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Keyword: stringtheory

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  • Graphene is key in taking manufacturing to next level

    05/23/2016 3:27:27 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    The Manchester Evening News ^ | May 12, 2016 | Ben Rooth
    Graphene is widely regarded to be the most important development in the world of advanced manufacturing to date. The world’s thinnest, strongest and most conductive material was isolated at the University of Manchester in 2004. The potential of graphene is vast and research is currently underway into everything from bendable electronics to portable, energy-efficient water filtration plants and corrosion-proof coatings, anti-cancer drugs and even energy sources sewn into people’s skin. Last autumn, the National Graphene Institute received a major boost when China’s largest mobile phone manufacturer Huawei signed a partnership with the university to develop graphene-based technologies. Huawei stated at...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Inside a Daya Bay Antineutrino Detector

    05/22/2016 9:30:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | Monday, May 23, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Why is there more matter than antimatter in the Universe? To better understand this facet of basic physics, energy departments in China and the USA led in the creation of the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. Located under thick rock about 50 kilometers northeast of Hong Kong, China, eight Daya Bay detectors monitor antineutrinos emitted by six nearby nuclear reactors. Featured here, a camera looks along one of the Daya Bay detectors, imaging photon sensors that pick up faint light emitted by antineutrinos interacting with fluids in the detector. Early results indicate an unexpectedly high rate of one type...
  • New study supports natural causes, not alien activity, explain mystery star's behavior

    05/09/2016 8:56:03 PM PDT · by rdl6989 · 16 replies
    phys.org ^ | May 9, 2016 | David Salisbury
    Sorry, E.T. lovers, but the results of a new study make it far less likely that KIC 8462852, popularly known as Tabby's star, is the home of industrious aliens who are gradually enclosing it in a vast shell called a Dyson sphere. Public interest in the star, which sits about 1,480 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus, began last fall when Yale astronomer Tabetha ("Tabby") Boyajian and colleagues posted a paper on an astronomy preprint server reporting that "planet hunters" - a citizen science group formed to search data from the Kepler space telescope for evidence of exoplanets - had...
  • Dimming star remains mystery, but it's likely not caused by comets

    01/16/2016 5:52:31 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    cnn ^ | jareen imam
    Theories surrounding the star system KIC 8462852, also known as Tabby's Star, ranged from comets to an "alien megastructure" after the online astronomy crowdsourcing site Planet Hunter discovered an unusual light fluctuation in the star system a few years ago. A new analysis of KIC 8462852 shows that the star system, which lies about 1,500 light years away, has been gradually dimming for more than a century, and it's likely not caused by a cloud of orbiting comets. Bradley Schaefer, a physics and astronomy professor at Louisiana State University, examined data from a Harvard University archive of digitally scanned photographic...
  • 'Alien Megastructure' Mystery May Soon Be Solved

    10/28/2015 12:56:27 PM PDT · by ETL · 59 replies
    Space.com ^ | October 28, 2015 | Mike Wall - Space.com Senior Writer
    The mystery behind a strangely dimming star could soon be solved. Astronomers around the world are keeping a close eye on the star KIC 8462852, which has dimmed dramatically numerous times over the past few years, dropping in brightness by up to 22 percent. These big dips have spurred speculation that the star may be surrounded by some type of alien megastructure — a hypothesis that will be put to the test if and when KIC 8462852 dims again. "As long as one of those events occurs again, we should be able to catch it in the act, and then...
  • SETI Institute undertakes search for alien signal from Kepler Star KIC 8462852

    10/24/2015 5:31:16 AM PDT · by Momaw Nadon · 16 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | October 22, 2015 | Bob King
    "We either caught something shortly after an event like two planets crashing together or alien intelligence," said Dr. Gerald Harp, senior scientist at the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, referring to the baffling light variations seen in the Kepler star KIC 8462852. And he and a team from the Institute are working hard at this moment to determine which of the two it is. Beginning last Friday (Oct. 16), the Institute's Allen Telescope Array (ATA) was taken off its normal survey schedule and instead focused on KIC 8462852, one of the 150,000-plus stars studied by NASA's Kepler Mission to...
  • Did Astronomers Find Evidence of an Alien Civilization? Probably Not. But Still Cool.

