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Keyword: stringtheory

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  • Mathematicians And 'The Man Who Knew Infinity'

    04/30/2016 8:09:39 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 58 replies
    Inside Science ^ | 29 Apr, 2016 | Ramin Skibba
    (Inside Science) In 1914, an unknown Indian man boarded a ship and traveled across the world to Cambridge University in England, where he could finally follow his passion for mathematics. In the few short years between his arrival and untimely death, he filled notebooks with formulas and discovered theorems, some of which still influence the work of mathematicians and scientists today. The new biopic, "The Man Who Knew Infinity," which opens in U.S. theaters beginning Friday, April 29, chronicles the life of Srinivasa Ramanujan. A self-taught Indian mathematician from the city then called Madras (now Chennai), Ramanujan struggled to...
  • Report: A Weasel Shut Down the Large Hadron Collider

    04/29/2016 6:44:28 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 38 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 04/29/2016 | Maddie Stone
    The Large Hadron Collider suffered a power outage last night, after a luckless weasel decided to chew on a 66-kilovolt power cable. Its not the first time the LHC, a 17-mile superconductor that smashes atoms together at close to the speed of light, has run into trouble because of something small and cute. In 2009, the power went down after a bird dropped a baguette onto a critical electrical system. Although the incident was widely reported and confirmed at the time by sources at the LHC, CERN is apparently now telling folks it may be apocryphal. This was a story...
  • Where Nature Hides the Darkest Mystery of All

    04/28/2016 4:16:35 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 20 replies
    Nautilus ^ | 28 Apr, 2016 | Matthew Francis
    Theres no boundary quite like a black hole boundary. No known object in existence has as clear a division between inside and outside as a black hole. We live and see the outside, and no probe will bring us information about the inside. We can send radio messages or robotic spacecraft, but once they cross over into a black holes interior, well never get back those emissaries or any information about what happened to them. The boundary of a black hole is its event horizon. Its not a surface in the usual sensetheres no physical barrierbut its very much...
  • Bizarre fourth state of water discovered

    04/28/2016 6:22:09 AM PDT · by Hostage · 56 replies
    gizmag ^ | April 26, 2016 | Michael Franco
    You already know that water can have three states of matter: solid, liquid and gas. But scientists at the Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) have discovered that when it's put under extreme pressure in small spaces, the life-giving liquid can exhibit a strange fourth state known as tunneling. The water under question was found in super-small six-sided channels in the mineral beryl, which forms the basis for the gems aquamarine and emerald. The channels measure only about five atoms across and function basically as cages that can each trap one water molecule. What the researchers found was that in this...
  • What Is The Strongest Force In The Universe?

    04/27/2016 7:17:25 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 78 replies
    Forbes ^ | 26 Apr, 2016 | Ethan Siegel
    When it comes to the fundamental laws of nature, we can break everything down into four forces that are at the core of everything in the Universe: The strong nuclear force: the force responsible for holding atomic nuclei and individual protons and neutrons together. The electromagnetic force: the force that attracts and repels charged particles, binds atoms together into molecules and life, and causes electric current, among other things. The weak nuclear force: the force responsible for some types of radioactive decay and the transmutation of heavy, unstable fundamental particles into lighter ones. And gravity: the force that bind the...
  • Nearing affordable extraction of uranium from seawater which would unlock over 800 times current res

    04/25/2016 10:02:42 PM PDT · by Vince Ferrer · 36 replies
    Next Big Future ^ | April 25, 2016 | Brian Wang
    Nearing affordable extraction of uranium from seawater, which would unlock over 800 times current reserves and with breeder reactors provide resources for billion years of current world power The oceans hold more than four billion tons of uranium—enough to meet global energy needs for the next 10,000 years if only we could capture the element from seawater to fuel nuclear power plants. For half a century, researchers worldwide have tried to mine uranium from the oceans with limited success. In the 1990s, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) scientists pioneered materials that hold uranium as it is stuck or adsorbed onto...
  • Neil deGrasse Tyson thinks there's a 'very high' chance the universe is just a simulation

