-orbiting NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. In normal light, an observer would only see this object floating in the inky blackness of space. However, view Hercules A with...
  • Lasers could rapidly make materials hotter than the Sun

    11/16/2015 12:54:59 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Lasers could heat materials to temperatures hotter than the centre of the Sun in only 20 quadrillionths of a second, according to new research. Theoretical physicists from Imperial College London have devised an extremely rapid heating mechanism that they believe could heat certain materials to ten million degrees in much less than a million millionth of a second. The method, proposed here for the first time, could be relevant to new avenues of research in thermonuclear fusion energy, where scientists are seeking to replicate the Sun’s ability to produce clean energy. The heating would be about 100 times faster than...
  • Astronomers Found the Ghost of a Rare Giant Radio Galaxy

    11/09/2015 6:14:29 AM PST · by Red Badger · 33 replies
    gizmodo.com ^ | 11/08/15 4:05pm | Kiona Smith-Strickland
    Image: J021659-044920. The red and yellow lobes are the galaxy’s radio lobes. The red spot in the center is the visible galaxy. Prathamesh Tamhane/Yogesh Wadadekar. ================================================================================================================== Astronomers in India have discovered a very unusual galaxy, and it’s dying. By now, in fact, it’s probably already dead. The new galaxy, known as J021659-044920, is 9 billion light years away from Earth. That means it’s really old in cosmic terms (but not quite as old as the oldest object astronomers have ever found, a galaxy 13 billion light years away called UDFy-38135539). Viewed in the visible spectrum, J021659-044920spans about 100,000 light years...
  • Black hole awakens after 26 years

    11/05/2015 2:13:20 PM PST · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 5, 2015 | Provided by: Oxford University
    On 15 June 2015, V404 Cygni (V404 Cyg), a binary system comprising a sun-like star orbiting a black hole, woke up. A huge outburst of energy across the electromagnetic spectrum 'lit up' the sky. The last such outburst was 1989. Dr Kunal Mooley, a Hintze Research Fellow at the University's Centre for Astrophysical Surveys works on cutting-edge research based on the discovery and detailed study of transients at radio and optical wavelengths using a wide range of telescope facilities such as the Jansky Very Large Array, the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI), the Palomar Transient Factory, and the Giant Meterwave Radio...
  • The Feynman Lectures on Physics

    11/04/2015 1:37:49 AM PST · by HKMk23 · 35 replies
    California Institute of Technology ^ | Michael A. Gottlieb, and Rudolf Pfeiffer
    Caltech and The Feynman Lectures Website are pleased to present this online edition of The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Now, anyone with internet access and a web browser can enjoy reading a high quality up-to-date copy of Feynman's legendary lectures.
  • Nuclear fusion just got a boost with the arrival of this stellarator

    11/03/2015 9:31:14 AM PST · by Borges · 33 replies
    Fox News ^ | 11/2/2015 | Michael Casey
    Researchers could be one step closer to producing energy through nuclear fusion with word that a device called the stellarator is set to go online later this year in Germany. The largest contraption its kind, the Wendelstein 7-X fusion device is housed in a branch of the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) near Munich. It won’t actually produce energy, the Institute said, but will be used to test the “specially shaped magnet coils which produce a magnetic cage which confines the plasma and keeps it away from the walls of the plasma vessel.”
  • The speed of light is... slooooooow

    11/02/2015 11:04:54 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 80 replies
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Massive Black Hole Shreds Passing Star

    10/28/2015 5:14:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    NASA ^ | October 28, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What happens when a star gets too close to a black hole? Recent observations from Earth-orbiting observatories of an event dubbed ASASSN-14li, in a distant galactic center, appears to be giving one star's harrowing story. Although angularly unresolved, variations in high energy light indicate that some of the star became shredded and reformed into a disk swirling around the dark abyss. In the hypothesized scenario envisioned, a jet formed on the spin axis of the black hole. The innermost part of the disk, colored white, glows most strongly in X-rays and may drive a periodic wind, shown in blue....
  • Infinitely fast light with new zero-index material