    10/15/2015 8:55:50 PM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 32 replies
    Slate ^ | October 14, 2015 | By Phil Plait
    The paper doesn’t mention aliens, and it doesn’t even imply aliens. Not directly, at least. But the astronomers found a star so odd, with behavior so difficult to explain, that it’s clear something weird is happening there. And some of the astronomers who did the work are now looking into the idea that what they’ve found might (might!) be due to aliens. But don’t let this idea run away with you. The scientists involved are being very skeptical and approaching this the right way. The star is called KIC 8462852, and it’s one of more than a hundred thousand stars...
  • The strange star that has serious scientists talking about an alien megastructure

    10/15/2015 12:04:31 PM PDT · by grundle · 66 replies
    Washington Post ^ | October 15, 2015 | Sarah Kaplan
    “It was kind of unbelievable that it was real data,” said Yale University astronomer Tabetha Boyajian. “We were scratching our heads. For any idea that came up there was always something that would argue against it.” She was talking to the New Scientist about KIC 8462852, a distant star with a very unusual flickering habit. Something was making the star dim drastically every few years, and she wasn’t sure what. Boyajian wrote up a paper on possible explanations for the star’s bizarre behavior, and it was published recently in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. But she also...
  • 'Alien Megastructure' Star Only Gets More Mysterious

    05/22/2016 6:39:00 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 52 replies
    Popular Science ^ | May 10, 2016 | Sarah Fecht
    Every now and then, a distant star called KIC 8462852 dims by as much as 20 percent. That's huge. Even a passing planet as big as Jupiter would only block about 1 percent of the star's light. Ruling out a planet, scientists have no idea what could be eclipsing the star (which is informally known as 'Tabby's Star'). The leading hypothesis is a family of really big comets, but that doesn't quite fit. Astronomer Jason Wright pointed out that the light patterns are consistent with what we'd expect if aliens had built a Dyson swarm of solar collectors around the...
  • Peek Inside Tri Alpha Energy, a Company Pursuing the Ideal Power Source

    05/20/2016 3:58:31 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | May 20, 2016 | Richard Martin
    No energy technology is more tantalizing than fusion, but no energy technology has proved more disappointing. So how has a fusion company in Southern California raised nearly half a billion dollars from the likes of Goldman Sachs and Paul Allen? Does it actually see a way to build a reactor that could generate vast amounts of clean power, even while other fusion projects have perpetually remained 20 years away from reality? In search of the answers, I visited the headquarters of Tri Alpha Energy in the spring. The coastal fog was lifting from the rolling hills in Foothill Ranch as...
  • How Does Light Travel?

    05/19/2016 1:06:30 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 82 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | 19 May , 2016 by | Matt Williams
    Ever since Democritus... argued that all of existence was made up of tiny indivisible atoms, scientists have been speculating as to the true nature of light. Whereas scientists ventured back and forth between the notion that light was a particle or a wave until the modern, the 20th century led to breakthroughs that showed that it behaves as both. These included the discovery of the electron, the development of quantum theory, and Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. However, there remains many fascinating and unanswered questions when it comes to light, many of which arise from its dual nature. For instance, how...
  • Do We Need to Revise General Relativity?

    05/20/2016 11:56:18 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 39 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | Ross Pomeroy
    The idea that our Universe is filled with dark matter has been around for nearly a century. When astronomers noticed that orbital speeds towards the edges of spiral galaxies remain the same or even increase slightly, rather than decrease, they surmised that either there must be some huge unseen mass driving the rotation, or that the laws of gravity given by Einstein's General Relativity need to be changed. They elected the first option. Over that time, cosmologists have accumulated boatloads of evidence in favor of the notion that this invisible, "dark" matter -- which neither interacts with nor emits light...
  • New Support for Alternative Quantum View