    04/24/2016 7:20:50 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 90 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 04/22/2016 | Kevin Loria
    We trust the scientists around us to have the best grasp on how the world actually works. So at this year's 2016 Isaac Asimov Memorial Debate at the American Museum of Natural History, which addressed the question of whether the universe is a simulation, the answers from some panelists may be more comforting than the responses from others. Physicist Lisa Randall, for example, said that she thought the odds that the universe isn't "real" are so low as to be "effectively zero." A satisfying answer for those who don't want to sit there puzzling out what it would mean for...
  • CERN releases 300TB of Large Hadron Collider data into open access

    04/24/2016 11:40:59 AM PDT · by rktman · 32 replies
    techcrunch.com ^ | 4/23/2016 | Devin Coldewey
    Cancel your plans for this weekend! CERN just dropped 300 terabytes of hot collider data on the world and you know you want to take a look. Kati Lassila-Perini, a physicist who works on the Compact Muon Solenoid (!) detector, gave a refreshingly straightforward explanation for this huge release. Once weve exhausted our exploration of the data, we see no reason not to make them available publicly, she said in a news release accompanying the data. The benefits are numerous, from inspiring high school students to the training of the particle physicists of tomorrow. And personally, as CMSs data preservation...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Galaxy Einstein Ring

    04/21/2016 1:43:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, April 20, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Can one galaxy hide behind another? Not in the case of SDP.81. Here the foreground galaxy, shown in blue in an image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, acts like a huge gravitational lens, pulling light from a background galaxy, shown in red in an image taken in radio waves by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), around it, keeping it visible. The alignment is so precise that the distant galaxy is distorted into part of a ring around the foreground galaxy, a formation known as an Einstein ring. Detailed analysis of the gravitational lens distortions indicate that a...
  • Reconfigured Tesla coil aligns, electrifies materials from a distance

    04/14/2016 8:28:59 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    phys.org ^ | April 14, 2016 | Provided by: Rice University
    Nanotube wires self-assemble under the influence of a directed electric field from the Tesla coil. Credit: Jeff Fitlow ======================================================================================================== Scientists at Rice University have discovered that the strong force field emitted by a Tesla coil causes carbon nanotubes to self-assemble into long wires, a phenomenon they call "Teslaphoresis." The team led by Rice chemist Paul Cherukuri reported its results this week in ACS Nano. Cherukuri sees this research as setting a clear path toward scalable assembly of nanotubes from the bottom up. The system works by remotely oscillating positive and negative charges in each nanotube, causing them to chain together...
  • Square Root Day (4/4/16), the Final Four and Opening Day -- sums it up today

    04/04/2016 9:26:58 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 21 replies
    The Plain Dealer ^ | April 04, 2016 | Brian Albrecht
    CLEVELAND, Ohio April 4, 2016 wins a triple crown in the department of cosmic coincidences. The day marks Major League Baseball's Opening Day, the NCAA basketball championship and Square Root Day. All provide potential fodder for math geeks who scrupulously compile baseball stats, slaved over Sweet 16 and Final 4 basketball playoff match-ups, and appreciate a date when both the month and date are the square root of the year's last two digits (4,4,16).
  • Even Engineers Are Completely Baffled By This New Magnet Technology

    03/31/2016 10:29:32 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 119 replies
    damn.com ^ | 03-31-2016 | Staff
    When you think of magnets you probably imagine being a kid in class playing with them for the first time, figuring out that forces we cant see have the ability to manipulate physical objects. We can make things affected by the magnetic waves, but not until recently have we been able to program them. A highly innovative company from Alabama have introduced to the world Polymagnets, and theyre incredible. Theyre guaranteed to be one of the coolest things you see today!
  • Are the Constants of Physics Constant?