    10/20/2015 3:31:03 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 15 replies
    SCImplified ^ | 10/20/15 | M. Lane
    Photonic devices, which use light to transport large amounts of information quickly, have the potential to enhance or even replace the electronic devices that are ubiquitous in our lives today. But before such optical connections can be integrated into telecommunication systems and computers, researchers need to make it easier to manipulate light at the nanoscale. A new on-chip zero-index metamaterial makes this possible, opening the door for technological innovation and research. This new metamaterial was developed in the lab of Eric Mazur at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), and is described in the...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- When Black Holes Collide

    10/20/2015 4:32:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    NASA ^ | October 20, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What happens when two black holes collide? This extreme scenario likely occurs in the centers of some merging galaxies and multiple star systems. The featured video shows a computer animation of the final stages of such a merger, while highlighting the gravitational lensing effects that would appear on a background starfield. The black regions indicate the event horizons of the dynamic duo, while a surrounding ring of shifting background stars indicates the position of their combined Einstein ring. All background stars not only have images visible outside of this Einstein ring, but also have one or more companion images...
  • The Universe Never Expands Faster Than the Speed of Light

    10/13/2015 11:04:06 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 49 replies
    Preposterous Universe ^ | 10/13/15 | Sean Carroll
    The Universe Never Expands Faster Than the Speed of Light Breaking my radio silence here to get a little nitpick off my chest: the claim that during inflation, the universe expanded faster than the speed of light. Its extraordinarily common, if utterly and hopelessly incorrect. (I just noticed it in this otherwise generally excellent post by Fraser Cain.) A Google search for inflation superluminal expansion reveals over 100,000 hits, although happily a few of the first ones are brave attempts to squelch the misconception. I can recommend this nice article by Tamara Davis and Charlie Lineweaver, which tries to address...
  • Long-Sought Exotic Particle of Pure Force Detected --"Key Prediction of the Standard Model"

    10/14/2015 12:44:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    The Daily Galaxy ^ | October 13, 2015 | unattributed
    Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have calculated that the meson f0(1710) could be a very special particle -- the long-sought-after glueball, a particle composed of pure force. The prediction that glueballs exist is one of the most important of the Standard Model of particle physics that has not yet been confirmed experimentally. For decades, scientists have been looking for so-called "glueballs". Now it seems they have been found at last. A glueball is an exotic particle, made up entirely of gluons -- the "sticky" particles that keep nuclear particles together. Glueballs are unstable and can only be detected indirectly, by...
  • For 1st time, MIT's free online classes can lead to degree

    10/12/2015 2:34:28 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 32 replies
    The San Francisco Chronicle ^ | October 7, 2015 | Collin Binkley, The Associated Press
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has offered free online courses for the last four years with one major downside: They didn't count toward a degree. That's about to change. In a pilot project announced Wednesday, students will be able to take a semester of free online courses in one of MIT's graduate programs and then, if they pay a "modest fee" of about $1,500 and pass an exam, they will earn a MicroMaster's credential, the school said. The new credential represents half of the university's one-year master's degree program in supply chain management....
  • What are white holes?

    10/12/2015 8:35:22 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 40 replies
    phys.org ^ | October 9, 2015 | by Fraser Cain, Universe Today
    White Hole. Credit: universe-review.ca =================================================================================================================== Black holes are created when stars die catastrophically in a supernova. So what in the universe is a white hole? It's imagination day, and we're going to talk about fantasy creatures. Like unicorns, but even rarer. Like leprechauns, but even more fantastical! Today, we're going to talk about white holes. Before we talk about white holes, let's talk about black holes. And before we talk about Black Holes, what's is this thing you have with holes exactly? Black holes are places in the universe where matter and energy are compacted so densely together that their...
  • Core Concept: Atom interferometry (May help scientists figure out what dark matter is, etc.)