    05/17/2016 11:13:33 AM PDT · by Reeses · 30 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | May 16, 2016 | Dan Falk
    An experiment claims to have invalidated a decades-old criticism against pilot-wave theory, an alternative formulation of quantum mechanics that avoids the most baffling features of the subatomic universe. Of the many counterintuitive features of quantum mechanics, perhaps the most challenging to our notions of common sense is that particles do not have locations until they are observed. This is exactly what the standard view of quantum mechanics, often called the Copenhagen interpretation, asks us to believe. Instead of the clear-cut positions and movements of Newtonian physics, we have a cloud of probabilities described by a mathematical structure known as a...
  • Three Problems With the Big Bang

    05/11/2016 7:53:28 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 54 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | Ross Pomeroy
    Somewhere around 13.8 billion years ago, the Universe began with a bang. In less than a second, the four fundamental forces -- electromagnetism, gravitation, weak nuclear interaction, and strong nuclear interaction -- which initially were joined as a single even more fundamental force, separated. Suddenly, the Universe started to expand at an exponential rate. Cosmic inflation had begun. .... The Big Bang is the best theory we have to explain the birth and existence of the Universe. As astrophysicist Ethan Siegel wrote in his recent book Beyond the Galaxy: "To this very day, there is no other model that is...
  • Hawking at Harvard ... tackles the contradictory qualities of black holes

    05/10/2016 1:00:09 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 15 replies
    Harvard.edu ^ | 4/18/16 | Peter Reuell
    Hawking at Harvard At packed Sanders Theatre, theoretical physicist and cosmologist tackles the contradictory qualities of black holes April 18, 2016 | Editor's Pick Popular Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer"If determinism — the predictability of the universe — breaks down in black holes, it could break down in other situations. Even worse, if determinism breaks down, we can’t be sure of our past history either. The history books and our memories could just be illusions. It is the past that tells us who we are. Without it, we lose our identity," said Stephen Hawking. By Peter Reuell, Harvard Staff Writer Twitter...
  • Why is space three-dimensional?

    05/05/2016 6:53:04 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 132 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 3 May, 2016 | Lisa Zyga
    The question of why space is three-dimensional (3D) and not some other number of dimensions has puzzled philosophers and scientists since ancient Greece. Space-time overall is four-dimensional, or (3 + 1)-dimensional, where time is the fourth dimension. It's well-known that the time dimension is related to the second law of thermodynamics: time has one direction (forward) because entropy (a measure of disorder) never decreases in a closed system such as the universe. In a new paper published in EPL, researchers have proposed that the second law of thermodynamics may also explain why space is 3D. "A number of researchers in...
  • A Photon Source That Operates at Ambient Temperatures on a Chip

    05/04/2016 7:52:34 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    Quantum information science and technology has emerged as a new paradigm for dramatically faster computation and secure communication in the 21st century. At the heart of any quantum system is the most basic building block, the quantum bit or qbit, which carries the quantum information that can be transferred and processed (this is the quantum analogue of the bit used in current information systems). The most promising carrier qbit for ultimately fast, long distance quantum information transfer is the photon, the quantum unit of light. The challenge facing scientists is to produce artificial sources of photons for various quantum information...
  • Mathematicians And 'The Man Who Knew Infinity'

    04/30/2016 8:09:39 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 74 replies
    Inside Science ^ | 29 Apr, 2016 | Ramin Skibba
    (Inside Science) – In 1914, an unknown Indian man boarded a ship and traveled across the world to Cambridge University in England, where he could finally follow his passion for mathematics. In the few short years between his arrival and untimely death, he filled notebooks with formulas and discovered theorems, some of which still influence the work of mathematicians and scientists today. The new biopic, "The Man Who Knew Infinity," which opens in U.S. theaters beginning Friday, April 29, chronicles the life of Srinivasa Ramanujan. A self-taught Indian mathematician from the city then called Madras (now Chennai), Ramanujan struggled to...
  • Report: A Weasel Shut Down the Large Hadron Collider