    03/09/2016 6:07:00 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 56 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 7 Mar, 2016 | Venkat Srinivasan
    When Max Born addressed the South Indian Science Association in November 1935, it was a time of great uncertainty in his life. The Nazi Party had already suspended the renowned quantum mechanics physicist's position at the University of Gottingen in 1933. He had been invited to teach at Cambridge, but it was temporary. Then, the Party terminated his tenure at Gottingen in the summer of 1935. Born took up an offer to work with C. V. Raman and his students for six months at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore. While there, he found that his family had lost...
  • Astrophysicists detect ultra-fast winds near supermassive black hole

    03/24/2016 12:44:16 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 22 replies
    phys.org ^ | March 21, 2016 | Provided by: York University
    Artist's illustration of turbulent winds of gas swirling around a black hole. Some of the gas is spiraling inward, but some is being blown away. Credit: NASA, and M. Weiss (Chandra X -ray Center) ============================================================================================================================================== New research led by astrophysicists at York University has revealed the fastest winds ever seen at ultraviolet wavelengths near a supermassive black hole. "We're talking wind speeds of 20 per cent the speed of light, which is more than 200 million kilometres an hour. That's equivalent to a category 77 hurricane," says Jesse Rogerson, who led the research as part of his PhD thesis in...
  • Cosmic rays fired at Earth now we know where from

    03/17/2016 9:55:45 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 33 replies
    Cosmos ^ | 3/17/16 | Bill Condie
    Cosmic rays fired at Earth - now we know where from The violent region at the centre of our galaxy is the prime candidate, after gamma ray analysis, Bill Condie reports. Photo montage of gamma-rays as measured by the HESS array on the night sky over Namibia, with one of the small HESS telescopes in the foreground. Credit: H.E.S.S. Collaboration, Fabio Acero and Henning Gast Astronomers believe they may have identified the source of the stream of cosmic rays that rain down on Earth from outer space. Cosmic rays are extremely high-energy particles such as protons and atomic nuclei....
  • Milky Ways black hole may be spewing out cosmic rays

    03/19/2016 9:24:38 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 20 replies
    Science ^ | 16 Mar, 2016 | Daniel Clery
    Mysterious high-energy particles known as cosmic rays zip through space at a wide range of energies, some millions of times greater than those produced in the worlds most powerful atom smasher. Scientists have long thought cosmic rays from inside our galaxy come from supernova explosions, but a new study has fingered a second source: the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way. With this new result, the search for cosmic ray origins, which has frustrated scientists for more than 100 years, has taken an unexpected new twist. Its very exciting, says astrophysicist Andrew Taylor of the Dublin...
  • Clocking the Extreme Spin of a Monster Black Hole

    03/17/2016 6:36:54 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 22 replies
    D-News ^ | 15 Mar, 2016 | IAN O'NEILL
    upermassive black holes are the most extreme objects in the known universe, with masses millions or even billions of times the mass of our sun. Now astronomers have been able to study one of these behemoths inside a strange, distant quasar and theyve made an astonishing discovery its spinning one-third the speed of light. Studying a supermassive black hole some 3.5 billion light-years away is no easy feat, but this isnt a regular object: its a quasar that shows quasi-periodic brightening events every 12 years or so a fact that has helped astronomers reveal its extreme nature. Quasars...
  • Hemp waste fibers form basis of supercapacitor more conductive than graphene

    03/15/2016 7:38:23 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 22 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | March 11, 2016 | Rick Stella
    Comprised of a lone hexagonal honeycomb lattice layer of tightly packed carbon atoms, graphene is one of the strongest, lightest, and most conductive compounds ever discovered. Bottom line, it's an extraordinary composite. However, a scientist from New York's Clarkson University says he's found a way to manufacture hemp waste into a material "better than graphene." Moreover, the scientist -- known to his peers as Dr. David Mitlin -- says creating this graphene-like hemp material costs but a minuscule fraction of what it takes to produce graphene. Presented at an American Chemical Society Meeting in San Francisco, Dr. Mitlin described how...
  • Celebrate Pi Day!