    10/08/2015 6:26:20 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 6 replies
    PNAS ^ | Oct 2015 | Maggie McKee
    Sometimes you have to think outside the box. Faced with some of the universes most stubborn mysteries, such as the identity of dark matter, physicists are turning to a technique that employs the weird laws of quantum mechanics: atom interferometry. Atom interferometers allow the study of various physical phenomena by splitting atom waves using a nanograting, such as this one. Composed of silicon nitride, this grating, imaged with a scanning electron microscope, has a period of 100 nm. Image courtesy of Alex Cronin (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ). This method, which takes advantage of the fact that quantum particles behave...
  • Kajita becomes Nobel physics prize co-winner

    10/06/2015 5:20:48 AM PDT · by chajin · 9 replies
    NHK (Japan Broadcasting Company) ^ | October 6, 2015 | NHK
    A Japanese scientist has won this year's Nobel Prize in Physics. Takaaki Kajita proved that neutrinos have mass. The neutrino is an elementary particle consisting of matter. Kajita observed neutrinos at a facility deep underground. He was part of a team that detected that some of the particles change to different types of neutrino. That proved neutrinos have mass. The discoveries were revealed at an international conference in 1998. His work surprised researchers all around the world because it disproved the established theory that neutrinos do not have mass. Kajita is the 24th Nobel Prize winner born in Japan. And...
  • Goodbye Big Bang, Hello Black Hole? A New Theory Of The Universes Creation

    09/30/2015 7:10:11 PM PDT · by lbryce · 40 replies
    Universe Today ^ | September 18, 2015 | ELIZABETH HOWELL on SEPTEMBER 18, 2013
    Could the famed Big Bang theory need a revision? A group of theoretical physicists suppose the birth of the universe could have happened after a four-dimensional star collapsed into a black hole and ejected debris. Before getting into their findings, lets just preface this by saying nobody knows anything for sure. Humans obviously werent around at the time the universe began. The standard theory is that the universe grew from an infinitely dense point or singularity, but who knows what was there before? For all physicists know, dragons could have come flying out of the singularity, stated Niayesh Afshordi, an...
  • Scientists think they know how to test the parallel universes theory - for real

    09/30/2015 9:03:31 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 60 replies
    Science Alert ^ | 09/30/2015 | EUGENE LIM, Published by The Conversation.
    The existence of parallel universes may seem like something cooked up by science fiction writers, with little relevance to modern theoretical physics. But the idea that we live in a 'multiverse' made up of an infinite number of parallel universes has long been considered a scientific possibility - although it is still a matter of vigorous debate among physicists. The race is now on to find a way to test the theory, including searching the sky for signs of collisions with other universes. It is important to keep in mind that the multiverse view is not actually a theory, it...
  • Light dawns

    09/20/2015 1:35:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Aeon ^ | September 18, 2015 | Sidney Perkowitz
    If you visit the Paris Observatory on the left bank of the Seine, you'll see a plaque on its wall announcing that the speed of light was first measured there in 1676. The odd thing is, this result came about unintentionally. Ole Romer, a Dane who was working as an assistant to the Italian astronomer Giovanni Domenico Cassini, was trying to account for certain discrepancies in eclipses of one of the moons of Jupiter. Romer and Cassini discussed the possibility that light has a finite speed (it had typically been thought to move instantaneously). Eventually, following some rough calculations, Romer...
  • The theory of parallel universes is not just maths it is science that can be tested

    09/11/2015 11:12:05 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 92 replies
    The Conversation ^ | 09/02/2015
    The existence of parallel universes may seem like something cooked up by science fiction writers, with little relevance to modern theoretical physics. But the idea that we live in a multiverse made up of an infinite number of parallel universes has long been considered a scientific possibility although it is still a matter of vigorous debate among physicists. The race is now on to find a way to test the theory, including searching the sky for signs of collisions with other universes. It is important to keep in mind that the multiverse view is not actually a theory,...