    04/29/2016 6:44:28 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 38 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 04/29/2016 | Maddie Stone
    The Large Hadron Collider suffered a power outage last night, after a luckless weasel decided to chew on a 66-kilovolt power cable. It’s not the first time the LHC, a 17-mile superconductor that smashes atoms together at close to the speed of light, has run into trouble because of something small and cute. In 2009, the power went down after a bird dropped a baguette onto a critical electrical system. Although the incident was widely reported and confirmed at the time by sources at the LHC, CERN is apparently now telling folks it may be apocryphal. “This was a story...
  • Where Nature Hides the Darkest Mystery of All

    04/28/2016 4:16:35 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 20 replies
    Nautilus ^ | 28 Apr, 2016 | Matthew Francis
    There’s no boundary quite like a black hole boundary. No known object in existence has as clear a division between “inside” and “outside” as a black hole. We live and see the outside, and no probe will bring us information about the inside. We can send radio messages or robotic spacecraft, but once they cross over into a black hole’s interior, we’ll never get back those emissaries … or any information about what happened to them. The boundary of a black hole is its event horizon. It’s not a surface in the usual sense—there’s no physical barrier—but it’s very much...
  • Bizarre fourth state of water discovered

    04/28/2016 6:22:09 AM PDT · by Hostage · 56 replies
    gizmag ^ | April 26, 2016 | Michael Franco
    You already know that water can have three states of matter: solid, liquid and gas. But scientists at the Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) have discovered that when it's put under extreme pressure in small spaces, the life-giving liquid can exhibit a strange fourth state known as tunneling. The water under question was found in super-small six-sided channels in the mineral beryl, which forms the basis for the gems aquamarine and emerald. The channels measure only about five atoms across and function basically as cages that can each trap one water molecule. What the researchers found was that in this...
  • What Is The Strongest Force In The Universe?

    04/27/2016 7:17:25 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 78 replies
    Forbes ^ | 26 Apr, 2016 | Ethan Siegel
    When it comes to the fundamental laws of nature, we can break everything down into four forces that are at the core of everything in the Universe: The strong nuclear force: the force responsible for holding atomic nuclei and individual protons and neutrons together. The electromagnetic force: the force that attracts and repels charged particles, binds atoms together into molecules and life, and causes electric current, among other things. The weak nuclear force: the force responsible for some types of radioactive decay and the transmutation of heavy, unstable fundamental particles into lighter ones. And gravity: the force that bind the...
  • Nearing affordable extraction of uranium from seawater which would unlock over 800 times current res

    04/25/2016 10:02:42 PM PDT · by Vince Ferrer · 36 replies
    Next Big Future ^ | April 25, 2016 | Brian Wang
    Nearing affordable extraction of uranium from seawater, which would unlock over 800 times current reserves and with breeder reactors provide resources for billion years of current world power The oceans hold more than four billion tons of uranium—enough to meet global energy needs for the next 10,000 years if only we could capture the element from seawater to fuel nuclear power plants. For half a century, researchers worldwide have tried to mine uranium from the oceans with limited success. In the 1990s, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) scientists pioneered materials that hold uranium as it is stuck or adsorbed onto...
  • Neil deGrasse Tyson thinks there's a 'very high' chance the universe is just a simulation

    04/24/2016 7:20:50 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 90 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 04/22/2016 | Kevin Loria
    We trust the scientists around us to have the best grasp on how the world actually works. So at this year's 2016 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate at the American Museum of Natural History, which addressed the question of whether the universe is a simulation, the answers from some panelists may be more comforting than the responses from others. Physicist Lisa Randall, for example, said that she thought the odds that the universe isn't "real" are so low as to be "effectively zero." A satisfying answer for those who don't want to sit there puzzling out what it would mean for...
  • CERN releases 300TB of Large Hadron Collider data into open access

    04/24/2016 11:40:59 AM PDT · by rktman · 32 replies
    techcrunch.com ^ | 4/23/2016 | Devin Coldewey
    Cancel your plans for this weekend! CERN just dropped 300 terabytes of hot collider data on the world and you know you want to take a look. Kati Lassila-Perini, a physicist who works on the Compact Muon Solenoid (!) detector, gave a refreshingly straightforward explanation for this huge release. “Once we’ve exhausted our exploration of the data, we see no reason not to make them available publicly,” she said in a news release accompanying the data. “The benefits are numerous, from inspiring high school students to the training of the particle physicists of tomorrow. And personally, as CMS’s data preservation...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Galaxy Einstein Ring