    03/14/2016 2:18:53 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 67 replies
    Chiff.com ^ | March 14, 2016 | staff reporter
    Happy Pi Day! No, not National Pie Day. That's January 23. On this day, geeks go wild at the mere thought of celebrating pi the ratio of a circles circumference to its diameter. pi = 3.1415926535897932384626433832795 or 3.14 for short.
  • German scientists successfully teleport classical information

    03/06/2016 7:48:42 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 43 replies
    spacedaily.com ^ | 03/04/2016 | Brooks Hayes
    Using a series of laser beams, a pair of German scientists successfully teleported classical information without the transfer or matter or energy. Researchers have previously demonstrated local teleportation within the world of quantum particles. But the latest experiment successfully translates the phenomenon for classical physics. "Elementary particles such as electrons and light particles exist per se in a spatially delocalized state," Alexander Szameit, a professor at the University of Jena, explained in a press release. In other words, these particles can be in two places at the same time. "Within such a system spread across multiple locations, it is possible...
  • Farthest Galaxy Yet Smashes Cosmic Distance Record

    03/04/2016 3:51:26 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 34 replies
    space.com ^ | 3/3/16 | Calla Cofield
    Farthest Galaxy Yet Smashes Cosmic Distance Record By Calla Cofield, Space.com Staff Writer March 3, 2016 04:45pm ET MORE Please upgrade your Flash Plugin The Hubble Space Telescope just calculated the distance to the most far-out galaxy ever measured, providing scientists with a look deep into the history of the universe. The far-away galaxy, named GN-z11, existed a mere 400 million years after the Big Bang, or about 13.3 billion years ago. Because the light from such a distant galaxy must travel huge distances to reach Earth, scientists are seeing the galaxy as it looked over 13 billion years ago....
  • Are Supermassive Black Holes Hiding Matter?

    02/29/2016 10:00:38 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    universetoday.com ^ |  29 Feb , 2016 | Matt Williams
    [S]cientists...for some time now, they have been working with a model that states that the Universe consists of 4.9% normal matter (i.e. that which we can see), 26.8% dark matter (that which we cant), and 68.3% dark energy. From what they have observed, scientists have also concluded that the normal matter in the Universe is concentrated in web-like filaments, which make up about 20% of the Universe by volume. But a recent study performed by the Institute of Astro- and Particle Physics at the University of Innsbruck in Austria has found that a surprising amount of normal matter may live...
  • Reactor data hint at existence of fourth neutrino

    02/29/2016 7:00:49 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 16 replies
    Science News ^ | 25 Feb, 2016 | Ron Cowen
    In tunnels deep inside a granite mountain at Daya Bay, a nuclear reactor facility some 55 kilometers from Hong Kong, sensitive detectors are hinting at the existence of a new form of neutrino, one of nature's most ghostly and abundant elementary particles. Neutrinos, electrically neutral particles that sense only gravity and the weak nuclear force, interact so feebly with matter that 100 trillion zip unimpeded through your body every second. They come in three known types: electron, muon and tau. The Daya Bay results suggest the possibility that a fourth, even more ghostly type of neutrino exists - one more...
  • Do Gravitational Waves Exhibit Wave-Particle Duality?

    02/24/2016 5:53:58 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 34 replies
    Forbes/Science ^ | 20 Feb. 2016 | Ethan Siegel
    Now that LIGO has detected their first gravitational wave signal, the part of Einstein's theory that predicts that the fabric of space itself should have ripples and waves in it has been confirmed. This brings up all sorts of interesting questions, including this one from reader (and Patreon supporter!) Joe Latone, who asks: "Are gravity waves expected to exhibit wave-particle duality, and if so, have LIGO physicists already conceived of ways to test it, like the double-slit experiment?" It started out simply enough: matter was made of particles, things like atoms and their constituents, and radiation was made of waves....
  • The number that fascinates physicists above all others

    02/20/2016 2:09:29 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 67 replies
    Cosmos Magazine ^ | Paul Davies
    "God is a pure mathematician!" declared British astronomer Sir James Jeans. The physical Universe does seem to be organised around elegant mathematical relationships. And one number above all others has exercised an enduring fascination for physicists: 137.03599913. Let me explain. When scientists measure any quantity they must specify the units being used. The speed of light, for example, is either 186,000 or 300,000 depending on whether it is expressed as miles per second or kilometres per second. Likewise your weight might be 150 or 68 according to whether you are measuring in pounds or kilograms. Without knowing the units being...
  • What Is The Universe Expanding Into?

    02/21/2016 2:52:24 PM PST · by Duke C. · 111 replies
    Forbes ^ | 2/19/16 | Ethan Siegel
    One of the most spectacular discoveries of the 20th century was that the Universe itself was expanding. When Einstein put forth his general theory of relativity, he swiftly recognized that there was a consequence he was unhappy about: a Universe that was filled with matter in all directions would be unstable against gravitational collapse. Einstein’s fix for this was to make up an invisible, outward-pushing force that prevented this collapse from occurring, a cosmological constant. But if you didn’t include this cosmological constant, others soon realized, you’d wind up with a Universe that wasn’t static in time, but where the...
  • The detection of gravitational waves – a triumph of science enabled by fossil fuels

    02/19/2016 3:06:33 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 9 replies
    wattsupwiththat.com ^ | February 17, 2016 | Anthony Watts
    Anthony Watts / 3 days ago February 17, 2016 Last week, the science world was abuzz with the news that gravitational waves had been discovered thanks to the LIGO project and the team of international scientists that made it possible. At WUWT, I covered the story here, saying that it was a “triumph of science”. Indeed it was, and still is, and the effects of this discovery on science will ripple into the future for decades and centuries to come.I woke in the middle of the night as I sometimes do, for no particular reason except that my brain doesn’t...
  • ASTRONOMERS JUST SNAPPED PHOTOS OF THE MOST MASSIVE BLACK HOLE WE’VE EVER OBSERVED

    02/18/2016 10:44:57 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 53 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | 2/17/16 | Chloe Olewitz
    A new photograph of galaxy NGC 4889 may look peaceful from such a great distance, but it’s actually home to one of the biggest black holes that astronomers have ever identified. The Hubble Space Telescope allowed scientists to capture photos of the galaxy, located in the Coma Cluster about 300 million light-years away. The supermassive black hole hidden away in NGC 4889 breaks all kinds of records, even though it is currently classified as dormant. So how big is it, exactly? Well, according to our best estimates, the supermassive black hole is roughly 21 billion times the size of the...
  • Pondering Gravitational Waves

    02/13/2016 5:52:10 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 25 replies
    Centauri Dreams ^ | 2/11/16 | Paul Gilster
    Pondering Gravitational Wavesby Paul Gilster on February 11, 2016 "Einstein would be beaming," said National Science Foundation director France Córdova as she began this morning's news conference announcing the discovery of gravitational waves. I can hardly disagree, because we have in this discovery yet another confirmation of the reality of General Relativity. Caltech's Kip Thorne, who discussed black hole mergers way back in 1994 in his book Black Holes and Time Warps, said at the same news conference that Einstein must have been frustrated by the lack of available technologies to detect the gravitational waves his theory predicted, a lack...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Two Black Holes Merge

    02/12/2016 12:16:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    NASA ^ | February 12, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Just press play to watch two black holes merge. Inspired by the first direct detection of gravitational waves by LIGO, this simulation video plays in slow motion but would take about one third of a second if run in real time. Set on a cosmic stage the black holes are posed in front of stars, gas, and dust. Their extreme gravity lenses the light from behind them into Einstein rings as they spiral closer and finally merge into one. The otherwise invisible gravitational waves generated as the massive objects rapidly coalesce cause the visible image to ripple and slosh...
  • Gravitational Wave Explained by Brian Green (simple and interesting way)

    02/11/2016 9:40:56 PM PST · by Rebelbase · 35 replies
    Liveleak ^ | 2/12/16 | Brian Green
    From the site: "One of the most simplest and interesting ways to explain Gravitational Waves" See video link below.
  • 100 years later scientists prove Einstein's theory