    04/21/2016 1:43:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, April 20, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Can one galaxy hide behind another? Not in the case of SDP.81. Here the foreground galaxy, shown in blue in an image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, acts like a huge gravitational lens, pulling light from a background galaxy, shown in red in an image taken in radio waves by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), around it, keeping it visible. The alignment is so precise that the distant galaxy is distorted into part of a ring around the foreground galaxy, a formation known as an Einstein ring. Detailed analysis of the gravitational lens distortions indicate that a...
  • Reconfigured Tesla coil aligns, electrifies materials from a distance

    04/14/2016 8:28:59 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    phys.org ^ | April 14, 2016 | Provided by: Rice University
    Nanotube wires self-assemble under the influence of a directed electric field from the Tesla coil. Credit: Jeff Fitlow ======================================================================================================== Scientists at Rice University have discovered that the strong force field emitted by a Tesla coil causes carbon nanotubes to self-assemble into long wires, a phenomenon they call "Teslaphoresis." The team led by Rice chemist Paul Cherukuri reported its results this week in ACS Nano. Cherukuri sees this research as setting a clear path toward scalable assembly of nanotubes from the bottom up. The system works by remotely oscillating positive and negative charges in each nanotube, causing them to chain together...
  • Square Root Day (4/4/16), the Final Four and Opening Day -- sums it up today

    04/04/2016 9:26:58 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 21 replies
    The Plain Dealer ^ | April 04, 2016 | Brian Albrecht
    CLEVELAND, Ohio – April 4, 2016 wins a triple crown in the department of cosmic coincidences. The day marks Major League Baseball's Opening Day, the NCAA basketball championship and Square Root Day. All provide potential fodder for math geeks who scrupulously compile baseball stats, slaved over Sweet 16 and Final 4 basketball playoff match-ups, and appreciate a date when both the month and date are the square root of the year's last two digits (4,4,16).
  • Even Engineers Are Completely Baffled By This New Magnet Technology

    03/31/2016 10:29:32 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 119 replies
    damn.com ^ | 03-31-2016 | Staff
    When you think of magnets you probably imagine being a kid in class playing with them for the first time, figuring out that forces we can’t see have the ability to manipulate physical objects. We can make things affected by the magnetic waves, but not until recently have we been able to “program” them. A highly innovative company from Alabama have introduced to the world “Polymagnets,” and they’re incredible. They’re guaranteed to be one of the coolest things you see today!
  • Are the Constants of Physics Constant?

    03/09/2016 6:07:00 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 56 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 7 Mar, 2016 | Venkat Srinivasan
    When Max Born addressed the South Indian Science Association in November 1935, it was a time of great uncertainty in his life. The Nazi Party had already suspended the renowned quantum mechanics physicist's position at the University of Gottingen in 1933. He had been invited to teach at Cambridge, but it was temporary. Then, the Party terminated his tenure at Gottingen in the summer of 1935. Born took up an offer to work with C. V. Raman and his students for six months at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore. While there, he found that his family had lost...
  • Astrophysicists detect ultra-fast winds near supermassive black hole

    03/24/2016 12:44:16 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 22 replies
    phys.org ^ | March 21, 2016 | Provided by: York University
    Artist's illustration of turbulent winds of gas swirling around a black hole. Some of the gas is spiraling inward, but some is being blown away. Credit: NASA, and M. Weiss (Chandra X -ray Center) ============================================================================================================================================== New research led by astrophysicists at York University has revealed the fastest winds ever seen at ultraviolet wavelengths near a supermassive black hole. "We're talking wind speeds of 20 per cent the speed of light, which is more than 200 million kilometres an hour. That's equivalent to a category 77 hurricane," says Jesse Rogerson, who led the research as part of his PhD thesis in...
  • Cosmic rays fired at Earth – now we know where from