    02/11/2016 10:27:40 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 21 replies
    INN ^ | 2/11/2016, 7:22 PM | (Arutz Sheva Staff)
    It took a century, but the theory from Albert Einstein handwritten neatly on paper that is now yellowing has finally been vindicated. Israeli officials on Thursday offered a rare look at the documents where Einstein presented his ideas on gravitational waves, a display that coincided with the historic announcement that scientists had glimpsed the first direct evidence of his theory. [...] In a landmark discovery for physics and astronomy, international scientists announced in Washington on Thursday that they had glimpsed the first direct evidence of gravitational waves, or ripples in space-time. Einstein's theory states that mass warps space and time,...
  • First Macroscopic Quantum Entanglement Performed At Room Temperature

    02/05/2016 11:32:15 AM PST · by Reeses · 43 replies
    Futurism.com ^ | Feb 5 2016 | Futurism
    In a breakthrough in quantum physics, scientists were able to create the phenomenon of quantum entanglement macroscopically using large magnets at room temperature. ... scientists working at the University of Chicago and the Argonne National Laboratory revealed that they were able to create quantum entanglement at a macroscopic level at room temperature on a semiconductor chip, using atomic nuclei and the application of relatively small magnetic fields. Their breakthrough, which is published in Science Advances, is not only significant in what they accomplished but also how they accomplished it. In quantum physics, the creation of entanglement in particles larger and...
  • Galactic center's gamma rays unlikely to originate from dark matter, evidence shows

    02/05/2016 1:08:03 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 15 replies
    Princeton University ^ | 4 Feb, 2016 | Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
    Bursts of gamma rays from the center of our galaxy are not likely to be signals of dark matter but rather other astrophysical phenomena such as fast-rotating stars called millisecond pulsars, according to two new studies, one from a team based at Princeton University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and another based in the Netherlands. Previous studies suggested that gamma rays coming from the dense region of space in the inner Milky Way galaxy could be caused when invisible dark matter particles collide. But using new statistical analysis methods, the two research teams independently found that the gamma ray...
  • When Will We Reach the End of the Periodic Table?

    02/02/2016 4:29:12 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 78 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 19 Jan, 2016 | Devin Powell
    Chemistry teachers recently had to update their classroom decor, with the announcement that scientists have confirmed the discovery of four new elements on the periodic table. The as-yet unnamed elements 113, 115, 117 and 118 filled in the remaining gaps at the bottom of the famous chart-a roadmap of matter's building blocks that has successfully guided chemists for nearly a century and a half. The official confirmation, granted by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), was years in the making, as these superheavy elements are highly unstable and tough to create. But scientists had strong reason to...
  • {snip} Researcher reveals scheme to create and control gravitational fields using current technology

    01/09/2016 9:58:03 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 26 replies
    Dailymail.com ^ | 8 January 2016 | Cheyenne Macdonald For
    'The most widespread source of gravitation is the inertial mass, which produces permanent gravitational fields. 'At the opposite, electromagnetic fields could be used to generate artificial, or human-made, gravitational fields, that could be switched on or off at will, depending whether their electromagnetic progenitors are present or not.' The experiment would require major resources, but if successful, it would give humans the power to control the 'last of four fundamental forces,' not within our grips. Current research, the scientist argues, observes and aims to understand gravitational fields, but makes no attempts to change them. 'Somehow, studying gravity is a contemplative...
  • New finding may explain heat loss in fusion reactors

    01/21/2016 1:45:42 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    phys.org ^ | January 21, 2016 by | David L. Chandler
    A long-standing discrepancy between predictions and observed results in test reactors has been called "the great unsolved problem" in understanding the turbulence that leads to a loss of heat in fusion reactors. ... [I]t turns out that interactions between turbulence at the tiniest scale, that of electrons, and turbulence at a scale 60 times larger, that of ions, can account for the mysterious mismatch between theory and experimental results. ... The expectation by physicists for more than a decade had been that turbulence associated with ions (atoms with an electric charge) was so much larger than turbulence caused by electrons...that...
  • Quantum Weirdness Now a Matter of Time

    01/19/2016 5:20:28 PM PST · by Reeses · 37 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | January 19, 2016 | George Musser
    Bizarre quantum bonds connect distinct moments in time, suggesting that quantum links - not space-time - constitute the fundamental structure of the universe. ... A field is a highly entangled system. Different parts of it are mutually correlated: A random fluctuation of the field in one place will be matched by a random fluctuation in another. ("Parts" here refers both to regions of space and to spans of time.) Even a perfect vacuum, which is defined as the absence of particles, will still have quantum fields. And these fields are always vibrating. Space looks empty because the vibrations cancel each...
  • Physicists propose the first scheme to teleport the memory of an organism

    01/15/2016 3:07:48 PM PST · by presidio9 · 51 replies
    Phys.org ^ | January 14, 2016
    In "Star Trek," a transporter can teleport a person from one location to a remote location without actually making the journey along the way. Such a transporter has fascinated many people. Quantum teleportation shares several features of the transporter and is one of the most important protocols in quantum information. In a recent study, Prof. Tongcang Li at Purdue University and Dr. Zhang-qi Yin at Tsinghua University proposed the first scheme to use electromechanical oscillators and superconducting circuits to teleport the internal quantum state (memory) and center-of-mass motion state of a microorganism. They also proposed a scheme to create a...
  • Gravitational wave rumors ripple through science world

    01/12/2016 9:00:15 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 87 replies
    spacedaily.com ^ | 01/12/2016
    There has been no announcement, no peer review or publication of the findings - all typically important steps in the process of releasing reliable and verifiable scientific research. Instead, a message on Twitter from an Arizona State University cosmologist, Lawrence Krauss, has sparked a firestorm of speculation and excitement. Krauss does not work with the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory, or LIGO, which is searching for ripples in the fabric of space and time. But he tweeted on Monday about the apparent shoring up of rumor he'd heard some months ago, that LIGO scientists were writing up a paper...
  • The mystery of the naked black hole

    01/06/2016 6:59:33 PM PST · by Utilizer · 38 replies
    AAAS Science ^ | 5 January 2016 2:45 pm | Daniel Clery
    KISSIMMEE, FLORIDA--Most, if not all, galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centers surrounded by dense clouds of stars. Now, researchers have found one that seems to have lost almost its entire entourage. The team, which reported its find here today at the annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society, says it doesn't know what stripped the stars away. But it has put forward a tantalizing possibility: The object could be an extremely rare medium-sized black hole, which theorists have predicted but observers have never seen. The unusual black hole sits about 1 billion light-years from Earth in SDSS J1126+2944,...
  • Black hole caught 'burping' galactic gas supply

    01/06/2016 2:18:17 PM PST · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    BBC ^ | 5 January 2016 | By Jonathan Webb
    NASA/CXC/Univ of Texas/E Schlegel et al Image caption The two waves of hot, X-ray emitting gas were seen in this image from Chandra ================================================================================================================ Astronomers have spotted two huge waves of gas being "burped" by the black hole at the heart of a nearby galaxy. The swathes of hot gas, detected in X-ray images from Nasa's Chandra space telescope, appear to be sweeping cooler hydrogen gas ahead of them. This vast, rippling belch is taking place in NGC 5195 - a small, neglected sibling of the "Whirlpool Galaxy", 26 million light years away. That makes it one of the closest...
  • ‘God Does Not Play Dice’ (Or does He? possible discovery of a new particle has Physics buzzing)

    01/04/2016 1:35:55 PM PST · by presidio9 · 40 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | Dec. 27, 2015 | Robbert Dijkgraaf
    <p>It was the perfect holiday surprise. On Dec. 15 the latest results from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland were announced, after early rumors had physicists buzzing. A signal in the data suggests a discovery that no one predicted: a possible new particle several times heavier than the Higgs boson.</p>
  • Gaza ENT Doctor Challenges Einstein's Relativity Theory, States: People in Gaza Have the...

    12/30/2015 4:42:15 PM PST · by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis · 44 replies
    MEMRI TV ^ | 11/17/15
    In a recent interview, Gaza ENT doctor Muhammad Yahya Barzaq said that he had written a book refuting Einstein's Theory of Special Relativity. "Had Einstein deigned to read the discoveries of Christian Doppler, we would never have had something called the Einstein Theory," he said. Barzaq further said that he had come up with his invention of what he called a "cartridge plane" after replacing a cassette at the exact moment when an airplane was flying overhead. On the issue of Gaza he said that people there "deserve to live because they have the benefit and interest of humanity at...
  • Could teleportation become a reality?