    03/17/2016 9:55:45 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 33 replies
    Cosmos ^ | 3/17/16 | Bill Condie
    Cosmic rays fired at Earth - now we know where from The violent region at the centre of our galaxy is the prime candidate, after gamma ray analysis, Bill Condie reports. Photo montage of gamma-rays as measured by the HESS array on the night sky over Namibia, with one of the small HESS telescopes in the foreground. Credit: H.E.S.S. Collaboration, Fabio Acero and Henning Gast Astronomers believe they may have identified the source of the stream of cosmic rays that rain down on Earth from outer space. Cosmic rays are extremely high-energy particles such as protons and atomic nuclei....
  • Milky Way’s black hole may be spewing out cosmic rays

    03/19/2016 9:24:38 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 20 replies
    Science ^ | 16 Mar, 2016 | Daniel Clery
    Mysterious high-energy particles known as cosmic rays zip through space at a wide range of energies, some millions of times greater than those produced in the world’s most powerful atom smasher. Scientists have long thought cosmic rays from inside our galaxy come from supernova explosions, but a new study has fingered a second source: the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way. With this new result, the search for cosmic ray origins, which has frustrated scientists for more than 100 years, has taken an unexpected new twist. “It’s very exciting,” says astrophysicist Andrew Taylor of the Dublin...
  • Clocking the Extreme Spin of a Monster Black Hole

    03/17/2016 6:36:54 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 22 replies
    D-News ^ | 15 Mar, 2016 | IAN O'NEILL
    upermassive black holes are the most extreme objects in the known universe, with masses millions or even billions of times the mass of our sun. Now astronomers have been able to study one of these behemoths inside a strange, distant quasar and they’ve made an astonishing discovery — it’s spinning one-third the speed of light. Studying a supermassive black hole some 3.5 billion light-years away is no easy feat, but this isn’t a regular object: it’s a quasar that shows quasi-periodic brightening events every 12 years or so — a fact that has helped astronomers reveal its extreme nature. Quasars...
  • Hemp waste fibers form basis of supercapacitor more conductive than graphene

    03/15/2016 7:38:23 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 22 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | March 11, 2016 | Rick Stella
    Comprised of a lone hexagonal honeycomb lattice layer of tightly packed carbon atoms, graphene is one of the strongest, lightest, and most conductive compounds ever discovered. Bottom line, it's an extraordinary composite. However, a scientist from New York's Clarkson University says he's found a way to manufacture hemp waste into a material "better than graphene." Moreover, the scientist -- known to his peers as Dr. David Mitlin -- says creating this graphene-like hemp material costs but a minuscule fraction of what it takes to produce graphene. Presented at an American Chemical Society Meeting in San Francisco, Dr. Mitlin described how...
  • Celebrate Pi Day!

    03/14/2016 2:18:53 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 67 replies
    Chiff.com ^ | March 14, 2016 | staff reporter
    Happy Pi Day! No, not National Pie Day. That's January 23. On this day, geeks go wild at the mere thought of celebrating pi — the ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. pi = 3.1415926535897932384626433832795 or 3.14 for short.
  • German scientists successfully teleport classical information

    03/06/2016 7:48:42 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 43 replies
    spacedaily.com ^ | 03/04/2016 | Brooks Hayes
    Using a series of laser beams, a pair of German scientists successfully teleported classical information without the transfer or matter or energy. Researchers have previously demonstrated local teleportation within the world of quantum particles. But the latest experiment successfully translates the phenomenon for classical physics. "Elementary particles such as electrons and light particles exist per se in a spatially delocalized state," Alexander Szameit, a professor at the University of Jena, explained in a press release. In other words, these particles can be in two places at the same time. "Within such a system spread across multiple locations, it is possible...
  • Farthest Galaxy Yet Smashes Cosmic Distance Record

    03/04/2016 3:51:26 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 34 replies
    space.com ^ | 3/3/16 | Calla Cofield
    Farthest Galaxy Yet Smashes Cosmic Distance Record By Calla Cofield, Space.com Staff Writer March 3, 2016 04:45pm ET MORE Please upgrade your Flash Plugin The Hubble Space Telescope just calculated the distance to the most far-out galaxy ever measured, providing scientists with a look deep into the history of the universe. The far-away galaxy, named GN-z11, existed a mere 400 million years after the Big Bang, or about 13.3 billion years ago. Because the light from such a distant galaxy must travel huge distances to reach Earth, scientists are seeing the galaxy as it looked over 13 billion years ago....
  • Are Supermassive Black Holes Hiding Matter?

    02/29/2016 10:00:38 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    universetoday.com ^ |  29 Feb , 2016 | Matt Williams
    [S]cientists...for some time now, they have been working with a model that states that the Universe consists of 4.9% “normal” matter (i.e. that which we can see), 26.8% “dark matter” (that which we can’t), and 68.3% “dark energy”. From what they have observed, scientists have also concluded that the normal matter in the Universe is concentrated in web-like filaments, which make up about 20% of the Universe by volume. But a recent study performed by the Institute of Astro- and Particle Physics at the University of Innsbruck in Austria has found that a surprising amount of normal matter may live...
  • Reactor data hint at existence of fourth neutrino

    02/29/2016 7:00:49 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 16 replies
    Science News ^ | 25 Feb, 2016 | Ron Cowen
    In tunnels deep inside a granite mountain at Daya Bay, a nuclear reactor facility some 55 kilometers from Hong Kong, sensitive detectors are hinting at the existence of a new form of neutrino, one of nature's most ghostly and abundant elementary particles. Neutrinos, electrically neutral particles that sense only gravity and the weak nuclear force, interact so feebly with matter that 100 trillion zip unimpeded through your body every second. They come in three known types: electron, muon and tau. The Daya Bay results suggest the possibility that a fourth, even more ghostly type of neutrino exists - one more...
  • Do Gravitational Waves Exhibit Wave-Particle Duality?

    02/24/2016 5:53:58 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 34 replies
    Forbes/Science ^ | 20 Feb. 2016 | Ethan Siegel
    Now that LIGO has detected their first gravitational wave signal, the part of Einstein's theory that predicts that the fabric of space itself should have ripples and waves in it has been confirmed. This brings up all sorts of interesting questions, including this one from reader (and Patreon supporter!) Joe Latone, who asks: "Are gravity waves expected to exhibit wave-particle duality, and if so, have LIGO physicists already conceived of ways to test it, like the double-slit experiment?" It started out simply enough: matter was made of particles, things like atoms and their constituents, and radiation was made of waves....
  • The number that fascinates physicists above all others

    02/20/2016 2:09:29 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 67 replies
    Cosmos Magazine ^ | Paul Davies
    "God is a pure mathematician!" declared British astronomer Sir James Jeans. The physical Universe does seem to be organised around elegant mathematical relationships. And one number above all others has exercised an enduring fascination for physicists: 137.03599913. Let me explain. When scientists measure any quantity they must specify the units being used. The speed of light, for example, is either 186,000 or 300,000 depending on whether it is expressed as miles per second or kilometres per second. Likewise your weight might be 150 or 68 according to whether you are measuring in pounds or kilograms. Without knowing the units being...
  • What Is The Universe Expanding Into?

    02/21/2016 2:52:24 PM PST · by Duke C. · 111 replies
    Forbes ^ | 2/19/16 | Ethan Siegel
    One of the most spectacular discoveries of the 20th century was that the Universe itself was expanding. When Einstein put forth his general theory of relativity, he swiftly recognized that there was a consequence he was unhappy about: a Universe that was filled with matter in all directions would be unstable against gravitational collapse. Einstein’s fix for this was to make up an invisible, outward-pushing force that prevented this collapse from occurring, a cosmological constant. But if you didn’t include this cosmological constant, others soon realized, you’d wind up with a Universe that wasn’t static in time, but where the...
  • The detection of gravitational waves – a triumph of science enabled by fossil fuels