    12/29/2015 2:39:13 PM PST · by DFG · 49 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 12/29/2015 | Richard Gray
    It might seem like more of a magic trick than real science, but physicists have successfully made a 'cloud' of atoms exist in two separate places at the same time. The laws of standard physics dictate an object can't be in two places at once, but the researchers have exploited a quirk of tiny particles that exist in the quantum world, and applied this to atoms. Their breakthrough raises the prospect of being able to send not just information but perhaps even 'recreate' physical objects over large distances in a form of teleportation.
  • Carbon doped with nitrogen dramatically improves storage capacity of supercapacitors

    12/29/2015 9:55:30 AM PST · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    phys.org ^ | December 28, 2015 | by Bob Yirka
    Fabrication schematic of ordered mesoporous fewlayer carbon (OMFLC). Credit: Science (2015). DOI: 10.1126/science.aab3798 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ (Phys.org) - A team of researchers working in China has found a way to dramatically improve the energy storage capacity of supercapacitors - by doping carbon tubes with nitrogen. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their process and how well the newly developed supercapacitors worked, and their goal of one day helping supercapacitors compete with batteries. Like a battery, a capacitor is able to hold a charge, unlike a battery, however, it is able to be charged and discharged very quickly...
  • Why String Theory Is Not Science

    12/24/2015 6:40:17 AM PST · by C19fan · 44 replies
    Forbes ^ | December 23, 2015 | Ethan Siegel
    There are a lot of different ways to define science, but perhaps one that everyone can agree on is that it’s a process by which: 1.knowledge about the natural world or a particular phenomenon is gathered, 2.a testable hypothesis is put forth concerning a natural, physical explanation for that phenomenon, 3.that hypothesis is then tested and either validated or falsified, 4.and an overarching framework — or scientific theory — is constructed to explain the hypothesis and that makes predictions about other phenomena, 5.which is then tested further, and either validated, in which case new phenomena to test are sought (back...
  • Physicists figure out how to retrieve information from a black hole

    12/23/2015 1:17:47 PM PST · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    sciencemag.org ^ | 23 December 2015 3:15 pm | By Adrian Cho
    Black holes earn their name because their gravity is so strong not even light can escape from them. Oddly, though, physicists have come up with a bit of theoretical sleight of hand to retrieve a speck of information that's been dropped into a black hole. The calculation touches on one of the biggest mysteries in physics: how all of the information trapped in a black hole leaks out as the black hole "evaporates." Many theorists think that must happen, but they don't know how. Unfortunately for them, the new scheme may do more to underscore the difficulty of the larger...
  • Intelligence genes discovered by scientists

    12/22/2015 4:43:59 AM PST · by SkyPilot · 93 replies
    Photo: AP The Telegraph ^ | 21 Dec 15 | Sarah Knapton
    Imperial College London has found that two networks of genes determine whether people are intelligent or not so bright. Genes which make people intelligent have been discovered and scientists believe they could be manipulated to boost brain power. Researchers have believed for some time that intellect is inherited with studies suggesting that up to 75 per cent of IQ is genetic, and the rest down to environmental factors such as schooling and friendship groups. But until now, nobody has been able to pin-point exactly which genes are responsible for better memory, attention, processing speed or reasoning skills. Now Imperial College...
  • Black holes can grow to 50 billion times the mass of the Sun... and then stop

    12/21/2015 1:15:25 PM PST · by Red Badger · 32 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | December 21, 2015 12:30 GMT | By Matt Atherton
    Black holes can only grow if they have a gas disc to feed on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr ======================================================================================================== Black holes can only grow to 50 billion times the mass of the Sun, before they lose their only source of 'food' and stop growing. Scientists discovered that black holes have a size limit, as when it gets so big, the gas which feeds the great void loses its energy, and falls into the unknown. A researcher from the University of Leicester analysed the disc of gas which surrounds supermassive black holes at the centre of galaxies. He found that...