    02/19/2016 3:06:33 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 9 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | February 17, 2016 | Anthony Watts
    Anthony Watts / 3 days ago February 17, 2016 Last week, the science world was abuzz with the news that gravitational waves had been discovered thanks to the LIGO project and the team of international scientists that made it possible. At WUWT, I covered the story here, saying that it was a “triumph of science”. Indeed it was, and still is, and the effects of this discovery on science will ripple into the future for decades and centuries to come.I woke in the middle of the night as I sometimes do, for no particular reason except that my brain doesn’t...
  • ASTRONOMERS JUST SNAPPED PHOTOS OF THE MOST MASSIVE BLACK HOLE WE’VE EVER OBSERVED

    02/18/2016 10:44:57 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 53 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | 2/17/16 | Chloe Olewitz
    A new photograph of galaxy NGC 4889 may look peaceful from such a great distance, but it’s actually home to one of the biggest black holes that astronomers have ever identified. The Hubble Space Telescope allowed scientists to capture photos of the galaxy, located in the Coma Cluster about 300 million light-years away. The supermassive black hole hidden away in NGC 4889 breaks all kinds of records, even though it is currently classified as dormant. So how big is it, exactly? Well, according to our best estimates, the supermassive black hole is roughly 21 billion times the size of the...
  • Pondering Gravitational Waves

    02/13/2016 5:52:10 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 25 replies
    Centauri Dreams ^ | 2/11/16 | Paul Gilster
    Pondering Gravitational Wavesby Paul Gilster on February 11, 2016 "Einstein would be beaming," said National Science Foundation director France CĂłrdova as she began this morning's news conference announcing the discovery of gravitational waves. I can hardly disagree, because we have in this discovery yet another confirmation of the reality of General Relativity. Caltech's Kip Thorne, who discussed black hole mergers way back in 1994 in his book Black Holes and Time Warps, said at the same news conference that Einstein must have been frustrated by the lack of available technologies to detect the gravitational waves his theory predicted, a lack...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Two Black Holes Merge

    02/12/2016 12:16:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    NASA ^ | February 12, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Just press play to watch two black holes merge. Inspired by the first direct detection of gravitational waves by LIGO, this simulation video plays in slow motion but would take about one third of a second if run in real time. Set on a cosmic stage the black holes are posed in front of stars, gas, and dust. Their extreme gravity lenses the light from behind them into Einstein rings as they spiral closer and finally merge into one. The otherwise invisible gravitational waves generated as the massive objects rapidly coalesce cause the visible image to ripple and slosh...
  • Gravitational Wave Explained by Brian Green (simple and interesting way)

    02/11/2016 9:40:56 PM PST · by Rebelbase · 35 replies
    Liveleak ^ | 2/12/16 | Brian Green
    From the site: "One of the most simplest and interesting ways to explain Gravitational Waves" See video link below.
  • 100 years later scientists prove Einstein's theory

    02/11/2016 10:27:40 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 21 replies
    INN ^ | 2/11/2016, 7:22 PM | (Arutz Sheva Staff)
    It took a century, but the theory from Albert Einstein handwritten neatly on paper that is now yellowing has finally been vindicated. Israeli officials on Thursday offered a rare look at the documents where Einstein presented his ideas on gravitational waves, a display that coincided with the historic announcement that scientists had glimpsed the first direct evidence of his theory. [...] In a landmark discovery for physics and astronomy, international scientists announced in Washington on Thursday that they had glimpsed the first direct evidence of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. Einstein's theory states that mass warps space and time,...
  • First Macroscopic Quantum Entanglement Performed At Room Temperature

    02/05/2016 11:32:15 AM PST · by Reeses · 43 replies
    Futurism.com ^ | Feb 5 2016 | Futurism
    In a breakthrough in quantum physics, scientists were able to create the phenomenon of quantum entanglement macroscopically using large magnets at room temperature. ... scientists working at the University of Chicago and the Argonne National Laboratory revealed that they were able to create quantum entanglement at a macroscopic level at room temperature on a semiconductor chip, using atomic nuclei and the application of relatively small magnetic fields. Their breakthrough, which is published in Science Advances, is not only significant in what they accomplished but also how they accomplished it. In quantum physics, the creation of entanglement in particles larger and...